Garden

Garden

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170
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Freezing temperatures don't stop us from harvesting nutritious fresh produce from our garden.

Daily LifeOYR Frugal Published the article • 0 comments • 170 views • 2018-01-03 16:50 • came from similar tags

Freezing temperatures don't stop us from harvesting nutritious fresh produce from our garden. Please join me as I gather today's harvest in mid-December.
 
 
 

 
 
  view all
Freezing temperatures don't stop us from harvesting nutritious fresh produce from our garden. Please join me as I gather today's harvest in mid-December.
 
 
 


 
 
 
160
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Final 2017 Tour of The Rusted Garden & Tips: Insects, Squirrel Tips, A Bee Herb & Organic Matter

ExperienceGary Pilarchik Published the article • 0 comments • 160 views • 2018-01-01 20:23 • came from similar tags

The final garden tour for 2017. I also talk about the insect issues that came in because of the mild fall, how to deal with squirrels, a great herb for bees and how to process your leaves and grass for easy garden organic matter. Just a basic tour and some tips. Enjoy
 
 
  view all
The final garden tour for 2017. I also talk about the insect issues that came in because of the mild fall, how to deal with squirrels, a great herb for bees and how to process your leaves and grass for easy garden organic matter. Just a basic tour and some tips. Enjoy
 
 
 


167
Views

How to Protect Your Vegetable Garden From Frosts & Hard Freezes: Layers Work at 20 Degrees!

ExperienceGary Pilarchik Published the article • 0 comments • 167 views • 2018-01-01 20:23 • came from similar tags

Here is a very inexpensive way to protect your cool weather crops from frosts and deep freezes depending on the crops. Use layers of material you can find in paint departments. They can be reused year after year. My radishes were protected from 19 and 22 degree nights
 
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Here is a very inexpensive way to protect your cool weather crops from frosts and deep freezes depending on the crops. Use layers of material you can find in paint departments. They can be reused year after year. My radishes were protected from 19 and 22 degree nights
 
 


179
Views

How to keep the garden healthy

ExperienceIves Published the article • 0 comments • 179 views • 2017-10-30 16:59 • came from similar tags

One of the most challenging—and sometimes frustrating — aspects of being a gardener is all the natural forces you have to combat. Even in the unlikely event that you have perfect soil and a marvelous climate, you're still not home and dry;
all sorts of pests are In competition with you for your crop. The pest problems you're likely to encounter in your vegetable garden fall Into two categories: insects and the like, of which there are a remarkable variety; and animals, usually the four-legged kind but occasionally two-legged intruders as well.

Most gardeners have to contend with insect problems at some time during the growing season, but the problems are not always obvious. It can come as quite a surprise, just when it looks as though all your hard work is paying off and your plants are progressing healthily towards a fine harvest, to find that the pests are at work. You may notice one morning that a couple of healthy young plants have keeled over and died — a pretty sure indication that you've got cutworms working away beneath the soil level. Or you may see tiny holes in the leaves of your eggplant, signaling the activity of the flea beetle.

Your plants are subject to diseases, too, and you know you're in trouble when the leaves turn'yellow, or the plants seem stunted and weak, or mildew starts to show up on leaves and stems. Plant diseases spread rapidly and must be curbed as soon as they appear, but this isn't always easy. There are certain measures you can take to forestall disease problems — like planting varieties that have been bred to be disease- resistant, and rotating some crops when it's
possible to do so. Beyond that, once a disease attacks a plant, about all you can do is remove the infected plant — among horticulturalists this process is called "culling" — to stop the disease from spreading to neighboring healthy plants. On the whole, pest problems are easier to control than problems caused by plant diseases.
 
CONTROLLING INSECT PESTS

To many people anything In the garden that crawls or flies and is smaller than a chipmunk or a sparrow can be classified as an insect. In fact, a lot of the creatures that may bug your vegetable plants are not insects at all — mites, slugs, snails, nematodes, sowbugs, and symphylans among them. Another popular misconception is that insects and similar creatures are harmful or unnecessary and have no place in the garden. Again, it isn't true. While some insects are destructive, many are perfectly harmless. A lot of them are actually important to the healthy development of your garden crop, some because they perform a specific service by keeping down other pests that do harm your crop, and some because they pollinate the plants. When you set out to control harmful pests, it's important to realize that indiscriminate controls may destroy the good as well as the bad; the useful creatures as well as the harmful ones.

Controlling the insect pests that attack your vegetable garden can be a challenge; the method you choose for controlling them can also be controversial. Many gardeners rely on chemical insecticides to do away with the enemy that's competing for the crop. Some people, however, object to the use of chemicals because they believe that the chemicals may remain on the plant and harm the person who eats it or that they may harm the environment. These gardeners prefer to rely on organic, or nonchemical, means of control. There may also be times when it's better not to use a chemical control even if you have no personal objection to it — if you catch a caterpillar attack in the early stages, for example, it can be easier to pick off the offenders by hand than to mix up a whole batch of insecticide. This chapter discusses the most effective means of control — both chemical and organic — for the pest problems you're most likely to encounter. 
 
CHEMICAL CONTROLS: INSECTICIDES

The surest way to control most of the insects and similar creatures that threaten your vegetable crop is by using a chemical insecticide. A word here about terminology: In horticultural language the terms "pesticide" and "insecticide" are not interchangeable. A pesticide is any form of chemical control used in the garden; an insecticide is a specific type of pesticide used to control a specific situation — to kill insects. A herbicide is a different kind of pesticide with a different application — it's used to help control garden weeds. These distinctions are important, because using the wrong one will cause havoc in your garden. For instance, if you use a herbicide instead of an insecticide you'll lose your entire crop for the season. It's also important to keep separate equipment for use with each kind of pesticide.

Insecticides are chemical products that are sprayed or dusted on the affected crops. The type you spray on is bought in concentrated form, then diluted for use with a hand sprayer or a spray attachment fitted to the end of your garden hose. Dust-on insecticides are powders that you pump on to the plants. Spraying is preferable because it gives more thorough coverage, and it's easier to treat the undersides as well as the tops of leaves and plants with a spray. You can also apply insecticides directly to the soil to kill insects under the soil surface — this technique is known as applying a "soil drench."

Used correctly and responsibly, insecticides are not harmful to humans or other animals. They are toxic, but the toxicity levels are low, and their residual or carryover effect is short — the longest any of the insecticides commonly used in the home garden will remain on the plant is about 14 days. Malathion, for instance, has the same toxicity level as Scotch whiskey and breaks down faster. As to any long-lasting hazards that may be involved —nobody knows if hazards exist or what they might be; we don't know what the long-lasting hazards of any product might be. The choice of an organic or a synthetic pesticide is a matter of personal opinion.
If you know all the options you'll be able to make your own choice .
 
Commonly used insecticides

The insecticides listed below for use in your home vegetable garden will provide effective control of garden insects with minimum hazard. Remember, though, that most insecticides are poisons and must be handled as such.
Diazinon. This is an organic phosphate, and it's an effective insecticide for general use. Diazinon is a contact poison. Its toxicity is low, and it's a good control for underground insects that attack the roots of cabbage family plants, onions, and radishes. You can get it as a wettable powder or in liquid form.
 
Malathion. This is also a phosphate insecticide; it kills sucking insects like aphids. Its effects are not as long-lasting as those of some other insecticides,but it's effective and safe in use. It's available as a dust, a wettable powder, or a liquid.
 
Sevin. This is also known as carbaryl and is another safe material for use in home gardens. It's an effective control for many leaf-eating caterpillars and leafhoppers, and is available as a wettable powder or a dust.Bacillus thuringiensis. This is an organic insecticide. It's a bacterium that is considered harmless to all but insects, and you can buy it under the brand names of Dipel, Thuricide, or Bactur. It controls cabbage worms and other caterpillars and is available in wettable powder or liquid forms. This is the choice of many gardeners who prefer not to use chemical insecticides. 
 
Cause and cure: Be sure you've got them right

Because an insecticide can't distinguish between friend and foe, it's your responsibility to make sure you're eliminating the pest, not the friendly insect that's out there working for you. Let's say, for instance, that aphids are attacking your cabbage plants, and you use carbaryl (Sevin) to try to get rid of them because you know carbaryl is a relatively safe insecticide with a short residual effect. You've overlooked the fact that carbaryl has to enter the insect's stomach in order to kill it, and since the aphid's mouth is inside the cabbage plant, none of the insecticide is going to enter the insect through the mouth and reach its stomach. Ladybugs, however, love aphids and are most helpful in keeping down their numbers. So when the ladybug eats the aphid, the carbaryl on the aphid's body enters the ladybug's stomach and kills it. Despite the best intentions in the world, you've killed off the useful insect and left the pest unharmed. In fact you've done the pest a favor by killing off its enemy — a ladybug can put away hundreds of aphids in a day.

Carbaryl can also be toxic to bees, and bees are important to your garden because they pollinate most fruiting vegetable crops. To avoid killing the bees, spray in the late evening when the flowers are closed. This way you kill the destructive pests but protect the bees.If you use an insecticide you must always be aware also of how long its residual effect is going to last. A residue of insecticide left on the plant when it's harvested is poisonous. The residual effect of an insecticide that you use in your vegetable garden is likely to be fairly short, but the effect may vary from one type of crop to another. And because the effect is not long-lasting, you can't spray as a preventive measure; you have no way of knowing which pests . are going to attack your plants before they're actually on the scene.  view all
One of the most challenging—and sometimes frustrating — aspects of being a gardener is all the natural forces you have to combat. Even in the unlikely event that you have perfect soil and a marvelous climate, you're still not home and dry;
all sorts of pests are In competition with you for your crop. The pest problems you're likely to encounter in your vegetable garden fall Into two categories: insects and the like, of which there are a remarkable variety; and animals, usually the four-legged kind but occasionally two-legged intruders as well.

Most gardeners have to contend with insect problems at some time during the growing season, but the problems are not always obvious. It can come as quite a surprise, just when it looks as though all your hard work is paying off and your plants are progressing healthily towards a fine harvest, to find that the pests are at work. You may notice one morning that a couple of healthy young plants have keeled over and died — a pretty sure indication that you've got cutworms working away beneath the soil level. Or you may see tiny holes in the leaves of your eggplant, signaling the activity of the flea beetle.

Your plants are subject to diseases, too, and you know you're in trouble when the leaves turn'yellow, or the plants seem stunted and weak, or mildew starts to show up on leaves and stems. Plant diseases spread rapidly and must be curbed as soon as they appear, but this isn't always easy. There are certain measures you can take to forestall disease problems — like planting varieties that have been bred to be disease- resistant, and rotating some crops when it's
possible to do so. Beyond that, once a disease attacks a plant, about all you can do is remove the infected plant — among horticulturalists this process is called "culling" — to stop the disease from spreading to neighboring healthy plants. On the whole, pest problems are easier to control than problems caused by plant diseases.
 
CONTROLLING INSECT PESTS

To many people anything In the garden that crawls or flies and is smaller than a chipmunk or a sparrow can be classified as an insect. In fact, a lot of the creatures that may bug your vegetable plants are not insects at all — mites, slugs, snails, nematodes, sowbugs, and symphylans among them. Another popular misconception is that insects and similar creatures are harmful or unnecessary and have no place in the garden. Again, it isn't true. While some insects are destructive, many are perfectly harmless. A lot of them are actually important to the healthy development of your garden crop, some because they perform a specific service by keeping down other pests that do harm your crop, and some because they pollinate the plants. When you set out to control harmful pests, it's important to realize that indiscriminate controls may destroy the good as well as the bad; the useful creatures as well as the harmful ones.

Controlling the insect pests that attack your vegetable garden can be a challenge; the method you choose for controlling them can also be controversial. Many gardeners rely on chemical insecticides to do away with the enemy that's competing for the crop. Some people, however, object to the use of chemicals because they believe that the chemicals may remain on the plant and harm the person who eats it or that they may harm the environment. These gardeners prefer to rely on organic, or nonchemical, means of control. There may also be times when it's better not to use a chemical control even if you have no personal objection to it — if you catch a caterpillar attack in the early stages, for example, it can be easier to pick off the offenders by hand than to mix up a whole batch of insecticide. This chapter discusses the most effective means of control — both chemical and organic — for the pest problems you're most likely to encounter. 
 
CHEMICAL CONTROLS: INSECTICIDES

The surest way to control most of the insects and similar creatures that threaten your vegetable crop is by using a chemical insecticide. A word here about terminology: In horticultural language the terms "pesticide" and "insecticide" are not interchangeable. A pesticide is any form of chemical control used in the garden; an insecticide is a specific type of pesticide used to control a specific situation — to kill insects. A herbicide is a different kind of pesticide with a different application — it's used to help control garden weeds. These distinctions are important, because using the wrong one will cause havoc in your garden. For instance, if you use a herbicide instead of an insecticide you'll lose your entire crop for the season. It's also important to keep separate equipment for use with each kind of pesticide.

Insecticides are chemical products that are sprayed or dusted on the affected crops. The type you spray on is bought in concentrated form, then diluted for use with a hand sprayer or a spray attachment fitted to the end of your garden hose. Dust-on insecticides are powders that you pump on to the plants. Spraying is preferable because it gives more thorough coverage, and it's easier to treat the undersides as well as the tops of leaves and plants with a spray. You can also apply insecticides directly to the soil to kill insects under the soil surface — this technique is known as applying a "soil drench."

Used correctly and responsibly, insecticides are not harmful to humans or other animals. They are toxic, but the toxicity levels are low, and their residual or carryover effect is short — the longest any of the insecticides commonly used in the home garden will remain on the plant is about 14 days. Malathion, for instance, has the same toxicity level as Scotch whiskey and breaks down faster. As to any long-lasting hazards that may be involved —nobody knows if hazards exist or what they might be; we don't know what the long-lasting hazards of any product might be. The choice of an organic or a synthetic pesticide is a matter of personal opinion.
If you know all the options you'll be able to make your own choice .
 
Commonly used insecticides

The insecticides listed below for use in your home vegetable garden will provide effective control of garden insects with minimum hazard. Remember, though, that most insecticides are poisons and must be handled as such.
  • Diazinon. This is an organic phosphate, and it's an effective insecticide for general use. Diazinon is a contact poison. Its toxicity is low, and it's a good control for underground insects that attack the roots of cabbage family plants, onions, and radishes. You can get it as a wettable powder or in liquid form.

 
  • Malathion. This is also a phosphate insecticide; it kills sucking insects like aphids. Its effects are not as long-lasting as those of some other insecticides,but it's effective and safe in use. It's available as a dust, a wettable powder, or a liquid.

 
  • Sevin. This is also known as carbaryl and is another safe material for use in home gardens. It's an effective control for many leaf-eating caterpillars and leafhoppers, and is available as a wettable powder or a dust.
  • Bacillus thuringiensis. This is an organic insecticide. It's a bacterium that is considered harmless to all but insects, and you can buy it under the brand names of Dipel, Thuricide, or Bactur. It controls cabbage worms and other caterpillars and is available in wettable powder or liquid forms. This is the choice of many gardeners who prefer not to use chemical insecticides. 

 
Cause and cure: Be sure you've got them right

Because an insecticide can't distinguish between friend and foe, it's your responsibility to make sure you're eliminating the pest, not the friendly insect that's out there working for you. Let's say, for instance, that aphids are attacking your cabbage plants, and you use carbaryl (Sevin) to try to get rid of them because you know carbaryl is a relatively safe insecticide with a short residual effect. You've overlooked the fact that carbaryl has to enter the insect's stomach in order to kill it, and since the aphid's mouth is inside the cabbage plant, none of the insecticide is going to enter the insect through the mouth and reach its stomach. Ladybugs, however, love aphids and are most helpful in keeping down their numbers. So when the ladybug eats the aphid, the carbaryl on the aphid's body enters the ladybug's stomach and kills it. Despite the best intentions in the world, you've killed off the useful insect and left the pest unharmed. In fact you've done the pest a favor by killing off its enemy — a ladybug can put away hundreds of aphids in a day.

Carbaryl can also be toxic to bees, and bees are important to your garden because they pollinate most fruiting vegetable crops. To avoid killing the bees, spray in the late evening when the flowers are closed. This way you kill the destructive pests but protect the bees.If you use an insecticide you must always be aware also of how long its residual effect is going to last. A residue of insecticide left on the plant when it's harvested is poisonous. The residual effect of an insecticide that you use in your vegetable garden is likely to be fairly short, but the effect may vary from one type of crop to another. And because the effect is not long-lasting, you can't spray as a preventive measure; you have no way of knowing which pests . are going to attack your plants before they're actually on the scene. 
125
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How to transforms your Swimming Pool Into GARDEN Paradise

Daily LifeJustin Rhodes Published the article • 0 comments • 125 views • 2017-10-16 18:55 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
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159
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Food Forest Gardening, Functional Permaculture Design

ExperienceJames Prigioni Published the article • 0 comments • 159 views • 2017-09-28 18:34 • came from similar tags

 

subtitle:


it's September 27 today I've been away for the past five days so the food forest has essentially been neglected you would think that it would suffer as a result but actually production has increased so now I want to go through show you just how everything is doing let's go looking from the outside in doesn't look like we skipped a beat really looks beautiful so far I haven't even gone in here yet the intro I did I did after this so this is kind of like my first look at everything but just peeking through I see a lot of ripe tomatoes a lot of ripe peppers and everything bunch of things to snack on look at these Tomatoes just self seeded and came right through the grapes they just found their way weed through and then I planted some Tomatoes also along this front welded wire fence you can see what I did here I took that welded wire fence just bent it grew stuff along the border this way the chickens can't get in and scratch around the bases it's worked beautifully got a lot of holy basil gonna be collecting a lot of holy basil seed I really love that holy basil and everything is just looking huge look at the size of this force now guys true forest a berry conservatory but everything in here is edible everything's in here for a purpose this is functional I planted everything my brother helped me with a lot of it but my hand was we planted every single thing unless it was self seeded so this was all by design and its really come together beautifully a lot of it was just planting more than we needed and letting nature sort a lot of things out but just even on the outside here we got a lot of production this year there were always Tomatoes just waiting to ripen up I know there's a lot of ripe tomatoes on the inside and this hazelnut trees full of catkins so many on it we should get real nice production next year she'd be loaded as I just come through one of the entrances here's one of the tomato just got so heavy it blew over sweet treats but still got some good ripe ones on there not quitting doesn't want to give up in this tomato here it almost looks like it's dying but that's a cucumber that was growing up the tomato but these ones were overripe I wasn't able to come to harvest them not being here and some of the stuff I just put in for the fall he's doing all right lettuces are getting a little bigger it looks like this kale over here is doing nice but I transplanted in there's gonna be some nice kale Lhasa not all the Dino kale so my favorite ones so we planted a number of them just right in the middle of the food forest where people would probably never play and stuff underneath the cherry tree a big cherry that's going dormant and then you've got the moon globe hair we've got the kale underneath there Bobcat tomato with a number of ripe tomatoes all look at these over here wow dude that color this is the rose of the Barents I'm gonna call her I also stick a pink for any wine but what do people call our healthy-looking Tomatoes with all these ripe tomatoes and peppers I see it looks like we're gonna have to harvest video soon and the almond tree the all-in-one almond still growing well hopefully we'll see some flowers on that next year Concord grape one of my favorites everything about it I love hanging out underneath it and it still has some grapes on it they're so old you're sweet right now just a few stragglers look it's also more over here too hmm good and it's just peaceful to be in here haven't been here for a little while so I really missed it I'm happy the first time I got to come in here I get to share it with you guys it's like it's like a breath of fresh air that plum tree really did get huge and it its immersive now even with some of the trees dropping their leaves heading towards fall it still feels immersive it's a lot of funds look at a ton of food which you'll see as I continue to walk through and for the harvest videos coming up may I get besides this tomato seems a monster Wow beautiful just sold Aki still putting out some zucchinis don't see many on there and I know I'm still getting a lot of green beans because these things never stop mm-hmm a little overripe okay some more Tomatoes more - minnows every year the watermelons still getting pretty big it's peach trees so tall so don't all even know 20 feet at least and look how open the center is I really have it wide open I like that and look at this pears the spare gets growing right in there really cool look at these Tomatoes beautiful oh man and again look where we're planting these Tomatoes look where I planted this is on right next to it apple tree just in the middle of the forest if you get sunlight plant it I'm getting good harvests out of these and spaces people would never grow stuff pulling beautiful harvest of tomatoes raspberries I love the raspberries you guys know that such treats and we got the sweet treats tomato we're doing the treats all day when did these eggplants back here the ding Tong so productive I got a couple of them here with the food forest and stuff you'll see him but the man they're productive huh beautiful and this section back here has been really productive and it's getting almost sloppy looking now but the mound of tomatoes and cucumbers we've pulled from back here I mean you guys can go back and watch the harvest videos there's a lot look at this come on now what's that like one two three four five six seven at 10 Tomatoes right there save that for the harvest video but jeez no no no fertilizer no pesticides no herbicides no fungicides nothing just natural that tells you could do it man these are loaded these tomatoes back here and the goji's are ripening you can have a lot of good wood you soon more flowers it's starting to go over here I put in some more fall stuff still a little slow to go but I'll start to take off got some kale I believe that's the scarlet kale a few more of them just thrown in wherever I can get some space and some light try to get as much production as possible in these little spaces weekend as we get we been eating this kale a lot and this is delicious it's my favorite kind but we want to keep getting more and more make sure we're eating kales late into the season as possible that's got some eggplants I should just give these plants to somebody maybe I will that'd be cool then they can harvest their own eggplant you can't get fresher than that and Wow look at that I miss those beautiful soul donkeys look like the ripe ready to go give me a huge tomato harvest coming up oh yeah look how beautiful that is monsters that one too these hot days and cool nights have really helped the ripening process look at that it's gonna be one of our bigger tomato harvest of the year probably in the fall we're getting it that's a lot of that's gotta be a tribute to the wood chips let's just look at the soil it's growing why is that so productive right now it's I mean let's say no work by me the worms the fungus never watered I haven't ordered this plant one time since I put it in the ground I transplanted it i watered again never watered it once since I've done no work for it all I had was actually have I pruned it and staked it and then harvested that's it ordering no fertilizing I don't got time for that and look at this how did this oil oh my gosh this is this is a build soil and I've shown you my mice and just five feet away over there it's all sand and this is what this was but five years of good soil practices that's what you could have and that's what your containers can be looking like with little to no work and all these tomatoes into here are self seeded going through and just grabbing little fruits from them is nice and they're growing underneath that apple tree getting that extra yield and the late season annuals are coming through real strong these peppers just prolific just striking the color isn't it the contrast that bright orange against a dark green no fertilizer just natural the wood shapes the mycorrhizal fungi the worms everything working together and I haven't watered this like the other one never would I wondered it when I put it in that's it it still wants to put out more and if you've got if you're in a really dry arid place the conditions aren't gonna be the same so you may have to order but you dig down deep you dig down in the soil and if it's wet you don't have water it's basically that simple and you've got the Rosita pink eggplant right here and we got the fireball red peppers and Claire your baby cheese I see a nice black king right there eggplant the classic really nice the zinnias came through on their own they're one of my favorites and the birds that birds love them the bees love them so I love him as well Ben and look at this old doc he's what a good late season producer for me at least and man this is one of my favorites it's a pretty disease resistant has passed resistant because it's the potato leaf tomato a bunch of them are ready right to eat so we'll be snacking on those using for sandwiches probably one of our last big tomato harvests this hazel most doing real well and now's the time when the California Poppy comes back as things cool off there's always a new flower coming through always drawing in more beneficials balance in the system create an ideal environment for all nature and maybe will just come to plant a little seed mom over here take some of these echinacea look at that Oh echinacea seed it will just sprinkle just for fun like Masanobu says played like a child you got to have fun and you got to enjoy this guy's you got to have faith that it's gonna work you got to just look out of nature and realize everything is growing very well on its own it's just a system that it's a part of make that system that's what I'm doing here you can have the same harvest same yield it's gonna look different but it's the same concept and you don't have to use wood chips I think the one of the best but you can use any natural mulch some areas my wood chip need to be thicker the weeds are coming through but again anyone can do this this is meant to inspire this is meant to encourage you this isn't meant to show off or anything because I didn't do anything I'm not working super hard laboring putting any crazy soil compound mixes together or anything to get these kind of yields I'm looking at it when how nature does it nothing works hard in nature everything eats everything's fed and that's how I want to be so that's the system I want to be a part of it doesn't stop there though I still have to show you the extended edge there's the main food forest in the back there this is the extended side where we getting huge harvests and just only the second year of this system and strawberries are so good every bearing once mmm really good and this is the same system haven't watered any of the stuff you've got the Tabor he's here and the boys and berries are all laying down they'll come through so we're gonna have a lot of berries this is focus mainly on berries in here blueberries black cap raspberries elderberries Taye berries boysenberries you know a lot of the berries and while we wait for all that stuff to come through we're gonna be growing annuals like the peppers very baby cheese in these big mouths so these are like the red ace New Age peppers and the pink tongue long eggplant so many I have to harvest that big one back there but so productive another huge holy basil and you can see how much I missed these Tomatoes he's only just rotted over ripen because I just wasn't here to harvest them a lot of them over here but here we've got the stamen Winesap apple some beautiful looking apples on it so we're gonna get a couple from that one it was just a tough year for apples even our apple tree from seed didn't do that great I see a lot of you guys in the comment section saying that you want to grow a food forest of your own and I want you to know all it is is just a few small investments over time so first you just got to get those wood chips bring them in and then plant a few trees today a few tomorrow a few next week let everything grow up slowly this took five years but you can see what it's come to now so thanks for watching thanks for tuning in if you enjoyed the video share with your friends it's a like button hit the subscribe button see the next one [Music]


 
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subtitle:


it's September 27 today I've been away for the past five days so the food forest has essentially been neglected you would think that it would suffer as a result but actually production has increased so now I want to go through show you just how everything is doing let's go looking from the outside in doesn't look like we skipped a beat really looks beautiful so far I haven't even gone in here yet the intro I did I did after this so this is kind of like my first look at everything but just peeking through I see a lot of ripe tomatoes a lot of ripe peppers and everything bunch of things to snack on look at these Tomatoes just self seeded and came right through the grapes they just found their way weed through and then I planted some Tomatoes also along this front welded wire fence you can see what I did here I took that welded wire fence just bent it grew stuff along the border this way the chickens can't get in and scratch around the bases it's worked beautifully got a lot of holy basil gonna be collecting a lot of holy basil seed I really love that holy basil and everything is just looking huge look at the size of this force now guys true forest a berry conservatory but everything in here is edible everything's in here for a purpose this is functional I planted everything my brother helped me with a lot of it but my hand was we planted every single thing unless it was self seeded so this was all by design and its really come together beautifully a lot of it was just planting more than we needed and letting nature sort a lot of things out but just even on the outside here we got a lot of production this year there were always Tomatoes just waiting to ripen up I know there's a lot of ripe tomatoes on the inside and this hazelnut trees full of catkins so many on it we should get real nice production next year she'd be loaded as I just come through one of the entrances here's one of the tomato just got so heavy it blew over sweet treats but still got some good ripe ones on there not quitting doesn't want to give up in this tomato here it almost looks like it's dying but that's a cucumber that was growing up the tomato but these ones were overripe I wasn't able to come to harvest them not being here and some of the stuff I just put in for the fall he's doing all right lettuces are getting a little bigger it looks like this kale over here is doing nice but I transplanted in there's gonna be some nice kale Lhasa not all the Dino kale so my favorite ones so we planted a number of them just right in the middle of the food forest where people would probably never play and stuff underneath the cherry tree a big cherry that's going dormant and then you've got the moon globe hair we've got the kale underneath there Bobcat tomato with a number of ripe tomatoes all look at these over here wow dude that color this is the rose of the Barents I'm gonna call her I also stick a pink for any wine but what do people call our healthy-looking Tomatoes with all these ripe tomatoes and peppers I see it looks like we're gonna have to harvest video soon and the almond tree the all-in-one almond still growing well hopefully we'll see some flowers on that next year Concord grape one of my favorites everything about it I love hanging out underneath it and it still has some grapes on it they're so old you're sweet right now just a few stragglers look it's also more over here too hmm good and it's just peaceful to be in here haven't been here for a little while so I really missed it I'm happy the first time I got to come in here I get to share it with you guys it's like it's like a breath of fresh air that plum tree really did get huge and it its immersive now even with some of the trees dropping their leaves heading towards fall it still feels immersive it's a lot of funds look at a ton of food which you'll see as I continue to walk through and for the harvest videos coming up may I get besides this tomato seems a monster Wow beautiful just sold Aki still putting out some zucchinis don't see many on there and I know I'm still getting a lot of green beans because these things never stop mm-hmm a little overripe okay some more Tomatoes more - minnows every year the watermelons still getting pretty big it's peach trees so tall so don't all even know 20 feet at least and look how open the center is I really have it wide open I like that and look at this pears the spare gets growing right in there really cool look at these Tomatoes beautiful oh man and again look where we're planting these Tomatoes look where I planted this is on right next to it apple tree just in the middle of the forest if you get sunlight plant it I'm getting good harvests out of these and spaces people would never grow stuff pulling beautiful harvest of tomatoes raspberries I love the raspberries you guys know that such treats and we got the sweet treats tomato we're doing the treats all day when did these eggplants back here the ding Tong so productive I got a couple of them here with the food forest and stuff you'll see him but the man they're productive huh beautiful and this section back here has been really productive and it's getting almost sloppy looking now but the mound of tomatoes and cucumbers we've pulled from back here I mean you guys can go back and watch the harvest videos there's a lot look at this come on now what's that like one two three four five six seven at 10 Tomatoes right there save that for the harvest video but jeez no no no fertilizer no pesticides no herbicides no fungicides nothing just natural that tells you could do it man these are loaded these tomatoes back here and the goji's are ripening you can have a lot of good wood you soon more flowers it's starting to go over here I put in some more fall stuff still a little slow to go but I'll start to take off got some kale I believe that's the scarlet kale a few more of them just thrown in wherever I can get some space and some light try to get as much production as possible in these little spaces weekend as we get we been eating this kale a lot and this is delicious it's my favorite kind but we want to keep getting more and more make sure we're eating kales late into the season as possible that's got some eggplants I should just give these plants to somebody maybe I will that'd be cool then they can harvest their own eggplant you can't get fresher than that and Wow look at that I miss those beautiful soul donkeys look like the ripe ready to go give me a huge tomato harvest coming up oh yeah look how beautiful that is monsters that one too these hot days and cool nights have really helped the ripening process look at that it's gonna be one of our bigger tomato harvest of the year probably in the fall we're getting it that's a lot of that's gotta be a tribute to the wood chips let's just look at the soil it's growing why is that so productive right now it's I mean let's say no work by me the worms the fungus never watered I haven't ordered this plant one time since I put it in the ground I transplanted it i watered again never watered it once since I've done no work for it all I had was actually have I pruned it and staked it and then harvested that's it ordering no fertilizing I don't got time for that and look at this how did this oil oh my gosh this is this is a build soil and I've shown you my mice and just five feet away over there it's all sand and this is what this was but five years of good soil practices that's what you could have and that's what your containers can be looking like with little to no work and all these tomatoes into here are self seeded going through and just grabbing little fruits from them is nice and they're growing underneath that apple tree getting that extra yield and the late season annuals are coming through real strong these peppers just prolific just striking the color isn't it the contrast that bright orange against a dark green no fertilizer just natural the wood shapes the mycorrhizal fungi the worms everything working together and I haven't watered this like the other one never would I wondered it when I put it in that's it it still wants to put out more and if you've got if you're in a really dry arid place the conditions aren't gonna be the same so you may have to order but you dig down deep you dig down in the soil and if it's wet you don't have water it's basically that simple and you've got the Rosita pink eggplant right here and we got the fireball red peppers and Claire your baby cheese I see a nice black king right there eggplant the classic really nice the zinnias came through on their own they're one of my favorites and the birds that birds love them the bees love them so I love him as well Ben and look at this old doc he's what a good late season producer for me at least and man this is one of my favorites it's a pretty disease resistant has passed resistant because it's the potato leaf tomato a bunch of them are ready right to eat so we'll be snacking on those using for sandwiches probably one of our last big tomato harvests this hazel most doing real well and now's the time when the California Poppy comes back as things cool off there's always a new flower coming through always drawing in more beneficials balance in the system create an ideal environment for all nature and maybe will just come to plant a little seed mom over here take some of these echinacea look at that Oh echinacea seed it will just sprinkle just for fun like Masanobu says played like a child you got to have fun and you got to enjoy this guy's you got to have faith that it's gonna work you got to just look out of nature and realize everything is growing very well on its own it's just a system that it's a part of make that system that's what I'm doing here you can have the same harvest same yield it's gonna look different but it's the same concept and you don't have to use wood chips I think the one of the best but you can use any natural mulch some areas my wood chip need to be thicker the weeds are coming through but again anyone can do this this is meant to inspire this is meant to encourage you this isn't meant to show off or anything because I didn't do anything I'm not working super hard laboring putting any crazy soil compound mixes together or anything to get these kind of yields I'm looking at it when how nature does it nothing works hard in nature everything eats everything's fed and that's how I want to be so that's the system I want to be a part of it doesn't stop there though I still have to show you the extended edge there's the main food forest in the back there this is the extended side where we getting huge harvests and just only the second year of this system and strawberries are so good every bearing once mmm really good and this is the same system haven't watered any of the stuff you've got the Tabor he's here and the boys and berries are all laying down they'll come through so we're gonna have a lot of berries this is focus mainly on berries in here blueberries black cap raspberries elderberries Taye berries boysenberries you know a lot of the berries and while we wait for all that stuff to come through we're gonna be growing annuals like the peppers very baby cheese in these big mouths so these are like the red ace New Age peppers and the pink tongue long eggplant so many I have to harvest that big one back there but so productive another huge holy basil and you can see how much I missed these Tomatoes he's only just rotted over ripen because I just wasn't here to harvest them a lot of them over here but here we've got the stamen Winesap apple some beautiful looking apples on it so we're gonna get a couple from that one it was just a tough year for apples even our apple tree from seed didn't do that great I see a lot of you guys in the comment section saying that you want to grow a food forest of your own and I want you to know all it is is just a few small investments over time so first you just got to get those wood chips bring them in and then plant a few trees today a few tomorrow a few next week let everything grow up slowly this took five years but you can see what it's come to now so thanks for watching thanks for tuning in if you enjoyed the video share with your friends it's a like button hit the subscribe button see the next one [Music]


 
 
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Here is a simple way to protect fruit on your backyard fruit trees from animals like birds and possums

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 1 comments • 173 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


get a I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to show you one of the methods I use to bag my fruit to easily protect it from animals and insects so that the end product is organically grown and delicious too let's get into it [Music] well some have long gone and so are the fruits from these mango trees it's weaker now and we've got other fruits on the go like citrus and even a local just over here I could show you loquats starting to fruit these are trees and fruit trees that flower and fruit through winter they are there they're not the real issue for us it's the summer fruits that are the main problem because they not only get totalled by the animals they're you know the fluffy things and the birds they get targeted by the small animals the insects in particular two types of fruit slide the Mediterranean and the Queensland fruit fly but that if they just sting the fruit they'll a maggot inside and it decimates it but that they don't that they aren't real prevalent through the winter months here so we can grow our citrus you know by the dozens by the hundreds even this small orange tree here it's a blood orange and see how good it is producing and most of our citrus are producing really well and you get the odd fruit the odd mandarine the others that gets taken by an animal you know and a bird but they just don't do enough damage to even worry about netting them so that's that's not a problem the main problem is through summer like our mango is very expensive fruit you don't want to lose too many of them and all the time some of the animals like the flying foxes and the opossums I'll just ruin it by biting into it and you don't want to even try to cut the bit of that off because you know get a bit of that saliva in your own system and you could get diseases and all types of nasty pathogens from these creatures so it's best get rid of the fruit altogether netting whole fruit trees can be done but it's not as practical as you'd might think we do it sometimes for our apples and and for other fruit trees sucker plums but often the larger fruit trees like mangoes it's it's not quite worth it you don't get enough fruit on them to warrant in the whole tree and I've found that bagging fruit and this method of bagging fruit is pretty good it's not that time intensive it's fairly cost effective and more more importantly it actually works rather than some of the marketed bags that you get that protect from fruit fly only they don't last very long they get damaged by Sun very easily and then deteriorate and also a lot of those white bags they are they're so easy to tear through for an animal it might protect from fruit fly but it certainly won't protect from a possum or a fruit bat trying to get to the fruit whereas this method that I'm going to show you does so without any further ado let's get into it okay well this is dead-set easy I use some fiberglass mosquito netting or insect netting that you use on screen doors or windows you can get it in these two meter lengths it's about 12 bucks for a whole roll so pretty cheap I just cut it in two sizes that's going to be appropriate for the fruit in this case you can cut a 2 meter length into about 8 pieces if you want the only other thing you need is those zip ties and this is how I do it it's really easy I just wrap this fiberglass netting around the crew in this case it's a single mango and then around the neck of it where the mango obviously meets it hanging stands by then G is a zip tie and just zip tie it up and that stops anything getting in and any insects sting it and it will stop the fruit fly because the fruit fly don't have they can't get through the fine netting to actually get its stinger and sting the fruit here's the same example but on a bunch of nation tears so I used a bit of a bigger slice there of netting and just you know you just remodel it into a ball and so you can then scrunch it together at the top and I just pull it off a little bit just pull it off the fruit to make sure that nothing can then try to sting it on the way through but like I said the netting fairly thick and fine so it doesn't quite it doesn't really warrant any worry but if it's touching the fruit this is the same demonstration but on pomegranate [Music] and that's pretty simple that's how it is just bothered this fella as I'm walking down I was actually hanging out the washing saw the sweller on the ground and just now I don't get them in time and they ripen and I don't see them they'll typically drop off the tree and this one is going to blush about it it's it's slightly giving which means it's just about ripe or or probably is ripe enough to eat maybe give it a day on the back kitchen bench and we'll be perfect it's got a bit of black spot in the end which is quite normal and this is going to be a fantastic mango to eat just like all the ones we're getting and you know I can you can grab them off the tree of course I don't lot wait till they all fall off this one's a huge mango it's like the size of a rock melon this is an r to ET and then I've got some that I've missed like this one but of course it's not bagged and soon as it falls off the tree the beetles get it and this one's going to beetle if it isn't fruit fly blonde which it probably is as well it's got beetles and yucky stuff in it and it's probably lucky it survived the night actually because the possums and the fruit bats would get it as well I've missed a few this time but I'm glad that I got most of them working really well so even if they do fall off the tree obviously this netting is strong enough it's that fiberglass flyscreen netting that nothing Kyle couldn't even rip this with my fingers whereas the bagging stuff that you typically get which is actually quite bloody expensive you have these black bags they are they are rubbish really they are rubbish anyway there you go face cooks pretty good yeah not even he can eat it haha here's another one I missed this man goes here was taken and look how clean eating all around the [Music] I'd say another poppin it was hoppin him to grab fruit and take it away I probably grabbed it from the orchard worried about my dog up at the house quickly grabbed it he came down here where it was closer probably to a time a lot of these trees here near the chicken pen funny things aren't they I bet he had a knife feed and use a typical bounty a collection of mangoes right from the tree and it's pretty simple to undo those zip ties so you can reuse these zip ties and of course you can reuse the bag it's just a matter of sticking the tip of the knife under the head of the zip tie and then you can just release it and reuse it there you go nice fat juicy mango I should be totally honest with you though it's not a hundred percent fix you can see this mango here it's being damaged by a flying fox or opossums sucking through the mesh you can see the mesh hasn't been really damaged too much but they've got so desperate that they've had the time to suck through the mesh and damage the fruit I should stress though that I found damaged fruit to be a very rare occasion we end up with for this reusable netting and subside focus it's pretty sustainable allowing the mango to ripen on the tree and eat it fresh and organically like this it just tastes amazing and no wonder it completes it with my food [Music] and I thought new snack [Music] well I hope you enjoyed that video don't forget to share it and give it a thumbs up if you did like it also visit my blog self-sufficient my calm that was my method of how to get around those animals stealing our much favored and important fruits that we spend all our time perfecting and trying to grow it's not a complete fantastic solution but it is a pretty good one and it works at least probably 90% of the time thanks for watching bye for now oh I knew we forgot at the end of that video you might have been wondering what I'm going to do with all those mangos or what I've done is I've turned them into dehydrated mango which is quite a delicacy and so easy to do well what I'll do is I'll I'll make a separate video on that nice short one and I'll post that within the next day or so and just to show you how I preserve our mangos when we have a glut of them and can't possibly eat them all fresh okay bye [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


get a I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to show you one of the methods I use to bag my fruit to easily protect it from animals and insects so that the end product is organically grown and delicious too let's get into it [Music] well some have long gone and so are the fruits from these mango trees it's weaker now and we've got other fruits on the go like citrus and even a local just over here I could show you loquats starting to fruit these are trees and fruit trees that flower and fruit through winter they are there they're not the real issue for us it's the summer fruits that are the main problem because they not only get totalled by the animals they're you know the fluffy things and the birds they get targeted by the small animals the insects in particular two types of fruit slide the Mediterranean and the Queensland fruit fly but that if they just sting the fruit they'll a maggot inside and it decimates it but that they don't that they aren't real prevalent through the winter months here so we can grow our citrus you know by the dozens by the hundreds even this small orange tree here it's a blood orange and see how good it is producing and most of our citrus are producing really well and you get the odd fruit the odd mandarine the others that gets taken by an animal you know and a bird but they just don't do enough damage to even worry about netting them so that's that's not a problem the main problem is through summer like our mango is very expensive fruit you don't want to lose too many of them and all the time some of the animals like the flying foxes and the opossums I'll just ruin it by biting into it and you don't want to even try to cut the bit of that off because you know get a bit of that saliva in your own system and you could get diseases and all types of nasty pathogens from these creatures so it's best get rid of the fruit altogether netting whole fruit trees can be done but it's not as practical as you'd might think we do it sometimes for our apples and and for other fruit trees sucker plums but often the larger fruit trees like mangoes it's it's not quite worth it you don't get enough fruit on them to warrant in the whole tree and I've found that bagging fruit and this method of bagging fruit is pretty good it's not that time intensive it's fairly cost effective and more more importantly it actually works rather than some of the marketed bags that you get that protect from fruit fly only they don't last very long they get damaged by Sun very easily and then deteriorate and also a lot of those white bags they are they're so easy to tear through for an animal it might protect from fruit fly but it certainly won't protect from a possum or a fruit bat trying to get to the fruit whereas this method that I'm going to show you does so without any further ado let's get into it okay well this is dead-set easy I use some fiberglass mosquito netting or insect netting that you use on screen doors or windows you can get it in these two meter lengths it's about 12 bucks for a whole roll so pretty cheap I just cut it in two sizes that's going to be appropriate for the fruit in this case you can cut a 2 meter length into about 8 pieces if you want the only other thing you need is those zip ties and this is how I do it it's really easy I just wrap this fiberglass netting around the crew in this case it's a single mango and then around the neck of it where the mango obviously meets it hanging stands by then G is a zip tie and just zip tie it up and that stops anything getting in and any insects sting it and it will stop the fruit fly because the fruit fly don't have they can't get through the fine netting to actually get its stinger and sting the fruit here's the same example but on a bunch of nation tears so I used a bit of a bigger slice there of netting and just you know you just remodel it into a ball and so you can then scrunch it together at the top and I just pull it off a little bit just pull it off the fruit to make sure that nothing can then try to sting it on the way through but like I said the netting fairly thick and fine so it doesn't quite it doesn't really warrant any worry but if it's touching the fruit this is the same demonstration but on pomegranate [Music] and that's pretty simple that's how it is just bothered this fella as I'm walking down I was actually hanging out the washing saw the sweller on the ground and just now I don't get them in time and they ripen and I don't see them they'll typically drop off the tree and this one is going to blush about it it's it's slightly giving which means it's just about ripe or or probably is ripe enough to eat maybe give it a day on the back kitchen bench and we'll be perfect it's got a bit of black spot in the end which is quite normal and this is going to be a fantastic mango to eat just like all the ones we're getting and you know I can you can grab them off the tree of course I don't lot wait till they all fall off this one's a huge mango it's like the size of a rock melon this is an r to ET and then I've got some that I've missed like this one but of course it's not bagged and soon as it falls off the tree the beetles get it and this one's going to beetle if it isn't fruit fly blonde which it probably is as well it's got beetles and yucky stuff in it and it's probably lucky it survived the night actually because the possums and the fruit bats would get it as well I've missed a few this time but I'm glad that I got most of them working really well so even if they do fall off the tree obviously this netting is strong enough it's that fiberglass flyscreen netting that nothing Kyle couldn't even rip this with my fingers whereas the bagging stuff that you typically get which is actually quite bloody expensive you have these black bags they are they are rubbish really they are rubbish anyway there you go face cooks pretty good yeah not even he can eat it haha here's another one I missed this man goes here was taken and look how clean eating all around the [Music] I'd say another poppin it was hoppin him to grab fruit and take it away I probably grabbed it from the orchard worried about my dog up at the house quickly grabbed it he came down here where it was closer probably to a time a lot of these trees here near the chicken pen funny things aren't they I bet he had a knife feed and use a typical bounty a collection of mangoes right from the tree and it's pretty simple to undo those zip ties so you can reuse these zip ties and of course you can reuse the bag it's just a matter of sticking the tip of the knife under the head of the zip tie and then you can just release it and reuse it there you go nice fat juicy mango I should be totally honest with you though it's not a hundred percent fix you can see this mango here it's being damaged by a flying fox or opossums sucking through the mesh you can see the mesh hasn't been really damaged too much but they've got so desperate that they've had the time to suck through the mesh and damage the fruit I should stress though that I found damaged fruit to be a very rare occasion we end up with for this reusable netting and subside focus it's pretty sustainable allowing the mango to ripen on the tree and eat it fresh and organically like this it just tastes amazing and no wonder it completes it with my food [Music] and I thought new snack [Music] well I hope you enjoyed that video don't forget to share it and give it a thumbs up if you did like it also visit my blog self-sufficient my calm that was my method of how to get around those animals stealing our much favored and important fruits that we spend all our time perfecting and trying to grow it's not a complete fantastic solution but it is a pretty good one and it works at least probably 90% of the time thanks for watching bye for now oh I knew we forgot at the end of that video you might have been wondering what I'm going to do with all those mangos or what I've done is I've turned them into dehydrated mango which is quite a delicacy and so easy to do well what I'll do is I'll I'll make a separate video on that nice short one and I'll post that within the next day or so and just to show you how I preserve our mangos when we have a glut of them and can't possibly eat them all fresh okay bye [Music]


 
218
Views

Sunrise Lime Tree Fantastic Citrus Variety to Grow

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 218 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:
 


today I'm mark from self-service of me and it's a terrible day here in sunny South East Queensland well in fact it's it's not funny at all to be raining for about the last three days it was a time I wanted to bring you a midweek video because one of our trees it's a small citrus that we've been growing for about three years it's called a sunrise lime it's in fruit the fruit are ready to pick I wanted to bring you this video before a the fruit fell off a tree or something ate them or something else happened it's just a good example at the moment and it's a really great little tree I'm excited that we're growing it we have about a hundred plus fruit trees here and I don't say that just a brag or maybe maybe a little bit but the reason why we grow so many fruit trees and I've said this before is because you just can't get the whole range of fruit that you know I would like from the local supermarket so therefore to get the maximum variety as possible we like to grow around fruit trees by different types of exotics try different trees try different fruits and experience those many thousands of fruit trees and fruits that you can that you that are grown around the world but I never sold in the supermarket simply because they're not economical to do so for a variety of reasons now as the rain comes down let's just get into it and have a look at this sunrise line alright we'll go past this with my lemon tree remember my lots of lemons video but here it is again I released that about twelve months ago that lots of lemons video and it's it's how I picked all that fruit off and now it's all fruiting again another million fruit on it but here's the sunrise line I hope the camera isn't going to get all fogged up and droplets everywhere because it is coming down now and I want to get this in you can see they're an oblong fruit about the size of a oblong kumquat you know most kumquats are round and I'll get into that in a minute the leaves are quite small from your standard citrus like say this Valencia orange over here you see how big the leaves are there is this one is it now I'm going to give this a taste test but before I do I wanted to just explain how this tree came about it's a hybrid but it's a hybrid between basically three different types of citrus a color monden which is a hybrid itself between a kumquat and a mandarine crossed with our Australian native finger lines and those finger limes are got our lime fruit shaped like my finger about as thick as that and in the middle it's like this caviar type flesh and as you eat they pop in your mouth and it's got a beautiful limey citrus taste great for cocktails and drinks and putting in food and it's up it spins quite a big industry now in Australia anyway let's have a taste of this sunrise line we'll pick one that's fairly right you can eat them unripe like that's about typical size this is about critical thighs here this is a quite a big one you have a look at this one here that's quite large it typically smaller than that and we do also have another native line to Australia that's quite famous that I'd never ever tried and I've got one growing just a small one but my mother used to tell me about it she lived out on a farm western Queensland at a chinchilla and she used to come across these wild lime bushes all the time out in the out in the scrub and she used to love them and she hadn't tried one for the last thirty years since she left the farm or more than that and she so I asked her is this similar this sunrise lime similar and she said no it's not at all and as I looked into it I reckon the one she's talking about is that outback lime because it is native to this area and as I aligned that similar to this but it is typically green when you pick them and they're maybe a little smaller than this actually so but it's a different plant this isn't a cross between the outback line this is a like a set a cross between the different citrus altogether anyway let's have a taste of this so you either with that I have tried them before there's a little tiny seed there I don't know normally notice the seeds but they're really sweet now before I showed you this lime I was out in the front yard and I taste tested a kumquat you know I can tell you the Sun just come out a little bit the kumquat is nowhere near as good as this this is sweet the skin is beautiful oh it's a real delicious fruit to eat everything's sweet about you don't have have a terrible aftertaste from the skin the skin is lovely it's a real pleasure and I'm excited too in the future work out what I'm going to use it for in salads own cooking eating fresh maybe as a dessert sort of Lacroix you know just like you would do with kumquats so um yeah it's a really beautiful tasting fruit and I hope they open up like an export market will say to sell these trees around the world because I think it's fantastic now I am NOT against crossbreeding plants and trees and hydrating things most of our most famous citrus trees for example in fruits and apples and that of all come from people experimenting in crossing trees I got no no qualms about that I think that's a great idea and it's exciting that all these new different types of crosses and trees can be established so that we can plant them in our own backyard and enjoy them well anyway I just really wanted to show you this sunrise line so that will do for now if you liked the video give it a thumbs up don't forget my website self-sufficient me calm thanks for watching bye for now [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:
 


today I'm mark from self-service of me and it's a terrible day here in sunny South East Queensland well in fact it's it's not funny at all to be raining for about the last three days it was a time I wanted to bring you a midweek video because one of our trees it's a small citrus that we've been growing for about three years it's called a sunrise lime it's in fruit the fruit are ready to pick I wanted to bring you this video before a the fruit fell off a tree or something ate them or something else happened it's just a good example at the moment and it's a really great little tree I'm excited that we're growing it we have about a hundred plus fruit trees here and I don't say that just a brag or maybe maybe a little bit but the reason why we grow so many fruit trees and I've said this before is because you just can't get the whole range of fruit that you know I would like from the local supermarket so therefore to get the maximum variety as possible we like to grow around fruit trees by different types of exotics try different trees try different fruits and experience those many thousands of fruit trees and fruits that you can that you that are grown around the world but I never sold in the supermarket simply because they're not economical to do so for a variety of reasons now as the rain comes down let's just get into it and have a look at this sunrise line alright we'll go past this with my lemon tree remember my lots of lemons video but here it is again I released that about twelve months ago that lots of lemons video and it's it's how I picked all that fruit off and now it's all fruiting again another million fruit on it but here's the sunrise line I hope the camera isn't going to get all fogged up and droplets everywhere because it is coming down now and I want to get this in you can see they're an oblong fruit about the size of a oblong kumquat you know most kumquats are round and I'll get into that in a minute the leaves are quite small from your standard citrus like say this Valencia orange over here you see how big the leaves are there is this one is it now I'm going to give this a taste test but before I do I wanted to just explain how this tree came about it's a hybrid but it's a hybrid between basically three different types of citrus a color monden which is a hybrid itself between a kumquat and a mandarine crossed with our Australian native finger lines and those finger limes are got our lime fruit shaped like my finger about as thick as that and in the middle it's like this caviar type flesh and as you eat they pop in your mouth and it's got a beautiful limey citrus taste great for cocktails and drinks and putting in food and it's up it spins quite a big industry now in Australia anyway let's have a taste of this sunrise line we'll pick one that's fairly right you can eat them unripe like that's about typical size this is about critical thighs here this is a quite a big one you have a look at this one here that's quite large it typically smaller than that and we do also have another native line to Australia that's quite famous that I'd never ever tried and I've got one growing just a small one but my mother used to tell me about it she lived out on a farm western Queensland at a chinchilla and she used to come across these wild lime bushes all the time out in the out in the scrub and she used to love them and she hadn't tried one for the last thirty years since she left the farm or more than that and she so I asked her is this similar this sunrise lime similar and she said no it's not at all and as I looked into it I reckon the one she's talking about is that outback lime because it is native to this area and as I aligned that similar to this but it is typically green when you pick them and they're maybe a little smaller than this actually so but it's a different plant this isn't a cross between the outback line this is a like a set a cross between the different citrus altogether anyway let's have a taste of this so you either with that I have tried them before there's a little tiny seed there I don't know normally notice the seeds but they're really sweet now before I showed you this lime I was out in the front yard and I taste tested a kumquat you know I can tell you the Sun just come out a little bit the kumquat is nowhere near as good as this this is sweet the skin is beautiful oh it's a real delicious fruit to eat everything's sweet about you don't have have a terrible aftertaste from the skin the skin is lovely it's a real pleasure and I'm excited too in the future work out what I'm going to use it for in salads own cooking eating fresh maybe as a dessert sort of Lacroix you know just like you would do with kumquats so um yeah it's a really beautiful tasting fruit and I hope they open up like an export market will say to sell these trees around the world because I think it's fantastic now I am NOT against crossbreeding plants and trees and hydrating things most of our most famous citrus trees for example in fruits and apples and that of all come from people experimenting in crossing trees I got no no qualms about that I think that's a great idea and it's exciting that all these new different types of crosses and trees can be established so that we can plant them in our own backyard and enjoy them well anyway I just really wanted to show you this sunrise line so that will do for now if you liked the video give it a thumbs up don't forget my website self-sufficient me calm thanks for watching bye for now [Music]

177
Views

Planting More Types of Fruit Trees & How to Dig a Hole - With Tips!

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 1 comments • 177 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from self-sufficiently many our orchard at the moment I thought that I'd bring you a quick video on what's been happening around here on our acreage on our small three acre property urban farming primarily to do with planting fruit trees are a bit of a fruit tree nut of a fruit tree collector and there's a lot of reasons for collecting fruit trees but the main one is to have a good variety of food to eat at different times of the year so let's get into it so before we watch me dig let's go ahead and see what I'm planting another name is Sapodilla central american plant the chestnut it's grown for at edible seeds then you've got the job at Aqaba that's the yellow touch usually it's the black kite like that once and I've also got one of them a clay mock which is a small orange fruit with really good flavor apparently in the soursop which is apparently a really beautiful juice and I'm also going to plant a white mulberry which I've always wanted to do and then on the other side of a softie just on our other neighbors think we're going to plant a row of citrus this outback line that's supposed to be a native to Australia this weird plant which is a mandarine lime apparently it's got really easy feel small mandarine but tastes like a lime then we've got the bush lemon which is very Hardy lemon that I've always wanted to have a West Indian line which is a really Hardy lime very common over obviously in the West Indies then earlier today I planted this golden fruit of the Andes and it's supposed to be one of the best fruits in the world and then this Babar Cove which has a torpedo fruit the taste of a pineapple and strawberry cross all right let me explain how I dig these holes I've done the same thing for our hundred plus fruit trees on our property I start by making sure the trees in the right spot for to begin with and then I start digging around in a circular fashion obviously I want a nice circular cut I start digging up the lawn first I want to dig out that patch of grass when you could always be plant that somewhere if you needed to but I put a different method for what I do with the grass so I go around I cut out that hole usually about two or three times the width of the pot because I want to get my bright on around this thing so I don't want it to be just sort of pot size II that otherwise it's a little bit too cumbersome to writing the mo around plus I want a nice big hole and gap of that graph so that grasses and granite grow through too easily and it's not too hard to manage especially when that tree is trying to establish and it needs as much moisture as possible so I'll just keep digging down until that pot or the stem is about the size of the pot meaning I don't want to plant that tree any deeper than it actually is in the poker moment and then once I've got the right size exactly I can dig down a little bit further actually and then backfill with a bit of loose soil and I'll whack the tree in the hole and then backfill I don't use any compost a little bit like one yard revolution where he has explained in his tip videos one of these really big rules or tips was not to backfill with compost or anything like that and on the same I don't do that either a stainless patrick otherwise you can it gets too loose I like to backfill with good soil that is come with and that way the roots will grow out better so then I took the grass that I've just cut out upside down and that backs and I'll put that around the outer perimeter of that plant and that kills the grass underneath it so it gives me a bit of extra wits as well with that hole that I've just cut and that grass upside down dies and then it killed the grass underneath it but I don't stop there I get some mulch and I also have a little bit of fertilizer I like to use an organic flood and bone if I don't have my own available like new or whatever I use that commercial blood and bone the organic stuff sprinkle a handful that around the tree first and then I lay down my mouth you could water that in first if you wanted to but I prefer to lay the mops down on top nice and thick Sully's pixelation thickly down around on top of that extra grass and a little bit more and that then will make sure that the grass doesn't grow through and into that tree and so while that sapling grows it won't get impeded by any extra grass or weeds and it will have retain the moisture because that mouse will give it extra moisture and you got will won't let it dry out as much planting in winter in this region the subtropics also helps too so then I'll go ahead and I lined them all up like I was saying I'm a little bit that studious when it comes to making sure I get my rows right even though I there's going to come a time where I've got to start planting in between rows but anyway that's another story but I then start going and I plant those six trees or saplings in those holes and keep mulching that one bag of small supply below get about five fruit trees so it goes quite a long way one of those one of those bags so it's fairly economical and it's a good thing first one row planted good it is about exposing out maybe like a 3/4 you know go around the corner here and I'm going to OB I'll be planting plants all the way along here but just in this corner I'm planting that mulberry because it will match that mulberry there and the one up the top so they'll be sort of like a triangle on mulberries in a similar area I think it'll look nice too mole Roos opening up as you come through down into the picnic area but like I said I'll just do one row behind the compost heap and the banana trees I don't think I'll go down further because then you're getting to this bush land where we've got the chicken area and the big gum trees and natives and the picnic area I don't want to encroach too much on that I think one more row will do and if I buy more fruit trees I'll just start squeezing I'm in the gaps around here around the orchard and out the front around planting some more citrus or at the side and that front as well so yeah I get onto this mulberry and then I'll move up to the citrus of the top right hand side plant them near the apple trees and the avocado tree near there yeah at this point in time I've probably dug for two hours or more which is a fair that we're digging and it's good for the shoulders I love citrus it's one of my favorite fruit trees if not the favorite type of variety there's four there in the middle I'm going to plant a tangerine that's why there's a gap but I'm expecting that strip of fruit tree is getting the afternoon Sun should do really well in that spike and be a really nice feature along that driveway well I hope you enjoyed that video I've got lots of videos in the pipeline at the moment and I'm working on some that are more complicated and probably more informative but I just wanted to knock this one up and send it out this weekend so that you guys have a little bit to chew on thanks for watching don't forget the website self-abusive me calm bye for now [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from self-sufficiently many our orchard at the moment I thought that I'd bring you a quick video on what's been happening around here on our acreage on our small three acre property urban farming primarily to do with planting fruit trees are a bit of a fruit tree nut of a fruit tree collector and there's a lot of reasons for collecting fruit trees but the main one is to have a good variety of food to eat at different times of the year so let's get into it so before we watch me dig let's go ahead and see what I'm planting another name is Sapodilla central american plant the chestnut it's grown for at edible seeds then you've got the job at Aqaba that's the yellow touch usually it's the black kite like that once and I've also got one of them a clay mock which is a small orange fruit with really good flavor apparently in the soursop which is apparently a really beautiful juice and I'm also going to plant a white mulberry which I've always wanted to do and then on the other side of a softie just on our other neighbors think we're going to plant a row of citrus this outback line that's supposed to be a native to Australia this weird plant which is a mandarine lime apparently it's got really easy feel small mandarine but tastes like a lime then we've got the bush lemon which is very Hardy lemon that I've always wanted to have a West Indian line which is a really Hardy lime very common over obviously in the West Indies then earlier today I planted this golden fruit of the Andes and it's supposed to be one of the best fruits in the world and then this Babar Cove which has a torpedo fruit the taste of a pineapple and strawberry cross all right let me explain how I dig these holes I've done the same thing for our hundred plus fruit trees on our property I start by making sure the trees in the right spot for to begin with and then I start digging around in a circular fashion obviously I want a nice circular cut I start digging up the lawn first I want to dig out that patch of grass when you could always be plant that somewhere if you needed to but I put a different method for what I do with the grass so I go around I cut out that hole usually about two or three times the width of the pot because I want to get my bright on around this thing so I don't want it to be just sort of pot size II that otherwise it's a little bit too cumbersome to writing the mo around plus I want a nice big hole and gap of that graph so that grasses and granite grow through too easily and it's not too hard to manage especially when that tree is trying to establish and it needs as much moisture as possible so I'll just keep digging down until that pot or the stem is about the size of the pot meaning I don't want to plant that tree any deeper than it actually is in the poker moment and then once I've got the right size exactly I can dig down a little bit further actually and then backfill with a bit of loose soil and I'll whack the tree in the hole and then backfill I don't use any compost a little bit like one yard revolution where he has explained in his tip videos one of these really big rules or tips was not to backfill with compost or anything like that and on the same I don't do that either a stainless patrick otherwise you can it gets too loose I like to backfill with good soil that is come with and that way the roots will grow out better so then I took the grass that I've just cut out upside down and that backs and I'll put that around the outer perimeter of that plant and that kills the grass underneath it so it gives me a bit of extra wits as well with that hole that I've just cut and that grass upside down dies and then it killed the grass underneath it but I don't stop there I get some mulch and I also have a little bit of fertilizer I like to use an organic flood and bone if I don't have my own available like new or whatever I use that commercial blood and bone the organic stuff sprinkle a handful that around the tree first and then I lay down my mouth you could water that in first if you wanted to but I prefer to lay the mops down on top nice and thick Sully's pixelation thickly down around on top of that extra grass and a little bit more and that then will make sure that the grass doesn't grow through and into that tree and so while that sapling grows it won't get impeded by any extra grass or weeds and it will have retain the moisture because that mouse will give it extra moisture and you got will won't let it dry out as much planting in winter in this region the subtropics also helps too so then I'll go ahead and I lined them all up like I was saying I'm a little bit that studious when it comes to making sure I get my rows right even though I there's going to come a time where I've got to start planting in between rows but anyway that's another story but I then start going and I plant those six trees or saplings in those holes and keep mulching that one bag of small supply below get about five fruit trees so it goes quite a long way one of those one of those bags so it's fairly economical and it's a good thing first one row planted good it is about exposing out maybe like a 3/4 you know go around the corner here and I'm going to OB I'll be planting plants all the way along here but just in this corner I'm planting that mulberry because it will match that mulberry there and the one up the top so they'll be sort of like a triangle on mulberries in a similar area I think it'll look nice too mole Roos opening up as you come through down into the picnic area but like I said I'll just do one row behind the compost heap and the banana trees I don't think I'll go down further because then you're getting to this bush land where we've got the chicken area and the big gum trees and natives and the picnic area I don't want to encroach too much on that I think one more row will do and if I buy more fruit trees I'll just start squeezing I'm in the gaps around here around the orchard and out the front around planting some more citrus or at the side and that front as well so yeah I get onto this mulberry and then I'll move up to the citrus of the top right hand side plant them near the apple trees and the avocado tree near there yeah at this point in time I've probably dug for two hours or more which is a fair that we're digging and it's good for the shoulders I love citrus it's one of my favorite fruit trees if not the favorite type of variety there's four there in the middle I'm going to plant a tangerine that's why there's a gap but I'm expecting that strip of fruit tree is getting the afternoon Sun should do really well in that spike and be a really nice feature along that driveway well I hope you enjoyed that video I've got lots of videos in the pipeline at the moment and I'm working on some that are more complicated and probably more informative but I just wanted to knock this one up and send it out this weekend so that you guys have a little bit to chew on thanks for watching don't forget the website self-abusive me calm bye for now [Music]


 
134
Views

Grow Vegetables in Your Lawn or Grassed Backyard - Plus Other Gardening Tips

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 134 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


you say do you see me I'm mark from self-sufficient me and this is my backyard here's the vegetable garden on the right hand side you can probably see a little bit of the orchard on the Left I'm standing right next to this beautiful asparagus fern I've left it grow at the end of summer so that it could get some energy into its root ball it'll die right back now over winter and then I'll give it a good chop down right to the base most within bit of fertilizer and in spring it will reshoot like Ayub uu and give us more asparagus spears through spring and summer but that's not what this video is about this video is about harvesting greens and veggies from our own lawn so it sounds extreme doesn't it and I'm not I'm a bit cheeky buyer by saying you know growing your vegetables in your lawn but in fact I really do do it now here as I'm just walking along I see vegetables and salad crops everywhere and I'm not talking about the grass I know you can eat grass and personally I'm not a big fan of it no matter how much better you put on it now I've got a nice little Asian green here this is a like a mizzu and how that happens is I'll harvest some vegetables from the garden and I'll leave one or two plants go to seed like the soccer here for example you can see all these seed pods I don't need all those seed either sometimes I could only need one pod and that'll do me then the rest of them inevitably gets strewn in the vegetable garden or I might pull the plants out throws our plant here and when I mow the grass I will run over those seeds and scare them everywhere all over the lawn now you'd think hard no mark you're going to have vegetables and stuff and weeds coming up or through your lawn of of course that doesn't happen because the grass out completes any weed or any or most weeds anyway sometimes the clove it might come in through winter but the grass will out-compete just about every anyway so it doesn't matter but what happens though at this time of year through our winter the salad crops and the brassicas like your cabbages and your broccoli your Chinese greens like your bok choy they out-compete the grass because the grass goes dormant it doesn't go fully dormant but it does go dormant enough that it grows really really slowly and the salad crops can out-compete the grass isn't that cool so most of the time I'm not even sowing seeds from one year to the next I'm walking around my lawn looking for little seedlings I can do two things I can harvest them and plant them back into the garden or I can harvest them and we can eat them baby greens they're great in salads they're great in stir-fries in cooking sandwiches whatever they're just walking around my vegetable garden I've got Tomatoes beans I've got some coriander and some dill that I've planted that was self seeded somewhere else in the garden I've even had turmeric now this turmeric he is dying off I've even had that growing in the lawn and was able to harvest it and that was part of this last crop ear this matter of turmeric that I've grown I can't think of many greens at all or plants that don't sell seed and I think that's one of the most important things I want to get across in this video not me being a smartass and saying oh look I can grow greens in the lawn what I want to get across is like your plants go to seed yeah sure harvest most of them but leave one broccoli go to seed leave one Chinese cabbage bok choy leave it go to seed and see how they come up even harvesting them and throwing them in the compost once that seed pot is fully formed and gone brown when you use your compass in the garden you might find that a few seedlings will come up there's another really great thing about leaving plants go to seed and that is adaptation and like I said to you at the beginning a lot of my salad crops and other types of greens they will come up through winter even herbs like dill and coriander very rarely see them cart through summer they tend to get into a groove where they come up just at the right time and that means they'll grow best as well so they know when to come up and over time those plants tend to do better than say a seedling that you get or a seed that you get that's been adapted or slightly adapted to different conditions here's another bok choy all the way up here there you go well that'll be good for dinner tonight I hope you enjoyed that video I don't like I said I don't want to be a smart aleck in' and say look you can grow vegetables in your lawn I'm just saying that let your plants go to seed and be a bit willy-nilly sometimes about it and you might be surprised what comes up at the exact right time of year that you can harvest to eat or plant back into the veggie garden thanks a lot for watching don't forget the website self submission me calm bye for now [Music] [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:


you say do you see me I'm mark from self-sufficient me and this is my backyard here's the vegetable garden on the right hand side you can probably see a little bit of the orchard on the Left I'm standing right next to this beautiful asparagus fern I've left it grow at the end of summer so that it could get some energy into its root ball it'll die right back now over winter and then I'll give it a good chop down right to the base most within bit of fertilizer and in spring it will reshoot like Ayub uu and give us more asparagus spears through spring and summer but that's not what this video is about this video is about harvesting greens and veggies from our own lawn so it sounds extreme doesn't it and I'm not I'm a bit cheeky buyer by saying you know growing your vegetables in your lawn but in fact I really do do it now here as I'm just walking along I see vegetables and salad crops everywhere and I'm not talking about the grass I know you can eat grass and personally I'm not a big fan of it no matter how much better you put on it now I've got a nice little Asian green here this is a like a mizzu and how that happens is I'll harvest some vegetables from the garden and I'll leave one or two plants go to seed like the soccer here for example you can see all these seed pods I don't need all those seed either sometimes I could only need one pod and that'll do me then the rest of them inevitably gets strewn in the vegetable garden or I might pull the plants out throws our plant here and when I mow the grass I will run over those seeds and scare them everywhere all over the lawn now you'd think hard no mark you're going to have vegetables and stuff and weeds coming up or through your lawn of of course that doesn't happen because the grass out completes any weed or any or most weeds anyway sometimes the clove it might come in through winter but the grass will out-compete just about every anyway so it doesn't matter but what happens though at this time of year through our winter the salad crops and the brassicas like your cabbages and your broccoli your Chinese greens like your bok choy they out-compete the grass because the grass goes dormant it doesn't go fully dormant but it does go dormant enough that it grows really really slowly and the salad crops can out-compete the grass isn't that cool so most of the time I'm not even sowing seeds from one year to the next I'm walking around my lawn looking for little seedlings I can do two things I can harvest them and plant them back into the garden or I can harvest them and we can eat them baby greens they're great in salads they're great in stir-fries in cooking sandwiches whatever they're just walking around my vegetable garden I've got Tomatoes beans I've got some coriander and some dill that I've planted that was self seeded somewhere else in the garden I've even had turmeric now this turmeric he is dying off I've even had that growing in the lawn and was able to harvest it and that was part of this last crop ear this matter of turmeric that I've grown I can't think of many greens at all or plants that don't sell seed and I think that's one of the most important things I want to get across in this video not me being a smartass and saying oh look I can grow greens in the lawn what I want to get across is like your plants go to seed yeah sure harvest most of them but leave one broccoli go to seed leave one Chinese cabbage bok choy leave it go to seed and see how they come up even harvesting them and throwing them in the compost once that seed pot is fully formed and gone brown when you use your compass in the garden you might find that a few seedlings will come up there's another really great thing about leaving plants go to seed and that is adaptation and like I said to you at the beginning a lot of my salad crops and other types of greens they will come up through winter even herbs like dill and coriander very rarely see them cart through summer they tend to get into a groove where they come up just at the right time and that means they'll grow best as well so they know when to come up and over time those plants tend to do better than say a seedling that you get or a seed that you get that's been adapted or slightly adapted to different conditions here's another bok choy all the way up here there you go well that'll be good for dinner tonight I hope you enjoyed that video I don't like I said I don't want to be a smart aleck in' and say look you can grow vegetables in your lawn I'm just saying that let your plants go to seed and be a bit willy-nilly sometimes about it and you might be surprised what comes up at the exact right time of year that you can harvest to eat or plant back into the veggie garden thanks a lot for watching don't forget the website self submission me calm bye for now [Music] [Music]

151
Views

How to manage unwanted weeds and grasses in vegetable garden beds.

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 151 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


get a unlike from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to show you guys a special technique I use to rest our garden beds and at the same time cool off weeds and grasses and seeds so I'm going to move that tarp and I'm going to put it over here over this bed one of my oldest garden beds in this patch that's become overgrown with nut weed grasses weeds or nut grass I should say that grass money down then end all sorts of grasses and weeds have gone to seed and I'm going to do the same going to take that top and put it across here a lot of these weeds came up through the manure that I spread throughout this bed about 12 month or so ago got a whole lot of horse meal was infested with weeds before I cover this bed I'm going to look for any little plants that have come up that I can salvage now I'd take this one this mustard this is sort of loose leaf mustard but I've got plenty of that going around so that's not that's not a drama here's a weed that's going to seed I'll just pull that out and chuck it I've already done that with some of these cobblers pegs here that weed there I got to get that out of the garden otherwise those seeds will just fall into the garden bed and come up as soon as I remove the top and that grows all year round that damn thing there's more of that mustard in there but there's also and I've saw this before dill coming up because of the weather is cooling down it's dill season and I always that me our dill go to seed and the last few seasons has been growing in this front bed here and so I knew that we're going to have dill coming up and I want to cover this bed over and not have any deal this year or have to replant seed our Mazel grab some of the seedlings that have come up now and replant them around in the other garden beds that are prepared so that we've got dill coming on so that's what I'll do I'll carefully remove some of these seedlings take out a bit of soil with them and and replant them this climbing spinach I'll probably just leave it sit up there and those seeds will dry out you can see some of my finger here those berries are edible by the way but fairly tasteless but what they are good for is colouring things like you could color a cake icing sugar you could color eggs pickled eggs and all types of things purple without you know using chemicals or additives yeah so this as well a little coriander plant coming up again as the weather cools down we have this coriander starts coming up and I'll salvage that little seedling as well and plant it alongside the dill probably and I've got this eggplant that was self seeded in the corner here along with this tomato this is a bush tomato a lot of people use a four-seat for root stock and graft other tomato plants on top because it's a vigorous but the tomatoes themselves are beautiful yes they're tiny but it will readily seed and grow all year in this climate whereas the larger come up Tomatoes won't even the larger cherry tomatoes struggling in the heat eggplant is unusual for it to go into winter the seedling came up at the right time and this plant is going strong even though we're coming into winter which is good they all might get some eggplant through winter here so I won't I'll try a weed around it as much as I can and I'll cover the whole bed except for that little corner and see how that eggplant goes once that plants finished then I'll cover it fully over so yeah that's what I want to do first before I cover is remove any plants that I can salvage and then as you can see this is this nut grass is really thick and ugly and you can pull this out as much as you like but it'll just break off as I see that's nut ball at the end here and what happens is this sends out a whole heap of other root systems and rhyme zones and more nuts form and then the plant forms from that so you pull it out and there's nuts in the ground still and it will free shoot the best way to do it is to cover the bed smother it and kill it off over several months so that it keeps trying to shoot and that eventually it'll just die out and that's the way to go and all that greenery and weeds will turn into compost to be eaten by worms all right so let's have a look at this bed now it's done the job that tarp there's nothing living underneath here it's all died down few things still trying to sprout soil underneath looks pretty good yeah that's what I was after that effect this is where I had the sweet potato and I was trying to kill that off in this bed it's still still rerouting here but I can easily dig that up now and get rid of it I don't want to growing in here anymore and I'm going to refurbish this bed after I stick the tarp down the front bed I'll refurbish this with some fresh manure that I've got that I've had sitting down the back there we're not freshmen yeah good composted manure that I've had composting in a heap for good six months be on the back here will whack that on there and some compost as well and other stuff and really bring this bed up and then I'll Mull fitting and we can turn this into a really nice winter's bed perhaps and grow some winter veggies in here but now my aim is to get this tarp on the front bed up here and smother out all that once I get the plants that I want out of that bed [Music] [Music] [Music] there we go all done nice and neat laid down so that we might pick it up that will work well we've got to do a bit of edging around the bottom knee otherwise and it could be with that not quite long enough so I use that shade cloth I'd be in there you know what I prefer that material I'm going to get a big roll of it about all of them 80 metres roll or something maybe this'll add maybe 40 or something and I'm gonna just use shade cloth maybe doubled over but I like shade cloth set it in half simply because it allows the rain and moisture through to do and all that and I think that's better for the microbes and wounds on the knee however the reason I like this tarp is because if the weed killer when the Sun even through winter when the Sun heats up on that tarp it permeates through into that bed and that's where it kills off the weed temperature gets very high on top of the worms migrate down the bottom and when the worms and microbes migrate down to the bottom because it's too hot obviously the the weed seeds can't and they get fried on top there and that's what I did to the other bed and that's why it'll be a good growing bed just reason it'll throw weaves in its back bed that I've taken this tarp off and put it on the front one but it'll have less weeds than what it otherwise would have had if I tried to hand weed it and refurbish the bed this way you're giving the better rest at the same time you're killing off weeds and the types of grasses that are really difficult to kill off that keep coming up now the grass will keep coming up that nut grass but it'll eventually have to die because they'll get no Sun and nothing no Sun not even water in some parts so this is a really good method an organic method to refurbish give them a rest at the same time protect it from extra weeds growing in it and all those weeds that are were underneath it sort of be pulling them out so will now die off and turn into compost and seed for the microbes and worms now you might have been hearing some noise in the background with water dropping things like I've got some parrots that are sitting on my roof having a bath in the gutter and we use about them making a racket while I'm trying to talk to you guys that's just annoying hey there's a bit of a low point in the gutter then from water clicks and that's come for some of the birds have a bath well I hope you enjoyed that video just another laid-back one showing how I work my garden beds I consider food gardening a very important part of my life and I'm glad that I'm able to share some of the things I do in the garden with you guys if you like this video give it a thumbs up and of course subscribe for more thanks for getting website self-sufficient me calm bye for now [Music] you [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


get a unlike from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to show you guys a special technique I use to rest our garden beds and at the same time cool off weeds and grasses and seeds so I'm going to move that tarp and I'm going to put it over here over this bed one of my oldest garden beds in this patch that's become overgrown with nut weed grasses weeds or nut grass I should say that grass money down then end all sorts of grasses and weeds have gone to seed and I'm going to do the same going to take that top and put it across here a lot of these weeds came up through the manure that I spread throughout this bed about 12 month or so ago got a whole lot of horse meal was infested with weeds before I cover this bed I'm going to look for any little plants that have come up that I can salvage now I'd take this one this mustard this is sort of loose leaf mustard but I've got plenty of that going around so that's not that's not a drama here's a weed that's going to seed I'll just pull that out and chuck it I've already done that with some of these cobblers pegs here that weed there I got to get that out of the garden otherwise those seeds will just fall into the garden bed and come up as soon as I remove the top and that grows all year round that damn thing there's more of that mustard in there but there's also and I've saw this before dill coming up because of the weather is cooling down it's dill season and I always that me our dill go to seed and the last few seasons has been growing in this front bed here and so I knew that we're going to have dill coming up and I want to cover this bed over and not have any deal this year or have to replant seed our Mazel grab some of the seedlings that have come up now and replant them around in the other garden beds that are prepared so that we've got dill coming on so that's what I'll do I'll carefully remove some of these seedlings take out a bit of soil with them and and replant them this climbing spinach I'll probably just leave it sit up there and those seeds will dry out you can see some of my finger here those berries are edible by the way but fairly tasteless but what they are good for is colouring things like you could color a cake icing sugar you could color eggs pickled eggs and all types of things purple without you know using chemicals or additives yeah so this as well a little coriander plant coming up again as the weather cools down we have this coriander starts coming up and I'll salvage that little seedling as well and plant it alongside the dill probably and I've got this eggplant that was self seeded in the corner here along with this tomato this is a bush tomato a lot of people use a four-seat for root stock and graft other tomato plants on top because it's a vigorous but the tomatoes themselves are beautiful yes they're tiny but it will readily seed and grow all year in this climate whereas the larger come up Tomatoes won't even the larger cherry tomatoes struggling in the heat eggplant is unusual for it to go into winter the seedling came up at the right time and this plant is going strong even though we're coming into winter which is good they all might get some eggplant through winter here so I won't I'll try a weed around it as much as I can and I'll cover the whole bed except for that little corner and see how that eggplant goes once that plants finished then I'll cover it fully over so yeah that's what I want to do first before I cover is remove any plants that I can salvage and then as you can see this is this nut grass is really thick and ugly and you can pull this out as much as you like but it'll just break off as I see that's nut ball at the end here and what happens is this sends out a whole heap of other root systems and rhyme zones and more nuts form and then the plant forms from that so you pull it out and there's nuts in the ground still and it will free shoot the best way to do it is to cover the bed smother it and kill it off over several months so that it keeps trying to shoot and that eventually it'll just die out and that's the way to go and all that greenery and weeds will turn into compost to be eaten by worms all right so let's have a look at this bed now it's done the job that tarp there's nothing living underneath here it's all died down few things still trying to sprout soil underneath looks pretty good yeah that's what I was after that effect this is where I had the sweet potato and I was trying to kill that off in this bed it's still still rerouting here but I can easily dig that up now and get rid of it I don't want to growing in here anymore and I'm going to refurbish this bed after I stick the tarp down the front bed I'll refurbish this with some fresh manure that I've got that I've had sitting down the back there we're not freshmen yeah good composted manure that I've had composting in a heap for good six months be on the back here will whack that on there and some compost as well and other stuff and really bring this bed up and then I'll Mull fitting and we can turn this into a really nice winter's bed perhaps and grow some winter veggies in here but now my aim is to get this tarp on the front bed up here and smother out all that once I get the plants that I want out of that bed [Music] [Music] [Music] there we go all done nice and neat laid down so that we might pick it up that will work well we've got to do a bit of edging around the bottom knee otherwise and it could be with that not quite long enough so I use that shade cloth I'd be in there you know what I prefer that material I'm going to get a big roll of it about all of them 80 metres roll or something maybe this'll add maybe 40 or something and I'm gonna just use shade cloth maybe doubled over but I like shade cloth set it in half simply because it allows the rain and moisture through to do and all that and I think that's better for the microbes and wounds on the knee however the reason I like this tarp is because if the weed killer when the Sun even through winter when the Sun heats up on that tarp it permeates through into that bed and that's where it kills off the weed temperature gets very high on top of the worms migrate down the bottom and when the worms and microbes migrate down to the bottom because it's too hot obviously the the weed seeds can't and they get fried on top there and that's what I did to the other bed and that's why it'll be a good growing bed just reason it'll throw weaves in its back bed that I've taken this tarp off and put it on the front one but it'll have less weeds than what it otherwise would have had if I tried to hand weed it and refurbish the bed this way you're giving the better rest at the same time you're killing off weeds and the types of grasses that are really difficult to kill off that keep coming up now the grass will keep coming up that nut grass but it'll eventually have to die because they'll get no Sun and nothing no Sun not even water in some parts so this is a really good method an organic method to refurbish give them a rest at the same time protect it from extra weeds growing in it and all those weeds that are were underneath it sort of be pulling them out so will now die off and turn into compost and seed for the microbes and worms now you might have been hearing some noise in the background with water dropping things like I've got some parrots that are sitting on my roof having a bath in the gutter and we use about them making a racket while I'm trying to talk to you guys that's just annoying hey there's a bit of a low point in the gutter then from water clicks and that's come for some of the birds have a bath well I hope you enjoyed that video just another laid-back one showing how I work my garden beds I consider food gardening a very important part of my life and I'm glad that I'm able to share some of the things I do in the garden with you guys if you like this video give it a thumbs up and of course subscribe for more thanks for getting website self-sufficient me calm bye for now [Music] you [Music]


 
217
Views

Why Aren't My Quail Laying Eggs Plus Coturnix Update

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 217 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:
 


today I'm Microsoft's official me and I'm holding a quail egg that's because I'm down the back here in our quail pen and it's pretty gloomy so I'm I'm hopeful this video will come out okay the reason why it's gloomy is because we're in winter here well we're not quite in winter yet it's just on the edge of winter late throws of autumn coming into winter and the weather is what I sort of want to talk to you guys about today in regards to quails laying eggs and after that I'll give you a bit of a general update on like while keeping now in the background you might hear the Ducks going off that's because they're coming back from the dam and they want to have a feed and I'm here annoying them because I'm even though I'm in this cloud pen I'm a few meters away from their feed bin so they're working up the courage to try to come into the chicken and duck pen and and have a feed of their funny animals but anyway let's get straight into it all right so it looks like the Ducks have gone down to the dam and left being peace which makes it a lot easier speak I can tell you so I did a bit of a hunt and I only found one quail egg and there's a good reason for that we're coming into winter and quail don't generally lay through the winter months now the reason why I really wanted to do this video and pretty quickly was because I'd been getting quite a few messages over the last two or three weeks saying mark what's going on my quail will stop lying they're expecting eggs out of these young adults six to nine weeks old and there's no eggs coming and they're thinking has something gone wrong during the breeding process have I got sterile hens or something or or what's happened but really that's just a matter of chance because if you've read quail up and they're coming into adulthood they're not going to probably lay not just because of the cold in fact it's not because the coal is all it's because of the daylight hours quail like good long daylight hours at least around 12 or more hours of daylight to bring on their line when we to comes obviously the daylight hours are shorter and the quail stop laying this is a good thing because it gives the quail a rest so I'm happy to find only just one egg because it means that they're coming into their natural cycle they've stopped laying they're still eating lots and drinking heaps they're actually fattening up a little and even though this is my breeding stock I'm quite happy for them not to be laying at all for the next three months at the start of the spring they'll start laying eggs and they'll be legs all over the ground here but for the next three months or more I'm quite happy for them just to chill out rejuvenate their body this little egg here might look quite small it's about you know three four times smaller than a chicken egg however when you think about it a chicken egg compared to a quail egg isn't much of a difference but a Clio at about 250 to 300 grams max is quite a lot smaller than a chicken it's a bit like a chicken laying an emu egg if you could use that analogy that's a big egg for a little bird to lay and it's good for them to have a break commercial outfits they just put on extra lighting in the quail shed and they will if not keep the lights on 24 hours they will at least make 17 or so 18 hours of light and so the quail continue to lay that the problem with that is those quails just pretty much later death their lifespan is a lot shorter and I would argue that their life isn't as fulfilling because it's not natural for them just to continue allele a main point I wanted to say is don't be too concerned if your quail have gone off the light particularly if it's coming into the cooler month for coming into winter because that's quite normal personally just for humane sake and for good quality eggs as a backyard breeder I'd recommend you let your quail have a break because then your breeders in the new season will be stronger they'll lay better eggs I'll be better quality and you'll have better hatching ray and a lot more benefits you'll get longevity out of your good quail breeders so you'll get perhaps 12 months or two years more than you would if you've made them late continuously it's best incubating quail eggs when the weather is a little bit more milder anyway you incubate doesn't have to work as hard it's easier to brood the little chicks of course there are other reasons why cryolite and lay they might have got a fright they might have in a hawk in the area it might have been a fox or an animal that's given them a fright and they make off the lay for a few weeks if they've been dressed or if you've transported on well if you've got purchased some adult quail and they've come into a new location they may take several weeks to settle also they might offer layer so being infested with lights or mics in particular mites will weaken the birds so check for that but generally quail a pretty good layers now just a quick update on my koala pen and what's happening so yes it's come it's coming into winter so I'm not getting many eggs that's cool I've got about fourteen quail at the moment I lost about three or four coming into well when it just started to get a bit cooler and that's normal quail sometimes the old earth breeders will drop off the perch particularly as the weather gets cooler because they aren't is stronger and it's normal for me to lose a few Birds coming in to winter overall they're all quite healthy the mulch is starting to wear down although not as much as I expected remember if you watch me closely I put a wood chip mulch in here and was interested to see how that would break down well it's not breaking down little it's certainly covered in poop and everything and but it still got some big chunks in there and it hasn't sort of broken down as much as say a hay or straw or or sugar cane Moss would break down put it that way but I'm still pretty happy with the results and that's going to go into the garden and do very well for my plans I'll probably change it maybe in a couple of weeks maybe a month scoop it all up and give the whole pin a good refurbish but yeah I think that'll do for me I'll leave these these fourteen or so birds rest over the winter months and then really hooking to my breeding come our spring in September what I want to do then is breathe a whole heap up which of them and when we butcher them for food I want to show you guys that process again even though I've done videos on it before you might do it slightly different from sort of pen to the plate type scene show you how I cook them up show you some special recipes that I've got for quail I think that'd be good this coming spring that's the medium to long term plan of what I'd like to show you guys as far as this channel is concerned anyway the sun's going down so I hope you enjoyed this video give it a thumbs up if you did don't forget to share it thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:
 


today I'm Microsoft's official me and I'm holding a quail egg that's because I'm down the back here in our quail pen and it's pretty gloomy so I'm I'm hopeful this video will come out okay the reason why it's gloomy is because we're in winter here well we're not quite in winter yet it's just on the edge of winter late throws of autumn coming into winter and the weather is what I sort of want to talk to you guys about today in regards to quails laying eggs and after that I'll give you a bit of a general update on like while keeping now in the background you might hear the Ducks going off that's because they're coming back from the dam and they want to have a feed and I'm here annoying them because I'm even though I'm in this cloud pen I'm a few meters away from their feed bin so they're working up the courage to try to come into the chicken and duck pen and and have a feed of their funny animals but anyway let's get straight into it all right so it looks like the Ducks have gone down to the dam and left being peace which makes it a lot easier speak I can tell you so I did a bit of a hunt and I only found one quail egg and there's a good reason for that we're coming into winter and quail don't generally lay through the winter months now the reason why I really wanted to do this video and pretty quickly was because I'd been getting quite a few messages over the last two or three weeks saying mark what's going on my quail will stop lying they're expecting eggs out of these young adults six to nine weeks old and there's no eggs coming and they're thinking has something gone wrong during the breeding process have I got sterile hens or something or or what's happened but really that's just a matter of chance because if you've read quail up and they're coming into adulthood they're not going to probably lay not just because of the cold in fact it's not because the coal is all it's because of the daylight hours quail like good long daylight hours at least around 12 or more hours of daylight to bring on their line when we to comes obviously the daylight hours are shorter and the quail stop laying this is a good thing because it gives the quail a rest so I'm happy to find only just one egg because it means that they're coming into their natural cycle they've stopped laying they're still eating lots and drinking heaps they're actually fattening up a little and even though this is my breeding stock I'm quite happy for them not to be laying at all for the next three months at the start of the spring they'll start laying eggs and they'll be legs all over the ground here but for the next three months or more I'm quite happy for them just to chill out rejuvenate their body this little egg here might look quite small it's about you know three four times smaller than a chicken egg however when you think about it a chicken egg compared to a quail egg isn't much of a difference but a Clio at about 250 to 300 grams max is quite a lot smaller than a chicken it's a bit like a chicken laying an emu egg if you could use that analogy that's a big egg for a little bird to lay and it's good for them to have a break commercial outfits they just put on extra lighting in the quail shed and they will if not keep the lights on 24 hours they will at least make 17 or so 18 hours of light and so the quail continue to lay that the problem with that is those quails just pretty much later death their lifespan is a lot shorter and I would argue that their life isn't as fulfilling because it's not natural for them just to continue allele a main point I wanted to say is don't be too concerned if your quail have gone off the light particularly if it's coming into the cooler month for coming into winter because that's quite normal personally just for humane sake and for good quality eggs as a backyard breeder I'd recommend you let your quail have a break because then your breeders in the new season will be stronger they'll lay better eggs I'll be better quality and you'll have better hatching ray and a lot more benefits you'll get longevity out of your good quail breeders so you'll get perhaps 12 months or two years more than you would if you've made them late continuously it's best incubating quail eggs when the weather is a little bit more milder anyway you incubate doesn't have to work as hard it's easier to brood the little chicks of course there are other reasons why cryolite and lay they might have got a fright they might have in a hawk in the area it might have been a fox or an animal that's given them a fright and they make off the lay for a few weeks if they've been dressed or if you've transported on well if you've got purchased some adult quail and they've come into a new location they may take several weeks to settle also they might offer layer so being infested with lights or mics in particular mites will weaken the birds so check for that but generally quail a pretty good layers now just a quick update on my koala pen and what's happening so yes it's come it's coming into winter so I'm not getting many eggs that's cool I've got about fourteen quail at the moment I lost about three or four coming into well when it just started to get a bit cooler and that's normal quail sometimes the old earth breeders will drop off the perch particularly as the weather gets cooler because they aren't is stronger and it's normal for me to lose a few Birds coming in to winter overall they're all quite healthy the mulch is starting to wear down although not as much as I expected remember if you watch me closely I put a wood chip mulch in here and was interested to see how that would break down well it's not breaking down little it's certainly covered in poop and everything and but it still got some big chunks in there and it hasn't sort of broken down as much as say a hay or straw or or sugar cane Moss would break down put it that way but I'm still pretty happy with the results and that's going to go into the garden and do very well for my plans I'll probably change it maybe in a couple of weeks maybe a month scoop it all up and give the whole pin a good refurbish but yeah I think that'll do for me I'll leave these these fourteen or so birds rest over the winter months and then really hooking to my breeding come our spring in September what I want to do then is breathe a whole heap up which of them and when we butcher them for food I want to show you guys that process again even though I've done videos on it before you might do it slightly different from sort of pen to the plate type scene show you how I cook them up show you some special recipes that I've got for quail I think that'd be good this coming spring that's the medium to long term plan of what I'd like to show you guys as far as this channel is concerned anyway the sun's going down so I hope you enjoyed this video give it a thumbs up if you did don't forget to share it thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]

159
Views

5 Tips How to Grow a Ton of Mint in one Container or Garden Bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 159 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to give you my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of mint in just one container tip number one location and contain mint grows and multiplies by horizontal runners that the plant sends out these runners they have nodes which readily route down and that essentially creates the new plants I made the mistake years ago and only once when I planted mint out into the general garden bed for the next 12 months it took over the whole backyard and I was spending hours trying to control it pull it out it just kept popping up everywhere it drove me nuts so for that reason I recommend growing mint in isolation whether it be in a large raised garden bed like this one or large container or a pot or in a separate rockery or a separate part of the garden where you know it can't escape as far as location goes mint is a very versatile plant it will grow well in full Sun and also part shade in a hot climate you might consider growing mint in a partly shaded positions just to protect it from the extreme heat because it doesn't like that a lot and if you're in a really cold climate I would strongly suggest you plant it out somewhere where it gets full Sun having said that though I do live in a hot climate subtropics and mink grows very well out in the full Sun for me tip number 2 prune your mint pruning your mint plant encourages new growth that is succulent rather than woody and tough succulent plump leaves and stems are much better in smoothies and cooking etc rather than the you know terrible tough and stringy stuff that you could get if you've just left it grow wild look you'll naturally prune your mint through the growing season anyway as you eat it but if you don't for some reason after a few weeks just remember to give it a clip around the edges give it a bit of a haircut and it'll love you for it you want to prune your mint heavily like I mean drastically that's what I do personally when it goes dormant for a cold climate mint usually goes dormant through winter in a warmer climate like mine the subtropics mint will go dormant through summer the hottest part of the year so yes I gained a traverse Atoll in that way where it will adapt to extreme conditions either way so whenever the plant is dormant that's when I give it a really harsh prune back I mean almost down to the roots and I get rid of all the woody growth all the old stuff and just prune it right back down to nothing almost tip number three feed your mint once with an organic fertilizer just a standard fertilizer is a store or from animals like your own chickens make sure it's not wet fresh poo as that could kill the plant it should be dry or composted down but whatever you use sprinkle it around the base of the plant and not on the leaves I reckon it's best to fertilize towards the end of that dormant stage just like I was talking about before or as the plant is just starting to shoot that could be in spring in some climates or coming into winter depending on what climate you're in now I feed my mint with just a small amount of organic fertilizer I just sprinkle it around the base of the plant because it's a hardy herb it doesn't need a whole lot of fertilizer in fact if you over fertilize it it could become leggy and stringy and not do very well at all also if you over fertilize it you could actually kill the plant and always remember after you've applied fertilizer give it a good water in the watering can or a hose to make sure that it's the fertilizer is watered right in well and it's also off the lead so it doesn't burn the lead tip number four water mint regularly now especially if you've got mint growing in a container that's got loose potting mix loose soil or types of sandy soil mix or in a sandy location make sure you water it regularly at least twice a week I would now if you're unsure if the plants getting enough water all you need to do is stick your finger in up to the first or second knuckle pull it out and have a feel if it's damp and wet well then the plant does need water if it's dry give it a drink real quick if your mint is growing in heavy conditions like a heavy soil or a clay well water it less obviously tip number five don't worry about pests and disease whatever you do don't spray your mint with pesticides or other chemicals it's really not required this is a solid crop it's a smoothie crop it's uh it's it's a leafy crop you don't want to be putting chemical residue on these leaves because it can be ingested so easily pests and disease can be kept under control with mint quite easily by just simply picking the pests off when you find them caterpillars and grasshoppers so they can be easily picked off or shoot away look they don't eat that much anyway as far as diseased leaves go that's the same goes through see any diseased leaves or door leaves with fungus on them just pick them off and throw them out in fact in tip number two regular pruning will help control a lot of the pests and diseases anyway by airing the plant out and letting it rejuvenate itself so that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of mint in just one container location and contain pruning fertilizer water and pests if you do all those five things right you will grow a ton of mint just like this and then you could do what you want you could make huge smoothies you could make big salads you could use it in cooking I tell you what in the comments section below leave your favorite way of using mint I look forward to reading them thanks a lot for watching don't forget the website self-sufficient Micom also give us a thumbs up and if you haven't subscribed subscribe already will ya bye for now [Music] [Music] by travelpod member [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to give you my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of mint in just one container tip number one location and contain mint grows and multiplies by horizontal runners that the plant sends out these runners they have nodes which readily route down and that essentially creates the new plants I made the mistake years ago and only once when I planted mint out into the general garden bed for the next 12 months it took over the whole backyard and I was spending hours trying to control it pull it out it just kept popping up everywhere it drove me nuts so for that reason I recommend growing mint in isolation whether it be in a large raised garden bed like this one or large container or a pot or in a separate rockery or a separate part of the garden where you know it can't escape as far as location goes mint is a very versatile plant it will grow well in full Sun and also part shade in a hot climate you might consider growing mint in a partly shaded positions just to protect it from the extreme heat because it doesn't like that a lot and if you're in a really cold climate I would strongly suggest you plant it out somewhere where it gets full Sun having said that though I do live in a hot climate subtropics and mink grows very well out in the full Sun for me tip number 2 prune your mint pruning your mint plant encourages new growth that is succulent rather than woody and tough succulent plump leaves and stems are much better in smoothies and cooking etc rather than the you know terrible tough and stringy stuff that you could get if you've just left it grow wild look you'll naturally prune your mint through the growing season anyway as you eat it but if you don't for some reason after a few weeks just remember to give it a clip around the edges give it a bit of a haircut and it'll love you for it you want to prune your mint heavily like I mean drastically that's what I do personally when it goes dormant for a cold climate mint usually goes dormant through winter in a warmer climate like mine the subtropics mint will go dormant through summer the hottest part of the year so yes I gained a traverse Atoll in that way where it will adapt to extreme conditions either way so whenever the plant is dormant that's when I give it a really harsh prune back I mean almost down to the roots and I get rid of all the woody growth all the old stuff and just prune it right back down to nothing almost tip number three feed your mint once with an organic fertilizer just a standard fertilizer is a store or from animals like your own chickens make sure it's not wet fresh poo as that could kill the plant it should be dry or composted down but whatever you use sprinkle it around the base of the plant and not on the leaves I reckon it's best to fertilize towards the end of that dormant stage just like I was talking about before or as the plant is just starting to shoot that could be in spring in some climates or coming into winter depending on what climate you're in now I feed my mint with just a small amount of organic fertilizer I just sprinkle it around the base of the plant because it's a hardy herb it doesn't need a whole lot of fertilizer in fact if you over fertilize it it could become leggy and stringy and not do very well at all also if you over fertilize it you could actually kill the plant and always remember after you've applied fertilizer give it a good water in the watering can or a hose to make sure that it's the fertilizer is watered right in well and it's also off the lead so it doesn't burn the lead tip number four water mint regularly now especially if you've got mint growing in a container that's got loose potting mix loose soil or types of sandy soil mix or in a sandy location make sure you water it regularly at least twice a week I would now if you're unsure if the plants getting enough water all you need to do is stick your finger in up to the first or second knuckle pull it out and have a feel if it's damp and wet well then the plant does need water if it's dry give it a drink real quick if your mint is growing in heavy conditions like a heavy soil or a clay well water it less obviously tip number five don't worry about pests and disease whatever you do don't spray your mint with pesticides or other chemicals it's really not required this is a solid crop it's a smoothie crop it's uh it's it's a leafy crop you don't want to be putting chemical residue on these leaves because it can be ingested so easily pests and disease can be kept under control with mint quite easily by just simply picking the pests off when you find them caterpillars and grasshoppers so they can be easily picked off or shoot away look they don't eat that much anyway as far as diseased leaves go that's the same goes through see any diseased leaves or door leaves with fungus on them just pick them off and throw them out in fact in tip number two regular pruning will help control a lot of the pests and diseases anyway by airing the plant out and letting it rejuvenate itself so that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of mint in just one container location and contain pruning fertilizer water and pests if you do all those five things right you will grow a ton of mint just like this and then you could do what you want you could make huge smoothies you could make big salads you could use it in cooking I tell you what in the comments section below leave your favorite way of using mint I look forward to reading them thanks a lot for watching don't forget the website self-sufficient Micom also give us a thumbs up and if you haven't subscribed subscribe already will ya bye for now [Music] [Music] by travelpod member [Music]


 
166
Views

How to Grow a Green Manure Crop From Weeds to Enrich Your Organic Garden Bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 166 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


say oppa didn't scare you I'm life and health recently and it's raining outside so I've got the camera in the shed and we're looking at the window beer I wanted to show you guys how I can turn a bunch of weeds into a really organic and fabulous manure green manure bed for your garden now let's get into it [Music] well a bit behind me here you can see through my shed window has already been refurbished what was in that bed was like a whole bunch of weeds now you know I hate we I am continuously weeding I'm continuously whinging about it in my garden but there are certain times when I lovely and I don't say that very often but the certain occasions where you can turn a whole bunch of leads into a very very profitable and cheap and great green manure for your garden especially vigils just love it and that's what I want to talk about over the rains not driving you're tuned up and I can't put a mic on either of them to wet them getting sake so you might have heard of green manures before and when gardeners and food gardens talked about green manure crops they usually talk about throwing a whole bunch of good plants like leftover seeds you might have a bunch of leftover fees or crops or mustard seed that you're not sure is viable and they're great to chucking to a garden bed leave them grow to about a foot or so high so that the plants are nice and lush but they're not getting too over brittle and then knocking them down and digging them back into the soil that's what most gardeners see but you can do the same thing with weeds so the reason why people say although we don't use lead for this type of revenuers is because generally certain weed plant are too leafy and not as sort of full of nitrogen and green some of them aren't a very fibrous and not very nice to dig into the garden and some go to seed real quick and a small and aren't worth it now I don't know this variety someone if you do work it in the comment section below of what variety of where it is so what I've done here first of all I've licked the weeds great I saw that there was a weed out first but the other thing that was happening in that bed was that was actually towards the end of its days I had grown several crops in there over the summer and it was probably good know nearly 12 months old thinks it's being properly refurbished so it needed refurbishing anyway that's the first thing the second thing is I could see it was a really good weed outbreak and I don't often say that about Lee a really good weed outbreak so it's covering a lot of a bit and are all growing at the same time monitoring it from seedling right up once I've identified the plants I want to keep and get rid of some that I don't I can then knock that down so I wait for the we to get a good height so that it's not too fibrous so that the leaves are all still lush but also that it has not gone to sea and that's very important last thing I want to do is grow a we let it all go to sea and then big that back into your bed because you are just going to be inundated with a million trillion weeds constantly in that garden then it's going to drive it up so you need to knock those plants down before it goes to sea so I'm not the plants down and then a hoe is really good for this because of how you can use as a digging in tool you can also use it as a scraper to scrape off the top scrape any other type of weed or anything that's like that like a clover for example that is grown underneath the leaves and you can really dig it in and scrape it and mix it up I don't think too deep I begin probably a hope death probably six or eight inches now just keep mixing that up and chopping and chopping and chopping until I get the garden bed that's all chopped in will mostly chopped in and I then try to even the bed out but I've got a good mix of greenery and dirt all mixed in together evenly throughout the garden bed once I've mixed it all in the last thing I do is I multiple e I use a good sugar cane most you can use a loose and if you want Lou seems a bit more expensive for some type of moss that doesn't have seeds in it of course and make sure it's organic you can also cover the bed if you don't want to Malta is it covered with shade cloth or something similar or a tarp what you're trying to do there is you're letting the worms and the microbes almost like compost if they are so it's going to compost that lush easy to digest ring than you are down and it's going to mix it in with that garden soil and that process is going to enrich that bed with nitrogen nutrients minerals and beautiful stuff all ready for your next crop usually in a few weeks or maybe a few months away the things on when you want to start planting I wouldn't plant immediately I'd probably leave it at least a couple of weeks and maybe even a month is best minimum two weeks I would say then you can start planting away and it's all for free you don't have to add an extra compost you can if you want to buy for all intents and purposes that bed is ready to go without too much extra additives to it the other good things about digging in green manure crops like this is it's good for the worms and microbes to have a healthy bed you want lots of animals in that bed because those animals tell the plants in lots of different ways they break down all that organic matter and they have a symbiotic relationship with the plants often if you've got trouble in your garden bed you've often got a lack of animals in that garden bed there's a lack of worms or the lack of microbes bacteria and all those type of things that's a sign that the bed is dead and there's not much life in it and thus the plants don't grow very well in it the other thing that green manure does is it adds body to the soil when you're pulling out plants and you're harvesting vegetables they're taking actual physical organic stuff out of the soil when you harvest the lettuce a little bit comes with it you take the roots off you put it in the compost heap you lose a little bit of that garden there so smashing your new whole heap of organic matter like that add body to that garden bed man's body to the soil and that way you don't have to keep adding extra soil from the garden center or anything like that you're building your own soil essentially so anyway if you're going any questions on making a green manure crop and digging it back into a garden bed let me know I'm happy to answer them put them in the comment section below don't forget to give a thumbs up if you enjoyed the video also share it that helps a lot bye for now oh just one other thing if you've got any other tips I'm not the be-all and end-all welcome in the comment section below and let everyone know what your garden tips are in regards to greening your pots [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:


say oppa didn't scare you I'm life and health recently and it's raining outside so I've got the camera in the shed and we're looking at the window beer I wanted to show you guys how I can turn a bunch of weeds into a really organic and fabulous manure green manure bed for your garden now let's get into it [Music] well a bit behind me here you can see through my shed window has already been refurbished what was in that bed was like a whole bunch of weeds now you know I hate we I am continuously weeding I'm continuously whinging about it in my garden but there are certain times when I lovely and I don't say that very often but the certain occasions where you can turn a whole bunch of leads into a very very profitable and cheap and great green manure for your garden especially vigils just love it and that's what I want to talk about over the rains not driving you're tuned up and I can't put a mic on either of them to wet them getting sake so you might have heard of green manures before and when gardeners and food gardens talked about green manure crops they usually talk about throwing a whole bunch of good plants like leftover seeds you might have a bunch of leftover fees or crops or mustard seed that you're not sure is viable and they're great to chucking to a garden bed leave them grow to about a foot or so high so that the plants are nice and lush but they're not getting too over brittle and then knocking them down and digging them back into the soil that's what most gardeners see but you can do the same thing with weeds so the reason why people say although we don't use lead for this type of revenuers is because generally certain weed plant are too leafy and not as sort of full of nitrogen and green some of them aren't a very fibrous and not very nice to dig into the garden and some go to seed real quick and a small and aren't worth it now I don't know this variety someone if you do work it in the comment section below of what variety of where it is so what I've done here first of all I've licked the weeds great I saw that there was a weed out first but the other thing that was happening in that bed was that was actually towards the end of its days I had grown several crops in there over the summer and it was probably good know nearly 12 months old thinks it's being properly refurbished so it needed refurbishing anyway that's the first thing the second thing is I could see it was a really good weed outbreak and I don't often say that about Lee a really good weed outbreak so it's covering a lot of a bit and are all growing at the same time monitoring it from seedling right up once I've identified the plants I want to keep and get rid of some that I don't I can then knock that down so I wait for the we to get a good height so that it's not too fibrous so that the leaves are all still lush but also that it has not gone to sea and that's very important last thing I want to do is grow a we let it all go to sea and then big that back into your bed because you are just going to be inundated with a million trillion weeds constantly in that garden then it's going to drive it up so you need to knock those plants down before it goes to sea so I'm not the plants down and then a hoe is really good for this because of how you can use as a digging in tool you can also use it as a scraper to scrape off the top scrape any other type of weed or anything that's like that like a clover for example that is grown underneath the leaves and you can really dig it in and scrape it and mix it up I don't think too deep I begin probably a hope death probably six or eight inches now just keep mixing that up and chopping and chopping and chopping until I get the garden bed that's all chopped in will mostly chopped in and I then try to even the bed out but I've got a good mix of greenery and dirt all mixed in together evenly throughout the garden bed once I've mixed it all in the last thing I do is I multiple e I use a good sugar cane most you can use a loose and if you want Lou seems a bit more expensive for some type of moss that doesn't have seeds in it of course and make sure it's organic you can also cover the bed if you don't want to Malta is it covered with shade cloth or something similar or a tarp what you're trying to do there is you're letting the worms and the microbes almost like compost if they are so it's going to compost that lush easy to digest ring than you are down and it's going to mix it in with that garden soil and that process is going to enrich that bed with nitrogen nutrients minerals and beautiful stuff all ready for your next crop usually in a few weeks or maybe a few months away the things on when you want to start planting I wouldn't plant immediately I'd probably leave it at least a couple of weeks and maybe even a month is best minimum two weeks I would say then you can start planting away and it's all for free you don't have to add an extra compost you can if you want to buy for all intents and purposes that bed is ready to go without too much extra additives to it the other good things about digging in green manure crops like this is it's good for the worms and microbes to have a healthy bed you want lots of animals in that bed because those animals tell the plants in lots of different ways they break down all that organic matter and they have a symbiotic relationship with the plants often if you've got trouble in your garden bed you've often got a lack of animals in that garden bed there's a lack of worms or the lack of microbes bacteria and all those type of things that's a sign that the bed is dead and there's not much life in it and thus the plants don't grow very well in it the other thing that green manure does is it adds body to the soil when you're pulling out plants and you're harvesting vegetables they're taking actual physical organic stuff out of the soil when you harvest the lettuce a little bit comes with it you take the roots off you put it in the compost heap you lose a little bit of that garden there so smashing your new whole heap of organic matter like that add body to that garden bed man's body to the soil and that way you don't have to keep adding extra soil from the garden center or anything like that you're building your own soil essentially so anyway if you're going any questions on making a green manure crop and digging it back into a garden bed let me know I'm happy to answer them put them in the comment section below don't forget to give a thumbs up if you enjoyed the video also share it that helps a lot bye for now oh just one other thing if you've got any other tips I'm not the be-all and end-all welcome in the comment section below and let everyone know what your garden tips are in regards to greening your pots [Music]

166
Views

Dragon Fruit Daytime Flower Plus Growing Tips How-to Pitaya

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 166 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


this is a real treat seeing a dragon fruit flower in the morning how gorgeous is this and look at the bees doing the business pollinating the fruit this is gorgeous absolutely gorgeous a wonder of nature what a magnificent flower as big well half the size of my head I've got a pretty big head and look how that bee is going in that flower right down the guts of it and that's then going to go all the way down and pollinate it's got to go all the way down this stem triggering the fruit or pollinating the fruit fertilizing the fruit I think you call it I'm no botanist I'm I'm shocking it this stuff but then that then once that gets that fertilization then it can grow if it doesn't get the fertilization it will only probably get to about this big that's not that's an unfertilized dragon fruit that's tiny small and that'll probably just die off and fall off and it might taste very good at all but if it does get pollinated it'll satin up and it'll become large like this a nice big fat dragon fruit which are over too great to eat now so I've showed that many times pollination of dragon fruit is fickle because often the flowers are dead by now like this is 8:00 in the morning probably because it's overcast and the conditions is perfect well then that's probably why that it's open like this but often the flowers only open at nighttime and where these dragon fruit plants come from the native to South America or Mexico I think don't quote me on that just yet I'll flush that up on the screen and here comes that B again and so we're their native I believe there's AB largemouth or other types of creatures that pull them out or a bat that pollinate these flowers through the night whereas in where I am it probably has to rely on things like ants and bees early morning or other insects crawling through it through the nighttime know perhaps bats might come here but I don't think you'd have as many native species attracted to these flowers through the night but in the daytime if they're opening in the daytime as you saw a bee will be attracted to the flower which is really great that's a bit of oh that needs to be trimmed back here this there's been a dragon fruit but this is really magnificent isn't it isn't it just terrific look at us you can see like I got fairly big hands and you can see the size of that flower many of you and it's starting to close and if you take into account the size of the these some no petals and more knuckle petals petals there but the outside of this flower you can see how huge it is just terrific it's real amazing look how long that that stem is that's the fruit forming on the vine there this is a yellow variety it's my favorite variety of dragon fruit to grow even though it's got the sort of the thorns the fruit is slightly sweeter than the big purple ones you see the yellow one has a fruit a yam or fruit here I suppose more effervescent type tastes but it's but it's a slightly sweeter taste and because some people can say going fruit can be a little bland but second watermelon idak in dragon fruit fruit tastes similar to watermelon but with a cross of kiwi fruit because we've got the small seeds that are quite edible and DNA notice them but that's the way I describe it but you can see you can see why it has trouble pollinating the fruit or fertilizing the fruit when you've got a the flowers rarely open through the day time and be you've got such a long way for that pulling together this flower will only it'll be dead by another few hours they only open once this is very rare to see you have to be at the right place the right time I was coming back from down the back there I was let the chickens out for the morning and I saw it you could search from a distance here's that be back I saw this you can see it from the from a distance they are so huge they just like the backyard up and I mean even if you don't get fruit out of these things just experiencing these in the flesh with your own eyeballs is just an amazing sight I remember once my wife got up she drew the curtains back and she looked into the backyard it was about 6:00 in the morning Sun was out and she said mark oh I just about shack myself I said wife should come here look at this and 60 meters away we looked down and there was three or four dragon fruit flowers opened at the same time it with the whole backyard up and it was a beautiful sight absolutely beautiful especially with the Sun behind them and other wonderful looking flowers so yeah even if you have trouble with the pollination which is always a difficult thing with dragon fruit there are people try to hand pollinate them and all sorts of things to try but I think a lot of the time you no matter what you do you hand pollinate them you got the bees and everything you can still run into trouble that it doesn't that the fruit doesn't get fertilized and it won't form but even if you just grow them for the flowers and just experiencing this lovely cactus itself which does like a good lot of rain to be honest it likes its water but even if you're just growing it for the ornamental value I like I need to trim off some of these older branches that's my fault and they look a lot better and they branch out more to I can show you I don't like to go away from that flower but I can show you over here I've been giving this one quite a bit of water and you can see how it's starting to branch out now if you find that they stopped growing or they're suffering more often than not they need more water they love lots of water for a cactus yes it will it will survive without water it's very drought tolerant but they will grow much better if you give them a whole lot of water and that was what was happening with this one it was drying out in this pot which I'm going to change I'm going to take get rid of that pot and make a larger raised bed and it was drying out in that pot so I ended up putting the sprinkler on it and watering it almost daily and then it just shot out and started growing all these new big stems which I have to start tying up and time back and making sure that they don't all just fall off but while I've got you here I was going to show you this separately but if you're going to try to grow make a new plant see how this stem is falling over it's falling over in US and this this one here is come straight up well what's happened is the stems fallen over and where the the join will look like the elbow joint see that where that is or the end of the dragon fruit vine or the elbow joint has hit the soil it's rooted down so if I can't pull that up that's rooted down and now a new plant is forming and that that would grow up if I left it there could put a post here good put a post there and then I'd read new dragon fruit plant would form from that and I could get rid of that stem that is that is called layering really that's like a form of layering where you pull down a branch or a stem from a tree and then it takes root and then you can cut cut away from the host plant or the mother plant and it'll grow up and make a new plant well you could layer it into another pot and then you could move it so I thought that was interesting that adieus did it itself but likewise you can just cut any of these off put it in a pot and make a new plant out of it it grows very easy from cuttings dragonfruit it grows very slowly but easily from seeds as well but the best way to grow dragon fruit is through cuttings in my opinion and yes a that is fallen over I've been mowing around it just to see how it went and that experiment was quite interesting and it has taken root now I can pull that up and replant it which I will do I'm going to going to pull that off and I'm going to put in a pot and replant it and make another plant out of that I'm not going to leave it there though but yeah that's getting away from the initial getting away from the initial flower that I was talking about but I could see it from from down the back there I was a good 40 meters away and it caught my eye that's whiteness look at it it's like a big trumpet well there you go that's the wonderful I just don't want to leave it but I'm I've got lots of work to do today so I'm going to have to leave it but that's the most fantastic dragon fruit flower I've said it many times before how wonderful they are but I haven't had the chance to show you guys footage through the day I've showed you it's opening at night and we've been through that video and how wonderful it is but I've never had the opportunity to really show you properly I'll show you a couple of buds that have closed through them by the time I've got to them but I haven't had a chance to show you almost fully open what this flower is like and I'm so glad that I was able to bring this to you so there you go thanks a lot for watching if you like the video give it a thumbs up share it because that helps a lot with the channel and inspires me to keep making more videos bye for now


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


this is a real treat seeing a dragon fruit flower in the morning how gorgeous is this and look at the bees doing the business pollinating the fruit this is gorgeous absolutely gorgeous a wonder of nature what a magnificent flower as big well half the size of my head I've got a pretty big head and look how that bee is going in that flower right down the guts of it and that's then going to go all the way down and pollinate it's got to go all the way down this stem triggering the fruit or pollinating the fruit fertilizing the fruit I think you call it I'm no botanist I'm I'm shocking it this stuff but then that then once that gets that fertilization then it can grow if it doesn't get the fertilization it will only probably get to about this big that's not that's an unfertilized dragon fruit that's tiny small and that'll probably just die off and fall off and it might taste very good at all but if it does get pollinated it'll satin up and it'll become large like this a nice big fat dragon fruit which are over too great to eat now so I've showed that many times pollination of dragon fruit is fickle because often the flowers are dead by now like this is 8:00 in the morning probably because it's overcast and the conditions is perfect well then that's probably why that it's open like this but often the flowers only open at nighttime and where these dragon fruit plants come from the native to South America or Mexico I think don't quote me on that just yet I'll flush that up on the screen and here comes that B again and so we're their native I believe there's AB largemouth or other types of creatures that pull them out or a bat that pollinate these flowers through the night whereas in where I am it probably has to rely on things like ants and bees early morning or other insects crawling through it through the nighttime know perhaps bats might come here but I don't think you'd have as many native species attracted to these flowers through the night but in the daytime if they're opening in the daytime as you saw a bee will be attracted to the flower which is really great that's a bit of oh that needs to be trimmed back here this there's been a dragon fruit but this is really magnificent isn't it isn't it just terrific look at us you can see like I got fairly big hands and you can see the size of that flower many of you and it's starting to close and if you take into account the size of the these some no petals and more knuckle petals petals there but the outside of this flower you can see how huge it is just terrific it's real amazing look how long that that stem is that's the fruit forming on the vine there this is a yellow variety it's my favorite variety of dragon fruit to grow even though it's got the sort of the thorns the fruit is slightly sweeter than the big purple ones you see the yellow one has a fruit a yam or fruit here I suppose more effervescent type tastes but it's but it's a slightly sweeter taste and because some people can say going fruit can be a little bland but second watermelon idak in dragon fruit fruit tastes similar to watermelon but with a cross of kiwi fruit because we've got the small seeds that are quite edible and DNA notice them but that's the way I describe it but you can see you can see why it has trouble pollinating the fruit or fertilizing the fruit when you've got a the flowers rarely open through the day time and be you've got such a long way for that pulling together this flower will only it'll be dead by another few hours they only open once this is very rare to see you have to be at the right place the right time I was coming back from down the back there I was let the chickens out for the morning and I saw it you could search from a distance here's that be back I saw this you can see it from the from a distance they are so huge they just like the backyard up and I mean even if you don't get fruit out of these things just experiencing these in the flesh with your own eyeballs is just an amazing sight I remember once my wife got up she drew the curtains back and she looked into the backyard it was about 6:00 in the morning Sun was out and she said mark oh I just about shack myself I said wife should come here look at this and 60 meters away we looked down and there was three or four dragon fruit flowers opened at the same time it with the whole backyard up and it was a beautiful sight absolutely beautiful especially with the Sun behind them and other wonderful looking flowers so yeah even if you have trouble with the pollination which is always a difficult thing with dragon fruit there are people try to hand pollinate them and all sorts of things to try but I think a lot of the time you no matter what you do you hand pollinate them you got the bees and everything you can still run into trouble that it doesn't that the fruit doesn't get fertilized and it won't form but even if you just grow them for the flowers and just experiencing this lovely cactus itself which does like a good lot of rain to be honest it likes its water but even if you're just growing it for the ornamental value I like I need to trim off some of these older branches that's my fault and they look a lot better and they branch out more to I can show you I don't like to go away from that flower but I can show you over here I've been giving this one quite a bit of water and you can see how it's starting to branch out now if you find that they stopped growing or they're suffering more often than not they need more water they love lots of water for a cactus yes it will it will survive without water it's very drought tolerant but they will grow much better if you give them a whole lot of water and that was what was happening with this one it was drying out in this pot which I'm going to change I'm going to take get rid of that pot and make a larger raised bed and it was drying out in that pot so I ended up putting the sprinkler on it and watering it almost daily and then it just shot out and started growing all these new big stems which I have to start tying up and time back and making sure that they don't all just fall off but while I've got you here I was going to show you this separately but if you're going to try to grow make a new plant see how this stem is falling over it's falling over in US and this this one here is come straight up well what's happened is the stems fallen over and where the the join will look like the elbow joint see that where that is or the end of the dragon fruit vine or the elbow joint has hit the soil it's rooted down so if I can't pull that up that's rooted down and now a new plant is forming and that that would grow up if I left it there could put a post here good put a post there and then I'd read new dragon fruit plant would form from that and I could get rid of that stem that is that is called layering really that's like a form of layering where you pull down a branch or a stem from a tree and then it takes root and then you can cut cut away from the host plant or the mother plant and it'll grow up and make a new plant well you could layer it into another pot and then you could move it so I thought that was interesting that adieus did it itself but likewise you can just cut any of these off put it in a pot and make a new plant out of it it grows very easy from cuttings dragonfruit it grows very slowly but easily from seeds as well but the best way to grow dragon fruit is through cuttings in my opinion and yes a that is fallen over I've been mowing around it just to see how it went and that experiment was quite interesting and it has taken root now I can pull that up and replant it which I will do I'm going to going to pull that off and I'm going to put in a pot and replant it and make another plant out of that I'm not going to leave it there though but yeah that's getting away from the initial getting away from the initial flower that I was talking about but I could see it from from down the back there I was a good 40 meters away and it caught my eye that's whiteness look at it it's like a big trumpet well there you go that's the wonderful I just don't want to leave it but I'm I've got lots of work to do today so I'm going to have to leave it but that's the most fantastic dragon fruit flower I've said it many times before how wonderful they are but I haven't had the chance to show you guys footage through the day I've showed you it's opening at night and we've been through that video and how wonderful it is but I've never had the opportunity to really show you properly I'll show you a couple of buds that have closed through them by the time I've got to them but I haven't had a chance to show you almost fully open what this flower is like and I'm so glad that I was able to bring this to you so there you go thanks a lot for watching if you like the video give it a thumbs up share it because that helps a lot with the channel and inspires me to keep making more videos bye for now


 
119
Views

Animal Proof Fruit to Grow in the Backyard - To Stop Birds & Critters Eating it

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 119 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

subtitle:


today I'm Mike from self-sufficient me and I wanted to show you guys a really special experiment that I've conducted all in the name of science except it's it's not very scientific but I'm quite excited to show you what I think is one of the world's most credible proof bird proof fruits to grow no netting required so let's get into it this is a dragon fruit vine growing up a trellis the vine itself has little spines that make it difficult for animals to climb but the real deterrent isn't the spines on the stem it's fine on the fruit itself [Music] after producing these massive gorgeous flowers the bass quickly forms into a thorn covered fruit and after several weeks it turns yellow signifying it's ready to eat what I did was leave the fruit on the vine for six whole months just to see if anything would eat it and nothing touched it which is unusual because I can't leave any fruit or any other fruit on the tree to ripen naturally without it getting in by something however what the animals haven't figured out is that you can just brush the spines off when it's ready to eat now in all honesty dragon fruit are best eaten when they first ripen you know within a few weeks but surprisingly this fruit tasted very good even though it was left on the vine ripe for so long Bon Appetit mmm wonderful the fruit the humans get and the animals don't well there you go the yellow spiny dragon proof in my view one of the most creative proof animal proof bird proof whatever you want to call it fruits that you can grow so I recommend growing it thanks a lot for watching if you like this video give it a thumbs up and also don't forget visit my blog visit my comm leave a comment down below bye for now I'll cheat


 
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subtitle:


today I'm Mike from self-sufficient me and I wanted to show you guys a really special experiment that I've conducted all in the name of science except it's it's not very scientific but I'm quite excited to show you what I think is one of the world's most credible proof bird proof fruits to grow no netting required so let's get into it this is a dragon fruit vine growing up a trellis the vine itself has little spines that make it difficult for animals to climb but the real deterrent isn't the spines on the stem it's fine on the fruit itself [Music] after producing these massive gorgeous flowers the bass quickly forms into a thorn covered fruit and after several weeks it turns yellow signifying it's ready to eat what I did was leave the fruit on the vine for six whole months just to see if anything would eat it and nothing touched it which is unusual because I can't leave any fruit or any other fruit on the tree to ripen naturally without it getting in by something however what the animals haven't figured out is that you can just brush the spines off when it's ready to eat now in all honesty dragon fruit are best eaten when they first ripen you know within a few weeks but surprisingly this fruit tasted very good even though it was left on the vine ripe for so long Bon Appetit mmm wonderful the fruit the humans get and the animals don't well there you go the yellow spiny dragon proof in my view one of the most creative proof animal proof bird proof whatever you want to call it fruits that you can grow so I recommend growing it thanks a lot for watching if you like this video give it a thumbs up and also don't forget visit my blog visit my comm leave a comment down below bye for now I'll cheat


 
 
146
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Try Growing Barbados Cherry for Hot Climates (low chill) How-to Superfood

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 146 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

subtitle:


get a unmarked from self-sufficiently and I wanted to do this impromptu video because I'm running out of time to show you this Barbados cherry tree there's a bit of a story behind us the fruit is just about ready to fall off the tree in fact some of them have and I wanted to do a taste test and let you guys know what I think of it first of all here's the tree here now it used to be a heck of a lot bigger but unfortunately this tree got a borer and it just about killed the whole tree off you can see I've cut it here this tree used to be a good head height 6 foot or so and probably 3 or 4 meters wide we used to get a ton of fruit off it was a fantastic tree we really loved the fruit it pained me when I saw it died in front of my eyes to my astonishment it reshoot 'add and it's fighting back hard and now I've got this mini Barbados cherry or other another name for it is the acerola or the West Indian cherry and there's a few other names as well it forms this really cool cherry you can eat them when they turn bright red but you can see here they've gone really dark like a dark genuine cherry see those third color the birds don't tend to eat these as much as well I expected they would you see the odd magpie the odd parrot grab hold of them but generally they don't they don't bother and I think that's great fruit fly in this part of the world will sting them occasionally but you don't see larvae developing them or the maggot developing them and I think that's good too I think they're just a little bit too acidic a bit like a cherry tomato a bit too acidic for the maggot to survive or hatch out so let's go ahead and have a taste of the Barbados cherry mmm insecurity and they typically have three small seeds not just one seeds three small seeds does have an acidic tang to it but it's delicious I'm trying to pull them all my mouth and then just spit all the seeds out how gross was that not God that tastes good and that apparently it's got something like a hundred times the vitamin C in a barbatus cherry then say a standard citrus like an orange or something like that don't quote me on it but that's what I've read and apart from that it's got a whole heap of other antioxidants making it a superfood I mean see if I can get a nice shot of it the sun's setting here so the sun's a bit harsh isn't it lovely that's a smaller one but they're generally about the size of this one here so just smaller then probably a standard cherry I can't tell you exactly what they taste like a little bit of grape flavor mixed with a citrus type of undertone and plum look at my dog or dogs eat see see them hears of them what are you doing skirts you egging them you want one good for you good boy there you go see and there's proof something I've been saying all along dogs love barbatus cherries and now you can hear them in the neighborhood all the dogs are starting to bark that's because they're jealous that he got one they didn't it's very ornamental looking it's a good hedging plant if you want to grow several in a row it's quite Hardy obviously susceptible to borås but as far as other insects go nothing really hits really that bad so it's a perfect substitute especially in a hot climate where you can't grow regular cherries because you don't have a chill factor in warmer climates this is a perfect cherry substitute thanks a lot for watching don't forget to give a thumbs up bye for now [Music] view all
 


subtitle:


get a unmarked from self-sufficiently and I wanted to do this impromptu video because I'm running out of time to show you this Barbados cherry tree there's a bit of a story behind us the fruit is just about ready to fall off the tree in fact some of them have and I wanted to do a taste test and let you guys know what I think of it first of all here's the tree here now it used to be a heck of a lot bigger but unfortunately this tree got a borer and it just about killed the whole tree off you can see I've cut it here this tree used to be a good head height 6 foot or so and probably 3 or 4 meters wide we used to get a ton of fruit off it was a fantastic tree we really loved the fruit it pained me when I saw it died in front of my eyes to my astonishment it reshoot 'add and it's fighting back hard and now I've got this mini Barbados cherry or other another name for it is the acerola or the West Indian cherry and there's a few other names as well it forms this really cool cherry you can eat them when they turn bright red but you can see here they've gone really dark like a dark genuine cherry see those third color the birds don't tend to eat these as much as well I expected they would you see the odd magpie the odd parrot grab hold of them but generally they don't they don't bother and I think that's great fruit fly in this part of the world will sting them occasionally but you don't see larvae developing them or the maggot developing them and I think that's good too I think they're just a little bit too acidic a bit like a cherry tomato a bit too acidic for the maggot to survive or hatch out so let's go ahead and have a taste of the Barbados cherry mmm insecurity and they typically have three small seeds not just one seeds three small seeds does have an acidic tang to it but it's delicious I'm trying to pull them all my mouth and then just spit all the seeds out how gross was that not God that tastes good and that apparently it's got something like a hundred times the vitamin C in a barbatus cherry then say a standard citrus like an orange or something like that don't quote me on it but that's what I've read and apart from that it's got a whole heap of other antioxidants making it a superfood I mean see if I can get a nice shot of it the sun's setting here so the sun's a bit harsh isn't it lovely that's a smaller one but they're generally about the size of this one here so just smaller then probably a standard cherry I can't tell you exactly what they taste like a little bit of grape flavor mixed with a citrus type of undertone and plum look at my dog or dogs eat see see them hears of them what are you doing skirts you egging them you want one good for you good boy there you go see and there's proof something I've been saying all along dogs love barbatus cherries and now you can hear them in the neighborhood all the dogs are starting to bark that's because they're jealous that he got one they didn't it's very ornamental looking it's a good hedging plant if you want to grow several in a row it's quite Hardy obviously susceptible to borås but as far as other insects go nothing really hits really that bad so it's a perfect substitute especially in a hot climate where you can't grow regular cherries because you don't have a chill factor in warmer climates this is a perfect cherry substitute thanks a lot for watching don't forget to give a thumbs up bye for now [Music]

126
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How to Easy Grow Sweet Potato With Lots of Tips

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 126 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

subtitle:


get a unlock from social visit me and in this video I want to show you guys how I grow sweet potato over the years I've learnt lots of tips and tricks and I want to pack them all into this video no particular order and show you guys exactly how I do it it's dead set easy now it's blowing a gale out here so what I'm going to do is voiceover in this video it'll make it easier for both of us so let's get into it so here I am in the patch I'm about to refurbish the bed and harvest some sweet potatoes I've been growing for about you know two to three months not a long time I can grow sweet potato in the one spot for years on end but in this particular case we've kind of been a few months it just grows wild at our place even in that bed there that we just saw with the blue tarp I try to I tried to kill it off in that particular part of a bed and a grew out the side and then at the back here it's growing like a ground cover you can walk all over it and it'll in and around those back garden beds there it just grows back and it doesn't get trampled down and it's actually quite a wonderful weed suppressant but it'll grow up as well like in this trellis example we used to grow it out the front then it took me ages to get out of our front bed but yeah it'll grow up a Traulsen look quite attractive wherever the vine goes it'll send down little runner roots and they will grow new tubers so it can be really difficult to get rid of if you've got a big garden and you just let it run wild but that is a bit of my thing I like to grow or what I call disperse gardening and just let plants go to seed and come up wherever see this to behere that's about the right size I love them about that size they're great too right there that's an example of the orange variety the one or two are bursting just here is the purple variety and they have a white flesh the orange variety which most people are used to has the orange flesh both are good to be honest I think the purple variety is more vigorous but I like the only variety for taste here's a really great example of how the vine has shut down a root and then created a tuber now when I go through the tubers that I've dug up if any a buggered like that one I'll just burn it straight back into the ground or replant it when I get the chance it's not worth eating but it'll certainly regrow very easily anything sort of over three inches and under seven inches or the size of a large cucumber is perfect I just think that that's about the best growing range because the flesh is nice and firm and it doesn't get too grainy when they get too big like I'll show you later they get way too grainy so once I've sorted it out I'm left with the whole heap of roots and smaller tubers and that's what I use to replant back into the next bed in this case I'm going to replant it back into the same bed you can do that for several times or several years in a row and then it's a good idea to move it away and find a new bed for your sweet potato otherwise they can start to attract pests and weevils and slugs and those type of things will start to ruin or the tubers so I just go through if the bed is a little hard well then I'll mash it up a bit because your soil is best for sweet potato when it's nice and loose so you potato will grow fine in heavy soil but they won't develop tubers very well and the tubers may in fact rot here I'm just adding a little bit of organic flooding bone to the bed you don't need to go crazy they need to over fertilize otherwise you'll just get a lot of leaf grace or not a lot of cheaver I like to mulch the bed nice and thick in this case it's sugar cane mulch and then I water it in make sure that sudden bonus fertilizers in washing that's pretty much it for the refurb of the bed I'm pretty happy with that little harvest after about you know 2 or 3 months that's going to be a good feed and whilst I can grow them a heck of a lot bigger let me tell you the bigger they get the more grainy and awful they taste so you can't be starving Kenya that's why I picked myself a couple of small sweet potato while I was out here while Nina was doing that corn just a couple of little ones that one there and this one here a couple of little sweet potatoes that should do us for dinner maybe one each and half of the kids so we don't go hungry through the big storm here in Brisbane well that was a bit of a retro clip taken some years ago when we used to grow the sweeps out the front there like that in the patch can you see the little pink flowers well what's interesting is sweet potato isn't related at all to standard potatoes it's in fact part of the morning glory family of plants which are known mainly for their tubular cone like pretty flowers not the tubers well I'm not finished with this bed yet this is going to seem really unorthodox but I'm now going to over plant over the top of this sweet potato things like tomatoes basil kale spinach and if you look here see those shoots coming through this is a bed that I planted earlier on just the same as what I did and demonstrate it before see that old mulch that old moles there was similar to the new mulch here and what will happen is that will all break down and all those plans for tomatoes they will all grow give crops be great and the sweet potato will slowly come through that mulch and eventually overtake that dead and when all those crops are gone the sweet potato will remain and then those cheeses will be ready to harvest in a few months after now in this bed here I mentioned earlier I tried to kill some sweet potato often the only reason I'm showing you this is to demonstrate how resilient it is so that you understand how easy it is to grow growing this plant the Orthodox way like putting a tuber on the kitchen sink in a glass of water and letting shoots come up and then planting those so that's all cool you could put it in a pot on its own you don't have to plant it about the plants and it'll grow very well in two or three months you'll have two burs there to harvest so see here's a great example of how resilient it is I've had that tarp over that bed for good six months and still it's reshooting it's just very difficult to kill off even if you want to in the subtropics sweet potato is probably one of the best weeds you can grow we can always find a sweet potato at our place when we need one that's for sure now check out this fella here look how odd it looks the potato that is not me something like this can be broken into several pieces and replanted back into the bed I hope you enjoyed that video on growing sweet potato if you liked it give it a thumbs up don't forget to subscribe and also visit my blog self-sufficient muqaam thanks for watching bye for now [Music]


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subtitle:


get a unlock from social visit me and in this video I want to show you guys how I grow sweet potato over the years I've learnt lots of tips and tricks and I want to pack them all into this video no particular order and show you guys exactly how I do it it's dead set easy now it's blowing a gale out here so what I'm going to do is voiceover in this video it'll make it easier for both of us so let's get into it so here I am in the patch I'm about to refurbish the bed and harvest some sweet potatoes I've been growing for about you know two to three months not a long time I can grow sweet potato in the one spot for years on end but in this particular case we've kind of been a few months it just grows wild at our place even in that bed there that we just saw with the blue tarp I try to I tried to kill it off in that particular part of a bed and a grew out the side and then at the back here it's growing like a ground cover you can walk all over it and it'll in and around those back garden beds there it just grows back and it doesn't get trampled down and it's actually quite a wonderful weed suppressant but it'll grow up as well like in this trellis example we used to grow it out the front then it took me ages to get out of our front bed but yeah it'll grow up a Traulsen look quite attractive wherever the vine goes it'll send down little runner roots and they will grow new tubers so it can be really difficult to get rid of if you've got a big garden and you just let it run wild but that is a bit of my thing I like to grow or what I call disperse gardening and just let plants go to seed and come up wherever see this to behere that's about the right size I love them about that size they're great too right there that's an example of the orange variety the one or two are bursting just here is the purple variety and they have a white flesh the orange variety which most people are used to has the orange flesh both are good to be honest I think the purple variety is more vigorous but I like the only variety for taste here's a really great example of how the vine has shut down a root and then created a tuber now when I go through the tubers that I've dug up if any a buggered like that one I'll just burn it straight back into the ground or replant it when I get the chance it's not worth eating but it'll certainly regrow very easily anything sort of over three inches and under seven inches or the size of a large cucumber is perfect I just think that that's about the best growing range because the flesh is nice and firm and it doesn't get too grainy when they get too big like I'll show you later they get way too grainy so once I've sorted it out I'm left with the whole heap of roots and smaller tubers and that's what I use to replant back into the next bed in this case I'm going to replant it back into the same bed you can do that for several times or several years in a row and then it's a good idea to move it away and find a new bed for your sweet potato otherwise they can start to attract pests and weevils and slugs and those type of things will start to ruin or the tubers so I just go through if the bed is a little hard well then I'll mash it up a bit because your soil is best for sweet potato when it's nice and loose so you potato will grow fine in heavy soil but they won't develop tubers very well and the tubers may in fact rot here I'm just adding a little bit of organic flooding bone to the bed you don't need to go crazy they need to over fertilize otherwise you'll just get a lot of leaf grace or not a lot of cheaver I like to mulch the bed nice and thick in this case it's sugar cane mulch and then I water it in make sure that sudden bonus fertilizers in washing that's pretty much it for the refurb of the bed I'm pretty happy with that little harvest after about you know 2 or 3 months that's going to be a good feed and whilst I can grow them a heck of a lot bigger let me tell you the bigger they get the more grainy and awful they taste so you can't be starving Kenya that's why I picked myself a couple of small sweet potato while I was out here while Nina was doing that corn just a couple of little ones that one there and this one here a couple of little sweet potatoes that should do us for dinner maybe one each and half of the kids so we don't go hungry through the big storm here in Brisbane well that was a bit of a retro clip taken some years ago when we used to grow the sweeps out the front there like that in the patch can you see the little pink flowers well what's interesting is sweet potato isn't related at all to standard potatoes it's in fact part of the morning glory family of plants which are known mainly for their tubular cone like pretty flowers not the tubers well I'm not finished with this bed yet this is going to seem really unorthodox but I'm now going to over plant over the top of this sweet potato things like tomatoes basil kale spinach and if you look here see those shoots coming through this is a bed that I planted earlier on just the same as what I did and demonstrate it before see that old mulch that old moles there was similar to the new mulch here and what will happen is that will all break down and all those plans for tomatoes they will all grow give crops be great and the sweet potato will slowly come through that mulch and eventually overtake that dead and when all those crops are gone the sweet potato will remain and then those cheeses will be ready to harvest in a few months after now in this bed here I mentioned earlier I tried to kill some sweet potato often the only reason I'm showing you this is to demonstrate how resilient it is so that you understand how easy it is to grow growing this plant the Orthodox way like putting a tuber on the kitchen sink in a glass of water and letting shoots come up and then planting those so that's all cool you could put it in a pot on its own you don't have to plant it about the plants and it'll grow very well in two or three months you'll have two burs there to harvest so see here's a great example of how resilient it is I've had that tarp over that bed for good six months and still it's reshooting it's just very difficult to kill off even if you want to in the subtropics sweet potato is probably one of the best weeds you can grow we can always find a sweet potato at our place when we need one that's for sure now check out this fella here look how odd it looks the potato that is not me something like this can be broken into several pieces and replanted back into the bed I hope you enjoyed that video on growing sweet potato if you liked it give it a thumbs up don't forget to subscribe and also visit my blog self-sufficient muqaam thanks for watching bye for now [Music]


 
145
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How to Preserve Mangoes by Drying in a Dehydrator - with Special TIP

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 145 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from selfish and me I'm just standing in the dappled shade of one of our mango trees remember the had a bag fruit video that I just released I promised at the end of that video that I would release a another video just a quick one on how to dehydrate mangoes and how we utilize a glut of mangoes well this is this video enjoy obviously the first thing I do is remove the fruit from the protective bag and I covered that in the other video then pretty much just sliced the mangoes up it's nothing to it no real set pieces I try to keep them about an inch across as possible and possibly you know half an inch thick your fav an easy way to do a mango to get to get the skin off it anyway is to cut it into quarters just through the skin there with a paring knife and then just peel the skin back that way it comes off nice and easy we can still are sucking that Skinny Bitch now I get some extra mango and then I just cut through right through to the seed and you're going to end up with some milk lots of different sizes but don't be too pedantic about it I certainly am NOT I throw a lot of that place into a compost bin that's just a Niles after 19 container how can they work well as a compost bin and then I just lay them out on a dehydrator tray there's many different types of dehydrators I've got an Excalibur so that's how I lay ours out if there's any real big pieces I'll just cut them down and you can see that there's a lot of small pieces left as well I'll tend to try to group the larger pieces of the larger pieces in small because because they dry at different times and you can either remove that trait earlier or you can just let it all dry you have some that are a little bit more crispier than others it's not a big war when it to be honest set to the ID rater on its live food setting on a low setting that and then V I'd rate at Marshall slowly until it's not khaki on the outside but it's still a little moist on the inside when you buy into it I reckon that's the best like I said you're going to get a few crunchy pieces I story as in glad bags you can store it in whatever you want you can store them in airtight containers jars but I just find that the team put them in bags like this connealy go mangoes dehydrated that'll keep sort of year sometimes I add a little buy things for them maybe a quarter of a teaspoon in the packet shake it up and that just stops it from sticking it also helps with not not sort of absorbing moisture and I think it's a good way to store it well I hope you enjoyed that don't forget to subscribe to the channel thumbs up and also visit my blog self-sufficient me.com there's plenty of information there links in the description bye for now [Music]


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subtitle:


today I'm mark from selfish and me I'm just standing in the dappled shade of one of our mango trees remember the had a bag fruit video that I just released I promised at the end of that video that I would release a another video just a quick one on how to dehydrate mangoes and how we utilize a glut of mangoes well this is this video enjoy obviously the first thing I do is remove the fruit from the protective bag and I covered that in the other video then pretty much just sliced the mangoes up it's nothing to it no real set pieces I try to keep them about an inch across as possible and possibly you know half an inch thick your fav an easy way to do a mango to get to get the skin off it anyway is to cut it into quarters just through the skin there with a paring knife and then just peel the skin back that way it comes off nice and easy we can still are sucking that Skinny Bitch now I get some extra mango and then I just cut through right through to the seed and you're going to end up with some milk lots of different sizes but don't be too pedantic about it I certainly am NOT I throw a lot of that place into a compost bin that's just a Niles after 19 container how can they work well as a compost bin and then I just lay them out on a dehydrator tray there's many different types of dehydrators I've got an Excalibur so that's how I lay ours out if there's any real big pieces I'll just cut them down and you can see that there's a lot of small pieces left as well I'll tend to try to group the larger pieces of the larger pieces in small because because they dry at different times and you can either remove that trait earlier or you can just let it all dry you have some that are a little bit more crispier than others it's not a big war when it to be honest set to the ID rater on its live food setting on a low setting that and then V I'd rate at Marshall slowly until it's not khaki on the outside but it's still a little moist on the inside when you buy into it I reckon that's the best like I said you're going to get a few crunchy pieces I story as in glad bags you can store it in whatever you want you can store them in airtight containers jars but I just find that the team put them in bags like this connealy go mangoes dehydrated that'll keep sort of year sometimes I add a little buy things for them maybe a quarter of a teaspoon in the packet shake it up and that just stops it from sticking it also helps with not not sort of absorbing moisture and I think it's a good way to store it well I hope you enjoyed that don't forget to subscribe to the channel thumbs up and also visit my blog self-sufficient me.com there's plenty of information there links in the description bye for now [Music]


 
139
Views

5 Vegetables that are too EASY to GROW in the Garden

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 139 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:
 


can i I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to give you my five top vegetables that are just too easy to grow so easy in fact that they'll grow themselves without hardly any effort from you at all let's get into it [Music] number one beans there's good reason why you tend to see being served up in all those old cowboy movies as beans were a staple frontier food containing all the nourishment a person needed to survive in just one small feed oh the irony of the spaghetti western they can be dried they can be canned and of course that could be eaten fresh beans have a very flexible growing climate range and that means in some places like hearing our subtropical climate pretty hot beans can be ground all year round they grow fast remember Jack and the Beanstalk beans uniquely don't take nitrogen from the soil unlike a lot of other plants they do take it from the air they and then they store it in their own roots therefore actually adding nitrogen to the soil so beans are really great pre crop to some of those other nitrogen hungry plants say cabbages etc that you want to grow after remember beans means hurry up and grow them number two Asian greens so we move from the west to the east asian greens are fast growing highly nutritious super and some say cancer-fighting wonderful on a continent with billions of people protein is getting rare and harder to catch and eat that's why their vegetables need to grow fast big be nutritious and above all easy to grow let a bunch of Asian greens go to seed in your garden and you'll never get rid of them that's a good thing Asian greens are great raw or cooked try mizuna or mbuna or even the mustards like the red giant or ruby streaks please Ruby streaks taking over my lawn now let's head the Europe with number three bikini originally from the Americas leave zucchini that we all know was developed in northern Italy where it was given the name which also means gourd squash and marrow the plant itself isn't a spoiler like other pumpkin vines so it's great for smaller gardens but nevertheless it's a big producer and a hearty mouthful it is really easy to grow and the speed at which the fruit swell is ridiculous you can almost see it growing real time some zigs can get up to a meter long actually the longest sig ever recorded was 2.5 5 meters there's also plenty of varieties such as round yellow white and they all taste fantastic raw cooked or even pickled in fact I pickled some the other day so what are you waiting for get on the boots and plant some Zuke's now let's head back over to the yeast for almost the middle we're number 4 carrot originated from you might find this hard to believe but did you know that the carrot originated in Afghanistan yeah it's true in fact evidence shows that carrots grew in Afghanistan over 5,000 years ago now I'm telling you if carrots could grow in Afghanistan it can grow anywhere orange carrots are really only a recent development in the overall scheme of time for this crunchy root vegetable original carrots were white or purple and had a very strong taste a bit like this white carrot here except the taste is good but in the old days they were considered a medicinal food because they were known to be good for you but taste is like should I say not great but these days with crossbreeding carrots are delicious carrot seed easily and they also store well after harvest so they are a top backyard crop to grow and keep using for months after I do recommend growing these heirloom varieties there's lots of different colors they taste great and if you leave them go to seed just a few plants they'll give you thousands of seeds for next season number five radish another perfect root crop vegetable to grow apt that it follows after carrots they reckon it originated from around India or China but no one knows for sure let's say India cue the Indian music radish is the cheater of the vegetable world if you want a fast growing crop and you just can't wait then so radish seeds and they'll pop up in literally a few days and be ready to eat immediately well as sprouts but within weeks as a root vegetable did you know that some modern farmers use them as a cover crop to soften and aerate the soil before planting their main crops sometimes they don't even harvest their dishes they just let them run in place acting as a natural fertilizer Kampai lost and groundbreaker at the same time a lot of backyard growers so radish seeds mixed in with their other slower growing crops so when they sow them the radish comes up first and I can harvest them while they're waiting for the other crop to come through there are lots of different types of radishes you can get the small ones that are best harvested young or you can get larger varieties like this Japanese daikons huge and they same with this one over here they're best harvested when they get a little bit larger in fact they can be harvested really big and greater than used in Japanese cooking or any cooking really radish also have a long sowing window and an excellent temperature tolerance making it a productive crop all around the world there are also plenty of ways to prepare and eat radish I like to eat radish raw with plenty of garlic and my family well I like to stay away for a few hours after that and that's it those are my five vegetables that are just too easy to grow but I challenge you guys to do it don't forget give me a thumbs up if you liked the video also share it subscribe visit the blog self-sufficient me.com thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:
 


can i I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to give you my five top vegetables that are just too easy to grow so easy in fact that they'll grow themselves without hardly any effort from you at all let's get into it [Music] number one beans there's good reason why you tend to see being served up in all those old cowboy movies as beans were a staple frontier food containing all the nourishment a person needed to survive in just one small feed oh the irony of the spaghetti western they can be dried they can be canned and of course that could be eaten fresh beans have a very flexible growing climate range and that means in some places like hearing our subtropical climate pretty hot beans can be ground all year round they grow fast remember Jack and the Beanstalk beans uniquely don't take nitrogen from the soil unlike a lot of other plants they do take it from the air they and then they store it in their own roots therefore actually adding nitrogen to the soil so beans are really great pre crop to some of those other nitrogen hungry plants say cabbages etc that you want to grow after remember beans means hurry up and grow them number two Asian greens so we move from the west to the east asian greens are fast growing highly nutritious super and some say cancer-fighting wonderful on a continent with billions of people protein is getting rare and harder to catch and eat that's why their vegetables need to grow fast big be nutritious and above all easy to grow let a bunch of Asian greens go to seed in your garden and you'll never get rid of them that's a good thing Asian greens are great raw or cooked try mizuna or mbuna or even the mustards like the red giant or ruby streaks please Ruby streaks taking over my lawn now let's head the Europe with number three bikini originally from the Americas leave zucchini that we all know was developed in northern Italy where it was given the name which also means gourd squash and marrow the plant itself isn't a spoiler like other pumpkin vines so it's great for smaller gardens but nevertheless it's a big producer and a hearty mouthful it is really easy to grow and the speed at which the fruit swell is ridiculous you can almost see it growing real time some zigs can get up to a meter long actually the longest sig ever recorded was 2.5 5 meters there's also plenty of varieties such as round yellow white and they all taste fantastic raw cooked or even pickled in fact I pickled some the other day so what are you waiting for get on the boots and plant some Zuke's now let's head back over to the yeast for almost the middle we're number 4 carrot originated from you might find this hard to believe but did you know that the carrot originated in Afghanistan yeah it's true in fact evidence shows that carrots grew in Afghanistan over 5,000 years ago now I'm telling you if carrots could grow in Afghanistan it can grow anywhere orange carrots are really only a recent development in the overall scheme of time for this crunchy root vegetable original carrots were white or purple and had a very strong taste a bit like this white carrot here except the taste is good but in the old days they were considered a medicinal food because they were known to be good for you but taste is like should I say not great but these days with crossbreeding carrots are delicious carrot seed easily and they also store well after harvest so they are a top backyard crop to grow and keep using for months after I do recommend growing these heirloom varieties there's lots of different colors they taste great and if you leave them go to seed just a few plants they'll give you thousands of seeds for next season number five radish another perfect root crop vegetable to grow apt that it follows after carrots they reckon it originated from around India or China but no one knows for sure let's say India cue the Indian music radish is the cheater of the vegetable world if you want a fast growing crop and you just can't wait then so radish seeds and they'll pop up in literally a few days and be ready to eat immediately well as sprouts but within weeks as a root vegetable did you know that some modern farmers use them as a cover crop to soften and aerate the soil before planting their main crops sometimes they don't even harvest their dishes they just let them run in place acting as a natural fertilizer Kampai lost and groundbreaker at the same time a lot of backyard growers so radish seeds mixed in with their other slower growing crops so when they sow them the radish comes up first and I can harvest them while they're waiting for the other crop to come through there are lots of different types of radishes you can get the small ones that are best harvested young or you can get larger varieties like this Japanese daikons huge and they same with this one over here they're best harvested when they get a little bit larger in fact they can be harvested really big and greater than used in Japanese cooking or any cooking really radish also have a long sowing window and an excellent temperature tolerance making it a productive crop all around the world there are also plenty of ways to prepare and eat radish I like to eat radish raw with plenty of garlic and my family well I like to stay away for a few hours after that and that's it those are my five vegetables that are just too easy to grow but I challenge you guys to do it don't forget give me a thumbs up if you liked the video also share it subscribe visit the blog self-sufficient me.com thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]

134
Views

how I lacto ferment or pickle zucchini all home grown organically and demonstrated in our outdoor makeshift kitchen

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 134 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
subtitle:


today I'm microphone self-sufficient me and it's a beautiful sunny winter's day here in subtropical Queensland I'm going to show you guys how I pickle zooks [Music] right the veggie patch is just behind me so let's get in there and have a look at the zucchinis that I'm going to use so I've got a little outdoor kitchen setup because on a beautiful sunny day like this why would you want to do this inside it's a simple process so I thought you know I'll set it up out here and enjoy the sunlight these aki-nee's are getting out of control we're eating them like crazy but they just keep growing and they swell so big so I'm going to pick quite a few and we're going to pickle them so that we can save them and eat them later look at the size of them wonderful give it a bit of a twist and it comes off like that that's one glass the cells are monster okay it's a big one that'll do let me explain to you what we've got here in the outdoor kitchen for pickling these zucchinis first of all immediately I'm going to get rid of these two large turkeys we don't need them when they get this size they're not great for pickling you can pickle no worries make a chutney out of them as well and that type of thing but I'd prefer to cook with these because the larger they get the more spongy they become the smaller the more compact the flesh is and that pickle better when they're more compact think of a cucumber when you want to make pickled cucumbers you know nice pickled gherkin small ones are the more crunchy ones it's a similar type of notion alright so I'll just use these younger zucchinis I've got a knife I've got a cutting board or a cutting piece of plastic here I've got my jars that I'm going to put the pickles in and ferment them this one's a mason jar and it comes with a pickled pipe for the airlock if you want to see more about pickled pipes you can go to my website I'll leave a link below to what pickled pipes are but it's a type of airlock that can be used with mason jars they're silicon quite easy and in these other jars these are wet jars german-made and they're different but it's the same or a similar thing a few more moving parts to it and in these I've got the standard old airlock that most brewers use and instead of a specific glass weight in these ones i have old smaller work leads the glassware Khalid's and i'll be using them to weigh down the zucchini and these lunch because these type of other weights specific to mason jars and are too small for the wek over the other side here I've got this contraption which is just a packer it can be used as a cabbage pounder when you're making sauerkraut but this is going to be used just to pack the jars in to make sure I can get as much as I Keaney in as possible and finally here's 8 cups of brine I've made this Brian up out of standard tap water can understand the reason behind using spring water and in filtered water that's fine if you want to do that go ahead I'm just saying that I just use standard tap water it's 8 cups or 2 liters for each cup of used 1 tbsp of fine seaside needs to be the fine sea salt and then I've dissolved that in that 2 litre container so that's ready to go once I've pack the jars of the zucchinis we'll pull that over the top and Bob's your arty for pair my jar these jars have been just washed in a dishwasher there's nothing special there's no sterilization needs all I do is I cut the ends off these end this can go to the chickens no peeling involved and I'm just cutting them you know about quarter-inch thick pieces if you want for the larger if you've got larger sized zucchini like this you can maybe cut them in half or you can dice them up you can even shred it you know we'll use a peeler and make sort of sheets out of the zucchini but I'm just going to leave them whole like this throw them in here's my Packer press it down a bit now it's just a matter of pouring this brine over it or whack the weight on top to make sure that that's kept underneath the brine there's a yep enough water in there leaving a bit of a gap on top so that it doesn't overflow put the airlock on this case it's a pickle pipe put the lid on so I'm going to go head down just do the other ones I'll just put these lids on as of wait back the brine in put the airlock in nice and carefully and in these particular airlocks they need to have water in there so that the co2 can bubble out but no oxygen can get sucked back in and they get topped up occasionally when required if the water starts to evaporate otherwise you can use jobs without the airlocks but you're just going to remember during the fermentation process that you have to burp the jar by opening the lid and letting out the co2 that builds up otherwise the jars could explode or the lids blow off and that's all there is to it there's my jars done up with the zucchinis ready to start pickling and the process will start immediately you'll see over the next few days it'll start to bubble and in about three to four weeks the zucchini will turn into pickled zucchini the bacteria will start eating the salty brine and reacting with the zucchini and or naturally turn into a pickle house al you want it depends on you you can leave it for longer and the longer you leave it the more sour it will go I would start giving it a taste about after two weeks and see what you think always try to keep the brine topped up over these zucchinis if you're worried about them bubbling out maybe you're worried you may have overfilled them a little put a little tray underneath or put them on a tea towel so that if they do end up bubbling over it will not make a big mess you can go elaborate if you want and add extra things to this pickle or you can just leave the fermentation process go on its own with straight zucchini and let it speak for itself later on you can use it in cooking you can add extra herbs and spices to it to enhance flavors if you need to that's what we usually do well I hope you liked this quick video on fermenting zucchinis if you did give it a thumbs up and also share it that helps a lot visit the website self-sufficient muqaam I've got some links in the description they're also where you can find some of these products that I used today and where you can read more about them in articles that I've read if you've got any questions welcome in the comments section below also if you've got any tips or hints for me put them in the comment section below as well I love reading all your comments and I reply to as many as I possibly can thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] view all
 


 
 
subtitle:


today I'm microphone self-sufficient me and it's a beautiful sunny winter's day here in subtropical Queensland I'm going to show you guys how I pickle zooks [Music] right the veggie patch is just behind me so let's get in there and have a look at the zucchinis that I'm going to use so I've got a little outdoor kitchen setup because on a beautiful sunny day like this why would you want to do this inside it's a simple process so I thought you know I'll set it up out here and enjoy the sunlight these aki-nee's are getting out of control we're eating them like crazy but they just keep growing and they swell so big so I'm going to pick quite a few and we're going to pickle them so that we can save them and eat them later look at the size of them wonderful give it a bit of a twist and it comes off like that that's one glass the cells are monster okay it's a big one that'll do let me explain to you what we've got here in the outdoor kitchen for pickling these zucchinis first of all immediately I'm going to get rid of these two large turkeys we don't need them when they get this size they're not great for pickling you can pickle no worries make a chutney out of them as well and that type of thing but I'd prefer to cook with these because the larger they get the more spongy they become the smaller the more compact the flesh is and that pickle better when they're more compact think of a cucumber when you want to make pickled cucumbers you know nice pickled gherkin small ones are the more crunchy ones it's a similar type of notion alright so I'll just use these younger zucchinis I've got a knife I've got a cutting board or a cutting piece of plastic here I've got my jars that I'm going to put the pickles in and ferment them this one's a mason jar and it comes with a pickled pipe for the airlock if you want to see more about pickled pipes you can go to my website I'll leave a link below to what pickled pipes are but it's a type of airlock that can be used with mason jars they're silicon quite easy and in these other jars these are wet jars german-made and they're different but it's the same or a similar thing a few more moving parts to it and in these I've got the standard old airlock that most brewers use and instead of a specific glass weight in these ones i have old smaller work leads the glassware Khalid's and i'll be using them to weigh down the zucchini and these lunch because these type of other weights specific to mason jars and are too small for the wek over the other side here I've got this contraption which is just a packer it can be used as a cabbage pounder when you're making sauerkraut but this is going to be used just to pack the jars in to make sure I can get as much as I Keaney in as possible and finally here's 8 cups of brine I've made this Brian up out of standard tap water can understand the reason behind using spring water and in filtered water that's fine if you want to do that go ahead I'm just saying that I just use standard tap water it's 8 cups or 2 liters for each cup of used 1 tbsp of fine seaside needs to be the fine sea salt and then I've dissolved that in that 2 litre container so that's ready to go once I've pack the jars of the zucchinis we'll pull that over the top and Bob's your arty for pair my jar these jars have been just washed in a dishwasher there's nothing special there's no sterilization needs all I do is I cut the ends off these end this can go to the chickens no peeling involved and I'm just cutting them you know about quarter-inch thick pieces if you want for the larger if you've got larger sized zucchini like this you can maybe cut them in half or you can dice them up you can even shred it you know we'll use a peeler and make sort of sheets out of the zucchini but I'm just going to leave them whole like this throw them in here's my Packer press it down a bit now it's just a matter of pouring this brine over it or whack the weight on top to make sure that that's kept underneath the brine there's a yep enough water in there leaving a bit of a gap on top so that it doesn't overflow put the airlock on this case it's a pickle pipe put the lid on so I'm going to go head down just do the other ones I'll just put these lids on as of wait back the brine in put the airlock in nice and carefully and in these particular airlocks they need to have water in there so that the co2 can bubble out but no oxygen can get sucked back in and they get topped up occasionally when required if the water starts to evaporate otherwise you can use jobs without the airlocks but you're just going to remember during the fermentation process that you have to burp the jar by opening the lid and letting out the co2 that builds up otherwise the jars could explode or the lids blow off and that's all there is to it there's my jars done up with the zucchinis ready to start pickling and the process will start immediately you'll see over the next few days it'll start to bubble and in about three to four weeks the zucchini will turn into pickled zucchini the bacteria will start eating the salty brine and reacting with the zucchini and or naturally turn into a pickle house al you want it depends on you you can leave it for longer and the longer you leave it the more sour it will go I would start giving it a taste about after two weeks and see what you think always try to keep the brine topped up over these zucchinis if you're worried about them bubbling out maybe you're worried you may have overfilled them a little put a little tray underneath or put them on a tea towel so that if they do end up bubbling over it will not make a big mess you can go elaborate if you want and add extra things to this pickle or you can just leave the fermentation process go on its own with straight zucchini and let it speak for itself later on you can use it in cooking you can add extra herbs and spices to it to enhance flavors if you need to that's what we usually do well I hope you liked this quick video on fermenting zucchinis if you did give it a thumbs up and also share it that helps a lot visit the website self-sufficient muqaam I've got some links in the description they're also where you can find some of these products that I used today and where you can read more about them in articles that I've read if you've got any questions welcome in the comments section below also if you've got any tips or hints for me put them in the comment section below as well I love reading all your comments and I reply to as many as I possibly can thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music]

126
Views

how we store our cabbage long term in the fridge crisper

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 126 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


get a mark from self-sufficiently and I'm out here in the veggie garden I thought I'd bring you this impromptu video about cabbage and more specifically how we store cabbage not preserve it but just store it because I've got cabbage in our crisper still left over from last season that's 12 months ago and how did we do it well it's easy okay have a look here I've been admiring our Sugarloaf cabbage this season Idol is growing fantastic look at it a nice row of these wonderful Sugarloaf cabbages they just look perfect over there is some wham box that we've been using I'll chop that off because that's in the crisper as well and you know we've got some zucchinis here but let's not dwell on them let's talk about last season's cabbage because this season I'm very happy with how it's going and yeah we could harvest one or two of them actually but I'm going to let them mature properly first but what I want to show you is over here was last year that's what's left of last year's mammoth rock and that's not going to produce heads that's just going to produce seeds for me to keep because mammoth rock is a really excellent heirloom variety of cabbage and it lasts well too but all cabbage will last well what I wanted to let you guys know was how did we keep our cabbage from last year's mammoth rock harvest which was pretty good filled up the nice big basket from memory well it's really simple whack it in the crisper a lot of you guys probably already know this but some of you may not in the old days they used to harvest their cabbages at the end of season and then store them in a cellar or a cold spot underneath the house and then use it all through the wintertime we live in the subtropics year so we don't necessarily have that problem but we can't grow cabbages or any other type of brassicas over summer because it's too hot so we sort of do this a similar thing except instead of a cellar we'll store it in our crisper in the fridge and it will last that long yes it might look a little bit old on the edges and the first layers of the cabbage will no doubt not be edible but underneath that there will be perfectly good cabbage just as we're running out we've got the new cabbages for this winter coming on and we'll be able to do that same process so that's a great way to store not preserve because I preserve cabbage as well through fermentation and making sauerkraut and all those beautiful fermenting type foods but this is just how you can store it normally straight in the crisper may be in a plastic bag or a container in the crisper shelf and then keep that by all means for a good 12 months until your next crop is ready to harvest we're making a wonderful chicken soup for dinner tonight I've used just about the end of our cabbage for that by the time we've run out I'll be harvesting those sugarloaf this season for another good whack of cabbage and perhaps save that again all the way through until next season if we've got enough of it thanks a lot for watching if you don't mind these impromptu videos give me a thumbs up and let me know you like them and I'll do more of them i I'm sort of tossing up whether or not I should be punching out more videos or not I do at the moment I do have the capacity to be able to put out one or two more videos throughout the week but they're they're not going to be highly edited they'll be a bit like this sort of on off points that I can think of and bring up around the garden so if you like them give me a thumbs up and also share it that helps a lot thanks for watching bye for now [Music] you view all
 


 
subtitle:


get a mark from self-sufficiently and I'm out here in the veggie garden I thought I'd bring you this impromptu video about cabbage and more specifically how we store cabbage not preserve it but just store it because I've got cabbage in our crisper still left over from last season that's 12 months ago and how did we do it well it's easy okay have a look here I've been admiring our Sugarloaf cabbage this season Idol is growing fantastic look at it a nice row of these wonderful Sugarloaf cabbages they just look perfect over there is some wham box that we've been using I'll chop that off because that's in the crisper as well and you know we've got some zucchinis here but let's not dwell on them let's talk about last season's cabbage because this season I'm very happy with how it's going and yeah we could harvest one or two of them actually but I'm going to let them mature properly first but what I want to show you is over here was last year that's what's left of last year's mammoth rock and that's not going to produce heads that's just going to produce seeds for me to keep because mammoth rock is a really excellent heirloom variety of cabbage and it lasts well too but all cabbage will last well what I wanted to let you guys know was how did we keep our cabbage from last year's mammoth rock harvest which was pretty good filled up the nice big basket from memory well it's really simple whack it in the crisper a lot of you guys probably already know this but some of you may not in the old days they used to harvest their cabbages at the end of season and then store them in a cellar or a cold spot underneath the house and then use it all through the wintertime we live in the subtropics year so we don't necessarily have that problem but we can't grow cabbages or any other type of brassicas over summer because it's too hot so we sort of do this a similar thing except instead of a cellar we'll store it in our crisper in the fridge and it will last that long yes it might look a little bit old on the edges and the first layers of the cabbage will no doubt not be edible but underneath that there will be perfectly good cabbage just as we're running out we've got the new cabbages for this winter coming on and we'll be able to do that same process so that's a great way to store not preserve because I preserve cabbage as well through fermentation and making sauerkraut and all those beautiful fermenting type foods but this is just how you can store it normally straight in the crisper may be in a plastic bag or a container in the crisper shelf and then keep that by all means for a good 12 months until your next crop is ready to harvest we're making a wonderful chicken soup for dinner tonight I've used just about the end of our cabbage for that by the time we've run out I'll be harvesting those sugarloaf this season for another good whack of cabbage and perhaps save that again all the way through until next season if we've got enough of it thanks a lot for watching if you don't mind these impromptu videos give me a thumbs up and let me know you like them and I'll do more of them i I'm sort of tossing up whether or not I should be punching out more videos or not I do at the moment I do have the capacity to be able to put out one or two more videos throughout the week but they're they're not going to be highly edited they'll be a bit like this sort of on off points that I can think of and bring up around the garden so if you like them give me a thumbs up and also share it that helps a lot thanks for watching bye for now [Music] you

128
Views

Growing Lemons with Fresh Manure Fertiliser but No Mulch! How to Plus Other Growing Tips!

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 128 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


can a unlife from self revision me and as the Sun sets here in sunny South East Queensland I'm standing in front of this magnificent lemon tree it's all in fruit again this season but it's always in fruit and that's what I wanted to talk about there's something extra-special I wanted to share with you that I learnt when I was overseas on holiday in Sorrento and that was the different ways of getting a whole lot of fruit off your lemon tree now in Sorrento if you know anything about it it's the home of lemons last season which is twelve months ago now I made a video on this very tree it was called how to grow a kind of lemons it is by far my most popular video with over 600,000 views so far hopefully I'll get more but anyway my point is this lemon tree behind me one of my main ways or tips for growing and getting a lot of fruit was to mulch heavily and use a mixture of fertilizer compost and mulch underneath the tree to feed its feeder roots and that was one of my key tips well when we were in Sorrento we toured a lemon farm it was a lemon and olive farm and I'll show you some raw footage of that shortly but the key thing there was the way they don't most underneath their trees and incredibly their use of now get this it's supposed to be a big no-no but their use of raw fresh manure underneath the tree and not only that not only do they use fresh cow manure underneath their trees as a form of fertilizer but they don't mulch and they dig a pit around their trees so in theory they're digging all around where those feeder roots should be essentially filling that pit gap with pure fresh manure I think it's a great thing that they're using the manure from their cows tables and everything on the farm is cyclic and recyclable but I can't get my head around how they use the fresh manure and no mulching and how they dug around the base of those lemon trees because that's the opposite to what I'd recommend anyway let's have a look at some of this raw footage that I was talking about yeah they're big old olive tree this one you like a gum tree you know the lemons typical Sorrento lemon farm look at how they most dig pits for the trees the Cure from like that our guys like a fruit forests have grown them all so close together and hi Thor the citrus and olives yeah and even flowers underneath and they've netted from the hot Suns and the hail so here's the net for and of course the low net use for the olives and they beat them no drop to the ground they're a different way to grow through like a jungle so there you go pretty interesting hey they are growing great lemons they're it's the home of lemons in Italy lemoncello if every second store they sell them and cello and I tell you what it's not a bad drop I'd like to make some myself so what can we take away from that my way of growing a lot of lemons and their way of growing a lot of lemons is quite different in regards to fertilizing and mulching underneath a tree or not mulching and not looking after the theatre roots in their case but they still get great results and I still get great results so there's a great scope for growing a lot of lemons but not necessarily having to follow that one way there's lots of ways to skin a cat as they say and this way it there's lots of ways to grow a lemon tree and get a lot of fruit okay I'm going to be a little bit cheeky and say that I reckon my method of mulching heavily underneath the lemon tree so that it's feeder roots can get all that nourishment if they don't get disturbed and when you do add manure even if it's a little bit fresh those roots won't get burnt and that lemon tree won't suffer because the mulch acts as an absorbent but also a barrier between that freshman you up or the toilet breaks down and gets through the mouth it's not as fresh and it's not as raw and I think that's a better way of adding molten manure and getting a lot of produce out of your lemon tree and also my wife she seems to think that from her observations our lemon tree looks much healthier the leaves look better than the ones in that Sorrento farm we visited but having said that their lemon trees are much older and they are among big olive trees as well so not getting as much light so they might look a bit be shoveled because of that but at the end of the day who am I to question the experience and the knowledge of a third-generation lemon farmer in Sorrento I mean come on I did be pretty poor form for me to start thinking I know more then than they do so at the end of the day there's two different ways of growing a lot of lemons I still probably wouldn't recommend adding freshmen you are especially to a young tree because that might harm it but to my shock but also amazement and wonder you can add fresh manure and in fact they do in the home of lemons and lemon jello so it afford it anyway I thought you might find this video and those points quite interesting as interesting as I have if you liked the video don't forget to give it a good sums up also share it because that's important it helps a lot don't forget the website self-sufficient me calm thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


can a unlife from self revision me and as the Sun sets here in sunny South East Queensland I'm standing in front of this magnificent lemon tree it's all in fruit again this season but it's always in fruit and that's what I wanted to talk about there's something extra-special I wanted to share with you that I learnt when I was overseas on holiday in Sorrento and that was the different ways of getting a whole lot of fruit off your lemon tree now in Sorrento if you know anything about it it's the home of lemons last season which is twelve months ago now I made a video on this very tree it was called how to grow a kind of lemons it is by far my most popular video with over 600,000 views so far hopefully I'll get more but anyway my point is this lemon tree behind me one of my main ways or tips for growing and getting a lot of fruit was to mulch heavily and use a mixture of fertilizer compost and mulch underneath the tree to feed its feeder roots and that was one of my key tips well when we were in Sorrento we toured a lemon farm it was a lemon and olive farm and I'll show you some raw footage of that shortly but the key thing there was the way they don't most underneath their trees and incredibly their use of now get this it's supposed to be a big no-no but their use of raw fresh manure underneath the tree and not only that not only do they use fresh cow manure underneath their trees as a form of fertilizer but they don't mulch and they dig a pit around their trees so in theory they're digging all around where those feeder roots should be essentially filling that pit gap with pure fresh manure I think it's a great thing that they're using the manure from their cows tables and everything on the farm is cyclic and recyclable but I can't get my head around how they use the fresh manure and no mulching and how they dug around the base of those lemon trees because that's the opposite to what I'd recommend anyway let's have a look at some of this raw footage that I was talking about yeah they're big old olive tree this one you like a gum tree you know the lemons typical Sorrento lemon farm look at how they most dig pits for the trees the Cure from like that our guys like a fruit forests have grown them all so close together and hi Thor the citrus and olives yeah and even flowers underneath and they've netted from the hot Suns and the hail so here's the net for and of course the low net use for the olives and they beat them no drop to the ground they're a different way to grow through like a jungle so there you go pretty interesting hey they are growing great lemons they're it's the home of lemons in Italy lemoncello if every second store they sell them and cello and I tell you what it's not a bad drop I'd like to make some myself so what can we take away from that my way of growing a lot of lemons and their way of growing a lot of lemons is quite different in regards to fertilizing and mulching underneath a tree or not mulching and not looking after the theatre roots in their case but they still get great results and I still get great results so there's a great scope for growing a lot of lemons but not necessarily having to follow that one way there's lots of ways to skin a cat as they say and this way it there's lots of ways to grow a lemon tree and get a lot of fruit okay I'm going to be a little bit cheeky and say that I reckon my method of mulching heavily underneath the lemon tree so that it's feeder roots can get all that nourishment if they don't get disturbed and when you do add manure even if it's a little bit fresh those roots won't get burnt and that lemon tree won't suffer because the mulch acts as an absorbent but also a barrier between that freshman you up or the toilet breaks down and gets through the mouth it's not as fresh and it's not as raw and I think that's a better way of adding molten manure and getting a lot of produce out of your lemon tree and also my wife she seems to think that from her observations our lemon tree looks much healthier the leaves look better than the ones in that Sorrento farm we visited but having said that their lemon trees are much older and they are among big olive trees as well so not getting as much light so they might look a bit be shoveled because of that but at the end of the day who am I to question the experience and the knowledge of a third-generation lemon farmer in Sorrento I mean come on I did be pretty poor form for me to start thinking I know more then than they do so at the end of the day there's two different ways of growing a lot of lemons I still probably wouldn't recommend adding freshmen you are especially to a young tree because that might harm it but to my shock but also amazement and wonder you can add fresh manure and in fact they do in the home of lemons and lemon jello so it afford it anyway I thought you might find this video and those points quite interesting as interesting as I have if you liked the video don't forget to give it a good sums up also share it because that's important it helps a lot don't forget the website self-sufficient me calm thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


 
130
Views

How To Hügelkultur AMAZING Grow Method For Raised Beds Vegetable Gardens

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 130 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
subtitle:


if a unmarked I'm self-sufficient me and today I want to have a chat to you guys about Google culture what is it how I used it in this very garden bed here without even knowing about it and perhaps you have two and what makes it so excellent for growing your fruit and vege now I want to use this bed here as my example because at the moment I've got some vegetables growing in here and some beautiful tomatoes some black Russians some of these tomato berries sweet potato I've got kale there's basil there's Asian greens there's beans all in this one bit but before I explain how constructed this garden bed using the Google culture principle I have to come clean and let you know that it was totally by accident so what happened was I was reading the comments on one of my videos and one of you guys a few months back said hey mark just wondering if you practice here go culture or have you used it in the garden I've read this word and I thought that looks like double dutch to me when in fact legal culture is German meaning Hill culture or mound culture so yeah googling I found out all this information and I found out that it was effectively to build up a nice big mound with all this organic matter log sticks leaves whatever plant material and then on top of that you lay soil compost mulch and that's where it then becomes a mound where you can plant and grow vegetables and fruit trees or whatever crops and it just so happens that this bed here I've been practicing Google culture in it and I didn't even know in fact all these beds along here are done using the Google culture method so this bed this round one in front of the rectangular bed without just demonstrating this one here that I've got the mint growing in you might have remembered that from my grow a ton of mint video this round galvanized here this one this one here this one and this other rectangular galvanized raised bed that mirrors the one on the other side there exactly so all of them have used the Hyuga culture method with logs and leaves and sticks and twigs and just fill them half way up with organic matter and it really has worked a treat if I compare it to my early days of gardening say twelve or thirteen years ago when I made those raised beds at the back here hopefully you can still see me so when I filled these ones out down here these large oval raised beds I was told by the manufacturer where I got them from that you should put about a foot or two of drainage in the bottom like crushed granite and then your dirt your compost your mulch on top of that for your growing medium but I've since found out over the last decade or so just through experimentation that you don't need great drainage at all in large high raised beds like this in fact those beds there are definitely more thirstier than these beds here I mean I can call on the Hyuga culture method of bed but to me because I never knew about that method or process anyway I would just probably call them the raised beds with logs and organic matter used as drainage or as a base or as a fill with soil and compost on top instead of any fancy German name and to be quite honest so what does the process do of lining the base of your raised garden bed with all this organic material and large organic material too in many cases big logs and sticks well it serves several excellent purposes the first thing it does and it's not often mentioned when you read about Hyuga culture and that is for raised garden bed like this it adds fill if you fill this whole raised garden bed with good organic soil that you buy from a landscaping mob that can cost quite a lot of money and the fact is you don't need you know 3 or 2 feet of organic soil for vegetables to grow in most crops only need about a foot of growing medium and don't forget you can also add to the medium compost and mulch which also help to build it up so it makes sense not to waste feel like organic soil or even crushed granite and other types of fill that you have to pay for for the base of the raised bed like this it makes sense to use whatever you've got around offcuts rubbishing in my case I've got plenty of debris down the back there that I can cut up logs etc and place in the bottom of this bed the second thing is it helps the garden bed to absorb and hold water as the logs and sticks break down they act as sponges that absorption can then be released and used by the plants and utilize that water that's being soaked up in them the other thing that is so effective about this method of gardening is that as the organic manner underneath the soil breaks down and you can imagine the plants roots going down into that it breaks down and releases nutrients and acts as a type of fertilizer it acts as food for the fruit and vegetables and there's another benefit as the logs and the sticks are breaking down that process generates energy so it releases heat into the soil and plants do love nice warm soil cold climates in particular or even here through winter that process of it's slowly breaking down and releasing a little bit of warmth into the garden bed is beneficial for segment Amato's which don't grow too well in this type of climate especially during winter but as you can see I'm getting at least some excellent fruit out of my Tomatoes when perhaps I really shouldn't be at this time of year when the temperatures are getting sometimes sub-zero and the final thing about the breaking down process and using the Hyuga culture method is that microbes and worms that are feeding and living in that breaking down material in the logs and the sticks they also start to get a relationship with the plants fungi as well plants rely on microbes and fungi and worms not just to break down the soil for nutrients but to also help the roots take up certain nutrients that the plants need to thrive so let me just pick this clump red tomato berry variety of tomato and squeeze between these two Hyuga culture beds because I guess that's what they're called even though if it wasn't for you guys I still probably wouldn't have known what Hyuga culture was I hope you enjoyed the video of me explaining Hyuga culture even though to me it was just a logical way of getting extra fill into these raised garden beds and by adding that extra fill being logs and sticks and organic matter that could break down attract microbes and worms which in turn helps the plants through fertilization keeping the soil a little bit warmer than it otherwise would retaining moisture and the symbiotic nature between fungi and animals helping the plants making them in theory thrive which I think the proof is in the pudding good juices up hmm excuse me all right let's beeline so thanks a lot for watching if you liked the video give it a thumbs up don't forget to share it as well because that helps heaps website self-sufficient me calm bye for now I think I'll go and have another tomato [Music] you [Music] view all
 


 
 
subtitle:


if a unmarked I'm self-sufficient me and today I want to have a chat to you guys about Google culture what is it how I used it in this very garden bed here without even knowing about it and perhaps you have two and what makes it so excellent for growing your fruit and vege now I want to use this bed here as my example because at the moment I've got some vegetables growing in here and some beautiful tomatoes some black Russians some of these tomato berries sweet potato I've got kale there's basil there's Asian greens there's beans all in this one bit but before I explain how constructed this garden bed using the Google culture principle I have to come clean and let you know that it was totally by accident so what happened was I was reading the comments on one of my videos and one of you guys a few months back said hey mark just wondering if you practice here go culture or have you used it in the garden I've read this word and I thought that looks like double dutch to me when in fact legal culture is German meaning Hill culture or mound culture so yeah googling I found out all this information and I found out that it was effectively to build up a nice big mound with all this organic matter log sticks leaves whatever plant material and then on top of that you lay soil compost mulch and that's where it then becomes a mound where you can plant and grow vegetables and fruit trees or whatever crops and it just so happens that this bed here I've been practicing Google culture in it and I didn't even know in fact all these beds along here are done using the Google culture method so this bed this round one in front of the rectangular bed without just demonstrating this one here that I've got the mint growing in you might have remembered that from my grow a ton of mint video this round galvanized here this one this one here this one and this other rectangular galvanized raised bed that mirrors the one on the other side there exactly so all of them have used the Hyuga culture method with logs and leaves and sticks and twigs and just fill them half way up with organic matter and it really has worked a treat if I compare it to my early days of gardening say twelve or thirteen years ago when I made those raised beds at the back here hopefully you can still see me so when I filled these ones out down here these large oval raised beds I was told by the manufacturer where I got them from that you should put about a foot or two of drainage in the bottom like crushed granite and then your dirt your compost your mulch on top of that for your growing medium but I've since found out over the last decade or so just through experimentation that you don't need great drainage at all in large high raised beds like this in fact those beds there are definitely more thirstier than these beds here I mean I can call on the Hyuga culture method of bed but to me because I never knew about that method or process anyway I would just probably call them the raised beds with logs and organic matter used as drainage or as a base or as a fill with soil and compost on top instead of any fancy German name and to be quite honest so what does the process do of lining the base of your raised garden bed with all this organic material and large organic material too in many cases big logs and sticks well it serves several excellent purposes the first thing it does and it's not often mentioned when you read about Hyuga culture and that is for raised garden bed like this it adds fill if you fill this whole raised garden bed with good organic soil that you buy from a landscaping mob that can cost quite a lot of money and the fact is you don't need you know 3 or 2 feet of organic soil for vegetables to grow in most crops only need about a foot of growing medium and don't forget you can also add to the medium compost and mulch which also help to build it up so it makes sense not to waste feel like organic soil or even crushed granite and other types of fill that you have to pay for for the base of the raised bed like this it makes sense to use whatever you've got around offcuts rubbishing in my case I've got plenty of debris down the back there that I can cut up logs etc and place in the bottom of this bed the second thing is it helps the garden bed to absorb and hold water as the logs and sticks break down they act as sponges that absorption can then be released and used by the plants and utilize that water that's being soaked up in them the other thing that is so effective about this method of gardening is that as the organic manner underneath the soil breaks down and you can imagine the plants roots going down into that it breaks down and releases nutrients and acts as a type of fertilizer it acts as food for the fruit and vegetables and there's another benefit as the logs and the sticks are breaking down that process generates energy so it releases heat into the soil and plants do love nice warm soil cold climates in particular or even here through winter that process of it's slowly breaking down and releasing a little bit of warmth into the garden bed is beneficial for segment Amato's which don't grow too well in this type of climate especially during winter but as you can see I'm getting at least some excellent fruit out of my Tomatoes when perhaps I really shouldn't be at this time of year when the temperatures are getting sometimes sub-zero and the final thing about the breaking down process and using the Hyuga culture method is that microbes and worms that are feeding and living in that breaking down material in the logs and the sticks they also start to get a relationship with the plants fungi as well plants rely on microbes and fungi and worms not just to break down the soil for nutrients but to also help the roots take up certain nutrients that the plants need to thrive so let me just pick this clump red tomato berry variety of tomato and squeeze between these two Hyuga culture beds because I guess that's what they're called even though if it wasn't for you guys I still probably wouldn't have known what Hyuga culture was I hope you enjoyed the video of me explaining Hyuga culture even though to me it was just a logical way of getting extra fill into these raised garden beds and by adding that extra fill being logs and sticks and organic matter that could break down attract microbes and worms which in turn helps the plants through fertilization keeping the soil a little bit warmer than it otherwise would retaining moisture and the symbiotic nature between fungi and animals helping the plants making them in theory thrive which I think the proof is in the pudding good juices up hmm excuse me all right let's beeline so thanks a lot for watching if you liked the video give it a thumbs up don't forget to share it as well because that helps heaps website self-sufficient me calm bye for now I think I'll go and have another tomato [Music] you [Music]

159
Views

5 Tips How to Grow a Ton of Ginger in One Container or Garden Bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 159 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

today unlike themselves provision me and I'm back with another how to grow a ton of video in this case it's ginger now I've been growing ginger for a heck of a long time and over the years I've learned quite a few things about growing this magnificent rhyme zone growing underneath the soil it's one of the world's most useful and beneficial foods but let's not ramble on too much about it and let's just get into my five top tips on how to grow a ton of ginger tip number one position here I am down here right in the middle of our property no tree shade full Sun that is the best place to grow ginger where it gets plenty of sunlight now in the past we've grown ginger in this very bed actually when it was placed underneath the gum trees to my right part shade actually grew quite well so you can grow ginger in part shade or a partly shaded position however it does grow much better when it's exposed to well as much sunlight as you can give it ginger also grows very well in containers so for those smaller places maybe you don't have big garden beds maybe you're on our balcony if you can give it as much Sun as possible you can grow it in a pot no trouble at all in fact you can get some great harvests out of some small containers tip number two soil now for digging here and squeeze this all together it holds together just nicely and then I can crumble it apart it's rich it's full of organic matter and that's what ginger loves the soil has to be able to hold moisture but be free-draining so that means retain moisture but not be sopping wet so that it constricts growth and suffocates the rhein tone making good soil for ginger is easy you want to develop your soil over time by adding homemade compost you can't make it at home buy some compost mix it into the soil use mulch use the old ginger plant stems that breaks down and as that breaks down and gets eaten by microbes and worms it mixes into the soil and becomes an excellent moisture holding capacity and an excellent food source for the ginger and that leads to B into tip number three water if you want nice big fat rhyme zones that are plump you need to water ginger a lot it loves water but only if the soil is free draining so there's that balance you need that organic good structured soil because you want that water running through that container or the soil or wherever gingers planted so that ginger can take up as much water as it needs but it doesn't want to be sitting in water that's the balance you've got to create and it's not really that hard when I first plant my ginger I generally lay off the water that's about the only time I don't water it often because when you first plant the tubers out or the rhein zones out you don't want them to rot in the soil before it starts growing and developing its root system I generally leave it I'll leave rain do its thing natural rainfall whatever maybe if it's very very dry I might give it the old water but generally I just leave my ginger sit and wait till I see the shoots come through and that's when I start giving it it's regular water and not over watering at planting leads me on to tip number four planting and here's the ginger all laid out I've got the pile that I want to plant in here and I've got a small pile of nice big plump juicy pieces of ginger that I'm going to take inside and store in a nice cool dry place probably just on the kitchen bench actually near the dried chilies if I need more ginger I can always just come back to the garden and dig it up so I'm not losing out now nice big long piece like this I can break up into several pieces probably about you can just break it off work naturally you can see where there's a natural indent here it goes into a small narrow place break it off there I don't look for eyes and where it might be starting to gray like here's an eye here and then point that up or whatever don't worry about all that bumpkin I mean yeah okay if you want to be really pedantic but don't bother I just break it into nice chunks of pieces you can go even smaller than that if you really want and spread it out you could break that into like two inch or inch sized pieces and plant that that will grow another ginger plant but I like to break them into segments about that size because that gives plenty of food for the ginger plant to start to grow off and then it can multiply from there so it gives it a good start if it's about that big couple of inches across in diameter then I go about laying it all out around 20 centimeters or 1/2 foot apart lay it all out first and of course once we've got the ginger all laid out then I bury them so I only bury the ginger a little bit underneath the soil not too deep maybe an inch because you don't want to do them too deep of area too deep it's too hard for the ginger to shoot through too much layers of soil when you're not planting potatoes here and by the time it gets that energy spent to try to get through that soil that ginger root could be expended and it might just right and die so it's just a matter of easily just pushing it in under as you go just slightly under the soil an inch of that once I've buried the ginger I use some of my trusty organic blood and bone you could use your chicken manures and all that type of other animal manures if you want I would hesitate on using anything sort of grass-fed so I like horse manure because that might end up with a whole lot of weeds and grass through your ginger because ginger czar sparse growing plant as it is well clumpy like this it can grow fairly fairly well but it might get out competed by some heavy grasses and that could be a bit of a pain trying to weed in between the ginger shoots so I would hesitate on using those top of manures trigger mule probably better or quail manure in my case as well but if you don't have that a good organic fertilizer like organic blood and bone that's the bee's knees just liberally spread around the top here and that will give that ginger an extra boost before you think of fertilizer think of good organic composted soil with plenty of organic matter that is more important than giving too much fertilizer or any fertilizer at all the next thing I do is mulch a nice heavy mulch food cane mouth woodchip whatever and this is going to keep it nice and comfortable suppress weeds and as it breaks down it's going to also provide seeds for that hungry ginger and that's planting done and going hand-in-hand with planting comes tip number five eating or you could say harvesting but I want to talk about them base because they go hand in hand I reckon if you're going to grow a ton of ginger you want to be bloody eating it don't you how many pies what's the point people often think that you need to wait for ginger to develop and die off before you can start harvesting it right at the end of the season in most cases in a normal cool climate it's at the beginning of winter when it all dies back and then you can harvest around zones in a subtropical climate you might find that or a tropical climate you might find that the ginger keeps growing way into even midwinter before it all dies back waiting for the ginger to die back isn't at all necessary you can start harvesting ginger right from the get-go right from planting actually but more so after the shoots have developed and they're about a foot or so high you'll see that the tremors will start to form it's called young ginger you can harvest it from then onwards ginger is excellent for your health it's known to help with cardiovascular disease help your circularity system it's known for helping the digestive system helping your body to absorb other vitamins and minerals necessary for your overall health it helps with pain relief cancer fighting and there's a myriad of other beneficial aspects of eating ginger and that's it my top five tips position soil water planting harvesting / eating do those five things right and you will grow a ton of ginger just like I can it's dead set easy one of the easiest rhymes ohm's vegetables spices whatever you want to call it to grow so if you liked this video make sure you give it a thumbs up it's important that you share it and also how about leave a comment below on what's your favorite way to use ginger thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:

today unlike themselves provision me and I'm back with another how to grow a ton of video in this case it's ginger now I've been growing ginger for a heck of a long time and over the years I've learned quite a few things about growing this magnificent rhyme zone growing underneath the soil it's one of the world's most useful and beneficial foods but let's not ramble on too much about it and let's just get into my five top tips on how to grow a ton of ginger tip number one position here I am down here right in the middle of our property no tree shade full Sun that is the best place to grow ginger where it gets plenty of sunlight now in the past we've grown ginger in this very bed actually when it was placed underneath the gum trees to my right part shade actually grew quite well so you can grow ginger in part shade or a partly shaded position however it does grow much better when it's exposed to well as much sunlight as you can give it ginger also grows very well in containers so for those smaller places maybe you don't have big garden beds maybe you're on our balcony if you can give it as much Sun as possible you can grow it in a pot no trouble at all in fact you can get some great harvests out of some small containers tip number two soil now for digging here and squeeze this all together it holds together just nicely and then I can crumble it apart it's rich it's full of organic matter and that's what ginger loves the soil has to be able to hold moisture but be free-draining so that means retain moisture but not be sopping wet so that it constricts growth and suffocates the rhein tone making good soil for ginger is easy you want to develop your soil over time by adding homemade compost you can't make it at home buy some compost mix it into the soil use mulch use the old ginger plant stems that breaks down and as that breaks down and gets eaten by microbes and worms it mixes into the soil and becomes an excellent moisture holding capacity and an excellent food source for the ginger and that leads to B into tip number three water if you want nice big fat rhyme zones that are plump you need to water ginger a lot it loves water but only if the soil is free draining so there's that balance you need that organic good structured soil because you want that water running through that container or the soil or wherever gingers planted so that ginger can take up as much water as it needs but it doesn't want to be sitting in water that's the balance you've got to create and it's not really that hard when I first plant my ginger I generally lay off the water that's about the only time I don't water it often because when you first plant the tubers out or the rhein zones out you don't want them to rot in the soil before it starts growing and developing its root system I generally leave it I'll leave rain do its thing natural rainfall whatever maybe if it's very very dry I might give it the old water but generally I just leave my ginger sit and wait till I see the shoots come through and that's when I start giving it it's regular water and not over watering at planting leads me on to tip number four planting and here's the ginger all laid out I've got the pile that I want to plant in here and I've got a small pile of nice big plump juicy pieces of ginger that I'm going to take inside and store in a nice cool dry place probably just on the kitchen bench actually near the dried chilies if I need more ginger I can always just come back to the garden and dig it up so I'm not losing out now nice big long piece like this I can break up into several pieces probably about you can just break it off work naturally you can see where there's a natural indent here it goes into a small narrow place break it off there I don't look for eyes and where it might be starting to gray like here's an eye here and then point that up or whatever don't worry about all that bumpkin I mean yeah okay if you want to be really pedantic but don't bother I just break it into nice chunks of pieces you can go even smaller than that if you really want and spread it out you could break that into like two inch or inch sized pieces and plant that that will grow another ginger plant but I like to break them into segments about that size because that gives plenty of food for the ginger plant to start to grow off and then it can multiply from there so it gives it a good start if it's about that big couple of inches across in diameter then I go about laying it all out around 20 centimeters or 1/2 foot apart lay it all out first and of course once we've got the ginger all laid out then I bury them so I only bury the ginger a little bit underneath the soil not too deep maybe an inch because you don't want to do them too deep of area too deep it's too hard for the ginger to shoot through too much layers of soil when you're not planting potatoes here and by the time it gets that energy spent to try to get through that soil that ginger root could be expended and it might just right and die so it's just a matter of easily just pushing it in under as you go just slightly under the soil an inch of that once I've buried the ginger I use some of my trusty organic blood and bone you could use your chicken manures and all that type of other animal manures if you want I would hesitate on using anything sort of grass-fed so I like horse manure because that might end up with a whole lot of weeds and grass through your ginger because ginger czar sparse growing plant as it is well clumpy like this it can grow fairly fairly well but it might get out competed by some heavy grasses and that could be a bit of a pain trying to weed in between the ginger shoots so I would hesitate on using those top of manures trigger mule probably better or quail manure in my case as well but if you don't have that a good organic fertilizer like organic blood and bone that's the bee's knees just liberally spread around the top here and that will give that ginger an extra boost before you think of fertilizer think of good organic composted soil with plenty of organic matter that is more important than giving too much fertilizer or any fertilizer at all the next thing I do is mulch a nice heavy mulch food cane mouth woodchip whatever and this is going to keep it nice and comfortable suppress weeds and as it breaks down it's going to also provide seeds for that hungry ginger and that's planting done and going hand-in-hand with planting comes tip number five eating or you could say harvesting but I want to talk about them base because they go hand in hand I reckon if you're going to grow a ton of ginger you want to be bloody eating it don't you how many pies what's the point people often think that you need to wait for ginger to develop and die off before you can start harvesting it right at the end of the season in most cases in a normal cool climate it's at the beginning of winter when it all dies back and then you can harvest around zones in a subtropical climate you might find that or a tropical climate you might find that the ginger keeps growing way into even midwinter before it all dies back waiting for the ginger to die back isn't at all necessary you can start harvesting ginger right from the get-go right from planting actually but more so after the shoots have developed and they're about a foot or so high you'll see that the tremors will start to form it's called young ginger you can harvest it from then onwards ginger is excellent for your health it's known to help with cardiovascular disease help your circularity system it's known for helping the digestive system helping your body to absorb other vitamins and minerals necessary for your overall health it helps with pain relief cancer fighting and there's a myriad of other beneficial aspects of eating ginger and that's it my top five tips position soil water planting harvesting / eating do those five things right and you will grow a ton of ginger just like I can it's dead set easy one of the easiest rhymes ohm's vegetables spices whatever you want to call it to grow so if you liked this video make sure you give it a thumbs up it's important that you share it and also how about leave a comment below on what's your favorite way to use ginger thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music]


 
151
Views

5 Tips How to Grow a Ton of Turmeric in Just 3 Square Feet Garden Bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 151 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

could I I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I'm going to show you how to grow all of this tumeric all this here in just three square feet of garden bed that's right just in that little corner all this turmeric and you won't believe how easy it is to do this is the rhizome or root of the turmeric plant technically it's part of the ginger family it's one of the most famous foods in the world particularly due to its versatility in cooking it's used in a whole range of foods but also its medicinal qualities scientific tests have shown turmeric to stimulate cancer fighting genes in human cells and the best way to eat it is fresh or powdered in food such as a curry rather than in a tablet supplement but health qualities aside I just love it because it adds flavor to home cooking and it tastes great so fresh turmeric is best a well let's get into my five top tips on how to grow a ton of it tip number one planting turmeric is a really Hardy crop it's easy to grow you can even abuse it and it'll still find a way but to get the best out of your turmeric crop and to grow the most of it try doing these things first of all compost prepare the soil before planting by adding lots of rich compost turmeric loves a lot of food like I said it will grow miserly if it has to but give it lots of food and I tell you what it'll love you back use pieces of the rhizome roughly 2 or 3 inches square smaller pieces will grow also but the bigger the piece the more energy reserves it has to grow well plant it in free-draining crumbly soil that has been well tilled otherwise in hard compacted soil the root will find it harder to expand and it may also rot plant about six inches apart or there abouts but turmeric does grow well crowded so don't worry too much if it's a little crowded in bury the rhizome about an inch or two underneath the surface and fertilize with a good few handfuls of organic fertilizer such as blood and bone and chicken pellet manure or you can use well rotted animal manures if you've got them handy you should mulch over the top of the turmeric once you plant say about two or three inches sugar cane mulch or even its own stems that have died back from the last season because this will stop weeds competing with the new shoots of the turmeric tries to grow through and for those of you who like growing in pots and containers just like ginger turmeric will grow really well in those environments also the same principles apply tip number two water turmeric originates from Southeast Asia which is primarily a tropical climate it loves it hot and wet but just because trimmer it comes from a tropical region doesn't mean you can't grow it all around the world grow it at the hottest time of the year in a position where as plenty of Sun and water it regularly water more especially if you are growing in pots or containers because they tend to dry out faster and that's the balance you have to make you need it free draining because that's what Tremec likes but you also need to give it plenty of water so if your soil is too heavy in whatever container you use or garden bed you're going to try to water it and give it the water it needs but then if it's too boggy the tubers might just rot in the soil so the key really is more free draining than anything even if it means you have to water it daily tip number three the growing area I'm sitting in it to grow this much turmeric you really need a fair-sized growing area yes this is only 3 feet by 3 feet just where I'm sitting now and I grew this much but of course logically you can't grow this much turmeric in a tiny pot like this so you've got to allow for at least a bit of space it's best to find a central vegetable garden position where the Sun can get access to the plants for most of the day without getting shaded out by other plants or trees you may need to build up your stock over several years you know to get this much turmeric it just doesn't happen overnight obviously all this started from just one plant in a small pot that I got from our local nursery three and a half years ago so it's possible take what you need preserve eat what you need and put the rest back into the garden and then you'll keep growing your stock like that tip number 4 crop rotation you may have heard about the benefits of crop rotation and how good it is to rotate your crops in a separate garden bed each year I've found it's only necessary to crop rotate every two seasons every few years to negate soil depletion and a buildup of pests so if you start off growing well and you find your plants are not doing so well ruk right worms borås slow growth etc consider moving to another bed and give it a fresh start that should do the trick tip number five harvesting let the plant die back fully because this is the time when the plant is dying back that it transfers all the energy into the rhizome and that prepares it for the dormant stage to come then when you harvest the roots it will be better tasting because it's more mature and it'll also store better on the shelf use these old stems back into the garden there's mulch because it rejuvenates the soil it protects the soil it also limits weed growth throughout the season try to harvest the turmeric before the new season starts in spring otherwise it will start shooting and you'll have to meet growing over the top of turmeric carefully dig up the turmeric rhizome with a garden fork it'll come out in clumps and with just a little bit of pulling and shaking it'll come apart quite easily you'll notice two distinct parts of the rhizome the often central mouth shaped part with side roots coming off it and also the finger parts I don't use the mouth shaped parts for eating I'd rather keep them for replanting you can eat them if you want but personally I think they're not as rich and tasty as the fingers our turmeric will store okay on the shelf or in the crisper to use fresh for several weeks but you can preserve it by freezing pickling or making your own powdered spice you can also store it in a bag or a tub or even just a box a little bit of soil or mulch over the top so that you can keep it for when you're ready to plant it out for the new coming season and that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of turmeric if you liked the video give me a big fat turmeric thumbs up and also share it like crazy all over the internet don't forget to subscribe and the website self-sufficient me.com thanks a lot for watching - ow [Music]


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subtitle:

could I I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I'm going to show you how to grow all of this tumeric all this here in just three square feet of garden bed that's right just in that little corner all this turmeric and you won't believe how easy it is to do this is the rhizome or root of the turmeric plant technically it's part of the ginger family it's one of the most famous foods in the world particularly due to its versatility in cooking it's used in a whole range of foods but also its medicinal qualities scientific tests have shown turmeric to stimulate cancer fighting genes in human cells and the best way to eat it is fresh or powdered in food such as a curry rather than in a tablet supplement but health qualities aside I just love it because it adds flavor to home cooking and it tastes great so fresh turmeric is best a well let's get into my five top tips on how to grow a ton of it tip number one planting turmeric is a really Hardy crop it's easy to grow you can even abuse it and it'll still find a way but to get the best out of your turmeric crop and to grow the most of it try doing these things first of all compost prepare the soil before planting by adding lots of rich compost turmeric loves a lot of food like I said it will grow miserly if it has to but give it lots of food and I tell you what it'll love you back use pieces of the rhizome roughly 2 or 3 inches square smaller pieces will grow also but the bigger the piece the more energy reserves it has to grow well plant it in free-draining crumbly soil that has been well tilled otherwise in hard compacted soil the root will find it harder to expand and it may also rot plant about six inches apart or there abouts but turmeric does grow well crowded so don't worry too much if it's a little crowded in bury the rhizome about an inch or two underneath the surface and fertilize with a good few handfuls of organic fertilizer such as blood and bone and chicken pellet manure or you can use well rotted animal manures if you've got them handy you should mulch over the top of the turmeric once you plant say about two or three inches sugar cane mulch or even its own stems that have died back from the last season because this will stop weeds competing with the new shoots of the turmeric tries to grow through and for those of you who like growing in pots and containers just like ginger turmeric will grow really well in those environments also the same principles apply tip number two water turmeric originates from Southeast Asia which is primarily a tropical climate it loves it hot and wet but just because trimmer it comes from a tropical region doesn't mean you can't grow it all around the world grow it at the hottest time of the year in a position where as plenty of Sun and water it regularly water more especially if you are growing in pots or containers because they tend to dry out faster and that's the balance you have to make you need it free draining because that's what Tremec likes but you also need to give it plenty of water so if your soil is too heavy in whatever container you use or garden bed you're going to try to water it and give it the water it needs but then if it's too boggy the tubers might just rot in the soil so the key really is more free draining than anything even if it means you have to water it daily tip number three the growing area I'm sitting in it to grow this much turmeric you really need a fair-sized growing area yes this is only 3 feet by 3 feet just where I'm sitting now and I grew this much but of course logically you can't grow this much turmeric in a tiny pot like this so you've got to allow for at least a bit of space it's best to find a central vegetable garden position where the Sun can get access to the plants for most of the day without getting shaded out by other plants or trees you may need to build up your stock over several years you know to get this much turmeric it just doesn't happen overnight obviously all this started from just one plant in a small pot that I got from our local nursery three and a half years ago so it's possible take what you need preserve eat what you need and put the rest back into the garden and then you'll keep growing your stock like that tip number 4 crop rotation you may have heard about the benefits of crop rotation and how good it is to rotate your crops in a separate garden bed each year I've found it's only necessary to crop rotate every two seasons every few years to negate soil depletion and a buildup of pests so if you start off growing well and you find your plants are not doing so well ruk right worms borås slow growth etc consider moving to another bed and give it a fresh start that should do the trick tip number five harvesting let the plant die back fully because this is the time when the plant is dying back that it transfers all the energy into the rhizome and that prepares it for the dormant stage to come then when you harvest the roots it will be better tasting because it's more mature and it'll also store better on the shelf use these old stems back into the garden there's mulch because it rejuvenates the soil it protects the soil it also limits weed growth throughout the season try to harvest the turmeric before the new season starts in spring otherwise it will start shooting and you'll have to meet growing over the top of turmeric carefully dig up the turmeric rhizome with a garden fork it'll come out in clumps and with just a little bit of pulling and shaking it'll come apart quite easily you'll notice two distinct parts of the rhizome the often central mouth shaped part with side roots coming off it and also the finger parts I don't use the mouth shaped parts for eating I'd rather keep them for replanting you can eat them if you want but personally I think they're not as rich and tasty as the fingers our turmeric will store okay on the shelf or in the crisper to use fresh for several weeks but you can preserve it by freezing pickling or making your own powdered spice you can also store it in a bag or a tub or even just a box a little bit of soil or mulch over the top so that you can keep it for when you're ready to plant it out for the new coming season and that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of turmeric if you liked the video give me a big fat turmeric thumbs up and also share it like crazy all over the internet don't forget to subscribe and the website self-sufficient me.com thanks a lot for watching - ow [Music]


 
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how I typically espalier single tomato plants that have self-seeded in the garden by making a simple mini trellis from reo mesh and a star picket.

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 152 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm like from self-sufficient me and I'm in the garden here I was just working on this mini tomato trellis and I thought you know what what I'd do some filming you guys might be interested in what I'm doing here and yeah let's just get right on into it a month ago or so there was this seedling that just popped up out of nowhere tomato seedling this is it here it's grown into quite a nice sizable tomato bush it looks like it's some type of larger variety what I need to do is trellis it up it's only one plant and I thought I'd show you how easy it is to knock up one of these many espalier tomato trellises just out of Rio mesh and a simple star picket the end of the day it's pretty easy yeah yeah whack the star pick it into the ground so it's you know fairly sold maybe a better foot down so it won't fall over too easy and I've got these smaller pieces of mesh just for individual plants like this just cut out and I've folded the sides over so that they're you know that I poked anyone's eye out when they're sort of getting in the garden it's only about a meter wide three feet or less than that and about the same square high well I like about this rear mesh is it's strong it lasts forever this is probably 10 years old this piece or more on the top of these stuff it gets you know how you have a slot from where normal wire goes when you're doing fencing well the Rio bar or the Rio mesh just fits nicely into that and if you line up the star picket with the center of the mesh just use a couple of zip ties or a piece of wire if you want but zip ties are nice and easy to get on and off you zip it together at the top together at the bottom through these holes here in the star picket and it becomes quite ace secure and fast way to set up a mini trellis so what I've got to do now is just pick this tomato plant up and attach it to the trellis so that it can grow and espalier out and of course if you leave it just flop into the garden like this it's just the fruits going to right because it's going to touch the green and slugs and snails will be able to get to the fruit easier so it's best off picking a plant up like this and obviously growing it up something as with most tomato plants use some of this twine that I've got here just blue gardening twine it degrades in the Sun after a while and I will tie the plant up to this and we'll see how we go so this is the main central leader and I'll try to centralize that main leader up the strongest part here so that the weight is distributed in the middle so you basically want to tie a knot that doesn't slip so a non-slip granny knot so that it doesn't shake the bottom of the stem off and we'll just start wrapping that through and twisting it around the main leader stem careful that I don't burn the plant or cut through it going in between the laterals the laterals will help support the twine as well though that what twine doesn't slide up it's bending over because of the position it's in he doesn't know which way to gray because it wasn't being supported in in any way at all the way it was so this will help straighten that leader stem up as well there we go now I can easily pull that up see right up to the top here go around and cut off any diseased leaves I can see and now I've got that secondary that I can that's all so you can see starting to curl around because it was going nowhere it was just sort of spiraling in the bed here it's still gonna grow out that way so I'll keep it sort of going on that trajectory another one on the other side here got some good fruit there what I'll do is I'll trim that it looks a bit bushy and train that up this side see even the kookaburras are happy and then pull that up and that'll train up to that and that's pretty much it nice and short keep it simple that plant there was myself cedar came out of nowhere I don't know how it got to that part of the garden but I'm glad I kept it because I'm interested to see how this fruit turns out looks like it's going to be a really nice variety and this is the right time for tomatoes now coming into our spring although we can grow them through winter and I do but they don't grow as well as this warmer time of the year is you're coming into spring before summer hits so I'm keen to see how this one works out I think it's going to be a good plant yeah thanks a lot for watching hope you enjoyed the video if you did give it a thumbs up go to self-sufficient muqaam subscribe obviously if you haven't already bye for now
 
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subtitle:


today I'm like from self-sufficient me and I'm in the garden here I was just working on this mini tomato trellis and I thought you know what what I'd do some filming you guys might be interested in what I'm doing here and yeah let's just get right on into it a month ago or so there was this seedling that just popped up out of nowhere tomato seedling this is it here it's grown into quite a nice sizable tomato bush it looks like it's some type of larger variety what I need to do is trellis it up it's only one plant and I thought I'd show you how easy it is to knock up one of these many espalier tomato trellises just out of Rio mesh and a simple star picket the end of the day it's pretty easy yeah yeah whack the star pick it into the ground so it's you know fairly sold maybe a better foot down so it won't fall over too easy and I've got these smaller pieces of mesh just for individual plants like this just cut out and I've folded the sides over so that they're you know that I poked anyone's eye out when they're sort of getting in the garden it's only about a meter wide three feet or less than that and about the same square high well I like about this rear mesh is it's strong it lasts forever this is probably 10 years old this piece or more on the top of these stuff it gets you know how you have a slot from where normal wire goes when you're doing fencing well the Rio bar or the Rio mesh just fits nicely into that and if you line up the star picket with the center of the mesh just use a couple of zip ties or a piece of wire if you want but zip ties are nice and easy to get on and off you zip it together at the top together at the bottom through these holes here in the star picket and it becomes quite ace secure and fast way to set up a mini trellis so what I've got to do now is just pick this tomato plant up and attach it to the trellis so that it can grow and espalier out and of course if you leave it just flop into the garden like this it's just the fruits going to right because it's going to touch the green and slugs and snails will be able to get to the fruit easier so it's best off picking a plant up like this and obviously growing it up something as with most tomato plants use some of this twine that I've got here just blue gardening twine it degrades in the Sun after a while and I will tie the plant up to this and we'll see how we go so this is the main central leader and I'll try to centralize that main leader up the strongest part here so that the weight is distributed in the middle so you basically want to tie a knot that doesn't slip so a non-slip granny knot so that it doesn't shake the bottom of the stem off and we'll just start wrapping that through and twisting it around the main leader stem careful that I don't burn the plant or cut through it going in between the laterals the laterals will help support the twine as well though that what twine doesn't slide up it's bending over because of the position it's in he doesn't know which way to gray because it wasn't being supported in in any way at all the way it was so this will help straighten that leader stem up as well there we go now I can easily pull that up see right up to the top here go around and cut off any diseased leaves I can see and now I've got that secondary that I can that's all so you can see starting to curl around because it was going nowhere it was just sort of spiraling in the bed here it's still gonna grow out that way so I'll keep it sort of going on that trajectory another one on the other side here got some good fruit there what I'll do is I'll trim that it looks a bit bushy and train that up this side see even the kookaburras are happy and then pull that up and that'll train up to that and that's pretty much it nice and short keep it simple that plant there was myself cedar came out of nowhere I don't know how it got to that part of the garden but I'm glad I kept it because I'm interested to see how this fruit turns out looks like it's going to be a really nice variety and this is the right time for tomatoes now coming into our spring although we can grow them through winter and I do but they don't grow as well as this warmer time of the year is you're coming into spring before summer hits so I'm keen to see how this one works out I think it's going to be a good plant yeah thanks a lot for watching hope you enjoyed the video if you did give it a thumbs up go to self-sufficient muqaam subscribe obviously if you haven't already bye for now
 
 
86
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5 tips on how I grow several varieties of salad plants in just one small raised garden bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 86 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
97
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Asparagus Citrus Tomatoes Eggplant Cucumber Beans Pruning Duck

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 97 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

today I'm not from self-sufficiently and it's a beautiful sunny day here for our first week of spring and there's a lot going on it's really windy today so I'll try my best to struggle and cope with that wind so that it doesn't disrupt the video too much but there's several things that I wanted to show you and I meant to show you this midweek around about Wednesday and I'd get a lot of shooting and a lot of govern off the problem was I didn't I didn't tend to like on so I had no microphone then when I went and played it back you know all excited on how I was going to edit this video out there was no it was no sound so that was a bit of a bummer but here I am I'm not going to give up I'm still gonna put out a video this weekend but my midweek video is gonna be the end of the week but like I said there's lots of want to show you so let's get into it okay the first thing I wanted to show you guys is see how I'm standing underneath this grapevine it's still in its dormant stage this is the one that I did a video on a few years ago on how to prune and grow a grape vine off your house and it's going great guns but pruning speaking of needs to be done all over the place here at the moment and I really should have got my pruning done through winter before spring had sprung Bernie way this is got to be pruned back and all my fruit trees have to be pruned back as well these things I'm going to mention in this video are things that you're going to see in videos coming up and then you'll be able to later go oh yeah yeah I remember that video mark done of all those several madness things that were going on in his yard at the time so that was how that turned out etc etc those so that's the aim of this video is to give you an update and and also really just show you what's going on at the moment because it is a busy time the start of spring even in the subtropical climate remember we're coming out of winter which is a growing time for us particularly with all those salad crops we grow all year it's just that it's different crops that we grow I'm just gonna grab the camera and we'll go around and have a look yeah that toilet kangaroo thing has been getting a beating going around around on top of our clothesline here boy that must be 20 20 years old or something I was here way before we got here anyway citrus starts at this part of the orchard and goes all the way back all these trees will need to be pruned even though they're staying to flower I've got to prune them but are they're just beautiful the lime tree which you've seen my lime video where you may have flowering again and small fruit it's always in fruit the Meyer lemon I love the Meyer lemon flowers they're different got that purple to them purple tinge look at the bees just love them a Valencia orange which is our last orange tree that we use we leave the fruit on the Valencia I've mentioned this many times but just look how many flowers are on it it is just pumping pumping with flowers we've got a few pests turning up if you follow my videos you know that I don't get to wrap around the axles when it comes to pest management you see a few aphids on the tree I monitor it i watch and see how many predator insects there are around because that's important things like the lady birds and the hover flies if there's a lot of them around how generally we'll just wait and I won't you know break out the organic pesticide organic sprays so I'll monitor this tree I see that it's got some clusters of aphids and that on it and if it gets too overwhelming then I might actually spray it but I'll spray it probably right at the end of the day when I know there's no bees around or maybe even after it's finished flowering you know I want to keep the predator insects and the pollinating insects in mind whenever I do any type of spraying even if it's organic these larger trees I can take a little bit of pest infestation and on the younger trees if you've got all the new spring growth that's getting eaten by bugs well then yeah it's probably a good idea to hit it straight away so that that young tree isn't challenged when it's just trying to grow and become you know a good stable tree otherwise nine times out of 10 it fixes itself up okay let's not go off too much more about citrus we've got plenty that's going I can see that our mandarine is is flowering which is a good sign last year we've got no fruit out of it because it's a biannual fruit oh so it looks like we're going to get a good harvest out of that this season we normally do in the second year Washington Orange behind that and several others but anyway let's move on to the asparagus how cool is this or the asparagus coming up I just love this time of year at the start of spring asparagus it never fails within that first week boom it just starts shooting up this one was a little early because we've had some hot days through winter so there was a few sprigs of asparagus that were coming through earlier than I expected while it prompted me into getting this bed prepared and knocking down all the old-growth remoulding and getting stuck into it before all these started coming through just wonderful I love eating asparagus fresh even raw there's nothing better than fresh asparagus on the table and being spring means Tomatoes look at how green and fresh these Tomatoes look this whole bet is cherry tomatoes the reason why I'm concentrating on them now is because it is coming into spring summer and it's fruit fly season and the fruit flies then target all large tomato so even though you can grow them here and I've got a couple on the guide to be honest I have to watch them because otherwise the fruit flower get them and some of the larger varieties if they're growing well into you know mid spring I'm gonna have to start netting them otherwise we'll lose every one of them whereas the cherry tomatoes even the pears and the the ones in our plum size they don't get hit at all in this bed here I grew tomatoes all winter and they're they've just about had it now and they're dying off because they've had their season I've still got a couple of larger ones like these black Russians or black cream but those little spots on there worry me because that looks like a fruit fly sting sometimes they don't the maggot doesn't grow inside but when it does it ruins the whole fruit it's not that easy ground tomato through winter here you have to look after them to make sure they're in a good warm spot as long as you start them when it's still warm and let them grow into the color putana of the year you can do it in the subtropics no worries but yeah the best time of year is coming into spring now and they should give us some really great Tomatoes all through mid spring and into summer when then it'll get too hot in the tomatoes to die back again so essentially it's sort of two times a year where I get the tomatoes up to speed and it's similar with the eggplant normally I start my eggplants off light winter so that they're getting a good start and then they grow into spring and into summer and they do really well but these ones self seeded several of them that I've got in the garden at the moment and they grew all through winter and gave us eggplants in winter and now they're picking up again getting their second wind so I don't think I need even need to grow or plant any new eggplants for this season I'm really impressed and I'm definitely going to keep the seed out of these guys and say them again because it seems like they're gonna get eggplant all year round we've got a couple more over here as well so when you when you get a variety in your garden that sort of just pops up and does well at an unusual time of the year well then save that seed because it's adapting to your garden and those are the type of plants that you want so now moving on to the cucumbers and the beans that I wanted to talk about the beans over here but there's a similar type of concept here's the cucumbers now these ki-- comes you'll notice there's no trellis that's because they're Bush cucumbers I'll only get a couple of feet high and the intent is see this round bed the intent is for the plants to grow up and then eventually on their own weight they're going to flop down and they're going to hang to about half of three cords of the way down that bed so you're going to get a cascading effect of Bush cucumbers and I think that is going to be really cool it's going to be less maintenance and I'm thinking it's going to be a great growing method to show you guys hopefully it works in the center there I'm going to plant some maybe some chilies or capsicums or you know sweet peppers but we'll see but I haven't decided exactly what I'm going to put in the bed there yet but I reckon it's going to work a treat maximize the growing space because you've got plants cascading down able to plant more other plants in the center there and plus you're limiting your gardening workload because you don't have to constantly tie them up or trellis them up I think it's going to work well and they've got the same concept going over here with these beans these are dwarf beans they're not growing up beans like these were and they needed to beat relased these are all purple beans I'll keep the seeds for that and grown again soon but here these are Dwarfs and you can see they're getting to a fair size I'll get a little bigger than that and then I'm just going to train them to flop over they'll get probably two-foot high they'll flop over they'll get the ends about there and I'll be able to plant other things around the inside here like I've already got some coriander some other herbs that's the flat leaf coriander and I've got a tomato in the middle here the last thing I wanted to show you or talk about is the zucchinis here you can see that they grew all through winter if you watch my videos you'd know that I did a video on pickling zucchinis got a few still left so it's it's chugging along but it is getting towards the end of life these plants here but what I wanted to say was I tasted some of that lacto-fermented zucchinis that I showed you in the video and I tell you what they came up a treat they were absolutely beautiful lessons learnt on the larger ones I wouldn't keep the seeds and the center because they went a little mushy but not not out of hand mushy but I'd say a better way to pickle them would be in strips or take out the seeds in the middle and cut them in halves and half slices without the seeds and they'd probably pickle more crunch here and better than that way but apart from that they are going to be great those pickled zucchinis and curry dishes just as a side or mixed in with your favorite dip you know may be mixed with some soft cheese and turn it into a beautiful lacto zucchini dip which we like to do with all sorts of lacto fermented foods and the last thing I wanted to show you guys was down the back here we've got a duck that's sitting on her eggs anyway I took some footage of that so let's have a look at that now that she is sitting on two sets of eggs the one over here and one inside the chicken coop I accidentally walked in on her that's why she is up to date she seems to be settling down a bit here comes the Drake I've stepped back out of the way Drake's coming in a la she's now gone and started eating some lettuce that I put down she's in there eating I'm I can't have a look at her nest okay so it's one two three four yeah it is there is a nice little nest made up twigs and sticks she's done well they're all off down to the dam there but I still reckon it's gonna be amazing if she actually produces any ducklings at all out of that nest we'll see have a look at this man go be haami isn't it fantastic when I do my pruning that I was talking about the beginning of the video I probably won't hit any of these smaller mango trees but I am going to really smash the larger mango tree and cut it right back that's a bone over there this one here I think this wasn't a qualm or maybe a Glen but I'm not too sure it have to have a look at my notes but it is in beautiful flower I think it's the best I've seen the mangos flower for many years here so hopefully we will get a good harvest this summer anyway that's the end of this update video will show you what's going on video and show you what's coming up in the future video I hope you enjoyed it don't forget to give a thumbs up if you did because I can do more of these type of update videos that are bitten more adlib rather than the structured ones which I am going to bring a more scripted video this weekend as well so that's maybe tomorrow or the next day you'll see another one from me how cool is that don't forget to share it as well visit the website self-sufficient me calm I just wrote an article about a courage lifestyle and living you might be interested in reading that and subscribe if you haven't already thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


 
 
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subtitle:

today I'm not from self-sufficiently and it's a beautiful sunny day here for our first week of spring and there's a lot going on it's really windy today so I'll try my best to struggle and cope with that wind so that it doesn't disrupt the video too much but there's several things that I wanted to show you and I meant to show you this midweek around about Wednesday and I'd get a lot of shooting and a lot of govern off the problem was I didn't I didn't tend to like on so I had no microphone then when I went and played it back you know all excited on how I was going to edit this video out there was no it was no sound so that was a bit of a bummer but here I am I'm not going to give up I'm still gonna put out a video this weekend but my midweek video is gonna be the end of the week but like I said there's lots of want to show you so let's get into it okay the first thing I wanted to show you guys is see how I'm standing underneath this grapevine it's still in its dormant stage this is the one that I did a video on a few years ago on how to prune and grow a grape vine off your house and it's going great guns but pruning speaking of needs to be done all over the place here at the moment and I really should have got my pruning done through winter before spring had sprung Bernie way this is got to be pruned back and all my fruit trees have to be pruned back as well these things I'm going to mention in this video are things that you're going to see in videos coming up and then you'll be able to later go oh yeah yeah I remember that video mark done of all those several madness things that were going on in his yard at the time so that was how that turned out etc etc those so that's the aim of this video is to give you an update and and also really just show you what's going on at the moment because it is a busy time the start of spring even in the subtropical climate remember we're coming out of winter which is a growing time for us particularly with all those salad crops we grow all year it's just that it's different crops that we grow I'm just gonna grab the camera and we'll go around and have a look yeah that toilet kangaroo thing has been getting a beating going around around on top of our clothesline here boy that must be 20 20 years old or something I was here way before we got here anyway citrus starts at this part of the orchard and goes all the way back all these trees will need to be pruned even though they're staying to flower I've got to prune them but are they're just beautiful the lime tree which you've seen my lime video where you may have flowering again and small fruit it's always in fruit the Meyer lemon I love the Meyer lemon flowers they're different got that purple to them purple tinge look at the bees just love them a Valencia orange which is our last orange tree that we use we leave the fruit on the Valencia I've mentioned this many times but just look how many flowers are on it it is just pumping pumping with flowers we've got a few pests turning up if you follow my videos you know that I don't get to wrap around the axles when it comes to pest management you see a few aphids on the tree I monitor it i watch and see how many predator insects there are around because that's important things like the lady birds and the hover flies if there's a lot of them around how generally we'll just wait and I won't you know break out the organic pesticide organic sprays so I'll monitor this tree I see that it's got some clusters of aphids and that on it and if it gets too overwhelming then I might actually spray it but I'll spray it probably right at the end of the day when I know there's no bees around or maybe even after it's finished flowering you know I want to keep the predator insects and the pollinating insects in mind whenever I do any type of spraying even if it's organic these larger trees I can take a little bit of pest infestation and on the younger trees if you've got all the new spring growth that's getting eaten by bugs well then yeah it's probably a good idea to hit it straight away so that that young tree isn't challenged when it's just trying to grow and become you know a good stable tree otherwise nine times out of 10 it fixes itself up okay let's not go off too much more about citrus we've got plenty that's going I can see that our mandarine is is flowering which is a good sign last year we've got no fruit out of it because it's a biannual fruit oh so it looks like we're going to get a good harvest out of that this season we normally do in the second year Washington Orange behind that and several others but anyway let's move on to the asparagus how cool is this or the asparagus coming up I just love this time of year at the start of spring asparagus it never fails within that first week boom it just starts shooting up this one was a little early because we've had some hot days through winter so there was a few sprigs of asparagus that were coming through earlier than I expected while it prompted me into getting this bed prepared and knocking down all the old-growth remoulding and getting stuck into it before all these started coming through just wonderful I love eating asparagus fresh even raw there's nothing better than fresh asparagus on the table and being spring means Tomatoes look at how green and fresh these Tomatoes look this whole bet is cherry tomatoes the reason why I'm concentrating on them now is because it is coming into spring summer and it's fruit fly season and the fruit flies then target all large tomato so even though you can grow them here and I've got a couple on the guide to be honest I have to watch them because otherwise the fruit flower get them and some of the larger varieties if they're growing well into you know mid spring I'm gonna have to start netting them otherwise we'll lose every one of them whereas the cherry tomatoes even the pears and the the ones in our plum size they don't get hit at all in this bed here I grew tomatoes all winter and they're they've just about had it now and they're dying off because they've had their season I've still got a couple of larger ones like these black Russians or black cream but those little spots on there worry me because that looks like a fruit fly sting sometimes they don't the maggot doesn't grow inside but when it does it ruins the whole fruit it's not that easy ground tomato through winter here you have to look after them to make sure they're in a good warm spot as long as you start them when it's still warm and let them grow into the color putana of the year you can do it in the subtropics no worries but yeah the best time of year is coming into spring now and they should give us some really great Tomatoes all through mid spring and into summer when then it'll get too hot in the tomatoes to die back again so essentially it's sort of two times a year where I get the tomatoes up to speed and it's similar with the eggplant normally I start my eggplants off light winter so that they're getting a good start and then they grow into spring and into summer and they do really well but these ones self seeded several of them that I've got in the garden at the moment and they grew all through winter and gave us eggplants in winter and now they're picking up again getting their second wind so I don't think I need even need to grow or plant any new eggplants for this season I'm really impressed and I'm definitely going to keep the seed out of these guys and say them again because it seems like they're gonna get eggplant all year round we've got a couple more over here as well so when you when you get a variety in your garden that sort of just pops up and does well at an unusual time of the year well then save that seed because it's adapting to your garden and those are the type of plants that you want so now moving on to the cucumbers and the beans that I wanted to talk about the beans over here but there's a similar type of concept here's the cucumbers now these ki-- comes you'll notice there's no trellis that's because they're Bush cucumbers I'll only get a couple of feet high and the intent is see this round bed the intent is for the plants to grow up and then eventually on their own weight they're going to flop down and they're going to hang to about half of three cords of the way down that bed so you're going to get a cascading effect of Bush cucumbers and I think that is going to be really cool it's going to be less maintenance and I'm thinking it's going to be a great growing method to show you guys hopefully it works in the center there I'm going to plant some maybe some chilies or capsicums or you know sweet peppers but we'll see but I haven't decided exactly what I'm going to put in the bed there yet but I reckon it's going to work a treat maximize the growing space because you've got plants cascading down able to plant more other plants in the center there and plus you're limiting your gardening workload because you don't have to constantly tie them up or trellis them up I think it's going to work well and they've got the same concept going over here with these beans these are dwarf beans they're not growing up beans like these were and they needed to beat relased these are all purple beans I'll keep the seeds for that and grown again soon but here these are Dwarfs and you can see they're getting to a fair size I'll get a little bigger than that and then I'm just going to train them to flop over they'll get probably two-foot high they'll flop over they'll get the ends about there and I'll be able to plant other things around the inside here like I've already got some coriander some other herbs that's the flat leaf coriander and I've got a tomato in the middle here the last thing I wanted to show you or talk about is the zucchinis here you can see that they grew all through winter if you watch my videos you'd know that I did a video on pickling zucchinis got a few still left so it's it's chugging along but it is getting towards the end of life these plants here but what I wanted to say was I tasted some of that lacto-fermented zucchinis that I showed you in the video and I tell you what they came up a treat they were absolutely beautiful lessons learnt on the larger ones I wouldn't keep the seeds and the center because they went a little mushy but not not out of hand mushy but I'd say a better way to pickle them would be in strips or take out the seeds in the middle and cut them in halves and half slices without the seeds and they'd probably pickle more crunch here and better than that way but apart from that they are going to be great those pickled zucchinis and curry dishes just as a side or mixed in with your favorite dip you know may be mixed with some soft cheese and turn it into a beautiful lacto zucchini dip which we like to do with all sorts of lacto fermented foods and the last thing I wanted to show you guys was down the back here we've got a duck that's sitting on her eggs anyway I took some footage of that so let's have a look at that now that she is sitting on two sets of eggs the one over here and one inside the chicken coop I accidentally walked in on her that's why she is up to date she seems to be settling down a bit here comes the Drake I've stepped back out of the way Drake's coming in a la she's now gone and started eating some lettuce that I put down she's in there eating I'm I can't have a look at her nest okay so it's one two three four yeah it is there is a nice little nest made up twigs and sticks she's done well they're all off down to the dam there but I still reckon it's gonna be amazing if she actually produces any ducklings at all out of that nest we'll see have a look at this man go be haami isn't it fantastic when I do my pruning that I was talking about the beginning of the video I probably won't hit any of these smaller mango trees but I am going to really smash the larger mango tree and cut it right back that's a bone over there this one here I think this wasn't a qualm or maybe a Glen but I'm not too sure it have to have a look at my notes but it is in beautiful flower I think it's the best I've seen the mangos flower for many years here so hopefully we will get a good harvest this summer anyway that's the end of this update video will show you what's going on video and show you what's coming up in the future video I hope you enjoyed it don't forget to give a thumbs up if you did because I can do more of these type of update videos that are bitten more adlib rather than the structured ones which I am going to bring a more scripted video this weekend as well so that's maybe tomorrow or the next day you'll see another one from me how cool is that don't forget to share it as well visit the website self-sufficient me calm I just wrote an article about a courage lifestyle and living you might be interested in reading that and subscribe if you haven't already thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


 
 
 
429
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170
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Freezing temperatures don't stop us from harvesting nutritious fresh produce from our garden.

Daily LifeOYR Frugal Published the article • 0 comments • 170 views • 2018-01-03 16:50 • came from similar tags

Freezing temperatures don't stop us from harvesting nutritious fresh produce from our garden. Please join me as I gather today's harvest in mid-December.
 
 
 

 
 
  view all
Freezing temperatures don't stop us from harvesting nutritious fresh produce from our garden. Please join me as I gather today's harvest in mid-December.
 
 
 


 
 
 
160
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Final 2017 Tour of The Rusted Garden & Tips: Insects, Squirrel Tips, A Bee Herb & Organic Matter

ExperienceGary Pilarchik Published the article • 0 comments • 160 views • 2018-01-01 20:23 • came from similar tags

The final garden tour for 2017. I also talk about the insect issues that came in because of the mild fall, how to deal with squirrels, a great herb for bees and how to process your leaves and grass for easy garden organic matter. Just a basic tour and some tips. Enjoy
 
 
  view all
The final garden tour for 2017. I also talk about the insect issues that came in because of the mild fall, how to deal with squirrels, a great herb for bees and how to process your leaves and grass for easy garden organic matter. Just a basic tour and some tips. Enjoy
 
 
 


167
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How to Protect Your Vegetable Garden From Frosts & Hard Freezes: Layers Work at 20 Degrees!

ExperienceGary Pilarchik Published the article • 0 comments • 167 views • 2018-01-01 20:23 • came from similar tags

Here is a very inexpensive way to protect your cool weather crops from frosts and deep freezes depending on the crops. Use layers of material you can find in paint departments. They can be reused year after year. My radishes were protected from 19 and 22 degree nights
 
  view all
Here is a very inexpensive way to protect your cool weather crops from frosts and deep freezes depending on the crops. Use layers of material you can find in paint departments. They can be reused year after year. My radishes were protected from 19 and 22 degree nights
 
 


179
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How to keep the garden healthy

ExperienceIves Published the article • 0 comments • 179 views • 2017-10-30 16:59 • came from similar tags

One of the most challenging—and sometimes frustrating — aspects of being a gardener is all the natural forces you have to combat. Even in the unlikely event that you have perfect soil and a marvelous climate, you're still not home and dry;
all sorts of pests are In competition with you for your crop. The pest problems you're likely to encounter in your vegetable garden fall Into two categories: insects and the like, of which there are a remarkable variety; and animals, usually the four-legged kind but occasionally two-legged intruders as well.

Most gardeners have to contend with insect problems at some time during the growing season, but the problems are not always obvious. It can come as quite a surprise, just when it looks as though all your hard work is paying off and your plants are progressing healthily towards a fine harvest, to find that the pests are at work. You may notice one morning that a couple of healthy young plants have keeled over and died — a pretty sure indication that you've got cutworms working away beneath the soil level. Or you may see tiny holes in the leaves of your eggplant, signaling the activity of the flea beetle.

Your plants are subject to diseases, too, and you know you're in trouble when the leaves turn'yellow, or the plants seem stunted and weak, or mildew starts to show up on leaves and stems. Plant diseases spread rapidly and must be curbed as soon as they appear, but this isn't always easy. There are certain measures you can take to forestall disease problems — like planting varieties that have been bred to be disease- resistant, and rotating some crops when it's
possible to do so. Beyond that, once a disease attacks a plant, about all you can do is remove the infected plant — among horticulturalists this process is called "culling" — to stop the disease from spreading to neighboring healthy plants. On the whole, pest problems are easier to control than problems caused by plant diseases.
 
CONTROLLING INSECT PESTS

To many people anything In the garden that crawls or flies and is smaller than a chipmunk or a sparrow can be classified as an insect. In fact, a lot of the creatures that may bug your vegetable plants are not insects at all — mites, slugs, snails, nematodes, sowbugs, and symphylans among them. Another popular misconception is that insects and similar creatures are harmful or unnecessary and have no place in the garden. Again, it isn't true. While some insects are destructive, many are perfectly harmless. A lot of them are actually important to the healthy development of your garden crop, some because they perform a specific service by keeping down other pests that do harm your crop, and some because they pollinate the plants. When you set out to control harmful pests, it's important to realize that indiscriminate controls may destroy the good as well as the bad; the useful creatures as well as the harmful ones.

Controlling the insect pests that attack your vegetable garden can be a challenge; the method you choose for controlling them can also be controversial. Many gardeners rely on chemical insecticides to do away with the enemy that's competing for the crop. Some people, however, object to the use of chemicals because they believe that the chemicals may remain on the plant and harm the person who eats it or that they may harm the environment. These gardeners prefer to rely on organic, or nonchemical, means of control. There may also be times when it's better not to use a chemical control even if you have no personal objection to it — if you catch a caterpillar attack in the early stages, for example, it can be easier to pick off the offenders by hand than to mix up a whole batch of insecticide. This chapter discusses the most effective means of control — both chemical and organic — for the pest problems you're most likely to encounter. 
 
CHEMICAL CONTROLS: INSECTICIDES

The surest way to control most of the insects and similar creatures that threaten your vegetable crop is by using a chemical insecticide. A word here about terminology: In horticultural language the terms "pesticide" and "insecticide" are not interchangeable. A pesticide is any form of chemical control used in the garden; an insecticide is a specific type of pesticide used to control a specific situation — to kill insects. A herbicide is a different kind of pesticide with a different application — it's used to help control garden weeds. These distinctions are important, because using the wrong one will cause havoc in your garden. For instance, if you use a herbicide instead of an insecticide you'll lose your entire crop for the season. It's also important to keep separate equipment for use with each kind of pesticide.

Insecticides are chemical products that are sprayed or dusted on the affected crops. The type you spray on is bought in concentrated form, then diluted for use with a hand sprayer or a spray attachment fitted to the end of your garden hose. Dust-on insecticides are powders that you pump on to the plants. Spraying is preferable because it gives more thorough coverage, and it's easier to treat the undersides as well as the tops of leaves and plants with a spray. You can also apply insecticides directly to the soil to kill insects under the soil surface — this technique is known as applying a "soil drench."

Used correctly and responsibly, insecticides are not harmful to humans or other animals. They are toxic, but the toxicity levels are low, and their residual or carryover effect is short — the longest any of the insecticides commonly used in the home garden will remain on the plant is about 14 days. Malathion, for instance, has the same toxicity level as Scotch whiskey and breaks down faster. As to any long-lasting hazards that may be involved —nobody knows if hazards exist or what they might be; we don't know what the long-lasting hazards of any product might be. The choice of an organic or a synthetic pesticide is a matter of personal opinion.
If you know all the options you'll be able to make your own choice .
 
Commonly used insecticides

The insecticides listed below for use in your home vegetable garden will provide effective control of garden insects with minimum hazard. Remember, though, that most insecticides are poisons and must be handled as such.
Diazinon. This is an organic phosphate, and it's an effective insecticide for general use. Diazinon is a contact poison. Its toxicity is low, and it's a good control for underground insects that attack the roots of cabbage family plants, onions, and radishes. You can get it as a wettable powder or in liquid form.
 
Malathion. This is also a phosphate insecticide; it kills sucking insects like aphids. Its effects are not as long-lasting as those of some other insecticides,but it's effective and safe in use. It's available as a dust, a wettable powder, or a liquid.
 
Sevin. This is also known as carbaryl and is another safe material for use in home gardens. It's an effective control for many leaf-eating caterpillars and leafhoppers, and is available as a wettable powder or a dust.Bacillus thuringiensis. This is an organic insecticide. It's a bacterium that is considered harmless to all but insects, and you can buy it under the brand names of Dipel, Thuricide, or Bactur. It controls cabbage worms and other caterpillars and is available in wettable powder or liquid forms. This is the choice of many gardeners who prefer not to use chemical insecticides. 
 
Cause and cure: Be sure you've got them right

Because an insecticide can't distinguish between friend and foe, it's your responsibility to make sure you're eliminating the pest, not the friendly insect that's out there working for you. Let's say, for instance, that aphids are attacking your cabbage plants, and you use carbaryl (Sevin) to try to get rid of them because you know carbaryl is a relatively safe insecticide with a short residual effect. You've overlooked the fact that carbaryl has to enter the insect's stomach in order to kill it, and since the aphid's mouth is inside the cabbage plant, none of the insecticide is going to enter the insect through the mouth and reach its stomach. Ladybugs, however, love aphids and are most helpful in keeping down their numbers. So when the ladybug eats the aphid, the carbaryl on the aphid's body enters the ladybug's stomach and kills it. Despite the best intentions in the world, you've killed off the useful insect and left the pest unharmed. In fact you've done the pest a favor by killing off its enemy — a ladybug can put away hundreds of aphids in a day.

Carbaryl can also be toxic to bees, and bees are important to your garden because they pollinate most fruiting vegetable crops. To avoid killing the bees, spray in the late evening when the flowers are closed. This way you kill the destructive pests but protect the bees.If you use an insecticide you must always be aware also of how long its residual effect is going to last. A residue of insecticide left on the plant when it's harvested is poisonous. The residual effect of an insecticide that you use in your vegetable garden is likely to be fairly short, but the effect may vary from one type of crop to another. And because the effect is not long-lasting, you can't spray as a preventive measure; you have no way of knowing which pests . are going to attack your plants before they're actually on the scene.  view all
One of the most challenging—and sometimes frustrating — aspects of being a gardener is all the natural forces you have to combat. Even in the unlikely event that you have perfect soil and a marvelous climate, you're still not home and dry;
all sorts of pests are In competition with you for your crop. The pest problems you're likely to encounter in your vegetable garden fall Into two categories: insects and the like, of which there are a remarkable variety; and animals, usually the four-legged kind but occasionally two-legged intruders as well.

Most gardeners have to contend with insect problems at some time during the growing season, but the problems are not always obvious. It can come as quite a surprise, just when it looks as though all your hard work is paying off and your plants are progressing healthily towards a fine harvest, to find that the pests are at work. You may notice one morning that a couple of healthy young plants have keeled over and died — a pretty sure indication that you've got cutworms working away beneath the soil level. Or you may see tiny holes in the leaves of your eggplant, signaling the activity of the flea beetle.

Your plants are subject to diseases, too, and you know you're in trouble when the leaves turn'yellow, or the plants seem stunted and weak, or mildew starts to show up on leaves and stems. Plant diseases spread rapidly and must be curbed as soon as they appear, but this isn't always easy. There are certain measures you can take to forestall disease problems — like planting varieties that have been bred to be disease- resistant, and rotating some crops when it's
possible to do so. Beyond that, once a disease attacks a plant, about all you can do is remove the infected plant — among horticulturalists this process is called "culling" — to stop the disease from spreading to neighboring healthy plants. On the whole, pest problems are easier to control than problems caused by plant diseases.
 
CONTROLLING INSECT PESTS

To many people anything In the garden that crawls or flies and is smaller than a chipmunk or a sparrow can be classified as an insect. In fact, a lot of the creatures that may bug your vegetable plants are not insects at all — mites, slugs, snails, nematodes, sowbugs, and symphylans among them. Another popular misconception is that insects and similar creatures are harmful or unnecessary and have no place in the garden. Again, it isn't true. While some insects are destructive, many are perfectly harmless. A lot of them are actually important to the healthy development of your garden crop, some because they perform a specific service by keeping down other pests that do harm your crop, and some because they pollinate the plants. When you set out to control harmful pests, it's important to realize that indiscriminate controls may destroy the good as well as the bad; the useful creatures as well as the harmful ones.

Controlling the insect pests that attack your vegetable garden can be a challenge; the method you choose for controlling them can also be controversial. Many gardeners rely on chemical insecticides to do away with the enemy that's competing for the crop. Some people, however, object to the use of chemicals because they believe that the chemicals may remain on the plant and harm the person who eats it or that they may harm the environment. These gardeners prefer to rely on organic, or nonchemical, means of control. There may also be times when it's better not to use a chemical control even if you have no personal objection to it — if you catch a caterpillar attack in the early stages, for example, it can be easier to pick off the offenders by hand than to mix up a whole batch of insecticide. This chapter discusses the most effective means of control — both chemical and organic — for the pest problems you're most likely to encounter. 
 
CHEMICAL CONTROLS: INSECTICIDES

The surest way to control most of the insects and similar creatures that threaten your vegetable crop is by using a chemical insecticide. A word here about terminology: In horticultural language the terms "pesticide" and "insecticide" are not interchangeable. A pesticide is any form of chemical control used in the garden; an insecticide is a specific type of pesticide used to control a specific situation — to kill insects. A herbicide is a different kind of pesticide with a different application — it's used to help control garden weeds. These distinctions are important, because using the wrong one will cause havoc in your garden. For instance, if you use a herbicide instead of an insecticide you'll lose your entire crop for the season. It's also important to keep separate equipment for use with each kind of pesticide.

Insecticides are chemical products that are sprayed or dusted on the affected crops. The type you spray on is bought in concentrated form, then diluted for use with a hand sprayer or a spray attachment fitted to the end of your garden hose. Dust-on insecticides are powders that you pump on to the plants. Spraying is preferable because it gives more thorough coverage, and it's easier to treat the undersides as well as the tops of leaves and plants with a spray. You can also apply insecticides directly to the soil to kill insects under the soil surface — this technique is known as applying a "soil drench."

Used correctly and responsibly, insecticides are not harmful to humans or other animals. They are toxic, but the toxicity levels are low, and their residual or carryover effect is short — the longest any of the insecticides commonly used in the home garden will remain on the plant is about 14 days. Malathion, for instance, has the same toxicity level as Scotch whiskey and breaks down faster. As to any long-lasting hazards that may be involved —nobody knows if hazards exist or what they might be; we don't know what the long-lasting hazards of any product might be. The choice of an organic or a synthetic pesticide is a matter of personal opinion.
If you know all the options you'll be able to make your own choice .
 
Commonly used insecticides

The insecticides listed below for use in your home vegetable garden will provide effective control of garden insects with minimum hazard. Remember, though, that most insecticides are poisons and must be handled as such.
  • Diazinon. This is an organic phosphate, and it's an effective insecticide for general use. Diazinon is a contact poison. Its toxicity is low, and it's a good control for underground insects that attack the roots of cabbage family plants, onions, and radishes. You can get it as a wettable powder or in liquid form.

 
  • Malathion. This is also a phosphate insecticide; it kills sucking insects like aphids. Its effects are not as long-lasting as those of some other insecticides,but it's effective and safe in use. It's available as a dust, a wettable powder, or a liquid.

 
  • Sevin. This is also known as carbaryl and is another safe material for use in home gardens. It's an effective control for many leaf-eating caterpillars and leafhoppers, and is available as a wettable powder or a dust.
  • Bacillus thuringiensis. This is an organic insecticide. It's a bacterium that is considered harmless to all but insects, and you can buy it under the brand names of Dipel, Thuricide, or Bactur. It controls cabbage worms and other caterpillars and is available in wettable powder or liquid forms. This is the choice of many gardeners who prefer not to use chemical insecticides. 

 
Cause and cure: Be sure you've got them right

Because an insecticide can't distinguish between friend and foe, it's your responsibility to make sure you're eliminating the pest, not the friendly insect that's out there working for you. Let's say, for instance, that aphids are attacking your cabbage plants, and you use carbaryl (Sevin) to try to get rid of them because you know carbaryl is a relatively safe insecticide with a short residual effect. You've overlooked the fact that carbaryl has to enter the insect's stomach in order to kill it, and since the aphid's mouth is inside the cabbage plant, none of the insecticide is going to enter the insect through the mouth and reach its stomach. Ladybugs, however, love aphids and are most helpful in keeping down their numbers. So when the ladybug eats the aphid, the carbaryl on the aphid's body enters the ladybug's stomach and kills it. Despite the best intentions in the world, you've killed off the useful insect and left the pest unharmed. In fact you've done the pest a favor by killing off its enemy — a ladybug can put away hundreds of aphids in a day.

Carbaryl can also be toxic to bees, and bees are important to your garden because they pollinate most fruiting vegetable crops. To avoid killing the bees, spray in the late evening when the flowers are closed. This way you kill the destructive pests but protect the bees.If you use an insecticide you must always be aware also of how long its residual effect is going to last. A residue of insecticide left on the plant when it's harvested is poisonous. The residual effect of an insecticide that you use in your vegetable garden is likely to be fairly short, but the effect may vary from one type of crop to another. And because the effect is not long-lasting, you can't spray as a preventive measure; you have no way of knowing which pests . are going to attack your plants before they're actually on the scene. 
125
Views

How to transforms your Swimming Pool Into GARDEN Paradise

Daily LifeJustin Rhodes Published the article • 0 comments • 125 views • 2017-10-16 18:55 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
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159
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Food Forest Gardening, Functional Permaculture Design

ExperienceJames Prigioni Published the article • 0 comments • 159 views • 2017-09-28 18:34 • came from similar tags

 

subtitle:


it's September 27 today I've been away for the past five days so the food forest has essentially been neglected you would think that it would suffer as a result but actually production has increased so now I want to go through show you just how everything is doing let's go looking from the outside in doesn't look like we skipped a beat really looks beautiful so far I haven't even gone in here yet the intro I did I did after this so this is kind of like my first look at everything but just peeking through I see a lot of ripe tomatoes a lot of ripe peppers and everything bunch of things to snack on look at these Tomatoes just self seeded and came right through the grapes they just found their way weed through and then I planted some Tomatoes also along this front welded wire fence you can see what I did here I took that welded wire fence just bent it grew stuff along the border this way the chickens can't get in and scratch around the bases it's worked beautifully got a lot of holy basil gonna be collecting a lot of holy basil seed I really love that holy basil and everything is just looking huge look at the size of this force now guys true forest a berry conservatory but everything in here is edible everything's in here for a purpose this is functional I planted everything my brother helped me with a lot of it but my hand was we planted every single thing unless it was self seeded so this was all by design and its really come together beautifully a lot of it was just planting more than we needed and letting nature sort a lot of things out but just even on the outside here we got a lot of production this year there were always Tomatoes just waiting to ripen up I know there's a lot of ripe tomatoes on the inside and this hazelnut trees full of catkins so many on it we should get real nice production next year she'd be loaded as I just come through one of the entrances here's one of the tomato just got so heavy it blew over sweet treats but still got some good ripe ones on there not quitting doesn't want to give up in this tomato here it almost looks like it's dying but that's a cucumber that was growing up the tomato but these ones were overripe I wasn't able to come to harvest them not being here and some of the stuff I just put in for the fall he's doing all right lettuces are getting a little bigger it looks like this kale over here is doing nice but I transplanted in there's gonna be some nice kale Lhasa not all the Dino kale so my favorite ones so we planted a number of them just right in the middle of the food forest where people would probably never play and stuff underneath the cherry tree a big cherry that's going dormant and then you've got the moon globe hair we've got the kale underneath there Bobcat tomato with a number of ripe tomatoes all look at these over here wow dude that color this is the rose of the Barents I'm gonna call her I also stick a pink for any wine but what do people call our healthy-looking Tomatoes with all these ripe tomatoes and peppers I see it looks like we're gonna have to harvest video soon and the almond tree the all-in-one almond still growing well hopefully we'll see some flowers on that next year Concord grape one of my favorites everything about it I love hanging out underneath it and it still has some grapes on it they're so old you're sweet right now just a few stragglers look it's also more over here too hmm good and it's just peaceful to be in here haven't been here for a little while so I really missed it I'm happy the first time I got to come in here I get to share it with you guys it's like it's like a breath of fresh air that plum tree really did get huge and it its immersive now even with some of the trees dropping their leaves heading towards fall it still feels immersive it's a lot of funds look at a ton of food which you'll see as I continue to walk through and for the harvest videos coming up may I get besides this tomato seems a monster Wow beautiful just sold Aki still putting out some zucchinis don't see many on there and I know I'm still getting a lot of green beans because these things never stop mm-hmm a little overripe okay some more Tomatoes more - minnows every year the watermelons still getting pretty big it's peach trees so tall so don't all even know 20 feet at least and look how open the center is I really have it wide open I like that and look at this pears the spare gets growing right in there really cool look at these Tomatoes beautiful oh man and again look where we're planting these Tomatoes look where I planted this is on right next to it apple tree just in the middle of the forest if you get sunlight plant it I'm getting good harvests out of these and spaces people would never grow stuff pulling beautiful harvest of tomatoes raspberries I love the raspberries you guys know that such treats and we got the sweet treats tomato we're doing the treats all day when did these eggplants back here the ding Tong so productive I got a couple of them here with the food forest and stuff you'll see him but the man they're productive huh beautiful and this section back here has been really productive and it's getting almost sloppy looking now but the mound of tomatoes and cucumbers we've pulled from back here I mean you guys can go back and watch the harvest videos there's a lot look at this come on now what's that like one two three four five six seven at 10 Tomatoes right there save that for the harvest video but jeez no no no fertilizer no pesticides no herbicides no fungicides nothing just natural that tells you could do it man these are loaded these tomatoes back here and the goji's are ripening you can have a lot of good wood you soon more flowers it's starting to go over here I put in some more fall stuff still a little slow to go but I'll start to take off got some kale I believe that's the scarlet kale a few more of them just thrown in wherever I can get some space and some light try to get as much production as possible in these little spaces weekend as we get we been eating this kale a lot and this is delicious it's my favorite kind but we want to keep getting more and more make sure we're eating kales late into the season as possible that's got some eggplants I should just give these plants to somebody maybe I will that'd be cool then they can harvest their own eggplant you can't get fresher than that and Wow look at that I miss those beautiful soul donkeys look like the ripe ready to go give me a huge tomato harvest coming up oh yeah look how beautiful that is monsters that one too these hot days and cool nights have really helped the ripening process look at that it's gonna be one of our bigger tomato harvest of the year probably in the fall we're getting it that's a lot of that's gotta be a tribute to the wood chips let's just look at the soil it's growing why is that so productive right now it's I mean let's say no work by me the worms the fungus never watered I haven't ordered this plant one time since I put it in the ground I transplanted it i watered again never watered it once since I've done no work for it all I had was actually have I pruned it and staked it and then harvested that's it ordering no fertilizing I don't got time for that and look at this how did this oil oh my gosh this is this is a build soil and I've shown you my mice and just five feet away over there it's all sand and this is what this was but five years of good soil practices that's what you could have and that's what your containers can be looking like with little to no work and all these tomatoes into here are self seeded going through and just grabbing little fruits from them is nice and they're growing underneath that apple tree getting that extra yield and the late season annuals are coming through real strong these peppers just prolific just striking the color isn't it the contrast that bright orange against a dark green no fertilizer just natural the wood shapes the mycorrhizal fungi the worms everything working together and I haven't watered this like the other one never would I wondered it when I put it in that's it it still wants to put out more and if you've got if you're in a really dry arid place the conditions aren't gonna be the same so you may have to order but you dig down deep you dig down in the soil and if it's wet you don't have water it's basically that simple and you've got the Rosita pink eggplant right here and we got the fireball red peppers and Claire your baby cheese I see a nice black king right there eggplant the classic really nice the zinnias came through on their own they're one of my favorites and the birds that birds love them the bees love them so I love him as well Ben and look at this old doc he's what a good late season producer for me at least and man this is one of my favorites it's a pretty disease resistant has passed resistant because it's the potato leaf tomato a bunch of them are ready right to eat so we'll be snacking on those using for sandwiches probably one of our last big tomato harvests this hazel most doing real well and now's the time when the California Poppy comes back as things cool off there's always a new flower coming through always drawing in more beneficials balance in the system create an ideal environment for all nature and maybe will just come to plant a little seed mom over here take some of these echinacea look at that Oh echinacea seed it will just sprinkle just for fun like Masanobu says played like a child you got to have fun and you got to enjoy this guy's you got to have faith that it's gonna work you got to just look out of nature and realize everything is growing very well on its own it's just a system that it's a part of make that system that's what I'm doing here you can have the same harvest same yield it's gonna look different but it's the same concept and you don't have to use wood chips I think the one of the best but you can use any natural mulch some areas my wood chip need to be thicker the weeds are coming through but again anyone can do this this is meant to inspire this is meant to encourage you this isn't meant to show off or anything because I didn't do anything I'm not working super hard laboring putting any crazy soil compound mixes together or anything to get these kind of yields I'm looking at it when how nature does it nothing works hard in nature everything eats everything's fed and that's how I want to be so that's the system I want to be a part of it doesn't stop there though I still have to show you the extended edge there's the main food forest in the back there this is the extended side where we getting huge harvests and just only the second year of this system and strawberries are so good every bearing once mmm really good and this is the same system haven't watered any of the stuff you've got the Tabor he's here and the boys and berries are all laying down they'll come through so we're gonna have a lot of berries this is focus mainly on berries in here blueberries black cap raspberries elderberries Taye berries boysenberries you know a lot of the berries and while we wait for all that stuff to come through we're gonna be growing annuals like the peppers very baby cheese in these big mouths so these are like the red ace New Age peppers and the pink tongue long eggplant so many I have to harvest that big one back there but so productive another huge holy basil and you can see how much I missed these Tomatoes he's only just rotted over ripen because I just wasn't here to harvest them a lot of them over here but here we've got the stamen Winesap apple some beautiful looking apples on it so we're gonna get a couple from that one it was just a tough year for apples even our apple tree from seed didn't do that great I see a lot of you guys in the comment section saying that you want to grow a food forest of your own and I want you to know all it is is just a few small investments over time so first you just got to get those wood chips bring them in and then plant a few trees today a few tomorrow a few next week let everything grow up slowly this took five years but you can see what it's come to now so thanks for watching thanks for tuning in if you enjoyed the video share with your friends it's a like button hit the subscribe button see the next one [Music]


 
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subtitle:


it's September 27 today I've been away for the past five days so the food forest has essentially been neglected you would think that it would suffer as a result but actually production has increased so now I want to go through show you just how everything is doing let's go looking from the outside in doesn't look like we skipped a beat really looks beautiful so far I haven't even gone in here yet the intro I did I did after this so this is kind of like my first look at everything but just peeking through I see a lot of ripe tomatoes a lot of ripe peppers and everything bunch of things to snack on look at these Tomatoes just self seeded and came right through the grapes they just found their way weed through and then I planted some Tomatoes also along this front welded wire fence you can see what I did here I took that welded wire fence just bent it grew stuff along the border this way the chickens can't get in and scratch around the bases it's worked beautifully got a lot of holy basil gonna be collecting a lot of holy basil seed I really love that holy basil and everything is just looking huge look at the size of this force now guys true forest a berry conservatory but everything in here is edible everything's in here for a purpose this is functional I planted everything my brother helped me with a lot of it but my hand was we planted every single thing unless it was self seeded so this was all by design and its really come together beautifully a lot of it was just planting more than we needed and letting nature sort a lot of things out but just even on the outside here we got a lot of production this year there were always Tomatoes just waiting to ripen up I know there's a lot of ripe tomatoes on the inside and this hazelnut trees full of catkins so many on it we should get real nice production next year she'd be loaded as I just come through one of the entrances here's one of the tomato just got so heavy it blew over sweet treats but still got some good ripe ones on there not quitting doesn't want to give up in this tomato here it almost looks like it's dying but that's a cucumber that was growing up the tomato but these ones were overripe I wasn't able to come to harvest them not being here and some of the stuff I just put in for the fall he's doing all right lettuces are getting a little bigger it looks like this kale over here is doing nice but I transplanted in there's gonna be some nice kale Lhasa not all the Dino kale so my favorite ones so we planted a number of them just right in the middle of the food forest where people would probably never play and stuff underneath the cherry tree a big cherry that's going dormant and then you've got the moon globe hair we've got the kale underneath there Bobcat tomato with a number of ripe tomatoes all look at these over here wow dude that color this is the rose of the Barents I'm gonna call her I also stick a pink for any wine but what do people call our healthy-looking Tomatoes with all these ripe tomatoes and peppers I see it looks like we're gonna have to harvest video soon and the almond tree the all-in-one almond still growing well hopefully we'll see some flowers on that next year Concord grape one of my favorites everything about it I love hanging out underneath it and it still has some grapes on it they're so old you're sweet right now just a few stragglers look it's also more over here too hmm good and it's just peaceful to be in here haven't been here for a little while so I really missed it I'm happy the first time I got to come in here I get to share it with you guys it's like it's like a breath of fresh air that plum tree really did get huge and it its immersive now even with some of the trees dropping their leaves heading towards fall it still feels immersive it's a lot of funds look at a ton of food which you'll see as I continue to walk through and for the harvest videos coming up may I get besides this tomato seems a monster Wow beautiful just sold Aki still putting out some zucchinis don't see many on there and I know I'm still getting a lot of green beans because these things never stop mm-hmm a little overripe okay some more Tomatoes more - minnows every year the watermelons still getting pretty big it's peach trees so tall so don't all even know 20 feet at least and look how open the center is I really have it wide open I like that and look at this pears the spare gets growing right in there really cool look at these Tomatoes beautiful oh man and again look where we're planting these Tomatoes look where I planted this is on right next to it apple tree just in the middle of the forest if you get sunlight plant it I'm getting good harvests out of these and spaces people would never grow stuff pulling beautiful harvest of tomatoes raspberries I love the raspberries you guys know that such treats and we got the sweet treats tomato we're doing the treats all day when did these eggplants back here the ding Tong so productive I got a couple of them here with the food forest and stuff you'll see him but the man they're productive huh beautiful and this section back here has been really productive and it's getting almost sloppy looking now but the mound of tomatoes and cucumbers we've pulled from back here I mean you guys can go back and watch the harvest videos there's a lot look at this come on now what's that like one two three four five six seven at 10 Tomatoes right there save that for the harvest video but jeez no no no fertilizer no pesticides no herbicides no fungicides nothing just natural that tells you could do it man these are loaded these tomatoes back here and the goji's are ripening you can have a lot of good wood you soon more flowers it's starting to go over here I put in some more fall stuff still a little slow to go but I'll start to take off got some kale I believe that's the scarlet kale a few more of them just thrown in wherever I can get some space and some light try to get as much production as possible in these little spaces weekend as we get we been eating this kale a lot and this is delicious it's my favorite kind but we want to keep getting more and more make sure we're eating kales late into the season as possible that's got some eggplants I should just give these plants to somebody maybe I will that'd be cool then they can harvest their own eggplant you can't get fresher than that and Wow look at that I miss those beautiful soul donkeys look like the ripe ready to go give me a huge tomato harvest coming up oh yeah look how beautiful that is monsters that one too these hot days and cool nights have really helped the ripening process look at that it's gonna be one of our bigger tomato harvest of the year probably in the fall we're getting it that's a lot of that's gotta be a tribute to the wood chips let's just look at the soil it's growing why is that so productive right now it's I mean let's say no work by me the worms the fungus never watered I haven't ordered this plant one time since I put it in the ground I transplanted it i watered again never watered it once since I've done no work for it all I had was actually have I pruned it and staked it and then harvested that's it ordering no fertilizing I don't got time for that and look at this how did this oil oh my gosh this is this is a build soil and I've shown you my mice and just five feet away over there it's all sand and this is what this was but five years of good soil practices that's what you could have and that's what your containers can be looking like with little to no work and all these tomatoes into here are self seeded going through and just grabbing little fruits from them is nice and they're growing underneath that apple tree getting that extra yield and the late season annuals are coming through real strong these peppers just prolific just striking the color isn't it the contrast that bright orange against a dark green no fertilizer just natural the wood shapes the mycorrhizal fungi the worms everything working together and I haven't watered this like the other one never would I wondered it when I put it in that's it it still wants to put out more and if you've got if you're in a really dry arid place the conditions aren't gonna be the same so you may have to order but you dig down deep you dig down in the soil and if it's wet you don't have water it's basically that simple and you've got the Rosita pink eggplant right here and we got the fireball red peppers and Claire your baby cheese I see a nice black king right there eggplant the classic really nice the zinnias came through on their own they're one of my favorites and the birds that birds love them the bees love them so I love him as well Ben and look at this old doc he's what a good late season producer for me at least and man this is one of my favorites it's a pretty disease resistant has passed resistant because it's the potato leaf tomato a bunch of them are ready right to eat so we'll be snacking on those using for sandwiches probably one of our last big tomato harvests this hazel most doing real well and now's the time when the California Poppy comes back as things cool off there's always a new flower coming through always drawing in more beneficials balance in the system create an ideal environment for all nature and maybe will just come to plant a little seed mom over here take some of these echinacea look at that Oh echinacea seed it will just sprinkle just for fun like Masanobu says played like a child you got to have fun and you got to enjoy this guy's you got to have faith that it's gonna work you got to just look out of nature and realize everything is growing very well on its own it's just a system that it's a part of make that system that's what I'm doing here you can have the same harvest same yield it's gonna look different but it's the same concept and you don't have to use wood chips I think the one of the best but you can use any natural mulch some areas my wood chip need to be thicker the weeds are coming through but again anyone can do this this is meant to inspire this is meant to encourage you this isn't meant to show off or anything because I didn't do anything I'm not working super hard laboring putting any crazy soil compound mixes together or anything to get these kind of yields I'm looking at it when how nature does it nothing works hard in nature everything eats everything's fed and that's how I want to be so that's the system I want to be a part of it doesn't stop there though I still have to show you the extended edge there's the main food forest in the back there this is the extended side where we getting huge harvests and just only the second year of this system and strawberries are so good every bearing once mmm really good and this is the same system haven't watered any of the stuff you've got the Tabor he's here and the boys and berries are all laying down they'll come through so we're gonna have a lot of berries this is focus mainly on berries in here blueberries black cap raspberries elderberries Taye berries boysenberries you know a lot of the berries and while we wait for all that stuff to come through we're gonna be growing annuals like the peppers very baby cheese in these big mouths so these are like the red ace New Age peppers and the pink tongue long eggplant so many I have to harvest that big one back there but so productive another huge holy basil and you can see how much I missed these Tomatoes he's only just rotted over ripen because I just wasn't here to harvest them a lot of them over here but here we've got the stamen Winesap apple some beautiful looking apples on it so we're gonna get a couple from that one it was just a tough year for apples even our apple tree from seed didn't do that great I see a lot of you guys in the comment section saying that you want to grow a food forest of your own and I want you to know all it is is just a few small investments over time so first you just got to get those wood chips bring them in and then plant a few trees today a few tomorrow a few next week let everything grow up slowly this took five years but you can see what it's come to now so thanks for watching thanks for tuning in if you enjoyed the video share with your friends it's a like button hit the subscribe button see the next one [Music]


 
 
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Here is a simple way to protect fruit on your backyard fruit trees from animals like birds and possums

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 1 comments • 173 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


get a I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to show you one of the methods I use to bag my fruit to easily protect it from animals and insects so that the end product is organically grown and delicious too let's get into it [Music] well some have long gone and so are the fruits from these mango trees it's weaker now and we've got other fruits on the go like citrus and even a local just over here I could show you loquats starting to fruit these are trees and fruit trees that flower and fruit through winter they are there they're not the real issue for us it's the summer fruits that are the main problem because they not only get totalled by the animals they're you know the fluffy things and the birds they get targeted by the small animals the insects in particular two types of fruit slide the Mediterranean and the Queensland fruit fly but that if they just sting the fruit they'll a maggot inside and it decimates it but that they don't that they aren't real prevalent through the winter months here so we can grow our citrus you know by the dozens by the hundreds even this small orange tree here it's a blood orange and see how good it is producing and most of our citrus are producing really well and you get the odd fruit the odd mandarine the others that gets taken by an animal you know and a bird but they just don't do enough damage to even worry about netting them so that's that's not a problem the main problem is through summer like our mango is very expensive fruit you don't want to lose too many of them and all the time some of the animals like the flying foxes and the opossums I'll just ruin it by biting into it and you don't want to even try to cut the bit of that off because you know get a bit of that saliva in your own system and you could get diseases and all types of nasty pathogens from these creatures so it's best get rid of the fruit altogether netting whole fruit trees can be done but it's not as practical as you'd might think we do it sometimes for our apples and and for other fruit trees sucker plums but often the larger fruit trees like mangoes it's it's not quite worth it you don't get enough fruit on them to warrant in the whole tree and I've found that bagging fruit and this method of bagging fruit is pretty good it's not that time intensive it's fairly cost effective and more more importantly it actually works rather than some of the marketed bags that you get that protect from fruit fly only they don't last very long they get damaged by Sun very easily and then deteriorate and also a lot of those white bags they are they're so easy to tear through for an animal it might protect from fruit fly but it certainly won't protect from a possum or a fruit bat trying to get to the fruit whereas this method that I'm going to show you does so without any further ado let's get into it okay well this is dead-set easy I use some fiberglass mosquito netting or insect netting that you use on screen doors or windows you can get it in these two meter lengths it's about 12 bucks for a whole roll so pretty cheap I just cut it in two sizes that's going to be appropriate for the fruit in this case you can cut a 2 meter length into about 8 pieces if you want the only other thing you need is those zip ties and this is how I do it it's really easy I just wrap this fiberglass netting around the crew in this case it's a single mango and then around the neck of it where the mango obviously meets it hanging stands by then G is a zip tie and just zip tie it up and that stops anything getting in and any insects sting it and it will stop the fruit fly because the fruit fly don't have they can't get through the fine netting to actually get its stinger and sting the fruit here's the same example but on a bunch of nation tears so I used a bit of a bigger slice there of netting and just you know you just remodel it into a ball and so you can then scrunch it together at the top and I just pull it off a little bit just pull it off the fruit to make sure that nothing can then try to sting it on the way through but like I said the netting fairly thick and fine so it doesn't quite it doesn't really warrant any worry but if it's touching the fruit this is the same demonstration but on pomegranate [Music] and that's pretty simple that's how it is just bothered this fella as I'm walking down I was actually hanging out the washing saw the sweller on the ground and just now I don't get them in time and they ripen and I don't see them they'll typically drop off the tree and this one is going to blush about it it's it's slightly giving which means it's just about ripe or or probably is ripe enough to eat maybe give it a day on the back kitchen bench and we'll be perfect it's got a bit of black spot in the end which is quite normal and this is going to be a fantastic mango to eat just like all the ones we're getting and you know I can you can grab them off the tree of course I don't lot wait till they all fall off this one's a huge mango it's like the size of a rock melon this is an r to ET and then I've got some that I've missed like this one but of course it's not bagged and soon as it falls off the tree the beetles get it and this one's going to beetle if it isn't fruit fly blonde which it probably is as well it's got beetles and yucky stuff in it and it's probably lucky it survived the night actually because the possums and the fruit bats would get it as well I've missed a few this time but I'm glad that I got most of them working really well so even if they do fall off the tree obviously this netting is strong enough it's that fiberglass flyscreen netting that nothing Kyle couldn't even rip this with my fingers whereas the bagging stuff that you typically get which is actually quite bloody expensive you have these black bags they are they are rubbish really they are rubbish anyway there you go face cooks pretty good yeah not even he can eat it haha here's another one I missed this man goes here was taken and look how clean eating all around the [Music] I'd say another poppin it was hoppin him to grab fruit and take it away I probably grabbed it from the orchard worried about my dog up at the house quickly grabbed it he came down here where it was closer probably to a time a lot of these trees here near the chicken pen funny things aren't they I bet he had a knife feed and use a typical bounty a collection of mangoes right from the tree and it's pretty simple to undo those zip ties so you can reuse these zip ties and of course you can reuse the bag it's just a matter of sticking the tip of the knife under the head of the zip tie and then you can just release it and reuse it there you go nice fat juicy mango I should be totally honest with you though it's not a hundred percent fix you can see this mango here it's being damaged by a flying fox or opossums sucking through the mesh you can see the mesh hasn't been really damaged too much but they've got so desperate that they've had the time to suck through the mesh and damage the fruit I should stress though that I found damaged fruit to be a very rare occasion we end up with for this reusable netting and subside focus it's pretty sustainable allowing the mango to ripen on the tree and eat it fresh and organically like this it just tastes amazing and no wonder it completes it with my food [Music] and I thought new snack [Music] well I hope you enjoyed that video don't forget to share it and give it a thumbs up if you did like it also visit my blog self-sufficient my calm that was my method of how to get around those animals stealing our much favored and important fruits that we spend all our time perfecting and trying to grow it's not a complete fantastic solution but it is a pretty good one and it works at least probably 90% of the time thanks for watching bye for now oh I knew we forgot at the end of that video you might have been wondering what I'm going to do with all those mangos or what I've done is I've turned them into dehydrated mango which is quite a delicacy and so easy to do well what I'll do is I'll I'll make a separate video on that nice short one and I'll post that within the next day or so and just to show you how I preserve our mangos when we have a glut of them and can't possibly eat them all fresh okay bye [Music]


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subtitle:


get a I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to show you one of the methods I use to bag my fruit to easily protect it from animals and insects so that the end product is organically grown and delicious too let's get into it [Music] well some have long gone and so are the fruits from these mango trees it's weaker now and we've got other fruits on the go like citrus and even a local just over here I could show you loquats starting to fruit these are trees and fruit trees that flower and fruit through winter they are there they're not the real issue for us it's the summer fruits that are the main problem because they not only get totalled by the animals they're you know the fluffy things and the birds they get targeted by the small animals the insects in particular two types of fruit slide the Mediterranean and the Queensland fruit fly but that if they just sting the fruit they'll a maggot inside and it decimates it but that they don't that they aren't real prevalent through the winter months here so we can grow our citrus you know by the dozens by the hundreds even this small orange tree here it's a blood orange and see how good it is producing and most of our citrus are producing really well and you get the odd fruit the odd mandarine the others that gets taken by an animal you know and a bird but they just don't do enough damage to even worry about netting them so that's that's not a problem the main problem is through summer like our mango is very expensive fruit you don't want to lose too many of them and all the time some of the animals like the flying foxes and the opossums I'll just ruin it by biting into it and you don't want to even try to cut the bit of that off because you know get a bit of that saliva in your own system and you could get diseases and all types of nasty pathogens from these creatures so it's best get rid of the fruit altogether netting whole fruit trees can be done but it's not as practical as you'd might think we do it sometimes for our apples and and for other fruit trees sucker plums but often the larger fruit trees like mangoes it's it's not quite worth it you don't get enough fruit on them to warrant in the whole tree and I've found that bagging fruit and this method of bagging fruit is pretty good it's not that time intensive it's fairly cost effective and more more importantly it actually works rather than some of the marketed bags that you get that protect from fruit fly only they don't last very long they get damaged by Sun very easily and then deteriorate and also a lot of those white bags they are they're so easy to tear through for an animal it might protect from fruit fly but it certainly won't protect from a possum or a fruit bat trying to get to the fruit whereas this method that I'm going to show you does so without any further ado let's get into it okay well this is dead-set easy I use some fiberglass mosquito netting or insect netting that you use on screen doors or windows you can get it in these two meter lengths it's about 12 bucks for a whole roll so pretty cheap I just cut it in two sizes that's going to be appropriate for the fruit in this case you can cut a 2 meter length into about 8 pieces if you want the only other thing you need is those zip ties and this is how I do it it's really easy I just wrap this fiberglass netting around the crew in this case it's a single mango and then around the neck of it where the mango obviously meets it hanging stands by then G is a zip tie and just zip tie it up and that stops anything getting in and any insects sting it and it will stop the fruit fly because the fruit fly don't have they can't get through the fine netting to actually get its stinger and sting the fruit here's the same example but on a bunch of nation tears so I used a bit of a bigger slice there of netting and just you know you just remodel it into a ball and so you can then scrunch it together at the top and I just pull it off a little bit just pull it off the fruit to make sure that nothing can then try to sting it on the way through but like I said the netting fairly thick and fine so it doesn't quite it doesn't really warrant any worry but if it's touching the fruit this is the same demonstration but on pomegranate [Music] and that's pretty simple that's how it is just bothered this fella as I'm walking down I was actually hanging out the washing saw the sweller on the ground and just now I don't get them in time and they ripen and I don't see them they'll typically drop off the tree and this one is going to blush about it it's it's slightly giving which means it's just about ripe or or probably is ripe enough to eat maybe give it a day on the back kitchen bench and we'll be perfect it's got a bit of black spot in the end which is quite normal and this is going to be a fantastic mango to eat just like all the ones we're getting and you know I can you can grab them off the tree of course I don't lot wait till they all fall off this one's a huge mango it's like the size of a rock melon this is an r to ET and then I've got some that I've missed like this one but of course it's not bagged and soon as it falls off the tree the beetles get it and this one's going to beetle if it isn't fruit fly blonde which it probably is as well it's got beetles and yucky stuff in it and it's probably lucky it survived the night actually because the possums and the fruit bats would get it as well I've missed a few this time but I'm glad that I got most of them working really well so even if they do fall off the tree obviously this netting is strong enough it's that fiberglass flyscreen netting that nothing Kyle couldn't even rip this with my fingers whereas the bagging stuff that you typically get which is actually quite bloody expensive you have these black bags they are they are rubbish really they are rubbish anyway there you go face cooks pretty good yeah not even he can eat it haha here's another one I missed this man goes here was taken and look how clean eating all around the [Music] I'd say another poppin it was hoppin him to grab fruit and take it away I probably grabbed it from the orchard worried about my dog up at the house quickly grabbed it he came down here where it was closer probably to a time a lot of these trees here near the chicken pen funny things aren't they I bet he had a knife feed and use a typical bounty a collection of mangoes right from the tree and it's pretty simple to undo those zip ties so you can reuse these zip ties and of course you can reuse the bag it's just a matter of sticking the tip of the knife under the head of the zip tie and then you can just release it and reuse it there you go nice fat juicy mango I should be totally honest with you though it's not a hundred percent fix you can see this mango here it's being damaged by a flying fox or opossums sucking through the mesh you can see the mesh hasn't been really damaged too much but they've got so desperate that they've had the time to suck through the mesh and damage the fruit I should stress though that I found damaged fruit to be a very rare occasion we end up with for this reusable netting and subside focus it's pretty sustainable allowing the mango to ripen on the tree and eat it fresh and organically like this it just tastes amazing and no wonder it completes it with my food [Music] and I thought new snack [Music] well I hope you enjoyed that video don't forget to share it and give it a thumbs up if you did like it also visit my blog self-sufficient my calm that was my method of how to get around those animals stealing our much favored and important fruits that we spend all our time perfecting and trying to grow it's not a complete fantastic solution but it is a pretty good one and it works at least probably 90% of the time thanks for watching bye for now oh I knew we forgot at the end of that video you might have been wondering what I'm going to do with all those mangos or what I've done is I've turned them into dehydrated mango which is quite a delicacy and so easy to do well what I'll do is I'll I'll make a separate video on that nice short one and I'll post that within the next day or so and just to show you how I preserve our mangos when we have a glut of them and can't possibly eat them all fresh okay bye [Music]


 
218
Views

Sunrise Lime Tree Fantastic Citrus Variety to Grow

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 218 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:
 


today I'm mark from self-service of me and it's a terrible day here in sunny South East Queensland well in fact it's it's not funny at all to be raining for about the last three days it was a time I wanted to bring you a midweek video because one of our trees it's a small citrus that we've been growing for about three years it's called a sunrise lime it's in fruit the fruit are ready to pick I wanted to bring you this video before a the fruit fell off a tree or something ate them or something else happened it's just a good example at the moment and it's a really great little tree I'm excited that we're growing it we have about a hundred plus fruit trees here and I don't say that just a brag or maybe maybe a little bit but the reason why we grow so many fruit trees and I've said this before is because you just can't get the whole range of fruit that you know I would like from the local supermarket so therefore to get the maximum variety as possible we like to grow around fruit trees by different types of exotics try different trees try different fruits and experience those many thousands of fruit trees and fruits that you can that you that are grown around the world but I never sold in the supermarket simply because they're not economical to do so for a variety of reasons now as the rain comes down let's just get into it and have a look at this sunrise line alright we'll go past this with my lemon tree remember my lots of lemons video but here it is again I released that about twelve months ago that lots of lemons video and it's it's how I picked all that fruit off and now it's all fruiting again another million fruit on it but here's the sunrise line I hope the camera isn't going to get all fogged up and droplets everywhere because it is coming down now and I want to get this in you can see they're an oblong fruit about the size of a oblong kumquat you know most kumquats are round and I'll get into that in a minute the leaves are quite small from your standard citrus like say this Valencia orange over here you see how big the leaves are there is this one is it now I'm going to give this a taste test but before I do I wanted to just explain how this tree came about it's a hybrid but it's a hybrid between basically three different types of citrus a color monden which is a hybrid itself between a kumquat and a mandarine crossed with our Australian native finger lines and those finger limes are got our lime fruit shaped like my finger about as thick as that and in the middle it's like this caviar type flesh and as you eat they pop in your mouth and it's got a beautiful limey citrus taste great for cocktails and drinks and putting in food and it's up it spins quite a big industry now in Australia anyway let's have a taste of this sunrise line we'll pick one that's fairly right you can eat them unripe like that's about typical size this is about critical thighs here this is a quite a big one you have a look at this one here that's quite large it typically smaller than that and we do also have another native line to Australia that's quite famous that I'd never ever tried and I've got one growing just a small one but my mother used to tell me about it she lived out on a farm western Queensland at a chinchilla and she used to come across these wild lime bushes all the time out in the out in the scrub and she used to love them and she hadn't tried one for the last thirty years since she left the farm or more than that and she so I asked her is this similar this sunrise lime similar and she said no it's not at all and as I looked into it I reckon the one she's talking about is that outback lime because it is native to this area and as I aligned that similar to this but it is typically green when you pick them and they're maybe a little smaller than this actually so but it's a different plant this isn't a cross between the outback line this is a like a set a cross between the different citrus altogether anyway let's have a taste of this so you either with that I have tried them before there's a little tiny seed there I don't know normally notice the seeds but they're really sweet now before I showed you this lime I was out in the front yard and I taste tested a kumquat you know I can tell you the Sun just come out a little bit the kumquat is nowhere near as good as this this is sweet the skin is beautiful oh it's a real delicious fruit to eat everything's sweet about you don't have have a terrible aftertaste from the skin the skin is lovely it's a real pleasure and I'm excited too in the future work out what I'm going to use it for in salads own cooking eating fresh maybe as a dessert sort of Lacroix you know just like you would do with kumquats so um yeah it's a really beautiful tasting fruit and I hope they open up like an export market will say to sell these trees around the world because I think it's fantastic now I am NOT against crossbreeding plants and trees and hydrating things most of our most famous citrus trees for example in fruits and apples and that of all come from people experimenting in crossing trees I got no no qualms about that I think that's a great idea and it's exciting that all these new different types of crosses and trees can be established so that we can plant them in our own backyard and enjoy them well anyway I just really wanted to show you this sunrise line so that will do for now if you liked the video give it a thumbs up don't forget my website self-sufficient me calm thanks for watching bye for now [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:
 


today I'm mark from self-service of me and it's a terrible day here in sunny South East Queensland well in fact it's it's not funny at all to be raining for about the last three days it was a time I wanted to bring you a midweek video because one of our trees it's a small citrus that we've been growing for about three years it's called a sunrise lime it's in fruit the fruit are ready to pick I wanted to bring you this video before a the fruit fell off a tree or something ate them or something else happened it's just a good example at the moment and it's a really great little tree I'm excited that we're growing it we have about a hundred plus fruit trees here and I don't say that just a brag or maybe maybe a little bit but the reason why we grow so many fruit trees and I've said this before is because you just can't get the whole range of fruit that you know I would like from the local supermarket so therefore to get the maximum variety as possible we like to grow around fruit trees by different types of exotics try different trees try different fruits and experience those many thousands of fruit trees and fruits that you can that you that are grown around the world but I never sold in the supermarket simply because they're not economical to do so for a variety of reasons now as the rain comes down let's just get into it and have a look at this sunrise line alright we'll go past this with my lemon tree remember my lots of lemons video but here it is again I released that about twelve months ago that lots of lemons video and it's it's how I picked all that fruit off and now it's all fruiting again another million fruit on it but here's the sunrise line I hope the camera isn't going to get all fogged up and droplets everywhere because it is coming down now and I want to get this in you can see they're an oblong fruit about the size of a oblong kumquat you know most kumquats are round and I'll get into that in a minute the leaves are quite small from your standard citrus like say this Valencia orange over here you see how big the leaves are there is this one is it now I'm going to give this a taste test but before I do I wanted to just explain how this tree came about it's a hybrid but it's a hybrid between basically three different types of citrus a color monden which is a hybrid itself between a kumquat and a mandarine crossed with our Australian native finger lines and those finger limes are got our lime fruit shaped like my finger about as thick as that and in the middle it's like this caviar type flesh and as you eat they pop in your mouth and it's got a beautiful limey citrus taste great for cocktails and drinks and putting in food and it's up it spins quite a big industry now in Australia anyway let's have a taste of this sunrise line we'll pick one that's fairly right you can eat them unripe like that's about typical size this is about critical thighs here this is a quite a big one you have a look at this one here that's quite large it typically smaller than that and we do also have another native line to Australia that's quite famous that I'd never ever tried and I've got one growing just a small one but my mother used to tell me about it she lived out on a farm western Queensland at a chinchilla and she used to come across these wild lime bushes all the time out in the out in the scrub and she used to love them and she hadn't tried one for the last thirty years since she left the farm or more than that and she so I asked her is this similar this sunrise lime similar and she said no it's not at all and as I looked into it I reckon the one she's talking about is that outback lime because it is native to this area and as I aligned that similar to this but it is typically green when you pick them and they're maybe a little smaller than this actually so but it's a different plant this isn't a cross between the outback line this is a like a set a cross between the different citrus altogether anyway let's have a taste of this so you either with that I have tried them before there's a little tiny seed there I don't know normally notice the seeds but they're really sweet now before I showed you this lime I was out in the front yard and I taste tested a kumquat you know I can tell you the Sun just come out a little bit the kumquat is nowhere near as good as this this is sweet the skin is beautiful oh it's a real delicious fruit to eat everything's sweet about you don't have have a terrible aftertaste from the skin the skin is lovely it's a real pleasure and I'm excited too in the future work out what I'm going to use it for in salads own cooking eating fresh maybe as a dessert sort of Lacroix you know just like you would do with kumquats so um yeah it's a really beautiful tasting fruit and I hope they open up like an export market will say to sell these trees around the world because I think it's fantastic now I am NOT against crossbreeding plants and trees and hydrating things most of our most famous citrus trees for example in fruits and apples and that of all come from people experimenting in crossing trees I got no no qualms about that I think that's a great idea and it's exciting that all these new different types of crosses and trees can be established so that we can plant them in our own backyard and enjoy them well anyway I just really wanted to show you this sunrise line so that will do for now if you liked the video give it a thumbs up don't forget my website self-sufficient me calm thanks for watching bye for now [Music]

177
Views

Planting More Types of Fruit Trees & How to Dig a Hole - With Tips!

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 1 comments • 177 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from self-sufficiently many our orchard at the moment I thought that I'd bring you a quick video on what's been happening around here on our acreage on our small three acre property urban farming primarily to do with planting fruit trees are a bit of a fruit tree nut of a fruit tree collector and there's a lot of reasons for collecting fruit trees but the main one is to have a good variety of food to eat at different times of the year so let's get into it so before we watch me dig let's go ahead and see what I'm planting another name is Sapodilla central american plant the chestnut it's grown for at edible seeds then you've got the job at Aqaba that's the yellow touch usually it's the black kite like that once and I've also got one of them a clay mock which is a small orange fruit with really good flavor apparently in the soursop which is apparently a really beautiful juice and I'm also going to plant a white mulberry which I've always wanted to do and then on the other side of a softie just on our other neighbors think we're going to plant a row of citrus this outback line that's supposed to be a native to Australia this weird plant which is a mandarine lime apparently it's got really easy feel small mandarine but tastes like a lime then we've got the bush lemon which is very Hardy lemon that I've always wanted to have a West Indian line which is a really Hardy lime very common over obviously in the West Indies then earlier today I planted this golden fruit of the Andes and it's supposed to be one of the best fruits in the world and then this Babar Cove which has a torpedo fruit the taste of a pineapple and strawberry cross all right let me explain how I dig these holes I've done the same thing for our hundred plus fruit trees on our property I start by making sure the trees in the right spot for to begin with and then I start digging around in a circular fashion obviously I want a nice circular cut I start digging up the lawn first I want to dig out that patch of grass when you could always be plant that somewhere if you needed to but I put a different method for what I do with the grass so I go around I cut out that hole usually about two or three times the width of the pot because I want to get my bright on around this thing so I don't want it to be just sort of pot size II that otherwise it's a little bit too cumbersome to writing the mo around plus I want a nice big hole and gap of that graph so that grasses and granite grow through too easily and it's not too hard to manage especially when that tree is trying to establish and it needs as much moisture as possible so I'll just keep digging down until that pot or the stem is about the size of the pot meaning I don't want to plant that tree any deeper than it actually is in the poker moment and then once I've got the right size exactly I can dig down a little bit further actually and then backfill with a bit of loose soil and I'll whack the tree in the hole and then backfill I don't use any compost a little bit like one yard revolution where he has explained in his tip videos one of these really big rules or tips was not to backfill with compost or anything like that and on the same I don't do that either a stainless patrick otherwise you can it gets too loose I like to backfill with good soil that is come with and that way the roots will grow out better so then I took the grass that I've just cut out upside down and that backs and I'll put that around the outer perimeter of that plant and that kills the grass underneath it so it gives me a bit of extra wits as well with that hole that I've just cut and that grass upside down dies and then it killed the grass underneath it but I don't stop there I get some mulch and I also have a little bit of fertilizer I like to use an organic flood and bone if I don't have my own available like new or whatever I use that commercial blood and bone the organic stuff sprinkle a handful that around the tree first and then I lay down my mouth you could water that in first if you wanted to but I prefer to lay the mops down on top nice and thick Sully's pixelation thickly down around on top of that extra grass and a little bit more and that then will make sure that the grass doesn't grow through and into that tree and so while that sapling grows it won't get impeded by any extra grass or weeds and it will have retain the moisture because that mouse will give it extra moisture and you got will won't let it dry out as much planting in winter in this region the subtropics also helps too so then I'll go ahead and I lined them all up like I was saying I'm a little bit that studious when it comes to making sure I get my rows right even though I there's going to come a time where I've got to start planting in between rows but anyway that's another story but I then start going and I plant those six trees or saplings in those holes and keep mulching that one bag of small supply below get about five fruit trees so it goes quite a long way one of those one of those bags so it's fairly economical and it's a good thing first one row planted good it is about exposing out maybe like a 3/4 you know go around the corner here and I'm going to OB I'll be planting plants all the way along here but just in this corner I'm planting that mulberry because it will match that mulberry there and the one up the top so they'll be sort of like a triangle on mulberries in a similar area I think it'll look nice too mole Roos opening up as you come through down into the picnic area but like I said I'll just do one row behind the compost heap and the banana trees I don't think I'll go down further because then you're getting to this bush land where we've got the chicken area and the big gum trees and natives and the picnic area I don't want to encroach too much on that I think one more row will do and if I buy more fruit trees I'll just start squeezing I'm in the gaps around here around the orchard and out the front around planting some more citrus or at the side and that front as well so yeah I get onto this mulberry and then I'll move up to the citrus of the top right hand side plant them near the apple trees and the avocado tree near there yeah at this point in time I've probably dug for two hours or more which is a fair that we're digging and it's good for the shoulders I love citrus it's one of my favorite fruit trees if not the favorite type of variety there's four there in the middle I'm going to plant a tangerine that's why there's a gap but I'm expecting that strip of fruit tree is getting the afternoon Sun should do really well in that spike and be a really nice feature along that driveway well I hope you enjoyed that video I've got lots of videos in the pipeline at the moment and I'm working on some that are more complicated and probably more informative but I just wanted to knock this one up and send it out this weekend so that you guys have a little bit to chew on thanks for watching don't forget the website self-abusive me calm bye for now [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from self-sufficiently many our orchard at the moment I thought that I'd bring you a quick video on what's been happening around here on our acreage on our small three acre property urban farming primarily to do with planting fruit trees are a bit of a fruit tree nut of a fruit tree collector and there's a lot of reasons for collecting fruit trees but the main one is to have a good variety of food to eat at different times of the year so let's get into it so before we watch me dig let's go ahead and see what I'm planting another name is Sapodilla central american plant the chestnut it's grown for at edible seeds then you've got the job at Aqaba that's the yellow touch usually it's the black kite like that once and I've also got one of them a clay mock which is a small orange fruit with really good flavor apparently in the soursop which is apparently a really beautiful juice and I'm also going to plant a white mulberry which I've always wanted to do and then on the other side of a softie just on our other neighbors think we're going to plant a row of citrus this outback line that's supposed to be a native to Australia this weird plant which is a mandarine lime apparently it's got really easy feel small mandarine but tastes like a lime then we've got the bush lemon which is very Hardy lemon that I've always wanted to have a West Indian line which is a really Hardy lime very common over obviously in the West Indies then earlier today I planted this golden fruit of the Andes and it's supposed to be one of the best fruits in the world and then this Babar Cove which has a torpedo fruit the taste of a pineapple and strawberry cross all right let me explain how I dig these holes I've done the same thing for our hundred plus fruit trees on our property I start by making sure the trees in the right spot for to begin with and then I start digging around in a circular fashion obviously I want a nice circular cut I start digging up the lawn first I want to dig out that patch of grass when you could always be plant that somewhere if you needed to but I put a different method for what I do with the grass so I go around I cut out that hole usually about two or three times the width of the pot because I want to get my bright on around this thing so I don't want it to be just sort of pot size II that otherwise it's a little bit too cumbersome to writing the mo around plus I want a nice big hole and gap of that graph so that grasses and granite grow through too easily and it's not too hard to manage especially when that tree is trying to establish and it needs as much moisture as possible so I'll just keep digging down until that pot or the stem is about the size of the pot meaning I don't want to plant that tree any deeper than it actually is in the poker moment and then once I've got the right size exactly I can dig down a little bit further actually and then backfill with a bit of loose soil and I'll whack the tree in the hole and then backfill I don't use any compost a little bit like one yard revolution where he has explained in his tip videos one of these really big rules or tips was not to backfill with compost or anything like that and on the same I don't do that either a stainless patrick otherwise you can it gets too loose I like to backfill with good soil that is come with and that way the roots will grow out better so then I took the grass that I've just cut out upside down and that backs and I'll put that around the outer perimeter of that plant and that kills the grass underneath it so it gives me a bit of extra wits as well with that hole that I've just cut and that grass upside down dies and then it killed the grass underneath it but I don't stop there I get some mulch and I also have a little bit of fertilizer I like to use an organic flood and bone if I don't have my own available like new or whatever I use that commercial blood and bone the organic stuff sprinkle a handful that around the tree first and then I lay down my mouth you could water that in first if you wanted to but I prefer to lay the mops down on top nice and thick Sully's pixelation thickly down around on top of that extra grass and a little bit more and that then will make sure that the grass doesn't grow through and into that tree and so while that sapling grows it won't get impeded by any extra grass or weeds and it will have retain the moisture because that mouse will give it extra moisture and you got will won't let it dry out as much planting in winter in this region the subtropics also helps too so then I'll go ahead and I lined them all up like I was saying I'm a little bit that studious when it comes to making sure I get my rows right even though I there's going to come a time where I've got to start planting in between rows but anyway that's another story but I then start going and I plant those six trees or saplings in those holes and keep mulching that one bag of small supply below get about five fruit trees so it goes quite a long way one of those one of those bags so it's fairly economical and it's a good thing first one row planted good it is about exposing out maybe like a 3/4 you know go around the corner here and I'm going to OB I'll be planting plants all the way along here but just in this corner I'm planting that mulberry because it will match that mulberry there and the one up the top so they'll be sort of like a triangle on mulberries in a similar area I think it'll look nice too mole Roos opening up as you come through down into the picnic area but like I said I'll just do one row behind the compost heap and the banana trees I don't think I'll go down further because then you're getting to this bush land where we've got the chicken area and the big gum trees and natives and the picnic area I don't want to encroach too much on that I think one more row will do and if I buy more fruit trees I'll just start squeezing I'm in the gaps around here around the orchard and out the front around planting some more citrus or at the side and that front as well so yeah I get onto this mulberry and then I'll move up to the citrus of the top right hand side plant them near the apple trees and the avocado tree near there yeah at this point in time I've probably dug for two hours or more which is a fair that we're digging and it's good for the shoulders I love citrus it's one of my favorite fruit trees if not the favorite type of variety there's four there in the middle I'm going to plant a tangerine that's why there's a gap but I'm expecting that strip of fruit tree is getting the afternoon Sun should do really well in that spike and be a really nice feature along that driveway well I hope you enjoyed that video I've got lots of videos in the pipeline at the moment and I'm working on some that are more complicated and probably more informative but I just wanted to knock this one up and send it out this weekend so that you guys have a little bit to chew on thanks for watching don't forget the website self-abusive me calm bye for now [Music]


 
134
Views

Grow Vegetables in Your Lawn or Grassed Backyard - Plus Other Gardening Tips

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 134 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


you say do you see me I'm mark from self-sufficient me and this is my backyard here's the vegetable garden on the right hand side you can probably see a little bit of the orchard on the Left I'm standing right next to this beautiful asparagus fern I've left it grow at the end of summer so that it could get some energy into its root ball it'll die right back now over winter and then I'll give it a good chop down right to the base most within bit of fertilizer and in spring it will reshoot like Ayub uu and give us more asparagus spears through spring and summer but that's not what this video is about this video is about harvesting greens and veggies from our own lawn so it sounds extreme doesn't it and I'm not I'm a bit cheeky buyer by saying you know growing your vegetables in your lawn but in fact I really do do it now here as I'm just walking along I see vegetables and salad crops everywhere and I'm not talking about the grass I know you can eat grass and personally I'm not a big fan of it no matter how much better you put on it now I've got a nice little Asian green here this is a like a mizzu and how that happens is I'll harvest some vegetables from the garden and I'll leave one or two plants go to seed like the soccer here for example you can see all these seed pods I don't need all those seed either sometimes I could only need one pod and that'll do me then the rest of them inevitably gets strewn in the vegetable garden or I might pull the plants out throws our plant here and when I mow the grass I will run over those seeds and scare them everywhere all over the lawn now you'd think hard no mark you're going to have vegetables and stuff and weeds coming up or through your lawn of of course that doesn't happen because the grass out completes any weed or any or most weeds anyway sometimes the clove it might come in through winter but the grass will out-compete just about every anyway so it doesn't matter but what happens though at this time of year through our winter the salad crops and the brassicas like your cabbages and your broccoli your Chinese greens like your bok choy they out-compete the grass because the grass goes dormant it doesn't go fully dormant but it does go dormant enough that it grows really really slowly and the salad crops can out-compete the grass isn't that cool so most of the time I'm not even sowing seeds from one year to the next I'm walking around my lawn looking for little seedlings I can do two things I can harvest them and plant them back into the garden or I can harvest them and we can eat them baby greens they're great in salads they're great in stir-fries in cooking sandwiches whatever they're just walking around my vegetable garden I've got Tomatoes beans I've got some coriander and some dill that I've planted that was self seeded somewhere else in the garden I've even had turmeric now this turmeric he is dying off I've even had that growing in the lawn and was able to harvest it and that was part of this last crop ear this matter of turmeric that I've grown I can't think of many greens at all or plants that don't sell seed and I think that's one of the most important things I want to get across in this video not me being a smartass and saying oh look I can grow greens in the lawn what I want to get across is like your plants go to seed yeah sure harvest most of them but leave one broccoli go to seed leave one Chinese cabbage bok choy leave it go to seed and see how they come up even harvesting them and throwing them in the compost once that seed pot is fully formed and gone brown when you use your compass in the garden you might find that a few seedlings will come up there's another really great thing about leaving plants go to seed and that is adaptation and like I said to you at the beginning a lot of my salad crops and other types of greens they will come up through winter even herbs like dill and coriander very rarely see them cart through summer they tend to get into a groove where they come up just at the right time and that means they'll grow best as well so they know when to come up and over time those plants tend to do better than say a seedling that you get or a seed that you get that's been adapted or slightly adapted to different conditions here's another bok choy all the way up here there you go well that'll be good for dinner tonight I hope you enjoyed that video I don't like I said I don't want to be a smart aleck in' and say look you can grow vegetables in your lawn I'm just saying that let your plants go to seed and be a bit willy-nilly sometimes about it and you might be surprised what comes up at the exact right time of year that you can harvest to eat or plant back into the veggie garden thanks a lot for watching don't forget the website self submission me calm bye for now [Music] [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:


you say do you see me I'm mark from self-sufficient me and this is my backyard here's the vegetable garden on the right hand side you can probably see a little bit of the orchard on the Left I'm standing right next to this beautiful asparagus fern I've left it grow at the end of summer so that it could get some energy into its root ball it'll die right back now over winter and then I'll give it a good chop down right to the base most within bit of fertilizer and in spring it will reshoot like Ayub uu and give us more asparagus spears through spring and summer but that's not what this video is about this video is about harvesting greens and veggies from our own lawn so it sounds extreme doesn't it and I'm not I'm a bit cheeky buyer by saying you know growing your vegetables in your lawn but in fact I really do do it now here as I'm just walking along I see vegetables and salad crops everywhere and I'm not talking about the grass I know you can eat grass and personally I'm not a big fan of it no matter how much better you put on it now I've got a nice little Asian green here this is a like a mizzu and how that happens is I'll harvest some vegetables from the garden and I'll leave one or two plants go to seed like the soccer here for example you can see all these seed pods I don't need all those seed either sometimes I could only need one pod and that'll do me then the rest of them inevitably gets strewn in the vegetable garden or I might pull the plants out throws our plant here and when I mow the grass I will run over those seeds and scare them everywhere all over the lawn now you'd think hard no mark you're going to have vegetables and stuff and weeds coming up or through your lawn of of course that doesn't happen because the grass out completes any weed or any or most weeds anyway sometimes the clove it might come in through winter but the grass will out-compete just about every anyway so it doesn't matter but what happens though at this time of year through our winter the salad crops and the brassicas like your cabbages and your broccoli your Chinese greens like your bok choy they out-compete the grass because the grass goes dormant it doesn't go fully dormant but it does go dormant enough that it grows really really slowly and the salad crops can out-compete the grass isn't that cool so most of the time I'm not even sowing seeds from one year to the next I'm walking around my lawn looking for little seedlings I can do two things I can harvest them and plant them back into the garden or I can harvest them and we can eat them baby greens they're great in salads they're great in stir-fries in cooking sandwiches whatever they're just walking around my vegetable garden I've got Tomatoes beans I've got some coriander and some dill that I've planted that was self seeded somewhere else in the garden I've even had turmeric now this turmeric he is dying off I've even had that growing in the lawn and was able to harvest it and that was part of this last crop ear this matter of turmeric that I've grown I can't think of many greens at all or plants that don't sell seed and I think that's one of the most important things I want to get across in this video not me being a smartass and saying oh look I can grow greens in the lawn what I want to get across is like your plants go to seed yeah sure harvest most of them but leave one broccoli go to seed leave one Chinese cabbage bok choy leave it go to seed and see how they come up even harvesting them and throwing them in the compost once that seed pot is fully formed and gone brown when you use your compass in the garden you might find that a few seedlings will come up there's another really great thing about leaving plants go to seed and that is adaptation and like I said to you at the beginning a lot of my salad crops and other types of greens they will come up through winter even herbs like dill and coriander very rarely see them cart through summer they tend to get into a groove where they come up just at the right time and that means they'll grow best as well so they know when to come up and over time those plants tend to do better than say a seedling that you get or a seed that you get that's been adapted or slightly adapted to different conditions here's another bok choy all the way up here there you go well that'll be good for dinner tonight I hope you enjoyed that video I don't like I said I don't want to be a smart aleck in' and say look you can grow vegetables in your lawn I'm just saying that let your plants go to seed and be a bit willy-nilly sometimes about it and you might be surprised what comes up at the exact right time of year that you can harvest to eat or plant back into the veggie garden thanks a lot for watching don't forget the website self submission me calm bye for now [Music] [Music]

151
Views

How to manage unwanted weeds and grasses in vegetable garden beds.

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 151 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


get a unlike from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to show you guys a special technique I use to rest our garden beds and at the same time cool off weeds and grasses and seeds so I'm going to move that tarp and I'm going to put it over here over this bed one of my oldest garden beds in this patch that's become overgrown with nut weed grasses weeds or nut grass I should say that grass money down then end all sorts of grasses and weeds have gone to seed and I'm going to do the same going to take that top and put it across here a lot of these weeds came up through the manure that I spread throughout this bed about 12 month or so ago got a whole lot of horse meal was infested with weeds before I cover this bed I'm going to look for any little plants that have come up that I can salvage now I'd take this one this mustard this is sort of loose leaf mustard but I've got plenty of that going around so that's not that's not a drama here's a weed that's going to seed I'll just pull that out and chuck it I've already done that with some of these cobblers pegs here that weed there I got to get that out of the garden otherwise those seeds will just fall into the garden bed and come up as soon as I remove the top and that grows all year round that damn thing there's more of that mustard in there but there's also and I've saw this before dill coming up because of the weather is cooling down it's dill season and I always that me our dill go to seed and the last few seasons has been growing in this front bed here and so I knew that we're going to have dill coming up and I want to cover this bed over and not have any deal this year or have to replant seed our Mazel grab some of the seedlings that have come up now and replant them around in the other garden beds that are prepared so that we've got dill coming on so that's what I'll do I'll carefully remove some of these seedlings take out a bit of soil with them and and replant them this climbing spinach I'll probably just leave it sit up there and those seeds will dry out you can see some of my finger here those berries are edible by the way but fairly tasteless but what they are good for is colouring things like you could color a cake icing sugar you could color eggs pickled eggs and all types of things purple without you know using chemicals or additives yeah so this as well a little coriander plant coming up again as the weather cools down we have this coriander starts coming up and I'll salvage that little seedling as well and plant it alongside the dill probably and I've got this eggplant that was self seeded in the corner here along with this tomato this is a bush tomato a lot of people use a four-seat for root stock and graft other tomato plants on top because it's a vigorous but the tomatoes themselves are beautiful yes they're tiny but it will readily seed and grow all year in this climate whereas the larger come up Tomatoes won't even the larger cherry tomatoes struggling in the heat eggplant is unusual for it to go into winter the seedling came up at the right time and this plant is going strong even though we're coming into winter which is good they all might get some eggplant through winter here so I won't I'll try a weed around it as much as I can and I'll cover the whole bed except for that little corner and see how that eggplant goes once that plants finished then I'll cover it fully over so yeah that's what I want to do first before I cover is remove any plants that I can salvage and then as you can see this is this nut grass is really thick and ugly and you can pull this out as much as you like but it'll just break off as I see that's nut ball at the end here and what happens is this sends out a whole heap of other root systems and rhyme zones and more nuts form and then the plant forms from that so you pull it out and there's nuts in the ground still and it will free shoot the best way to do it is to cover the bed smother it and kill it off over several months so that it keeps trying to shoot and that eventually it'll just die out and that's the way to go and all that greenery and weeds will turn into compost to be eaten by worms all right so let's have a look at this bed now it's done the job that tarp there's nothing living underneath here it's all died down few things still trying to sprout soil underneath looks pretty good yeah that's what I was after that effect this is where I had the sweet potato and I was trying to kill that off in this bed it's still still rerouting here but I can easily dig that up now and get rid of it I don't want to growing in here anymore and I'm going to refurbish this bed after I stick the tarp down the front bed I'll refurbish this with some fresh manure that I've got that I've had sitting down the back there we're not freshmen yeah good composted manure that I've had composting in a heap for good six months be on the back here will whack that on there and some compost as well and other stuff and really bring this bed up and then I'll Mull fitting and we can turn this into a really nice winter's bed perhaps and grow some winter veggies in here but now my aim is to get this tarp on the front bed up here and smother out all that once I get the plants that I want out of that bed [Music] [Music] [Music] there we go all done nice and neat laid down so that we might pick it up that will work well we've got to do a bit of edging around the bottom knee otherwise and it could be with that not quite long enough so I use that shade cloth I'd be in there you know what I prefer that material I'm going to get a big roll of it about all of them 80 metres roll or something maybe this'll add maybe 40 or something and I'm gonna just use shade cloth maybe doubled over but I like shade cloth set it in half simply because it allows the rain and moisture through to do and all that and I think that's better for the microbes and wounds on the knee however the reason I like this tarp is because if the weed killer when the Sun even through winter when the Sun heats up on that tarp it permeates through into that bed and that's where it kills off the weed temperature gets very high on top of the worms migrate down the bottom and when the worms and microbes migrate down to the bottom because it's too hot obviously the the weed seeds can't and they get fried on top there and that's what I did to the other bed and that's why it'll be a good growing bed just reason it'll throw weaves in its back bed that I've taken this tarp off and put it on the front one but it'll have less weeds than what it otherwise would have had if I tried to hand weed it and refurbish the bed this way you're giving the better rest at the same time you're killing off weeds and the types of grasses that are really difficult to kill off that keep coming up now the grass will keep coming up that nut grass but it'll eventually have to die because they'll get no Sun and nothing no Sun not even water in some parts so this is a really good method an organic method to refurbish give them a rest at the same time protect it from extra weeds growing in it and all those weeds that are were underneath it sort of be pulling them out so will now die off and turn into compost and seed for the microbes and worms now you might have been hearing some noise in the background with water dropping things like I've got some parrots that are sitting on my roof having a bath in the gutter and we use about them making a racket while I'm trying to talk to you guys that's just annoying hey there's a bit of a low point in the gutter then from water clicks and that's come for some of the birds have a bath well I hope you enjoyed that video just another laid-back one showing how I work my garden beds I consider food gardening a very important part of my life and I'm glad that I'm able to share some of the things I do in the garden with you guys if you like this video give it a thumbs up and of course subscribe for more thanks for getting website self-sufficient me calm bye for now [Music] you [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


get a unlike from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to show you guys a special technique I use to rest our garden beds and at the same time cool off weeds and grasses and seeds so I'm going to move that tarp and I'm going to put it over here over this bed one of my oldest garden beds in this patch that's become overgrown with nut weed grasses weeds or nut grass I should say that grass money down then end all sorts of grasses and weeds have gone to seed and I'm going to do the same going to take that top and put it across here a lot of these weeds came up through the manure that I spread throughout this bed about 12 month or so ago got a whole lot of horse meal was infested with weeds before I cover this bed I'm going to look for any little plants that have come up that I can salvage now I'd take this one this mustard this is sort of loose leaf mustard but I've got plenty of that going around so that's not that's not a drama here's a weed that's going to seed I'll just pull that out and chuck it I've already done that with some of these cobblers pegs here that weed there I got to get that out of the garden otherwise those seeds will just fall into the garden bed and come up as soon as I remove the top and that grows all year round that damn thing there's more of that mustard in there but there's also and I've saw this before dill coming up because of the weather is cooling down it's dill season and I always that me our dill go to seed and the last few seasons has been growing in this front bed here and so I knew that we're going to have dill coming up and I want to cover this bed over and not have any deal this year or have to replant seed our Mazel grab some of the seedlings that have come up now and replant them around in the other garden beds that are prepared so that we've got dill coming on so that's what I'll do I'll carefully remove some of these seedlings take out a bit of soil with them and and replant them this climbing spinach I'll probably just leave it sit up there and those seeds will dry out you can see some of my finger here those berries are edible by the way but fairly tasteless but what they are good for is colouring things like you could color a cake icing sugar you could color eggs pickled eggs and all types of things purple without you know using chemicals or additives yeah so this as well a little coriander plant coming up again as the weather cools down we have this coriander starts coming up and I'll salvage that little seedling as well and plant it alongside the dill probably and I've got this eggplant that was self seeded in the corner here along with this tomato this is a bush tomato a lot of people use a four-seat for root stock and graft other tomato plants on top because it's a vigorous but the tomatoes themselves are beautiful yes they're tiny but it will readily seed and grow all year in this climate whereas the larger come up Tomatoes won't even the larger cherry tomatoes struggling in the heat eggplant is unusual for it to go into winter the seedling came up at the right time and this plant is going strong even though we're coming into winter which is good they all might get some eggplant through winter here so I won't I'll try a weed around it as much as I can and I'll cover the whole bed except for that little corner and see how that eggplant goes once that plants finished then I'll cover it fully over so yeah that's what I want to do first before I cover is remove any plants that I can salvage and then as you can see this is this nut grass is really thick and ugly and you can pull this out as much as you like but it'll just break off as I see that's nut ball at the end here and what happens is this sends out a whole heap of other root systems and rhyme zones and more nuts form and then the plant forms from that so you pull it out and there's nuts in the ground still and it will free shoot the best way to do it is to cover the bed smother it and kill it off over several months so that it keeps trying to shoot and that eventually it'll just die out and that's the way to go and all that greenery and weeds will turn into compost to be eaten by worms all right so let's have a look at this bed now it's done the job that tarp there's nothing living underneath here it's all died down few things still trying to sprout soil underneath looks pretty good yeah that's what I was after that effect this is where I had the sweet potato and I was trying to kill that off in this bed it's still still rerouting here but I can easily dig that up now and get rid of it I don't want to growing in here anymore and I'm going to refurbish this bed after I stick the tarp down the front bed I'll refurbish this with some fresh manure that I've got that I've had sitting down the back there we're not freshmen yeah good composted manure that I've had composting in a heap for good six months be on the back here will whack that on there and some compost as well and other stuff and really bring this bed up and then I'll Mull fitting and we can turn this into a really nice winter's bed perhaps and grow some winter veggies in here but now my aim is to get this tarp on the front bed up here and smother out all that once I get the plants that I want out of that bed [Music] [Music] [Music] there we go all done nice and neat laid down so that we might pick it up that will work well we've got to do a bit of edging around the bottom knee otherwise and it could be with that not quite long enough so I use that shade cloth I'd be in there you know what I prefer that material I'm going to get a big roll of it about all of them 80 metres roll or something maybe this'll add maybe 40 or something and I'm gonna just use shade cloth maybe doubled over but I like shade cloth set it in half simply because it allows the rain and moisture through to do and all that and I think that's better for the microbes and wounds on the knee however the reason I like this tarp is because if the weed killer when the Sun even through winter when the Sun heats up on that tarp it permeates through into that bed and that's where it kills off the weed temperature gets very high on top of the worms migrate down the bottom and when the worms and microbes migrate down to the bottom because it's too hot obviously the the weed seeds can't and they get fried on top there and that's what I did to the other bed and that's why it'll be a good growing bed just reason it'll throw weaves in its back bed that I've taken this tarp off and put it on the front one but it'll have less weeds than what it otherwise would have had if I tried to hand weed it and refurbish the bed this way you're giving the better rest at the same time you're killing off weeds and the types of grasses that are really difficult to kill off that keep coming up now the grass will keep coming up that nut grass but it'll eventually have to die because they'll get no Sun and nothing no Sun not even water in some parts so this is a really good method an organic method to refurbish give them a rest at the same time protect it from extra weeds growing in it and all those weeds that are were underneath it sort of be pulling them out so will now die off and turn into compost and seed for the microbes and worms now you might have been hearing some noise in the background with water dropping things like I've got some parrots that are sitting on my roof having a bath in the gutter and we use about them making a racket while I'm trying to talk to you guys that's just annoying hey there's a bit of a low point in the gutter then from water clicks and that's come for some of the birds have a bath well I hope you enjoyed that video just another laid-back one showing how I work my garden beds I consider food gardening a very important part of my life and I'm glad that I'm able to share some of the things I do in the garden with you guys if you like this video give it a thumbs up and of course subscribe for more thanks for getting website self-sufficient me calm bye for now [Music] you [Music]


 
217
Views

Why Aren't My Quail Laying Eggs Plus Coturnix Update

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 217 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:
 


today I'm Microsoft's official me and I'm holding a quail egg that's because I'm down the back here in our quail pen and it's pretty gloomy so I'm I'm hopeful this video will come out okay the reason why it's gloomy is because we're in winter here well we're not quite in winter yet it's just on the edge of winter late throws of autumn coming into winter and the weather is what I sort of want to talk to you guys about today in regards to quails laying eggs and after that I'll give you a bit of a general update on like while keeping now in the background you might hear the Ducks going off that's because they're coming back from the dam and they want to have a feed and I'm here annoying them because I'm even though I'm in this cloud pen I'm a few meters away from their feed bin so they're working up the courage to try to come into the chicken and duck pen and and have a feed of their funny animals but anyway let's get straight into it all right so it looks like the Ducks have gone down to the dam and left being peace which makes it a lot easier speak I can tell you so I did a bit of a hunt and I only found one quail egg and there's a good reason for that we're coming into winter and quail don't generally lay through the winter months now the reason why I really wanted to do this video and pretty quickly was because I'd been getting quite a few messages over the last two or three weeks saying mark what's going on my quail will stop lying they're expecting eggs out of these young adults six to nine weeks old and there's no eggs coming and they're thinking has something gone wrong during the breeding process have I got sterile hens or something or or what's happened but really that's just a matter of chance because if you've read quail up and they're coming into adulthood they're not going to probably lay not just because of the cold in fact it's not because the coal is all it's because of the daylight hours quail like good long daylight hours at least around 12 or more hours of daylight to bring on their line when we to comes obviously the daylight hours are shorter and the quail stop laying this is a good thing because it gives the quail a rest so I'm happy to find only just one egg because it means that they're coming into their natural cycle they've stopped laying they're still eating lots and drinking heaps they're actually fattening up a little and even though this is my breeding stock I'm quite happy for them not to be laying at all for the next three months at the start of the spring they'll start laying eggs and they'll be legs all over the ground here but for the next three months or more I'm quite happy for them just to chill out rejuvenate their body this little egg here might look quite small it's about you know three four times smaller than a chicken egg however when you think about it a chicken egg compared to a quail egg isn't much of a difference but a Clio at about 250 to 300 grams max is quite a lot smaller than a chicken it's a bit like a chicken laying an emu egg if you could use that analogy that's a big egg for a little bird to lay and it's good for them to have a break commercial outfits they just put on extra lighting in the quail shed and they will if not keep the lights on 24 hours they will at least make 17 or so 18 hours of light and so the quail continue to lay that the problem with that is those quails just pretty much later death their lifespan is a lot shorter and I would argue that their life isn't as fulfilling because it's not natural for them just to continue allele a main point I wanted to say is don't be too concerned if your quail have gone off the light particularly if it's coming into the cooler month for coming into winter because that's quite normal personally just for humane sake and for good quality eggs as a backyard breeder I'd recommend you let your quail have a break because then your breeders in the new season will be stronger they'll lay better eggs I'll be better quality and you'll have better hatching ray and a lot more benefits you'll get longevity out of your good quail breeders so you'll get perhaps 12 months or two years more than you would if you've made them late continuously it's best incubating quail eggs when the weather is a little bit more milder anyway you incubate doesn't have to work as hard it's easier to brood the little chicks of course there are other reasons why cryolite and lay they might have got a fright they might have in a hawk in the area it might have been a fox or an animal that's given them a fright and they make off the lay for a few weeks if they've been dressed or if you've transported on well if you've got purchased some adult quail and they've come into a new location they may take several weeks to settle also they might offer layer so being infested with lights or mics in particular mites will weaken the birds so check for that but generally quail a pretty good layers now just a quick update on my koala pen and what's happening so yes it's come it's coming into winter so I'm not getting many eggs that's cool I've got about fourteen quail at the moment I lost about three or four coming into well when it just started to get a bit cooler and that's normal quail sometimes the old earth breeders will drop off the perch particularly as the weather gets cooler because they aren't is stronger and it's normal for me to lose a few Birds coming in to winter overall they're all quite healthy the mulch is starting to wear down although not as much as I expected remember if you watch me closely I put a wood chip mulch in here and was interested to see how that would break down well it's not breaking down little it's certainly covered in poop and everything and but it still got some big chunks in there and it hasn't sort of broken down as much as say a hay or straw or or sugar cane Moss would break down put it that way but I'm still pretty happy with the results and that's going to go into the garden and do very well for my plans I'll probably change it maybe in a couple of weeks maybe a month scoop it all up and give the whole pin a good refurbish but yeah I think that'll do for me I'll leave these these fourteen or so birds rest over the winter months and then really hooking to my breeding come our spring in September what I want to do then is breathe a whole heap up which of them and when we butcher them for food I want to show you guys that process again even though I've done videos on it before you might do it slightly different from sort of pen to the plate type scene show you how I cook them up show you some special recipes that I've got for quail I think that'd be good this coming spring that's the medium to long term plan of what I'd like to show you guys as far as this channel is concerned anyway the sun's going down so I hope you enjoyed this video give it a thumbs up if you did don't forget to share it thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:
 


today I'm Microsoft's official me and I'm holding a quail egg that's because I'm down the back here in our quail pen and it's pretty gloomy so I'm I'm hopeful this video will come out okay the reason why it's gloomy is because we're in winter here well we're not quite in winter yet it's just on the edge of winter late throws of autumn coming into winter and the weather is what I sort of want to talk to you guys about today in regards to quails laying eggs and after that I'll give you a bit of a general update on like while keeping now in the background you might hear the Ducks going off that's because they're coming back from the dam and they want to have a feed and I'm here annoying them because I'm even though I'm in this cloud pen I'm a few meters away from their feed bin so they're working up the courage to try to come into the chicken and duck pen and and have a feed of their funny animals but anyway let's get straight into it all right so it looks like the Ducks have gone down to the dam and left being peace which makes it a lot easier speak I can tell you so I did a bit of a hunt and I only found one quail egg and there's a good reason for that we're coming into winter and quail don't generally lay through the winter months now the reason why I really wanted to do this video and pretty quickly was because I'd been getting quite a few messages over the last two or three weeks saying mark what's going on my quail will stop lying they're expecting eggs out of these young adults six to nine weeks old and there's no eggs coming and they're thinking has something gone wrong during the breeding process have I got sterile hens or something or or what's happened but really that's just a matter of chance because if you've read quail up and they're coming into adulthood they're not going to probably lay not just because of the cold in fact it's not because the coal is all it's because of the daylight hours quail like good long daylight hours at least around 12 or more hours of daylight to bring on their line when we to comes obviously the daylight hours are shorter and the quail stop laying this is a good thing because it gives the quail a rest so I'm happy to find only just one egg because it means that they're coming into their natural cycle they've stopped laying they're still eating lots and drinking heaps they're actually fattening up a little and even though this is my breeding stock I'm quite happy for them not to be laying at all for the next three months at the start of the spring they'll start laying eggs and they'll be legs all over the ground here but for the next three months or more I'm quite happy for them just to chill out rejuvenate their body this little egg here might look quite small it's about you know three four times smaller than a chicken egg however when you think about it a chicken egg compared to a quail egg isn't much of a difference but a Clio at about 250 to 300 grams max is quite a lot smaller than a chicken it's a bit like a chicken laying an emu egg if you could use that analogy that's a big egg for a little bird to lay and it's good for them to have a break commercial outfits they just put on extra lighting in the quail shed and they will if not keep the lights on 24 hours they will at least make 17 or so 18 hours of light and so the quail continue to lay that the problem with that is those quails just pretty much later death their lifespan is a lot shorter and I would argue that their life isn't as fulfilling because it's not natural for them just to continue allele a main point I wanted to say is don't be too concerned if your quail have gone off the light particularly if it's coming into the cooler month for coming into winter because that's quite normal personally just for humane sake and for good quality eggs as a backyard breeder I'd recommend you let your quail have a break because then your breeders in the new season will be stronger they'll lay better eggs I'll be better quality and you'll have better hatching ray and a lot more benefits you'll get longevity out of your good quail breeders so you'll get perhaps 12 months or two years more than you would if you've made them late continuously it's best incubating quail eggs when the weather is a little bit more milder anyway you incubate doesn't have to work as hard it's easier to brood the little chicks of course there are other reasons why cryolite and lay they might have got a fright they might have in a hawk in the area it might have been a fox or an animal that's given them a fright and they make off the lay for a few weeks if they've been dressed or if you've transported on well if you've got purchased some adult quail and they've come into a new location they may take several weeks to settle also they might offer layer so being infested with lights or mics in particular mites will weaken the birds so check for that but generally quail a pretty good layers now just a quick update on my koala pen and what's happening so yes it's come it's coming into winter so I'm not getting many eggs that's cool I've got about fourteen quail at the moment I lost about three or four coming into well when it just started to get a bit cooler and that's normal quail sometimes the old earth breeders will drop off the perch particularly as the weather gets cooler because they aren't is stronger and it's normal for me to lose a few Birds coming in to winter overall they're all quite healthy the mulch is starting to wear down although not as much as I expected remember if you watch me closely I put a wood chip mulch in here and was interested to see how that would break down well it's not breaking down little it's certainly covered in poop and everything and but it still got some big chunks in there and it hasn't sort of broken down as much as say a hay or straw or or sugar cane Moss would break down put it that way but I'm still pretty happy with the results and that's going to go into the garden and do very well for my plans I'll probably change it maybe in a couple of weeks maybe a month scoop it all up and give the whole pin a good refurbish but yeah I think that'll do for me I'll leave these these fourteen or so birds rest over the winter months and then really hooking to my breeding come our spring in September what I want to do then is breathe a whole heap up which of them and when we butcher them for food I want to show you guys that process again even though I've done videos on it before you might do it slightly different from sort of pen to the plate type scene show you how I cook them up show you some special recipes that I've got for quail I think that'd be good this coming spring that's the medium to long term plan of what I'd like to show you guys as far as this channel is concerned anyway the sun's going down so I hope you enjoyed this video give it a thumbs up if you did don't forget to share it thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]

159
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5 Tips How to Grow a Ton of Mint in one Container or Garden Bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 159 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to give you my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of mint in just one container tip number one location and contain mint grows and multiplies by horizontal runners that the plant sends out these runners they have nodes which readily route down and that essentially creates the new plants I made the mistake years ago and only once when I planted mint out into the general garden bed for the next 12 months it took over the whole backyard and I was spending hours trying to control it pull it out it just kept popping up everywhere it drove me nuts so for that reason I recommend growing mint in isolation whether it be in a large raised garden bed like this one or large container or a pot or in a separate rockery or a separate part of the garden where you know it can't escape as far as location goes mint is a very versatile plant it will grow well in full Sun and also part shade in a hot climate you might consider growing mint in a partly shaded positions just to protect it from the extreme heat because it doesn't like that a lot and if you're in a really cold climate I would strongly suggest you plant it out somewhere where it gets full Sun having said that though I do live in a hot climate subtropics and mink grows very well out in the full Sun for me tip number 2 prune your mint pruning your mint plant encourages new growth that is succulent rather than woody and tough succulent plump leaves and stems are much better in smoothies and cooking etc rather than the you know terrible tough and stringy stuff that you could get if you've just left it grow wild look you'll naturally prune your mint through the growing season anyway as you eat it but if you don't for some reason after a few weeks just remember to give it a clip around the edges give it a bit of a haircut and it'll love you for it you want to prune your mint heavily like I mean drastically that's what I do personally when it goes dormant for a cold climate mint usually goes dormant through winter in a warmer climate like mine the subtropics mint will go dormant through summer the hottest part of the year so yes I gained a traverse Atoll in that way where it will adapt to extreme conditions either way so whenever the plant is dormant that's when I give it a really harsh prune back I mean almost down to the roots and I get rid of all the woody growth all the old stuff and just prune it right back down to nothing almost tip number three feed your mint once with an organic fertilizer just a standard fertilizer is a store or from animals like your own chickens make sure it's not wet fresh poo as that could kill the plant it should be dry or composted down but whatever you use sprinkle it around the base of the plant and not on the leaves I reckon it's best to fertilize towards the end of that dormant stage just like I was talking about before or as the plant is just starting to shoot that could be in spring in some climates or coming into winter depending on what climate you're in now I feed my mint with just a small amount of organic fertilizer I just sprinkle it around the base of the plant because it's a hardy herb it doesn't need a whole lot of fertilizer in fact if you over fertilize it it could become leggy and stringy and not do very well at all also if you over fertilize it you could actually kill the plant and always remember after you've applied fertilizer give it a good water in the watering can or a hose to make sure that it's the fertilizer is watered right in well and it's also off the lead so it doesn't burn the lead tip number four water mint regularly now especially if you've got mint growing in a container that's got loose potting mix loose soil or types of sandy soil mix or in a sandy location make sure you water it regularly at least twice a week I would now if you're unsure if the plants getting enough water all you need to do is stick your finger in up to the first or second knuckle pull it out and have a feel if it's damp and wet well then the plant does need water if it's dry give it a drink real quick if your mint is growing in heavy conditions like a heavy soil or a clay well water it less obviously tip number five don't worry about pests and disease whatever you do don't spray your mint with pesticides or other chemicals it's really not required this is a solid crop it's a smoothie crop it's uh it's it's a leafy crop you don't want to be putting chemical residue on these leaves because it can be ingested so easily pests and disease can be kept under control with mint quite easily by just simply picking the pests off when you find them caterpillars and grasshoppers so they can be easily picked off or shoot away look they don't eat that much anyway as far as diseased leaves go that's the same goes through see any diseased leaves or door leaves with fungus on them just pick them off and throw them out in fact in tip number two regular pruning will help control a lot of the pests and diseases anyway by airing the plant out and letting it rejuvenate itself so that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of mint in just one container location and contain pruning fertilizer water and pests if you do all those five things right you will grow a ton of mint just like this and then you could do what you want you could make huge smoothies you could make big salads you could use it in cooking I tell you what in the comments section below leave your favorite way of using mint I look forward to reading them thanks a lot for watching don't forget the website self-sufficient Micom also give us a thumbs up and if you haven't subscribed subscribe already will ya bye for now [Music] [Music] by travelpod member [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to give you my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of mint in just one container tip number one location and contain mint grows and multiplies by horizontal runners that the plant sends out these runners they have nodes which readily route down and that essentially creates the new plants I made the mistake years ago and only once when I planted mint out into the general garden bed for the next 12 months it took over the whole backyard and I was spending hours trying to control it pull it out it just kept popping up everywhere it drove me nuts so for that reason I recommend growing mint in isolation whether it be in a large raised garden bed like this one or large container or a pot or in a separate rockery or a separate part of the garden where you know it can't escape as far as location goes mint is a very versatile plant it will grow well in full Sun and also part shade in a hot climate you might consider growing mint in a partly shaded positions just to protect it from the extreme heat because it doesn't like that a lot and if you're in a really cold climate I would strongly suggest you plant it out somewhere where it gets full Sun having said that though I do live in a hot climate subtropics and mink grows very well out in the full Sun for me tip number 2 prune your mint pruning your mint plant encourages new growth that is succulent rather than woody and tough succulent plump leaves and stems are much better in smoothies and cooking etc rather than the you know terrible tough and stringy stuff that you could get if you've just left it grow wild look you'll naturally prune your mint through the growing season anyway as you eat it but if you don't for some reason after a few weeks just remember to give it a clip around the edges give it a bit of a haircut and it'll love you for it you want to prune your mint heavily like I mean drastically that's what I do personally when it goes dormant for a cold climate mint usually goes dormant through winter in a warmer climate like mine the subtropics mint will go dormant through summer the hottest part of the year so yes I gained a traverse Atoll in that way where it will adapt to extreme conditions either way so whenever the plant is dormant that's when I give it a really harsh prune back I mean almost down to the roots and I get rid of all the woody growth all the old stuff and just prune it right back down to nothing almost tip number three feed your mint once with an organic fertilizer just a standard fertilizer is a store or from animals like your own chickens make sure it's not wet fresh poo as that could kill the plant it should be dry or composted down but whatever you use sprinkle it around the base of the plant and not on the leaves I reckon it's best to fertilize towards the end of that dormant stage just like I was talking about before or as the plant is just starting to shoot that could be in spring in some climates or coming into winter depending on what climate you're in now I feed my mint with just a small amount of organic fertilizer I just sprinkle it around the base of the plant because it's a hardy herb it doesn't need a whole lot of fertilizer in fact if you over fertilize it it could become leggy and stringy and not do very well at all also if you over fertilize it you could actually kill the plant and always remember after you've applied fertilizer give it a good water in the watering can or a hose to make sure that it's the fertilizer is watered right in well and it's also off the lead so it doesn't burn the lead tip number four water mint regularly now especially if you've got mint growing in a container that's got loose potting mix loose soil or types of sandy soil mix or in a sandy location make sure you water it regularly at least twice a week I would now if you're unsure if the plants getting enough water all you need to do is stick your finger in up to the first or second knuckle pull it out and have a feel if it's damp and wet well then the plant does need water if it's dry give it a drink real quick if your mint is growing in heavy conditions like a heavy soil or a clay well water it less obviously tip number five don't worry about pests and disease whatever you do don't spray your mint with pesticides or other chemicals it's really not required this is a solid crop it's a smoothie crop it's uh it's it's a leafy crop you don't want to be putting chemical residue on these leaves because it can be ingested so easily pests and disease can be kept under control with mint quite easily by just simply picking the pests off when you find them caterpillars and grasshoppers so they can be easily picked off or shoot away look they don't eat that much anyway as far as diseased leaves go that's the same goes through see any diseased leaves or door leaves with fungus on them just pick them off and throw them out in fact in tip number two regular pruning will help control a lot of the pests and diseases anyway by airing the plant out and letting it rejuvenate itself so that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of mint in just one container location and contain pruning fertilizer water and pests if you do all those five things right you will grow a ton of mint just like this and then you could do what you want you could make huge smoothies you could make big salads you could use it in cooking I tell you what in the comments section below leave your favorite way of using mint I look forward to reading them thanks a lot for watching don't forget the website self-sufficient Micom also give us a thumbs up and if you haven't subscribed subscribe already will ya bye for now [Music] [Music] by travelpod member [Music]


 
166
Views

How to Grow a Green Manure Crop From Weeds to Enrich Your Organic Garden Bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 166 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


say oppa didn't scare you I'm life and health recently and it's raining outside so I've got the camera in the shed and we're looking at the window beer I wanted to show you guys how I can turn a bunch of weeds into a really organic and fabulous manure green manure bed for your garden now let's get into it [Music] well a bit behind me here you can see through my shed window has already been refurbished what was in that bed was like a whole bunch of weeds now you know I hate we I am continuously weeding I'm continuously whinging about it in my garden but there are certain times when I lovely and I don't say that very often but the certain occasions where you can turn a whole bunch of leads into a very very profitable and cheap and great green manure for your garden especially vigils just love it and that's what I want to talk about over the rains not driving you're tuned up and I can't put a mic on either of them to wet them getting sake so you might have heard of green manures before and when gardeners and food gardens talked about green manure crops they usually talk about throwing a whole bunch of good plants like leftover seeds you might have a bunch of leftover fees or crops or mustard seed that you're not sure is viable and they're great to chucking to a garden bed leave them grow to about a foot or so high so that the plants are nice and lush but they're not getting too over brittle and then knocking them down and digging them back into the soil that's what most gardeners see but you can do the same thing with weeds so the reason why people say although we don't use lead for this type of revenuers is because generally certain weed plant are too leafy and not as sort of full of nitrogen and green some of them aren't a very fibrous and not very nice to dig into the garden and some go to seed real quick and a small and aren't worth it now I don't know this variety someone if you do work it in the comment section below of what variety of where it is so what I've done here first of all I've licked the weeds great I saw that there was a weed out first but the other thing that was happening in that bed was that was actually towards the end of its days I had grown several crops in there over the summer and it was probably good know nearly 12 months old thinks it's being properly refurbished so it needed refurbishing anyway that's the first thing the second thing is I could see it was a really good weed outbreak and I don't often say that about Lee a really good weed outbreak so it's covering a lot of a bit and are all growing at the same time monitoring it from seedling right up once I've identified the plants I want to keep and get rid of some that I don't I can then knock that down so I wait for the we to get a good height so that it's not too fibrous so that the leaves are all still lush but also that it has not gone to sea and that's very important last thing I want to do is grow a we let it all go to sea and then big that back into your bed because you are just going to be inundated with a million trillion weeds constantly in that garden then it's going to drive it up so you need to knock those plants down before it goes to sea so I'm not the plants down and then a hoe is really good for this because of how you can use as a digging in tool you can also use it as a scraper to scrape off the top scrape any other type of weed or anything that's like that like a clover for example that is grown underneath the leaves and you can really dig it in and scrape it and mix it up I don't think too deep I begin probably a hope death probably six or eight inches now just keep mixing that up and chopping and chopping and chopping until I get the garden bed that's all chopped in will mostly chopped in and I then try to even the bed out but I've got a good mix of greenery and dirt all mixed in together evenly throughout the garden bed once I've mixed it all in the last thing I do is I multiple e I use a good sugar cane most you can use a loose and if you want Lou seems a bit more expensive for some type of moss that doesn't have seeds in it of course and make sure it's organic you can also cover the bed if you don't want to Malta is it covered with shade cloth or something similar or a tarp what you're trying to do there is you're letting the worms and the microbes almost like compost if they are so it's going to compost that lush easy to digest ring than you are down and it's going to mix it in with that garden soil and that process is going to enrich that bed with nitrogen nutrients minerals and beautiful stuff all ready for your next crop usually in a few weeks or maybe a few months away the things on when you want to start planting I wouldn't plant immediately I'd probably leave it at least a couple of weeks and maybe even a month is best minimum two weeks I would say then you can start planting away and it's all for free you don't have to add an extra compost you can if you want to buy for all intents and purposes that bed is ready to go without too much extra additives to it the other good things about digging in green manure crops like this is it's good for the worms and microbes to have a healthy bed you want lots of animals in that bed because those animals tell the plants in lots of different ways they break down all that organic matter and they have a symbiotic relationship with the plants often if you've got trouble in your garden bed you've often got a lack of animals in that garden bed there's a lack of worms or the lack of microbes bacteria and all those type of things that's a sign that the bed is dead and there's not much life in it and thus the plants don't grow very well in it the other thing that green manure does is it adds body to the soil when you're pulling out plants and you're harvesting vegetables they're taking actual physical organic stuff out of the soil when you harvest the lettuce a little bit comes with it you take the roots off you put it in the compost heap you lose a little bit of that garden there so smashing your new whole heap of organic matter like that add body to that garden bed man's body to the soil and that way you don't have to keep adding extra soil from the garden center or anything like that you're building your own soil essentially so anyway if you're going any questions on making a green manure crop and digging it back into a garden bed let me know I'm happy to answer them put them in the comment section below don't forget to give a thumbs up if you enjoyed the video also share it that helps a lot bye for now oh just one other thing if you've got any other tips I'm not the be-all and end-all welcome in the comment section below and let everyone know what your garden tips are in regards to greening your pots [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:


say oppa didn't scare you I'm life and health recently and it's raining outside so I've got the camera in the shed and we're looking at the window beer I wanted to show you guys how I can turn a bunch of weeds into a really organic and fabulous manure green manure bed for your garden now let's get into it [Music] well a bit behind me here you can see through my shed window has already been refurbished what was in that bed was like a whole bunch of weeds now you know I hate we I am continuously weeding I'm continuously whinging about it in my garden but there are certain times when I lovely and I don't say that very often but the certain occasions where you can turn a whole bunch of leads into a very very profitable and cheap and great green manure for your garden especially vigils just love it and that's what I want to talk about over the rains not driving you're tuned up and I can't put a mic on either of them to wet them getting sake so you might have heard of green manures before and when gardeners and food gardens talked about green manure crops they usually talk about throwing a whole bunch of good plants like leftover seeds you might have a bunch of leftover fees or crops or mustard seed that you're not sure is viable and they're great to chucking to a garden bed leave them grow to about a foot or so high so that the plants are nice and lush but they're not getting too over brittle and then knocking them down and digging them back into the soil that's what most gardeners see but you can do the same thing with weeds so the reason why people say although we don't use lead for this type of revenuers is because generally certain weed plant are too leafy and not as sort of full of nitrogen and green some of them aren't a very fibrous and not very nice to dig into the garden and some go to seed real quick and a small and aren't worth it now I don't know this variety someone if you do work it in the comment section below of what variety of where it is so what I've done here first of all I've licked the weeds great I saw that there was a weed out first but the other thing that was happening in that bed was that was actually towards the end of its days I had grown several crops in there over the summer and it was probably good know nearly 12 months old thinks it's being properly refurbished so it needed refurbishing anyway that's the first thing the second thing is I could see it was a really good weed outbreak and I don't often say that about Lee a really good weed outbreak so it's covering a lot of a bit and are all growing at the same time monitoring it from seedling right up once I've identified the plants I want to keep and get rid of some that I don't I can then knock that down so I wait for the we to get a good height so that it's not too fibrous so that the leaves are all still lush but also that it has not gone to sea and that's very important last thing I want to do is grow a we let it all go to sea and then big that back into your bed because you are just going to be inundated with a million trillion weeds constantly in that garden then it's going to drive it up so you need to knock those plants down before it goes to sea so I'm not the plants down and then a hoe is really good for this because of how you can use as a digging in tool you can also use it as a scraper to scrape off the top scrape any other type of weed or anything that's like that like a clover for example that is grown underneath the leaves and you can really dig it in and scrape it and mix it up I don't think too deep I begin probably a hope death probably six or eight inches now just keep mixing that up and chopping and chopping and chopping until I get the garden bed that's all chopped in will mostly chopped in and I then try to even the bed out but I've got a good mix of greenery and dirt all mixed in together evenly throughout the garden bed once I've mixed it all in the last thing I do is I multiple e I use a good sugar cane most you can use a loose and if you want Lou seems a bit more expensive for some type of moss that doesn't have seeds in it of course and make sure it's organic you can also cover the bed if you don't want to Malta is it covered with shade cloth or something similar or a tarp what you're trying to do there is you're letting the worms and the microbes almost like compost if they are so it's going to compost that lush easy to digest ring than you are down and it's going to mix it in with that garden soil and that process is going to enrich that bed with nitrogen nutrients minerals and beautiful stuff all ready for your next crop usually in a few weeks or maybe a few months away the things on when you want to start planting I wouldn't plant immediately I'd probably leave it at least a couple of weeks and maybe even a month is best minimum two weeks I would say then you can start planting away and it's all for free you don't have to add an extra compost you can if you want to buy for all intents and purposes that bed is ready to go without too much extra additives to it the other good things about digging in green manure crops like this is it's good for the worms and microbes to have a healthy bed you want lots of animals in that bed because those animals tell the plants in lots of different ways they break down all that organic matter and they have a symbiotic relationship with the plants often if you've got trouble in your garden bed you've often got a lack of animals in that garden bed there's a lack of worms or the lack of microbes bacteria and all those type of things that's a sign that the bed is dead and there's not much life in it and thus the plants don't grow very well in it the other thing that green manure does is it adds body to the soil when you're pulling out plants and you're harvesting vegetables they're taking actual physical organic stuff out of the soil when you harvest the lettuce a little bit comes with it you take the roots off you put it in the compost heap you lose a little bit of that garden there so smashing your new whole heap of organic matter like that add body to that garden bed man's body to the soil and that way you don't have to keep adding extra soil from the garden center or anything like that you're building your own soil essentially so anyway if you're going any questions on making a green manure crop and digging it back into a garden bed let me know I'm happy to answer them put them in the comment section below don't forget to give a thumbs up if you enjoyed the video also share it that helps a lot bye for now oh just one other thing if you've got any other tips I'm not the be-all and end-all welcome in the comment section below and let everyone know what your garden tips are in regards to greening your pots [Music]

166
Views

Dragon Fruit Daytime Flower Plus Growing Tips How-to Pitaya

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 166 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


this is a real treat seeing a dragon fruit flower in the morning how gorgeous is this and look at the bees doing the business pollinating the fruit this is gorgeous absolutely gorgeous a wonder of nature what a magnificent flower as big well half the size of my head I've got a pretty big head and look how that bee is going in that flower right down the guts of it and that's then going to go all the way down and pollinate it's got to go all the way down this stem triggering the fruit or pollinating the fruit fertilizing the fruit I think you call it I'm no botanist I'm I'm shocking it this stuff but then that then once that gets that fertilization then it can grow if it doesn't get the fertilization it will only probably get to about this big that's not that's an unfertilized dragon fruit that's tiny small and that'll probably just die off and fall off and it might taste very good at all but if it does get pollinated it'll satin up and it'll become large like this a nice big fat dragon fruit which are over too great to eat now so I've showed that many times pollination of dragon fruit is fickle because often the flowers are dead by now like this is 8:00 in the morning probably because it's overcast and the conditions is perfect well then that's probably why that it's open like this but often the flowers only open at nighttime and where these dragon fruit plants come from the native to South America or Mexico I think don't quote me on that just yet I'll flush that up on the screen and here comes that B again and so we're their native I believe there's AB largemouth or other types of creatures that pull them out or a bat that pollinate these flowers through the night whereas in where I am it probably has to rely on things like ants and bees early morning or other insects crawling through it through the nighttime know perhaps bats might come here but I don't think you'd have as many native species attracted to these flowers through the night but in the daytime if they're opening in the daytime as you saw a bee will be attracted to the flower which is really great that's a bit of oh that needs to be trimmed back here this there's been a dragon fruit but this is really magnificent isn't it isn't it just terrific look at us you can see like I got fairly big hands and you can see the size of that flower many of you and it's starting to close and if you take into account the size of the these some no petals and more knuckle petals petals there but the outside of this flower you can see how huge it is just terrific it's real amazing look how long that that stem is that's the fruit forming on the vine there this is a yellow variety it's my favorite variety of dragon fruit to grow even though it's got the sort of the thorns the fruit is slightly sweeter than the big purple ones you see the yellow one has a fruit a yam or fruit here I suppose more effervescent type tastes but it's but it's a slightly sweeter taste and because some people can say going fruit can be a little bland but second watermelon idak in dragon fruit fruit tastes similar to watermelon but with a cross of kiwi fruit because we've got the small seeds that are quite edible and DNA notice them but that's the way I describe it but you can see you can see why it has trouble pollinating the fruit or fertilizing the fruit when you've got a the flowers rarely open through the day time and be you've got such a long way for that pulling together this flower will only it'll be dead by another few hours they only open once this is very rare to see you have to be at the right place the right time I was coming back from down the back there I was let the chickens out for the morning and I saw it you could search from a distance here's that be back I saw this you can see it from the from a distance they are so huge they just like the backyard up and I mean even if you don't get fruit out of these things just experiencing these in the flesh with your own eyeballs is just an amazing sight I remember once my wife got up she drew the curtains back and she looked into the backyard it was about 6:00 in the morning Sun was out and she said mark oh I just about shack myself I said wife should come here look at this and 60 meters away we looked down and there was three or four dragon fruit flowers opened at the same time it with the whole backyard up and it was a beautiful sight absolutely beautiful especially with the Sun behind them and other wonderful looking flowers so yeah even if you have trouble with the pollination which is always a difficult thing with dragon fruit there are people try to hand pollinate them and all sorts of things to try but I think a lot of the time you no matter what you do you hand pollinate them you got the bees and everything you can still run into trouble that it doesn't that the fruit doesn't get fertilized and it won't form but even if you just grow them for the flowers and just experiencing this lovely cactus itself which does like a good lot of rain to be honest it likes its water but even if you're just growing it for the ornamental value I like I need to trim off some of these older branches that's my fault and they look a lot better and they branch out more to I can show you I don't like to go away from that flower but I can show you over here I've been giving this one quite a bit of water and you can see how it's starting to branch out now if you find that they stopped growing or they're suffering more often than not they need more water they love lots of water for a cactus yes it will it will survive without water it's very drought tolerant but they will grow much better if you give them a whole lot of water and that was what was happening with this one it was drying out in this pot which I'm going to change I'm going to take get rid of that pot and make a larger raised bed and it was drying out in that pot so I ended up putting the sprinkler on it and watering it almost daily and then it just shot out and started growing all these new big stems which I have to start tying up and time back and making sure that they don't all just fall off but while I've got you here I was going to show you this separately but if you're going to try to grow make a new plant see how this stem is falling over it's falling over in US and this this one here is come straight up well what's happened is the stems fallen over and where the the join will look like the elbow joint see that where that is or the end of the dragon fruit vine or the elbow joint has hit the soil it's rooted down so if I can't pull that up that's rooted down and now a new plant is forming and that that would grow up if I left it there could put a post here good put a post there and then I'd read new dragon fruit plant would form from that and I could get rid of that stem that is that is called layering really that's like a form of layering where you pull down a branch or a stem from a tree and then it takes root and then you can cut cut away from the host plant or the mother plant and it'll grow up and make a new plant well you could layer it into another pot and then you could move it so I thought that was interesting that adieus did it itself but likewise you can just cut any of these off put it in a pot and make a new plant out of it it grows very easy from cuttings dragonfruit it grows very slowly but easily from seeds as well but the best way to grow dragon fruit is through cuttings in my opinion and yes a that is fallen over I've been mowing around it just to see how it went and that experiment was quite interesting and it has taken root now I can pull that up and replant it which I will do I'm going to going to pull that off and I'm going to put in a pot and replant it and make another plant out of that I'm not going to leave it there though but yeah that's getting away from the initial getting away from the initial flower that I was talking about but I could see it from from down the back there I was a good 40 meters away and it caught my eye that's whiteness look at it it's like a big trumpet well there you go that's the wonderful I just don't want to leave it but I'm I've got lots of work to do today so I'm going to have to leave it but that's the most fantastic dragon fruit flower I've said it many times before how wonderful they are but I haven't had the chance to show you guys footage through the day I've showed you it's opening at night and we've been through that video and how wonderful it is but I've never had the opportunity to really show you properly I'll show you a couple of buds that have closed through them by the time I've got to them but I haven't had a chance to show you almost fully open what this flower is like and I'm so glad that I was able to bring this to you so there you go thanks a lot for watching if you like the video give it a thumbs up share it because that helps a lot with the channel and inspires me to keep making more videos bye for now


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subtitle:


this is a real treat seeing a dragon fruit flower in the morning how gorgeous is this and look at the bees doing the business pollinating the fruit this is gorgeous absolutely gorgeous a wonder of nature what a magnificent flower as big well half the size of my head I've got a pretty big head and look how that bee is going in that flower right down the guts of it and that's then going to go all the way down and pollinate it's got to go all the way down this stem triggering the fruit or pollinating the fruit fertilizing the fruit I think you call it I'm no botanist I'm I'm shocking it this stuff but then that then once that gets that fertilization then it can grow if it doesn't get the fertilization it will only probably get to about this big that's not that's an unfertilized dragon fruit that's tiny small and that'll probably just die off and fall off and it might taste very good at all but if it does get pollinated it'll satin up and it'll become large like this a nice big fat dragon fruit which are over too great to eat now so I've showed that many times pollination of dragon fruit is fickle because often the flowers are dead by now like this is 8:00 in the morning probably because it's overcast and the conditions is perfect well then that's probably why that it's open like this but often the flowers only open at nighttime and where these dragon fruit plants come from the native to South America or Mexico I think don't quote me on that just yet I'll flush that up on the screen and here comes that B again and so we're their native I believe there's AB largemouth or other types of creatures that pull them out or a bat that pollinate these flowers through the night whereas in where I am it probably has to rely on things like ants and bees early morning or other insects crawling through it through the nighttime know perhaps bats might come here but I don't think you'd have as many native species attracted to these flowers through the night but in the daytime if they're opening in the daytime as you saw a bee will be attracted to the flower which is really great that's a bit of oh that needs to be trimmed back here this there's been a dragon fruit but this is really magnificent isn't it isn't it just terrific look at us you can see like I got fairly big hands and you can see the size of that flower many of you and it's starting to close and if you take into account the size of the these some no petals and more knuckle petals petals there but the outside of this flower you can see how huge it is just terrific it's real amazing look how long that that stem is that's the fruit forming on the vine there this is a yellow variety it's my favorite variety of dragon fruit to grow even though it's got the sort of the thorns the fruit is slightly sweeter than the big purple ones you see the yellow one has a fruit a yam or fruit here I suppose more effervescent type tastes but it's but it's a slightly sweeter taste and because some people can say going fruit can be a little bland but second watermelon idak in dragon fruit fruit tastes similar to watermelon but with a cross of kiwi fruit because we've got the small seeds that are quite edible and DNA notice them but that's the way I describe it but you can see you can see why it has trouble pollinating the fruit or fertilizing the fruit when you've got a the flowers rarely open through the day time and be you've got such a long way for that pulling together this flower will only it'll be dead by another few hours they only open once this is very rare to see you have to be at the right place the right time I was coming back from down the back there I was let the chickens out for the morning and I saw it you could search from a distance here's that be back I saw this you can see it from the from a distance they are so huge they just like the backyard up and I mean even if you don't get fruit out of these things just experiencing these in the flesh with your own eyeballs is just an amazing sight I remember once my wife got up she drew the curtains back and she looked into the backyard it was about 6:00 in the morning Sun was out and she said mark oh I just about shack myself I said wife should come here look at this and 60 meters away we looked down and there was three or four dragon fruit flowers opened at the same time it with the whole backyard up and it was a beautiful sight absolutely beautiful especially with the Sun behind them and other wonderful looking flowers so yeah even if you have trouble with the pollination which is always a difficult thing with dragon fruit there are people try to hand pollinate them and all sorts of things to try but I think a lot of the time you no matter what you do you hand pollinate them you got the bees and everything you can still run into trouble that it doesn't that the fruit doesn't get fertilized and it won't form but even if you just grow them for the flowers and just experiencing this lovely cactus itself which does like a good lot of rain to be honest it likes its water but even if you're just growing it for the ornamental value I like I need to trim off some of these older branches that's my fault and they look a lot better and they branch out more to I can show you I don't like to go away from that flower but I can show you over here I've been giving this one quite a bit of water and you can see how it's starting to branch out now if you find that they stopped growing or they're suffering more often than not they need more water they love lots of water for a cactus yes it will it will survive without water it's very drought tolerant but they will grow much better if you give them a whole lot of water and that was what was happening with this one it was drying out in this pot which I'm going to change I'm going to take get rid of that pot and make a larger raised bed and it was drying out in that pot so I ended up putting the sprinkler on it and watering it almost daily and then it just shot out and started growing all these new big stems which I have to start tying up and time back and making sure that they don't all just fall off but while I've got you here I was going to show you this separately but if you're going to try to grow make a new plant see how this stem is falling over it's falling over in US and this this one here is come straight up well what's happened is the stems fallen over and where the the join will look like the elbow joint see that where that is or the end of the dragon fruit vine or the elbow joint has hit the soil it's rooted down so if I can't pull that up that's rooted down and now a new plant is forming and that that would grow up if I left it there could put a post here good put a post there and then I'd read new dragon fruit plant would form from that and I could get rid of that stem that is that is called layering really that's like a form of layering where you pull down a branch or a stem from a tree and then it takes root and then you can cut cut away from the host plant or the mother plant and it'll grow up and make a new plant well you could layer it into another pot and then you could move it so I thought that was interesting that adieus did it itself but likewise you can just cut any of these off put it in a pot and make a new plant out of it it grows very easy from cuttings dragonfruit it grows very slowly but easily from seeds as well but the best way to grow dragon fruit is through cuttings in my opinion and yes a that is fallen over I've been mowing around it just to see how it went and that experiment was quite interesting and it has taken root now I can pull that up and replant it which I will do I'm going to going to pull that off and I'm going to put in a pot and replant it and make another plant out of that I'm not going to leave it there though but yeah that's getting away from the initial getting away from the initial flower that I was talking about but I could see it from from down the back there I was a good 40 meters away and it caught my eye that's whiteness look at it it's like a big trumpet well there you go that's the wonderful I just don't want to leave it but I'm I've got lots of work to do today so I'm going to have to leave it but that's the most fantastic dragon fruit flower I've said it many times before how wonderful they are but I haven't had the chance to show you guys footage through the day I've showed you it's opening at night and we've been through that video and how wonderful it is but I've never had the opportunity to really show you properly I'll show you a couple of buds that have closed through them by the time I've got to them but I haven't had a chance to show you almost fully open what this flower is like and I'm so glad that I was able to bring this to you so there you go thanks a lot for watching if you like the video give it a thumbs up share it because that helps a lot with the channel and inspires me to keep making more videos bye for now


 
119
Views

Animal Proof Fruit to Grow in the Backyard - To Stop Birds & Critters Eating it

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 119 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

subtitle:


today I'm Mike from self-sufficient me and I wanted to show you guys a really special experiment that I've conducted all in the name of science except it's it's not very scientific but I'm quite excited to show you what I think is one of the world's most credible proof bird proof fruits to grow no netting required so let's get into it this is a dragon fruit vine growing up a trellis the vine itself has little spines that make it difficult for animals to climb but the real deterrent isn't the spines on the stem it's fine on the fruit itself [Music] after producing these massive gorgeous flowers the bass quickly forms into a thorn covered fruit and after several weeks it turns yellow signifying it's ready to eat what I did was leave the fruit on the vine for six whole months just to see if anything would eat it and nothing touched it which is unusual because I can't leave any fruit or any other fruit on the tree to ripen naturally without it getting in by something however what the animals haven't figured out is that you can just brush the spines off when it's ready to eat now in all honesty dragon fruit are best eaten when they first ripen you know within a few weeks but surprisingly this fruit tasted very good even though it was left on the vine ripe for so long Bon Appetit mmm wonderful the fruit the humans get and the animals don't well there you go the yellow spiny dragon proof in my view one of the most creative proof animal proof bird proof whatever you want to call it fruits that you can grow so I recommend growing it thanks a lot for watching if you like this video give it a thumbs up and also don't forget visit my blog visit my comm leave a comment down below bye for now I'll cheat


 
  view all
 


subtitle:


today I'm Mike from self-sufficient me and I wanted to show you guys a really special experiment that I've conducted all in the name of science except it's it's not very scientific but I'm quite excited to show you what I think is one of the world's most credible proof bird proof fruits to grow no netting required so let's get into it this is a dragon fruit vine growing up a trellis the vine itself has little spines that make it difficult for animals to climb but the real deterrent isn't the spines on the stem it's fine on the fruit itself [Music] after producing these massive gorgeous flowers the bass quickly forms into a thorn covered fruit and after several weeks it turns yellow signifying it's ready to eat what I did was leave the fruit on the vine for six whole months just to see if anything would eat it and nothing touched it which is unusual because I can't leave any fruit or any other fruit on the tree to ripen naturally without it getting in by something however what the animals haven't figured out is that you can just brush the spines off when it's ready to eat now in all honesty dragon fruit are best eaten when they first ripen you know within a few weeks but surprisingly this fruit tasted very good even though it was left on the vine ripe for so long Bon Appetit mmm wonderful the fruit the humans get and the animals don't well there you go the yellow spiny dragon proof in my view one of the most creative proof animal proof bird proof whatever you want to call it fruits that you can grow so I recommend growing it thanks a lot for watching if you like this video give it a thumbs up and also don't forget visit my blog visit my comm leave a comment down below bye for now I'll cheat


 
 
146
Views

Try Growing Barbados Cherry for Hot Climates (low chill) How-to Superfood

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 146 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

subtitle:


get a unmarked from self-sufficiently and I wanted to do this impromptu video because I'm running out of time to show you this Barbados cherry tree there's a bit of a story behind us the fruit is just about ready to fall off the tree in fact some of them have and I wanted to do a taste test and let you guys know what I think of it first of all here's the tree here now it used to be a heck of a lot bigger but unfortunately this tree got a borer and it just about killed the whole tree off you can see I've cut it here this tree used to be a good head height 6 foot or so and probably 3 or 4 meters wide we used to get a ton of fruit off it was a fantastic tree we really loved the fruit it pained me when I saw it died in front of my eyes to my astonishment it reshoot 'add and it's fighting back hard and now I've got this mini Barbados cherry or other another name for it is the acerola or the West Indian cherry and there's a few other names as well it forms this really cool cherry you can eat them when they turn bright red but you can see here they've gone really dark like a dark genuine cherry see those third color the birds don't tend to eat these as much as well I expected they would you see the odd magpie the odd parrot grab hold of them but generally they don't they don't bother and I think that's great fruit fly in this part of the world will sting them occasionally but you don't see larvae developing them or the maggot developing them and I think that's good too I think they're just a little bit too acidic a bit like a cherry tomato a bit too acidic for the maggot to survive or hatch out so let's go ahead and have a taste of the Barbados cherry mmm insecurity and they typically have three small seeds not just one seeds three small seeds does have an acidic tang to it but it's delicious I'm trying to pull them all my mouth and then just spit all the seeds out how gross was that not God that tastes good and that apparently it's got something like a hundred times the vitamin C in a barbatus cherry then say a standard citrus like an orange or something like that don't quote me on it but that's what I've read and apart from that it's got a whole heap of other antioxidants making it a superfood I mean see if I can get a nice shot of it the sun's setting here so the sun's a bit harsh isn't it lovely that's a smaller one but they're generally about the size of this one here so just smaller then probably a standard cherry I can't tell you exactly what they taste like a little bit of grape flavor mixed with a citrus type of undertone and plum look at my dog or dogs eat see see them hears of them what are you doing skirts you egging them you want one good for you good boy there you go see and there's proof something I've been saying all along dogs love barbatus cherries and now you can hear them in the neighborhood all the dogs are starting to bark that's because they're jealous that he got one they didn't it's very ornamental looking it's a good hedging plant if you want to grow several in a row it's quite Hardy obviously susceptible to borås but as far as other insects go nothing really hits really that bad so it's a perfect substitute especially in a hot climate where you can't grow regular cherries because you don't have a chill factor in warmer climates this is a perfect cherry substitute thanks a lot for watching don't forget to give a thumbs up bye for now [Music] view all
 


subtitle:


get a unmarked from self-sufficiently and I wanted to do this impromptu video because I'm running out of time to show you this Barbados cherry tree there's a bit of a story behind us the fruit is just about ready to fall off the tree in fact some of them have and I wanted to do a taste test and let you guys know what I think of it first of all here's the tree here now it used to be a heck of a lot bigger but unfortunately this tree got a borer and it just about killed the whole tree off you can see I've cut it here this tree used to be a good head height 6 foot or so and probably 3 or 4 meters wide we used to get a ton of fruit off it was a fantastic tree we really loved the fruit it pained me when I saw it died in front of my eyes to my astonishment it reshoot 'add and it's fighting back hard and now I've got this mini Barbados cherry or other another name for it is the acerola or the West Indian cherry and there's a few other names as well it forms this really cool cherry you can eat them when they turn bright red but you can see here they've gone really dark like a dark genuine cherry see those third color the birds don't tend to eat these as much as well I expected they would you see the odd magpie the odd parrot grab hold of them but generally they don't they don't bother and I think that's great fruit fly in this part of the world will sting them occasionally but you don't see larvae developing them or the maggot developing them and I think that's good too I think they're just a little bit too acidic a bit like a cherry tomato a bit too acidic for the maggot to survive or hatch out so let's go ahead and have a taste of the Barbados cherry mmm insecurity and they typically have three small seeds not just one seeds three small seeds does have an acidic tang to it but it's delicious I'm trying to pull them all my mouth and then just spit all the seeds out how gross was that not God that tastes good and that apparently it's got something like a hundred times the vitamin C in a barbatus cherry then say a standard citrus like an orange or something like that don't quote me on it but that's what I've read and apart from that it's got a whole heap of other antioxidants making it a superfood I mean see if I can get a nice shot of it the sun's setting here so the sun's a bit harsh isn't it lovely that's a smaller one but they're generally about the size of this one here so just smaller then probably a standard cherry I can't tell you exactly what they taste like a little bit of grape flavor mixed with a citrus type of undertone and plum look at my dog or dogs eat see see them hears of them what are you doing skirts you egging them you want one good for you good boy there you go see and there's proof something I've been saying all along dogs love barbatus cherries and now you can hear them in the neighborhood all the dogs are starting to bark that's because they're jealous that he got one they didn't it's very ornamental looking it's a good hedging plant if you want to grow several in a row it's quite Hardy obviously susceptible to borås but as far as other insects go nothing really hits really that bad so it's a perfect substitute especially in a hot climate where you can't grow regular cherries because you don't have a chill factor in warmer climates this is a perfect cherry substitute thanks a lot for watching don't forget to give a thumbs up bye for now [Music]

126
Views

How to Easy Grow Sweet Potato With Lots of Tips

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 126 views • 2017-09-28 08:34 • came from similar tags

 

subtitle:


get a unlock from social visit me and in this video I want to show you guys how I grow sweet potato over the years I've learnt lots of tips and tricks and I want to pack them all into this video no particular order and show you guys exactly how I do it it's dead set easy now it's blowing a gale out here so what I'm going to do is voiceover in this video it'll make it easier for both of us so let's get into it so here I am in the patch I'm about to refurbish the bed and harvest some sweet potatoes I've been growing for about you know two to three months not a long time I can grow sweet potato in the one spot for years on end but in this particular case we've kind of been a few months it just grows wild at our place even in that bed there that we just saw with the blue tarp I try to I tried to kill it off in that particular part of a bed and a grew out the side and then at the back here it's growing like a ground cover you can walk all over it and it'll in and around those back garden beds there it just grows back and it doesn't get trampled down and it's actually quite a wonderful weed suppressant but it'll grow up as well like in this trellis example we used to grow it out the front then it took me ages to get out of our front bed but yeah it'll grow up a Traulsen look quite attractive wherever the vine goes it'll send down little runner roots and they will grow new tubers so it can be really difficult to get rid of if you've got a big garden and you just let it run wild but that is a bit of my thing I like to grow or what I call disperse gardening and just let plants go to seed and come up wherever see this to behere that's about the right size I love them about that size they're great too right there that's an example of the orange variety the one or two are bursting just here is the purple variety and they have a white flesh the orange variety which most people are used to has the orange flesh both are good to be honest I think the purple variety is more vigorous but I like the only variety for taste here's a really great example of how the vine has shut down a root and then created a tuber now when I go through the tubers that I've dug up if any a buggered like that one I'll just burn it straight back into the ground or replant it when I get the chance it's not worth eating but it'll certainly regrow very easily anything sort of over three inches and under seven inches or the size of a large cucumber is perfect I just think that that's about the best growing range because the flesh is nice and firm and it doesn't get too grainy when they get too big like I'll show you later they get way too grainy so once I've sorted it out I'm left with the whole heap of roots and smaller tubers and that's what I use to replant back into the next bed in this case I'm going to replant it back into the same bed you can do that for several times or several years in a row and then it's a good idea to move it away and find a new bed for your sweet potato otherwise they can start to attract pests and weevils and slugs and those type of things will start to ruin or the tubers so I just go through if the bed is a little hard well then I'll mash it up a bit because your soil is best for sweet potato when it's nice and loose so you potato will grow fine in heavy soil but they won't develop tubers very well and the tubers may in fact rot here I'm just adding a little bit of organic flooding bone to the bed you don't need to go crazy they need to over fertilize otherwise you'll just get a lot of leaf grace or not a lot of cheaver I like to mulch the bed nice and thick in this case it's sugar cane mulch and then I water it in make sure that sudden bonus fertilizers in washing that's pretty much it for the refurb of the bed I'm pretty happy with that little harvest after about you know 2 or 3 months that's going to be a good feed and whilst I can grow them a heck of a lot bigger let me tell you the bigger they get the more grainy and awful they taste so you can't be starving Kenya that's why I picked myself a couple of small sweet potato while I was out here while Nina was doing that corn just a couple of little ones that one there and this one here a couple of little sweet potatoes that should do us for dinner maybe one each and half of the kids so we don't go hungry through the big storm here in Brisbane well that was a bit of a retro clip taken some years ago when we used to grow the sweeps out the front there like that in the patch can you see the little pink flowers well what's interesting is sweet potato isn't related at all to standard potatoes it's in fact part of the morning glory family of plants which are known mainly for their tubular cone like pretty flowers not the tubers well I'm not finished with this bed yet this is going to seem really unorthodox but I'm now going to over plant over the top of this sweet potato things like tomatoes basil kale spinach and if you look here see those shoots coming through this is a bed that I planted earlier on just the same as what I did and demonstrate it before see that old mulch that old moles there was similar to the new mulch here and what will happen is that will all break down and all those plans for tomatoes they will all grow give crops be great and the sweet potato will slowly come through that mulch and eventually overtake that dead and when all those crops are gone the sweet potato will remain and then those cheeses will be ready to harvest in a few months after now in this bed here I mentioned earlier I tried to kill some sweet potato often the only reason I'm showing you this is to demonstrate how resilient it is so that you understand how easy it is to grow growing this plant the Orthodox way like putting a tuber on the kitchen sink in a glass of water and letting shoots come up and then planting those so that's all cool you could put it in a pot on its own you don't have to plant it about the plants and it'll grow very well in two or three months you'll have two burs there to harvest so see here's a great example of how resilient it is I've had that tarp over that bed for good six months and still it's reshooting it's just very difficult to kill off even if you want to in the subtropics sweet potato is probably one of the best weeds you can grow we can always find a sweet potato at our place when we need one that's for sure now check out this fella here look how odd it looks the potato that is not me something like this can be broken into several pieces and replanted back into the bed I hope you enjoyed that video on growing sweet potato if you liked it give it a thumbs up don't forget to subscribe and also visit my blog self-sufficient muqaam thanks for watching bye for now [Music]


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subtitle:


get a unlock from social visit me and in this video I want to show you guys how I grow sweet potato over the years I've learnt lots of tips and tricks and I want to pack them all into this video no particular order and show you guys exactly how I do it it's dead set easy now it's blowing a gale out here so what I'm going to do is voiceover in this video it'll make it easier for both of us so let's get into it so here I am in the patch I'm about to refurbish the bed and harvest some sweet potatoes I've been growing for about you know two to three months not a long time I can grow sweet potato in the one spot for years on end but in this particular case we've kind of been a few months it just grows wild at our place even in that bed there that we just saw with the blue tarp I try to I tried to kill it off in that particular part of a bed and a grew out the side and then at the back here it's growing like a ground cover you can walk all over it and it'll in and around those back garden beds there it just grows back and it doesn't get trampled down and it's actually quite a wonderful weed suppressant but it'll grow up as well like in this trellis example we used to grow it out the front then it took me ages to get out of our front bed but yeah it'll grow up a Traulsen look quite attractive wherever the vine goes it'll send down little runner roots and they will grow new tubers so it can be really difficult to get rid of if you've got a big garden and you just let it run wild but that is a bit of my thing I like to grow or what I call disperse gardening and just let plants go to seed and come up wherever see this to behere that's about the right size I love them about that size they're great too right there that's an example of the orange variety the one or two are bursting just here is the purple variety and they have a white flesh the orange variety which most people are used to has the orange flesh both are good to be honest I think the purple variety is more vigorous but I like the only variety for taste here's a really great example of how the vine has shut down a root and then created a tuber now when I go through the tubers that I've dug up if any a buggered like that one I'll just burn it straight back into the ground or replant it when I get the chance it's not worth eating but it'll certainly regrow very easily anything sort of over three inches and under seven inches or the size of a large cucumber is perfect I just think that that's about the best growing range because the flesh is nice and firm and it doesn't get too grainy when they get too big like I'll show you later they get way too grainy so once I've sorted it out I'm left with the whole heap of roots and smaller tubers and that's what I use to replant back into the next bed in this case I'm going to replant it back into the same bed you can do that for several times or several years in a row and then it's a good idea to move it away and find a new bed for your sweet potato otherwise they can start to attract pests and weevils and slugs and those type of things will start to ruin or the tubers so I just go through if the bed is a little hard well then I'll mash it up a bit because your soil is best for sweet potato when it's nice and loose so you potato will grow fine in heavy soil but they won't develop tubers very well and the tubers may in fact rot here I'm just adding a little bit of organic flooding bone to the bed you don't need to go crazy they need to over fertilize otherwise you'll just get a lot of leaf grace or not a lot of cheaver I like to mulch the bed nice and thick in this case it's sugar cane mulch and then I water it in make sure that sudden bonus fertilizers in washing that's pretty much it for the refurb of the bed I'm pretty happy with that little harvest after about you know 2 or 3 months that's going to be a good feed and whilst I can grow them a heck of a lot bigger let me tell you the bigger they get the more grainy and awful they taste so you can't be starving Kenya that's why I picked myself a couple of small sweet potato while I was out here while Nina was doing that corn just a couple of little ones that one there and this one here a couple of little sweet potatoes that should do us for dinner maybe one each and half of the kids so we don't go hungry through the big storm here in Brisbane well that was a bit of a retro clip taken some years ago when we used to grow the sweeps out the front there like that in the patch can you see the little pink flowers well what's interesting is sweet potato isn't related at all to standard potatoes it's in fact part of the morning glory family of plants which are known mainly for their tubular cone like pretty flowers not the tubers well I'm not finished with this bed yet this is going to seem really unorthodox but I'm now going to over plant over the top of this sweet potato things like tomatoes basil kale spinach and if you look here see those shoots coming through this is a bed that I planted earlier on just the same as what I did and demonstrate it before see that old mulch that old moles there was similar to the new mulch here and what will happen is that will all break down and all those plans for tomatoes they will all grow give crops be great and the sweet potato will slowly come through that mulch and eventually overtake that dead and when all those crops are gone the sweet potato will remain and then those cheeses will be ready to harvest in a few months after now in this bed here I mentioned earlier I tried to kill some sweet potato often the only reason I'm showing you this is to demonstrate how resilient it is so that you understand how easy it is to grow growing this plant the Orthodox way like putting a tuber on the kitchen sink in a glass of water and letting shoots come up and then planting those so that's all cool you could put it in a pot on its own you don't have to plant it about the plants and it'll grow very well in two or three months you'll have two burs there to harvest so see here's a great example of how resilient it is I've had that tarp over that bed for good six months and still it's reshooting it's just very difficult to kill off even if you want to in the subtropics sweet potato is probably one of the best weeds you can grow we can always find a sweet potato at our place when we need one that's for sure now check out this fella here look how odd it looks the potato that is not me something like this can be broken into several pieces and replanted back into the bed I hope you enjoyed that video on growing sweet potato if you liked it give it a thumbs up don't forget to subscribe and also visit my blog self-sufficient muqaam thanks for watching bye for now [Music]


 
145
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How to Preserve Mangoes by Drying in a Dehydrator - with Special TIP

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 145 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from selfish and me I'm just standing in the dappled shade of one of our mango trees remember the had a bag fruit video that I just released I promised at the end of that video that I would release a another video just a quick one on how to dehydrate mangoes and how we utilize a glut of mangoes well this is this video enjoy obviously the first thing I do is remove the fruit from the protective bag and I covered that in the other video then pretty much just sliced the mangoes up it's nothing to it no real set pieces I try to keep them about an inch across as possible and possibly you know half an inch thick your fav an easy way to do a mango to get to get the skin off it anyway is to cut it into quarters just through the skin there with a paring knife and then just peel the skin back that way it comes off nice and easy we can still are sucking that Skinny Bitch now I get some extra mango and then I just cut through right through to the seed and you're going to end up with some milk lots of different sizes but don't be too pedantic about it I certainly am NOT I throw a lot of that place into a compost bin that's just a Niles after 19 container how can they work well as a compost bin and then I just lay them out on a dehydrator tray there's many different types of dehydrators I've got an Excalibur so that's how I lay ours out if there's any real big pieces I'll just cut them down and you can see that there's a lot of small pieces left as well I'll tend to try to group the larger pieces of the larger pieces in small because because they dry at different times and you can either remove that trait earlier or you can just let it all dry you have some that are a little bit more crispier than others it's not a big war when it to be honest set to the ID rater on its live food setting on a low setting that and then V I'd rate at Marshall slowly until it's not khaki on the outside but it's still a little moist on the inside when you buy into it I reckon that's the best like I said you're going to get a few crunchy pieces I story as in glad bags you can store it in whatever you want you can store them in airtight containers jars but I just find that the team put them in bags like this connealy go mangoes dehydrated that'll keep sort of year sometimes I add a little buy things for them maybe a quarter of a teaspoon in the packet shake it up and that just stops it from sticking it also helps with not not sort of absorbing moisture and I think it's a good way to store it well I hope you enjoyed that don't forget to subscribe to the channel thumbs up and also visit my blog self-sufficient me.com there's plenty of information there links in the description bye for now [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


today I'm mark from selfish and me I'm just standing in the dappled shade of one of our mango trees remember the had a bag fruit video that I just released I promised at the end of that video that I would release a another video just a quick one on how to dehydrate mangoes and how we utilize a glut of mangoes well this is this video enjoy obviously the first thing I do is remove the fruit from the protective bag and I covered that in the other video then pretty much just sliced the mangoes up it's nothing to it no real set pieces I try to keep them about an inch across as possible and possibly you know half an inch thick your fav an easy way to do a mango to get to get the skin off it anyway is to cut it into quarters just through the skin there with a paring knife and then just peel the skin back that way it comes off nice and easy we can still are sucking that Skinny Bitch now I get some extra mango and then I just cut through right through to the seed and you're going to end up with some milk lots of different sizes but don't be too pedantic about it I certainly am NOT I throw a lot of that place into a compost bin that's just a Niles after 19 container how can they work well as a compost bin and then I just lay them out on a dehydrator tray there's many different types of dehydrators I've got an Excalibur so that's how I lay ours out if there's any real big pieces I'll just cut them down and you can see that there's a lot of small pieces left as well I'll tend to try to group the larger pieces of the larger pieces in small because because they dry at different times and you can either remove that trait earlier or you can just let it all dry you have some that are a little bit more crispier than others it's not a big war when it to be honest set to the ID rater on its live food setting on a low setting that and then V I'd rate at Marshall slowly until it's not khaki on the outside but it's still a little moist on the inside when you buy into it I reckon that's the best like I said you're going to get a few crunchy pieces I story as in glad bags you can store it in whatever you want you can store them in airtight containers jars but I just find that the team put them in bags like this connealy go mangoes dehydrated that'll keep sort of year sometimes I add a little buy things for them maybe a quarter of a teaspoon in the packet shake it up and that just stops it from sticking it also helps with not not sort of absorbing moisture and I think it's a good way to store it well I hope you enjoyed that don't forget to subscribe to the channel thumbs up and also visit my blog self-sufficient me.com there's plenty of information there links in the description bye for now [Music]


 
139
Views

5 Vegetables that are too EASY to GROW in the Garden

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 139 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:
 


can i I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to give you my five top vegetables that are just too easy to grow so easy in fact that they'll grow themselves without hardly any effort from you at all let's get into it [Music] number one beans there's good reason why you tend to see being served up in all those old cowboy movies as beans were a staple frontier food containing all the nourishment a person needed to survive in just one small feed oh the irony of the spaghetti western they can be dried they can be canned and of course that could be eaten fresh beans have a very flexible growing climate range and that means in some places like hearing our subtropical climate pretty hot beans can be ground all year round they grow fast remember Jack and the Beanstalk beans uniquely don't take nitrogen from the soil unlike a lot of other plants they do take it from the air they and then they store it in their own roots therefore actually adding nitrogen to the soil so beans are really great pre crop to some of those other nitrogen hungry plants say cabbages etc that you want to grow after remember beans means hurry up and grow them number two Asian greens so we move from the west to the east asian greens are fast growing highly nutritious super and some say cancer-fighting wonderful on a continent with billions of people protein is getting rare and harder to catch and eat that's why their vegetables need to grow fast big be nutritious and above all easy to grow let a bunch of Asian greens go to seed in your garden and you'll never get rid of them that's a good thing Asian greens are great raw or cooked try mizuna or mbuna or even the mustards like the red giant or ruby streaks please Ruby streaks taking over my lawn now let's head the Europe with number three bikini originally from the Americas leave zucchini that we all know was developed in northern Italy where it was given the name which also means gourd squash and marrow the plant itself isn't a spoiler like other pumpkin vines so it's great for smaller gardens but nevertheless it's a big producer and a hearty mouthful it is really easy to grow and the speed at which the fruit swell is ridiculous you can almost see it growing real time some zigs can get up to a meter long actually the longest sig ever recorded was 2.5 5 meters there's also plenty of varieties such as round yellow white and they all taste fantastic raw cooked or even pickled in fact I pickled some the other day so what are you waiting for get on the boots and plant some Zuke's now let's head back over to the yeast for almost the middle we're number 4 carrot originated from you might find this hard to believe but did you know that the carrot originated in Afghanistan yeah it's true in fact evidence shows that carrots grew in Afghanistan over 5,000 years ago now I'm telling you if carrots could grow in Afghanistan it can grow anywhere orange carrots are really only a recent development in the overall scheme of time for this crunchy root vegetable original carrots were white or purple and had a very strong taste a bit like this white carrot here except the taste is good but in the old days they were considered a medicinal food because they were known to be good for you but taste is like should I say not great but these days with crossbreeding carrots are delicious carrot seed easily and they also store well after harvest so they are a top backyard crop to grow and keep using for months after I do recommend growing these heirloom varieties there's lots of different colors they taste great and if you leave them go to seed just a few plants they'll give you thousands of seeds for next season number five radish another perfect root crop vegetable to grow apt that it follows after carrots they reckon it originated from around India or China but no one knows for sure let's say India cue the Indian music radish is the cheater of the vegetable world if you want a fast growing crop and you just can't wait then so radish seeds and they'll pop up in literally a few days and be ready to eat immediately well as sprouts but within weeks as a root vegetable did you know that some modern farmers use them as a cover crop to soften and aerate the soil before planting their main crops sometimes they don't even harvest their dishes they just let them run in place acting as a natural fertilizer Kampai lost and groundbreaker at the same time a lot of backyard growers so radish seeds mixed in with their other slower growing crops so when they sow them the radish comes up first and I can harvest them while they're waiting for the other crop to come through there are lots of different types of radishes you can get the small ones that are best harvested young or you can get larger varieties like this Japanese daikons huge and they same with this one over here they're best harvested when they get a little bit larger in fact they can be harvested really big and greater than used in Japanese cooking or any cooking really radish also have a long sowing window and an excellent temperature tolerance making it a productive crop all around the world there are also plenty of ways to prepare and eat radish I like to eat radish raw with plenty of garlic and my family well I like to stay away for a few hours after that and that's it those are my five vegetables that are just too easy to grow but I challenge you guys to do it don't forget give me a thumbs up if you liked the video also share it subscribe visit the blog self-sufficient me.com thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music] view all
 


 
subtitle:
 


can i I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I want to give you my five top vegetables that are just too easy to grow so easy in fact that they'll grow themselves without hardly any effort from you at all let's get into it [Music] number one beans there's good reason why you tend to see being served up in all those old cowboy movies as beans were a staple frontier food containing all the nourishment a person needed to survive in just one small feed oh the irony of the spaghetti western they can be dried they can be canned and of course that could be eaten fresh beans have a very flexible growing climate range and that means in some places like hearing our subtropical climate pretty hot beans can be ground all year round they grow fast remember Jack and the Beanstalk beans uniquely don't take nitrogen from the soil unlike a lot of other plants they do take it from the air they and then they store it in their own roots therefore actually adding nitrogen to the soil so beans are really great pre crop to some of those other nitrogen hungry plants say cabbages etc that you want to grow after remember beans means hurry up and grow them number two Asian greens so we move from the west to the east asian greens are fast growing highly nutritious super and some say cancer-fighting wonderful on a continent with billions of people protein is getting rare and harder to catch and eat that's why their vegetables need to grow fast big be nutritious and above all easy to grow let a bunch of Asian greens go to seed in your garden and you'll never get rid of them that's a good thing Asian greens are great raw or cooked try mizuna or mbuna or even the mustards like the red giant or ruby streaks please Ruby streaks taking over my lawn now let's head the Europe with number three bikini originally from the Americas leave zucchini that we all know was developed in northern Italy where it was given the name which also means gourd squash and marrow the plant itself isn't a spoiler like other pumpkin vines so it's great for smaller gardens but nevertheless it's a big producer and a hearty mouthful it is really easy to grow and the speed at which the fruit swell is ridiculous you can almost see it growing real time some zigs can get up to a meter long actually the longest sig ever recorded was 2.5 5 meters there's also plenty of varieties such as round yellow white and they all taste fantastic raw cooked or even pickled in fact I pickled some the other day so what are you waiting for get on the boots and plant some Zuke's now let's head back over to the yeast for almost the middle we're number 4 carrot originated from you might find this hard to believe but did you know that the carrot originated in Afghanistan yeah it's true in fact evidence shows that carrots grew in Afghanistan over 5,000 years ago now I'm telling you if carrots could grow in Afghanistan it can grow anywhere orange carrots are really only a recent development in the overall scheme of time for this crunchy root vegetable original carrots were white or purple and had a very strong taste a bit like this white carrot here except the taste is good but in the old days they were considered a medicinal food because they were known to be good for you but taste is like should I say not great but these days with crossbreeding carrots are delicious carrot seed easily and they also store well after harvest so they are a top backyard crop to grow and keep using for months after I do recommend growing these heirloom varieties there's lots of different colors they taste great and if you leave them go to seed just a few plants they'll give you thousands of seeds for next season number five radish another perfect root crop vegetable to grow apt that it follows after carrots they reckon it originated from around India or China but no one knows for sure let's say India cue the Indian music radish is the cheater of the vegetable world if you want a fast growing crop and you just can't wait then so radish seeds and they'll pop up in literally a few days and be ready to eat immediately well as sprouts but within weeks as a root vegetable did you know that some modern farmers use them as a cover crop to soften and aerate the soil before planting their main crops sometimes they don't even harvest their dishes they just let them run in place acting as a natural fertilizer Kampai lost and groundbreaker at the same time a lot of backyard growers so radish seeds mixed in with their other slower growing crops so when they sow them the radish comes up first and I can harvest them while they're waiting for the other crop to come through there are lots of different types of radishes you can get the small ones that are best harvested young or you can get larger varieties like this Japanese daikons huge and they same with this one over here they're best harvested when they get a little bit larger in fact they can be harvested really big and greater than used in Japanese cooking or any cooking really radish also have a long sowing window and an excellent temperature tolerance making it a productive crop all around the world there are also plenty of ways to prepare and eat radish I like to eat radish raw with plenty of garlic and my family well I like to stay away for a few hours after that and that's it those are my five vegetables that are just too easy to grow but I challenge you guys to do it don't forget give me a thumbs up if you liked the video also share it subscribe visit the blog self-sufficient me.com thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]

134
Views

how I lacto ferment or pickle zucchini all home grown organically and demonstrated in our outdoor makeshift kitchen

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 134 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
subtitle:


today I'm microphone self-sufficient me and it's a beautiful sunny winter's day here in subtropical Queensland I'm going to show you guys how I pickle zooks [Music] right the veggie patch is just behind me so let's get in there and have a look at the zucchinis that I'm going to use so I've got a little outdoor kitchen setup because on a beautiful sunny day like this why would you want to do this inside it's a simple process so I thought you know I'll set it up out here and enjoy the sunlight these aki-nee's are getting out of control we're eating them like crazy but they just keep growing and they swell so big so I'm going to pick quite a few and we're going to pickle them so that we can save them and eat them later look at the size of them wonderful give it a bit of a twist and it comes off like that that's one glass the cells are monster okay it's a big one that'll do let me explain to you what we've got here in the outdoor kitchen for pickling these zucchinis first of all immediately I'm going to get rid of these two large turkeys we don't need them when they get this size they're not great for pickling you can pickle no worries make a chutney out of them as well and that type of thing but I'd prefer to cook with these because the larger they get the more spongy they become the smaller the more compact the flesh is and that pickle better when they're more compact think of a cucumber when you want to make pickled cucumbers you know nice pickled gherkin small ones are the more crunchy ones it's a similar type of notion alright so I'll just use these younger zucchinis I've got a knife I've got a cutting board or a cutting piece of plastic here I've got my jars that I'm going to put the pickles in and ferment them this one's a mason jar and it comes with a pickled pipe for the airlock if you want to see more about pickled pipes you can go to my website I'll leave a link below to what pickled pipes are but it's a type of airlock that can be used with mason jars they're silicon quite easy and in these other jars these are wet jars german-made and they're different but it's the same or a similar thing a few more moving parts to it and in these I've got the standard old airlock that most brewers use and instead of a specific glass weight in these ones i have old smaller work leads the glassware Khalid's and i'll be using them to weigh down the zucchini and these lunch because these type of other weights specific to mason jars and are too small for the wek over the other side here I've got this contraption which is just a packer it can be used as a cabbage pounder when you're making sauerkraut but this is going to be used just to pack the jars in to make sure I can get as much as I Keaney in as possible and finally here's 8 cups of brine I've made this Brian up out of standard tap water can understand the reason behind using spring water and in filtered water that's fine if you want to do that go ahead I'm just saying that I just use standard tap water it's 8 cups or 2 liters for each cup of used 1 tbsp of fine seaside needs to be the fine sea salt and then I've dissolved that in that 2 litre container so that's ready to go once I've pack the jars of the zucchinis we'll pull that over the top and Bob's your arty for pair my jar these jars have been just washed in a dishwasher there's nothing special there's no sterilization needs all I do is I cut the ends off these end this can go to the chickens no peeling involved and I'm just cutting them you know about quarter-inch thick pieces if you want for the larger if you've got larger sized zucchini like this you can maybe cut them in half or you can dice them up you can even shred it you know we'll use a peeler and make sort of sheets out of the zucchini but I'm just going to leave them whole like this throw them in here's my Packer press it down a bit now it's just a matter of pouring this brine over it or whack the weight on top to make sure that that's kept underneath the brine there's a yep enough water in there leaving a bit of a gap on top so that it doesn't overflow put the airlock on this case it's a pickle pipe put the lid on so I'm going to go head down just do the other ones I'll just put these lids on as of wait back the brine in put the airlock in nice and carefully and in these particular airlocks they need to have water in there so that the co2 can bubble out but no oxygen can get sucked back in and they get topped up occasionally when required if the water starts to evaporate otherwise you can use jobs without the airlocks but you're just going to remember during the fermentation process that you have to burp the jar by opening the lid and letting out the co2 that builds up otherwise the jars could explode or the lids blow off and that's all there is to it there's my jars done up with the zucchinis ready to start pickling and the process will start immediately you'll see over the next few days it'll start to bubble and in about three to four weeks the zucchini will turn into pickled zucchini the bacteria will start eating the salty brine and reacting with the zucchini and or naturally turn into a pickle house al you want it depends on you you can leave it for longer and the longer you leave it the more sour it will go I would start giving it a taste about after two weeks and see what you think always try to keep the brine topped up over these zucchinis if you're worried about them bubbling out maybe you're worried you may have overfilled them a little put a little tray underneath or put them on a tea towel so that if they do end up bubbling over it will not make a big mess you can go elaborate if you want and add extra things to this pickle or you can just leave the fermentation process go on its own with straight zucchini and let it speak for itself later on you can use it in cooking you can add extra herbs and spices to it to enhance flavors if you need to that's what we usually do well I hope you liked this quick video on fermenting zucchinis if you did give it a thumbs up and also share it that helps a lot visit the website self-sufficient muqaam I've got some links in the description they're also where you can find some of these products that I used today and where you can read more about them in articles that I've read if you've got any questions welcome in the comments section below also if you've got any tips or hints for me put them in the comment section below as well I love reading all your comments and I reply to as many as I possibly can thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] view all
 


 
 
subtitle:


today I'm microphone self-sufficient me and it's a beautiful sunny winter's day here in subtropical Queensland I'm going to show you guys how I pickle zooks [Music] right the veggie patch is just behind me so let's get in there and have a look at the zucchinis that I'm going to use so I've got a little outdoor kitchen setup because on a beautiful sunny day like this why would you want to do this inside it's a simple process so I thought you know I'll set it up out here and enjoy the sunlight these aki-nee's are getting out of control we're eating them like crazy but they just keep growing and they swell so big so I'm going to pick quite a few and we're going to pickle them so that we can save them and eat them later look at the size of them wonderful give it a bit of a twist and it comes off like that that's one glass the cells are monster okay it's a big one that'll do let me explain to you what we've got here in the outdoor kitchen for pickling these zucchinis first of all immediately I'm going to get rid of these two large turkeys we don't need them when they get this size they're not great for pickling you can pickle no worries make a chutney out of them as well and that type of thing but I'd prefer to cook with these because the larger they get the more spongy they become the smaller the more compact the flesh is and that pickle better when they're more compact think of a cucumber when you want to make pickled cucumbers you know nice pickled gherkin small ones are the more crunchy ones it's a similar type of notion alright so I'll just use these younger zucchinis I've got a knife I've got a cutting board or a cutting piece of plastic here I've got my jars that I'm going to put the pickles in and ferment them this one's a mason jar and it comes with a pickled pipe for the airlock if you want to see more about pickled pipes you can go to my website I'll leave a link below to what pickled pipes are but it's a type of airlock that can be used with mason jars they're silicon quite easy and in these other jars these are wet jars german-made and they're different but it's the same or a similar thing a few more moving parts to it and in these I've got the standard old airlock that most brewers use and instead of a specific glass weight in these ones i have old smaller work leads the glassware Khalid's and i'll be using them to weigh down the zucchini and these lunch because these type of other weights specific to mason jars and are too small for the wek over the other side here I've got this contraption which is just a packer it can be used as a cabbage pounder when you're making sauerkraut but this is going to be used just to pack the jars in to make sure I can get as much as I Keaney in as possible and finally here's 8 cups of brine I've made this Brian up out of standard tap water can understand the reason behind using spring water and in filtered water that's fine if you want to do that go ahead I'm just saying that I just use standard tap water it's 8 cups or 2 liters for each cup of used 1 tbsp of fine seaside needs to be the fine sea salt and then I've dissolved that in that 2 litre container so that's ready to go once I've pack the jars of the zucchinis we'll pull that over the top and Bob's your arty for pair my jar these jars have been just washed in a dishwasher there's nothing special there's no sterilization needs all I do is I cut the ends off these end this can go to the chickens no peeling involved and I'm just cutting them you know about quarter-inch thick pieces if you want for the larger if you've got larger sized zucchini like this you can maybe cut them in half or you can dice them up you can even shred it you know we'll use a peeler and make sort of sheets out of the zucchini but I'm just going to leave them whole like this throw them in here's my Packer press it down a bit now it's just a matter of pouring this brine over it or whack the weight on top to make sure that that's kept underneath the brine there's a yep enough water in there leaving a bit of a gap on top so that it doesn't overflow put the airlock on this case it's a pickle pipe put the lid on so I'm going to go head down just do the other ones I'll just put these lids on as of wait back the brine in put the airlock in nice and carefully and in these particular airlocks they need to have water in there so that the co2 can bubble out but no oxygen can get sucked back in and they get topped up occasionally when required if the water starts to evaporate otherwise you can use jobs without the airlocks but you're just going to remember during the fermentation process that you have to burp the jar by opening the lid and letting out the co2 that builds up otherwise the jars could explode or the lids blow off and that's all there is to it there's my jars done up with the zucchinis ready to start pickling and the process will start immediately you'll see over the next few days it'll start to bubble and in about three to four weeks the zucchini will turn into pickled zucchini the bacteria will start eating the salty brine and reacting with the zucchini and or naturally turn into a pickle house al you want it depends on you you can leave it for longer and the longer you leave it the more sour it will go I would start giving it a taste about after two weeks and see what you think always try to keep the brine topped up over these zucchinis if you're worried about them bubbling out maybe you're worried you may have overfilled them a little put a little tray underneath or put them on a tea towel so that if they do end up bubbling over it will not make a big mess you can go elaborate if you want and add extra things to this pickle or you can just leave the fermentation process go on its own with straight zucchini and let it speak for itself later on you can use it in cooking you can add extra herbs and spices to it to enhance flavors if you need to that's what we usually do well I hope you liked this quick video on fermenting zucchinis if you did give it a thumbs up and also share it that helps a lot visit the website self-sufficient muqaam I've got some links in the description they're also where you can find some of these products that I used today and where you can read more about them in articles that I've read if you've got any questions welcome in the comments section below also if you've got any tips or hints for me put them in the comment section below as well I love reading all your comments and I reply to as many as I possibly can thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music]

126
Views

how we store our cabbage long term in the fridge crisper

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 126 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


get a mark from self-sufficiently and I'm out here in the veggie garden I thought I'd bring you this impromptu video about cabbage and more specifically how we store cabbage not preserve it but just store it because I've got cabbage in our crisper still left over from last season that's 12 months ago and how did we do it well it's easy okay have a look here I've been admiring our Sugarloaf cabbage this season Idol is growing fantastic look at it a nice row of these wonderful Sugarloaf cabbages they just look perfect over there is some wham box that we've been using I'll chop that off because that's in the crisper as well and you know we've got some zucchinis here but let's not dwell on them let's talk about last season's cabbage because this season I'm very happy with how it's going and yeah we could harvest one or two of them actually but I'm going to let them mature properly first but what I want to show you is over here was last year that's what's left of last year's mammoth rock and that's not going to produce heads that's just going to produce seeds for me to keep because mammoth rock is a really excellent heirloom variety of cabbage and it lasts well too but all cabbage will last well what I wanted to let you guys know was how did we keep our cabbage from last year's mammoth rock harvest which was pretty good filled up the nice big basket from memory well it's really simple whack it in the crisper a lot of you guys probably already know this but some of you may not in the old days they used to harvest their cabbages at the end of season and then store them in a cellar or a cold spot underneath the house and then use it all through the wintertime we live in the subtropics year so we don't necessarily have that problem but we can't grow cabbages or any other type of brassicas over summer because it's too hot so we sort of do this a similar thing except instead of a cellar we'll store it in our crisper in the fridge and it will last that long yes it might look a little bit old on the edges and the first layers of the cabbage will no doubt not be edible but underneath that there will be perfectly good cabbage just as we're running out we've got the new cabbages for this winter coming on and we'll be able to do that same process so that's a great way to store not preserve because I preserve cabbage as well through fermentation and making sauerkraut and all those beautiful fermenting type foods but this is just how you can store it normally straight in the crisper may be in a plastic bag or a container in the crisper shelf and then keep that by all means for a good 12 months until your next crop is ready to harvest we're making a wonderful chicken soup for dinner tonight I've used just about the end of our cabbage for that by the time we've run out I'll be harvesting those sugarloaf this season for another good whack of cabbage and perhaps save that again all the way through until next season if we've got enough of it thanks a lot for watching if you don't mind these impromptu videos give me a thumbs up and let me know you like them and I'll do more of them i I'm sort of tossing up whether or not I should be punching out more videos or not I do at the moment I do have the capacity to be able to put out one or two more videos throughout the week but they're they're not going to be highly edited they'll be a bit like this sort of on off points that I can think of and bring up around the garden so if you like them give me a thumbs up and also share it that helps a lot thanks for watching bye for now [Music] you view all
 


 
subtitle:


get a mark from self-sufficiently and I'm out here in the veggie garden I thought I'd bring you this impromptu video about cabbage and more specifically how we store cabbage not preserve it but just store it because I've got cabbage in our crisper still left over from last season that's 12 months ago and how did we do it well it's easy okay have a look here I've been admiring our Sugarloaf cabbage this season Idol is growing fantastic look at it a nice row of these wonderful Sugarloaf cabbages they just look perfect over there is some wham box that we've been using I'll chop that off because that's in the crisper as well and you know we've got some zucchinis here but let's not dwell on them let's talk about last season's cabbage because this season I'm very happy with how it's going and yeah we could harvest one or two of them actually but I'm going to let them mature properly first but what I want to show you is over here was last year that's what's left of last year's mammoth rock and that's not going to produce heads that's just going to produce seeds for me to keep because mammoth rock is a really excellent heirloom variety of cabbage and it lasts well too but all cabbage will last well what I wanted to let you guys know was how did we keep our cabbage from last year's mammoth rock harvest which was pretty good filled up the nice big basket from memory well it's really simple whack it in the crisper a lot of you guys probably already know this but some of you may not in the old days they used to harvest their cabbages at the end of season and then store them in a cellar or a cold spot underneath the house and then use it all through the wintertime we live in the subtropics year so we don't necessarily have that problem but we can't grow cabbages or any other type of brassicas over summer because it's too hot so we sort of do this a similar thing except instead of a cellar we'll store it in our crisper in the fridge and it will last that long yes it might look a little bit old on the edges and the first layers of the cabbage will no doubt not be edible but underneath that there will be perfectly good cabbage just as we're running out we've got the new cabbages for this winter coming on and we'll be able to do that same process so that's a great way to store not preserve because I preserve cabbage as well through fermentation and making sauerkraut and all those beautiful fermenting type foods but this is just how you can store it normally straight in the crisper may be in a plastic bag or a container in the crisper shelf and then keep that by all means for a good 12 months until your next crop is ready to harvest we're making a wonderful chicken soup for dinner tonight I've used just about the end of our cabbage for that by the time we've run out I'll be harvesting those sugarloaf this season for another good whack of cabbage and perhaps save that again all the way through until next season if we've got enough of it thanks a lot for watching if you don't mind these impromptu videos give me a thumbs up and let me know you like them and I'll do more of them i I'm sort of tossing up whether or not I should be punching out more videos or not I do at the moment I do have the capacity to be able to put out one or two more videos throughout the week but they're they're not going to be highly edited they'll be a bit like this sort of on off points that I can think of and bring up around the garden so if you like them give me a thumbs up and also share it that helps a lot thanks for watching bye for now [Music] you

128
Views

Growing Lemons with Fresh Manure Fertiliser but No Mulch! How to Plus Other Growing Tips!

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 128 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


can a unlife from self revision me and as the Sun sets here in sunny South East Queensland I'm standing in front of this magnificent lemon tree it's all in fruit again this season but it's always in fruit and that's what I wanted to talk about there's something extra-special I wanted to share with you that I learnt when I was overseas on holiday in Sorrento and that was the different ways of getting a whole lot of fruit off your lemon tree now in Sorrento if you know anything about it it's the home of lemons last season which is twelve months ago now I made a video on this very tree it was called how to grow a kind of lemons it is by far my most popular video with over 600,000 views so far hopefully I'll get more but anyway my point is this lemon tree behind me one of my main ways or tips for growing and getting a lot of fruit was to mulch heavily and use a mixture of fertilizer compost and mulch underneath the tree to feed its feeder roots and that was one of my key tips well when we were in Sorrento we toured a lemon farm it was a lemon and olive farm and I'll show you some raw footage of that shortly but the key thing there was the way they don't most underneath their trees and incredibly their use of now get this it's supposed to be a big no-no but their use of raw fresh manure underneath the tree and not only that not only do they use fresh cow manure underneath their trees as a form of fertilizer but they don't mulch and they dig a pit around their trees so in theory they're digging all around where those feeder roots should be essentially filling that pit gap with pure fresh manure I think it's a great thing that they're using the manure from their cows tables and everything on the farm is cyclic and recyclable but I can't get my head around how they use the fresh manure and no mulching and how they dug around the base of those lemon trees because that's the opposite to what I'd recommend anyway let's have a look at some of this raw footage that I was talking about yeah they're big old olive tree this one you like a gum tree you know the lemons typical Sorrento lemon farm look at how they most dig pits for the trees the Cure from like that our guys like a fruit forests have grown them all so close together and hi Thor the citrus and olives yeah and even flowers underneath and they've netted from the hot Suns and the hail so here's the net for and of course the low net use for the olives and they beat them no drop to the ground they're a different way to grow through like a jungle so there you go pretty interesting hey they are growing great lemons they're it's the home of lemons in Italy lemoncello if every second store they sell them and cello and I tell you what it's not a bad drop I'd like to make some myself so what can we take away from that my way of growing a lot of lemons and their way of growing a lot of lemons is quite different in regards to fertilizing and mulching underneath a tree or not mulching and not looking after the theatre roots in their case but they still get great results and I still get great results so there's a great scope for growing a lot of lemons but not necessarily having to follow that one way there's lots of ways to skin a cat as they say and this way it there's lots of ways to grow a lemon tree and get a lot of fruit okay I'm going to be a little bit cheeky and say that I reckon my method of mulching heavily underneath the lemon tree so that it's feeder roots can get all that nourishment if they don't get disturbed and when you do add manure even if it's a little bit fresh those roots won't get burnt and that lemon tree won't suffer because the mulch acts as an absorbent but also a barrier between that freshman you up or the toilet breaks down and gets through the mouth it's not as fresh and it's not as raw and I think that's a better way of adding molten manure and getting a lot of produce out of your lemon tree and also my wife she seems to think that from her observations our lemon tree looks much healthier the leaves look better than the ones in that Sorrento farm we visited but having said that their lemon trees are much older and they are among big olive trees as well so not getting as much light so they might look a bit be shoveled because of that but at the end of the day who am I to question the experience and the knowledge of a third-generation lemon farmer in Sorrento I mean come on I did be pretty poor form for me to start thinking I know more then than they do so at the end of the day there's two different ways of growing a lot of lemons I still probably wouldn't recommend adding freshmen you are especially to a young tree because that might harm it but to my shock but also amazement and wonder you can add fresh manure and in fact they do in the home of lemons and lemon jello so it afford it anyway I thought you might find this video and those points quite interesting as interesting as I have if you liked the video don't forget to give it a good sums up also share it because that's important it helps a lot don't forget the website self-sufficient me calm thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:


can a unlife from self revision me and as the Sun sets here in sunny South East Queensland I'm standing in front of this magnificent lemon tree it's all in fruit again this season but it's always in fruit and that's what I wanted to talk about there's something extra-special I wanted to share with you that I learnt when I was overseas on holiday in Sorrento and that was the different ways of getting a whole lot of fruit off your lemon tree now in Sorrento if you know anything about it it's the home of lemons last season which is twelve months ago now I made a video on this very tree it was called how to grow a kind of lemons it is by far my most popular video with over 600,000 views so far hopefully I'll get more but anyway my point is this lemon tree behind me one of my main ways or tips for growing and getting a lot of fruit was to mulch heavily and use a mixture of fertilizer compost and mulch underneath the tree to feed its feeder roots and that was one of my key tips well when we were in Sorrento we toured a lemon farm it was a lemon and olive farm and I'll show you some raw footage of that shortly but the key thing there was the way they don't most underneath their trees and incredibly their use of now get this it's supposed to be a big no-no but their use of raw fresh manure underneath the tree and not only that not only do they use fresh cow manure underneath their trees as a form of fertilizer but they don't mulch and they dig a pit around their trees so in theory they're digging all around where those feeder roots should be essentially filling that pit gap with pure fresh manure I think it's a great thing that they're using the manure from their cows tables and everything on the farm is cyclic and recyclable but I can't get my head around how they use the fresh manure and no mulching and how they dug around the base of those lemon trees because that's the opposite to what I'd recommend anyway let's have a look at some of this raw footage that I was talking about yeah they're big old olive tree this one you like a gum tree you know the lemons typical Sorrento lemon farm look at how they most dig pits for the trees the Cure from like that our guys like a fruit forests have grown them all so close together and hi Thor the citrus and olives yeah and even flowers underneath and they've netted from the hot Suns and the hail so here's the net for and of course the low net use for the olives and they beat them no drop to the ground they're a different way to grow through like a jungle so there you go pretty interesting hey they are growing great lemons they're it's the home of lemons in Italy lemoncello if every second store they sell them and cello and I tell you what it's not a bad drop I'd like to make some myself so what can we take away from that my way of growing a lot of lemons and their way of growing a lot of lemons is quite different in regards to fertilizing and mulching underneath a tree or not mulching and not looking after the theatre roots in their case but they still get great results and I still get great results so there's a great scope for growing a lot of lemons but not necessarily having to follow that one way there's lots of ways to skin a cat as they say and this way it there's lots of ways to grow a lemon tree and get a lot of fruit okay I'm going to be a little bit cheeky and say that I reckon my method of mulching heavily underneath the lemon tree so that it's feeder roots can get all that nourishment if they don't get disturbed and when you do add manure even if it's a little bit fresh those roots won't get burnt and that lemon tree won't suffer because the mulch acts as an absorbent but also a barrier between that freshman you up or the toilet breaks down and gets through the mouth it's not as fresh and it's not as raw and I think that's a better way of adding molten manure and getting a lot of produce out of your lemon tree and also my wife she seems to think that from her observations our lemon tree looks much healthier the leaves look better than the ones in that Sorrento farm we visited but having said that their lemon trees are much older and they are among big olive trees as well so not getting as much light so they might look a bit be shoveled because of that but at the end of the day who am I to question the experience and the knowledge of a third-generation lemon farmer in Sorrento I mean come on I did be pretty poor form for me to start thinking I know more then than they do so at the end of the day there's two different ways of growing a lot of lemons I still probably wouldn't recommend adding freshmen you are especially to a young tree because that might harm it but to my shock but also amazement and wonder you can add fresh manure and in fact they do in the home of lemons and lemon jello so it afford it anyway I thought you might find this video and those points quite interesting as interesting as I have if you liked the video don't forget to give it a good sums up also share it because that's important it helps a lot don't forget the website self-sufficient me calm thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


 
130
Views

How To Hügelkultur AMAZING Grow Method For Raised Beds Vegetable Gardens

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 130 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
subtitle:


if a unmarked I'm self-sufficient me and today I want to have a chat to you guys about Google culture what is it how I used it in this very garden bed here without even knowing about it and perhaps you have two and what makes it so excellent for growing your fruit and vege now I want to use this bed here as my example because at the moment I've got some vegetables growing in here and some beautiful tomatoes some black Russians some of these tomato berries sweet potato I've got kale there's basil there's Asian greens there's beans all in this one bit but before I explain how constructed this garden bed using the Google culture principle I have to come clean and let you know that it was totally by accident so what happened was I was reading the comments on one of my videos and one of you guys a few months back said hey mark just wondering if you practice here go culture or have you used it in the garden I've read this word and I thought that looks like double dutch to me when in fact legal culture is German meaning Hill culture or mound culture so yeah googling I found out all this information and I found out that it was effectively to build up a nice big mound with all this organic matter log sticks leaves whatever plant material and then on top of that you lay soil compost mulch and that's where it then becomes a mound where you can plant and grow vegetables and fruit trees or whatever crops and it just so happens that this bed here I've been practicing Google culture in it and I didn't even know in fact all these beds along here are done using the Google culture method so this bed this round one in front of the rectangular bed without just demonstrating this one here that I've got the mint growing in you might have remembered that from my grow a ton of mint video this round galvanized here this one this one here this one and this other rectangular galvanized raised bed that mirrors the one on the other side there exactly so all of them have used the Hyuga culture method with logs and leaves and sticks and twigs and just fill them half way up with organic matter and it really has worked a treat if I compare it to my early days of gardening say twelve or thirteen years ago when I made those raised beds at the back here hopefully you can still see me so when I filled these ones out down here these large oval raised beds I was told by the manufacturer where I got them from that you should put about a foot or two of drainage in the bottom like crushed granite and then your dirt your compost your mulch on top of that for your growing medium but I've since found out over the last decade or so just through experimentation that you don't need great drainage at all in large high raised beds like this in fact those beds there are definitely more thirstier than these beds here I mean I can call on the Hyuga culture method of bed but to me because I never knew about that method or process anyway I would just probably call them the raised beds with logs and organic matter used as drainage or as a base or as a fill with soil and compost on top instead of any fancy German name and to be quite honest so what does the process do of lining the base of your raised garden bed with all this organic material and large organic material too in many cases big logs and sticks well it serves several excellent purposes the first thing it does and it's not often mentioned when you read about Hyuga culture and that is for raised garden bed like this it adds fill if you fill this whole raised garden bed with good organic soil that you buy from a landscaping mob that can cost quite a lot of money and the fact is you don't need you know 3 or 2 feet of organic soil for vegetables to grow in most crops only need about a foot of growing medium and don't forget you can also add to the medium compost and mulch which also help to build it up so it makes sense not to waste feel like organic soil or even crushed granite and other types of fill that you have to pay for for the base of the raised bed like this it makes sense to use whatever you've got around offcuts rubbishing in my case I've got plenty of debris down the back there that I can cut up logs etc and place in the bottom of this bed the second thing is it helps the garden bed to absorb and hold water as the logs and sticks break down they act as sponges that absorption can then be released and used by the plants and utilize that water that's being soaked up in them the other thing that is so effective about this method of gardening is that as the organic manner underneath the soil breaks down and you can imagine the plants roots going down into that it breaks down and releases nutrients and acts as a type of fertilizer it acts as food for the fruit and vegetables and there's another benefit as the logs and the sticks are breaking down that process generates energy so it releases heat into the soil and plants do love nice warm soil cold climates in particular or even here through winter that process of it's slowly breaking down and releasing a little bit of warmth into the garden bed is beneficial for segment Amato's which don't grow too well in this type of climate especially during winter but as you can see I'm getting at least some excellent fruit out of my Tomatoes when perhaps I really shouldn't be at this time of year when the temperatures are getting sometimes sub-zero and the final thing about the breaking down process and using the Hyuga culture method is that microbes and worms that are feeding and living in that breaking down material in the logs and the sticks they also start to get a relationship with the plants fungi as well plants rely on microbes and fungi and worms not just to break down the soil for nutrients but to also help the roots take up certain nutrients that the plants need to thrive so let me just pick this clump red tomato berry variety of tomato and squeeze between these two Hyuga culture beds because I guess that's what they're called even though if it wasn't for you guys I still probably wouldn't have known what Hyuga culture was I hope you enjoyed the video of me explaining Hyuga culture even though to me it was just a logical way of getting extra fill into these raised garden beds and by adding that extra fill being logs and sticks and organic matter that could break down attract microbes and worms which in turn helps the plants through fertilization keeping the soil a little bit warmer than it otherwise would retaining moisture and the symbiotic nature between fungi and animals helping the plants making them in theory thrive which I think the proof is in the pudding good juices up hmm excuse me all right let's beeline so thanks a lot for watching if you liked the video give it a thumbs up don't forget to share it as well because that helps heaps website self-sufficient me calm bye for now I think I'll go and have another tomato [Music] you [Music] view all
 


 
 
subtitle:


if a unmarked I'm self-sufficient me and today I want to have a chat to you guys about Google culture what is it how I used it in this very garden bed here without even knowing about it and perhaps you have two and what makes it so excellent for growing your fruit and vege now I want to use this bed here as my example because at the moment I've got some vegetables growing in here and some beautiful tomatoes some black Russians some of these tomato berries sweet potato I've got kale there's basil there's Asian greens there's beans all in this one bit but before I explain how constructed this garden bed using the Google culture principle I have to come clean and let you know that it was totally by accident so what happened was I was reading the comments on one of my videos and one of you guys a few months back said hey mark just wondering if you practice here go culture or have you used it in the garden I've read this word and I thought that looks like double dutch to me when in fact legal culture is German meaning Hill culture or mound culture so yeah googling I found out all this information and I found out that it was effectively to build up a nice big mound with all this organic matter log sticks leaves whatever plant material and then on top of that you lay soil compost mulch and that's where it then becomes a mound where you can plant and grow vegetables and fruit trees or whatever crops and it just so happens that this bed here I've been practicing Google culture in it and I didn't even know in fact all these beds along here are done using the Google culture method so this bed this round one in front of the rectangular bed without just demonstrating this one here that I've got the mint growing in you might have remembered that from my grow a ton of mint video this round galvanized here this one this one here this one and this other rectangular galvanized raised bed that mirrors the one on the other side there exactly so all of them have used the Hyuga culture method with logs and leaves and sticks and twigs and just fill them half way up with organic matter and it really has worked a treat if I compare it to my early days of gardening say twelve or thirteen years ago when I made those raised beds at the back here hopefully you can still see me so when I filled these ones out down here these large oval raised beds I was told by the manufacturer where I got them from that you should put about a foot or two of drainage in the bottom like crushed granite and then your dirt your compost your mulch on top of that for your growing medium but I've since found out over the last decade or so just through experimentation that you don't need great drainage at all in large high raised beds like this in fact those beds there are definitely more thirstier than these beds here I mean I can call on the Hyuga culture method of bed but to me because I never knew about that method or process anyway I would just probably call them the raised beds with logs and organic matter used as drainage or as a base or as a fill with soil and compost on top instead of any fancy German name and to be quite honest so what does the process do of lining the base of your raised garden bed with all this organic material and large organic material too in many cases big logs and sticks well it serves several excellent purposes the first thing it does and it's not often mentioned when you read about Hyuga culture and that is for raised garden bed like this it adds fill if you fill this whole raised garden bed with good organic soil that you buy from a landscaping mob that can cost quite a lot of money and the fact is you don't need you know 3 or 2 feet of organic soil for vegetables to grow in most crops only need about a foot of growing medium and don't forget you can also add to the medium compost and mulch which also help to build it up so it makes sense not to waste feel like organic soil or even crushed granite and other types of fill that you have to pay for for the base of the raised bed like this it makes sense to use whatever you've got around offcuts rubbishing in my case I've got plenty of debris down the back there that I can cut up logs etc and place in the bottom of this bed the second thing is it helps the garden bed to absorb and hold water as the logs and sticks break down they act as sponges that absorption can then be released and used by the plants and utilize that water that's being soaked up in them the other thing that is so effective about this method of gardening is that as the organic manner underneath the soil breaks down and you can imagine the plants roots going down into that it breaks down and releases nutrients and acts as a type of fertilizer it acts as food for the fruit and vegetables and there's another benefit as the logs and the sticks are breaking down that process generates energy so it releases heat into the soil and plants do love nice warm soil cold climates in particular or even here through winter that process of it's slowly breaking down and releasing a little bit of warmth into the garden bed is beneficial for segment Amato's which don't grow too well in this type of climate especially during winter but as you can see I'm getting at least some excellent fruit out of my Tomatoes when perhaps I really shouldn't be at this time of year when the temperatures are getting sometimes sub-zero and the final thing about the breaking down process and using the Hyuga culture method is that microbes and worms that are feeding and living in that breaking down material in the logs and the sticks they also start to get a relationship with the plants fungi as well plants rely on microbes and fungi and worms not just to break down the soil for nutrients but to also help the roots take up certain nutrients that the plants need to thrive so let me just pick this clump red tomato berry variety of tomato and squeeze between these two Hyuga culture beds because I guess that's what they're called even though if it wasn't for you guys I still probably wouldn't have known what Hyuga culture was I hope you enjoyed the video of me explaining Hyuga culture even though to me it was just a logical way of getting extra fill into these raised garden beds and by adding that extra fill being logs and sticks and organic matter that could break down attract microbes and worms which in turn helps the plants through fertilization keeping the soil a little bit warmer than it otherwise would retaining moisture and the symbiotic nature between fungi and animals helping the plants making them in theory thrive which I think the proof is in the pudding good juices up hmm excuse me all right let's beeline so thanks a lot for watching if you liked the video give it a thumbs up don't forget to share it as well because that helps heaps website self-sufficient me calm bye for now I think I'll go and have another tomato [Music] you [Music]

159
Views

5 Tips How to Grow a Ton of Ginger in One Container or Garden Bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 159 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

today unlike themselves provision me and I'm back with another how to grow a ton of video in this case it's ginger now I've been growing ginger for a heck of a long time and over the years I've learned quite a few things about growing this magnificent rhyme zone growing underneath the soil it's one of the world's most useful and beneficial foods but let's not ramble on too much about it and let's just get into my five top tips on how to grow a ton of ginger tip number one position here I am down here right in the middle of our property no tree shade full Sun that is the best place to grow ginger where it gets plenty of sunlight now in the past we've grown ginger in this very bed actually when it was placed underneath the gum trees to my right part shade actually grew quite well so you can grow ginger in part shade or a partly shaded position however it does grow much better when it's exposed to well as much sunlight as you can give it ginger also grows very well in containers so for those smaller places maybe you don't have big garden beds maybe you're on our balcony if you can give it as much Sun as possible you can grow it in a pot no trouble at all in fact you can get some great harvests out of some small containers tip number two soil now for digging here and squeeze this all together it holds together just nicely and then I can crumble it apart it's rich it's full of organic matter and that's what ginger loves the soil has to be able to hold moisture but be free-draining so that means retain moisture but not be sopping wet so that it constricts growth and suffocates the rhein tone making good soil for ginger is easy you want to develop your soil over time by adding homemade compost you can't make it at home buy some compost mix it into the soil use mulch use the old ginger plant stems that breaks down and as that breaks down and gets eaten by microbes and worms it mixes into the soil and becomes an excellent moisture holding capacity and an excellent food source for the ginger and that leads to B into tip number three water if you want nice big fat rhyme zones that are plump you need to water ginger a lot it loves water but only if the soil is free draining so there's that balance you need that organic good structured soil because you want that water running through that container or the soil or wherever gingers planted so that ginger can take up as much water as it needs but it doesn't want to be sitting in water that's the balance you've got to create and it's not really that hard when I first plant my ginger I generally lay off the water that's about the only time I don't water it often because when you first plant the tubers out or the rhein zones out you don't want them to rot in the soil before it starts growing and developing its root system I generally leave it I'll leave rain do its thing natural rainfall whatever maybe if it's very very dry I might give it the old water but generally I just leave my ginger sit and wait till I see the shoots come through and that's when I start giving it it's regular water and not over watering at planting leads me on to tip number four planting and here's the ginger all laid out I've got the pile that I want to plant in here and I've got a small pile of nice big plump juicy pieces of ginger that I'm going to take inside and store in a nice cool dry place probably just on the kitchen bench actually near the dried chilies if I need more ginger I can always just come back to the garden and dig it up so I'm not losing out now nice big long piece like this I can break up into several pieces probably about you can just break it off work naturally you can see where there's a natural indent here it goes into a small narrow place break it off there I don't look for eyes and where it might be starting to gray like here's an eye here and then point that up or whatever don't worry about all that bumpkin I mean yeah okay if you want to be really pedantic but don't bother I just break it into nice chunks of pieces you can go even smaller than that if you really want and spread it out you could break that into like two inch or inch sized pieces and plant that that will grow another ginger plant but I like to break them into segments about that size because that gives plenty of food for the ginger plant to start to grow off and then it can multiply from there so it gives it a good start if it's about that big couple of inches across in diameter then I go about laying it all out around 20 centimeters or 1/2 foot apart lay it all out first and of course once we've got the ginger all laid out then I bury them so I only bury the ginger a little bit underneath the soil not too deep maybe an inch because you don't want to do them too deep of area too deep it's too hard for the ginger to shoot through too much layers of soil when you're not planting potatoes here and by the time it gets that energy spent to try to get through that soil that ginger root could be expended and it might just right and die so it's just a matter of easily just pushing it in under as you go just slightly under the soil an inch of that once I've buried the ginger I use some of my trusty organic blood and bone you could use your chicken manures and all that type of other animal manures if you want I would hesitate on using anything sort of grass-fed so I like horse manure because that might end up with a whole lot of weeds and grass through your ginger because ginger czar sparse growing plant as it is well clumpy like this it can grow fairly fairly well but it might get out competed by some heavy grasses and that could be a bit of a pain trying to weed in between the ginger shoots so I would hesitate on using those top of manures trigger mule probably better or quail manure in my case as well but if you don't have that a good organic fertilizer like organic blood and bone that's the bee's knees just liberally spread around the top here and that will give that ginger an extra boost before you think of fertilizer think of good organic composted soil with plenty of organic matter that is more important than giving too much fertilizer or any fertilizer at all the next thing I do is mulch a nice heavy mulch food cane mouth woodchip whatever and this is going to keep it nice and comfortable suppress weeds and as it breaks down it's going to also provide seeds for that hungry ginger and that's planting done and going hand-in-hand with planting comes tip number five eating or you could say harvesting but I want to talk about them base because they go hand in hand I reckon if you're going to grow a ton of ginger you want to be bloody eating it don't you how many pies what's the point people often think that you need to wait for ginger to develop and die off before you can start harvesting it right at the end of the season in most cases in a normal cool climate it's at the beginning of winter when it all dies back and then you can harvest around zones in a subtropical climate you might find that or a tropical climate you might find that the ginger keeps growing way into even midwinter before it all dies back waiting for the ginger to die back isn't at all necessary you can start harvesting ginger right from the get-go right from planting actually but more so after the shoots have developed and they're about a foot or so high you'll see that the tremors will start to form it's called young ginger you can harvest it from then onwards ginger is excellent for your health it's known to help with cardiovascular disease help your circularity system it's known for helping the digestive system helping your body to absorb other vitamins and minerals necessary for your overall health it helps with pain relief cancer fighting and there's a myriad of other beneficial aspects of eating ginger and that's it my top five tips position soil water planting harvesting / eating do those five things right and you will grow a ton of ginger just like I can it's dead set easy one of the easiest rhymes ohm's vegetables spices whatever you want to call it to grow so if you liked this video make sure you give it a thumbs up it's important that you share it and also how about leave a comment below on what's your favorite way to use ginger thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music]


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subtitle:

today unlike themselves provision me and I'm back with another how to grow a ton of video in this case it's ginger now I've been growing ginger for a heck of a long time and over the years I've learned quite a few things about growing this magnificent rhyme zone growing underneath the soil it's one of the world's most useful and beneficial foods but let's not ramble on too much about it and let's just get into my five top tips on how to grow a ton of ginger tip number one position here I am down here right in the middle of our property no tree shade full Sun that is the best place to grow ginger where it gets plenty of sunlight now in the past we've grown ginger in this very bed actually when it was placed underneath the gum trees to my right part shade actually grew quite well so you can grow ginger in part shade or a partly shaded position however it does grow much better when it's exposed to well as much sunlight as you can give it ginger also grows very well in containers so for those smaller places maybe you don't have big garden beds maybe you're on our balcony if you can give it as much Sun as possible you can grow it in a pot no trouble at all in fact you can get some great harvests out of some small containers tip number two soil now for digging here and squeeze this all together it holds together just nicely and then I can crumble it apart it's rich it's full of organic matter and that's what ginger loves the soil has to be able to hold moisture but be free-draining so that means retain moisture but not be sopping wet so that it constricts growth and suffocates the rhein tone making good soil for ginger is easy you want to develop your soil over time by adding homemade compost you can't make it at home buy some compost mix it into the soil use mulch use the old ginger plant stems that breaks down and as that breaks down and gets eaten by microbes and worms it mixes into the soil and becomes an excellent moisture holding capacity and an excellent food source for the ginger and that leads to B into tip number three water if you want nice big fat rhyme zones that are plump you need to water ginger a lot it loves water but only if the soil is free draining so there's that balance you need that organic good structured soil because you want that water running through that container or the soil or wherever gingers planted so that ginger can take up as much water as it needs but it doesn't want to be sitting in water that's the balance you've got to create and it's not really that hard when I first plant my ginger I generally lay off the water that's about the only time I don't water it often because when you first plant the tubers out or the rhein zones out you don't want them to rot in the soil before it starts growing and developing its root system I generally leave it I'll leave rain do its thing natural rainfall whatever maybe if it's very very dry I might give it the old water but generally I just leave my ginger sit and wait till I see the shoots come through and that's when I start giving it it's regular water and not over watering at planting leads me on to tip number four planting and here's the ginger all laid out I've got the pile that I want to plant in here and I've got a small pile of nice big plump juicy pieces of ginger that I'm going to take inside and store in a nice cool dry place probably just on the kitchen bench actually near the dried chilies if I need more ginger I can always just come back to the garden and dig it up so I'm not losing out now nice big long piece like this I can break up into several pieces probably about you can just break it off work naturally you can see where there's a natural indent here it goes into a small narrow place break it off there I don't look for eyes and where it might be starting to gray like here's an eye here and then point that up or whatever don't worry about all that bumpkin I mean yeah okay if you want to be really pedantic but don't bother I just break it into nice chunks of pieces you can go even smaller than that if you really want and spread it out you could break that into like two inch or inch sized pieces and plant that that will grow another ginger plant but I like to break them into segments about that size because that gives plenty of food for the ginger plant to start to grow off and then it can multiply from there so it gives it a good start if it's about that big couple of inches across in diameter then I go about laying it all out around 20 centimeters or 1/2 foot apart lay it all out first and of course once we've got the ginger all laid out then I bury them so I only bury the ginger a little bit underneath the soil not too deep maybe an inch because you don't want to do them too deep of area too deep it's too hard for the ginger to shoot through too much layers of soil when you're not planting potatoes here and by the time it gets that energy spent to try to get through that soil that ginger root could be expended and it might just right and die so it's just a matter of easily just pushing it in under as you go just slightly under the soil an inch of that once I've buried the ginger I use some of my trusty organic blood and bone you could use your chicken manures and all that type of other animal manures if you want I would hesitate on using anything sort of grass-fed so I like horse manure because that might end up with a whole lot of weeds and grass through your ginger because ginger czar sparse growing plant as it is well clumpy like this it can grow fairly fairly well but it might get out competed by some heavy grasses and that could be a bit of a pain trying to weed in between the ginger shoots so I would hesitate on using those top of manures trigger mule probably better or quail manure in my case as well but if you don't have that a good organic fertilizer like organic blood and bone that's the bee's knees just liberally spread around the top here and that will give that ginger an extra boost before you think of fertilizer think of good organic composted soil with plenty of organic matter that is more important than giving too much fertilizer or any fertilizer at all the next thing I do is mulch a nice heavy mulch food cane mouth woodchip whatever and this is going to keep it nice and comfortable suppress weeds and as it breaks down it's going to also provide seeds for that hungry ginger and that's planting done and going hand-in-hand with planting comes tip number five eating or you could say harvesting but I want to talk about them base because they go hand in hand I reckon if you're going to grow a ton of ginger you want to be bloody eating it don't you how many pies what's the point people often think that you need to wait for ginger to develop and die off before you can start harvesting it right at the end of the season in most cases in a normal cool climate it's at the beginning of winter when it all dies back and then you can harvest around zones in a subtropical climate you might find that or a tropical climate you might find that the ginger keeps growing way into even midwinter before it all dies back waiting for the ginger to die back isn't at all necessary you can start harvesting ginger right from the get-go right from planting actually but more so after the shoots have developed and they're about a foot or so high you'll see that the tremors will start to form it's called young ginger you can harvest it from then onwards ginger is excellent for your health it's known to help with cardiovascular disease help your circularity system it's known for helping the digestive system helping your body to absorb other vitamins and minerals necessary for your overall health it helps with pain relief cancer fighting and there's a myriad of other beneficial aspects of eating ginger and that's it my top five tips position soil water planting harvesting / eating do those five things right and you will grow a ton of ginger just like I can it's dead set easy one of the easiest rhymes ohm's vegetables spices whatever you want to call it to grow so if you liked this video make sure you give it a thumbs up it's important that you share it and also how about leave a comment below on what's your favorite way to use ginger thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music]


 
151
Views

5 Tips How to Grow a Ton of Turmeric in Just 3 Square Feet Garden Bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 151 views • 2017-09-27 16:31 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

could I I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I'm going to show you how to grow all of this tumeric all this here in just three square feet of garden bed that's right just in that little corner all this turmeric and you won't believe how easy it is to do this is the rhizome or root of the turmeric plant technically it's part of the ginger family it's one of the most famous foods in the world particularly due to its versatility in cooking it's used in a whole range of foods but also its medicinal qualities scientific tests have shown turmeric to stimulate cancer fighting genes in human cells and the best way to eat it is fresh or powdered in food such as a curry rather than in a tablet supplement but health qualities aside I just love it because it adds flavor to home cooking and it tastes great so fresh turmeric is best a well let's get into my five top tips on how to grow a ton of it tip number one planting turmeric is a really Hardy crop it's easy to grow you can even abuse it and it'll still find a way but to get the best out of your turmeric crop and to grow the most of it try doing these things first of all compost prepare the soil before planting by adding lots of rich compost turmeric loves a lot of food like I said it will grow miserly if it has to but give it lots of food and I tell you what it'll love you back use pieces of the rhizome roughly 2 or 3 inches square smaller pieces will grow also but the bigger the piece the more energy reserves it has to grow well plant it in free-draining crumbly soil that has been well tilled otherwise in hard compacted soil the root will find it harder to expand and it may also rot plant about six inches apart or there abouts but turmeric does grow well crowded so don't worry too much if it's a little crowded in bury the rhizome about an inch or two underneath the surface and fertilize with a good few handfuls of organic fertilizer such as blood and bone and chicken pellet manure or you can use well rotted animal manures if you've got them handy you should mulch over the top of the turmeric once you plant say about two or three inches sugar cane mulch or even its own stems that have died back from the last season because this will stop weeds competing with the new shoots of the turmeric tries to grow through and for those of you who like growing in pots and containers just like ginger turmeric will grow really well in those environments also the same principles apply tip number two water turmeric originates from Southeast Asia which is primarily a tropical climate it loves it hot and wet but just because trimmer it comes from a tropical region doesn't mean you can't grow it all around the world grow it at the hottest time of the year in a position where as plenty of Sun and water it regularly water more especially if you are growing in pots or containers because they tend to dry out faster and that's the balance you have to make you need it free draining because that's what Tremec likes but you also need to give it plenty of water so if your soil is too heavy in whatever container you use or garden bed you're going to try to water it and give it the water it needs but then if it's too boggy the tubers might just rot in the soil so the key really is more free draining than anything even if it means you have to water it daily tip number three the growing area I'm sitting in it to grow this much turmeric you really need a fair-sized growing area yes this is only 3 feet by 3 feet just where I'm sitting now and I grew this much but of course logically you can't grow this much turmeric in a tiny pot like this so you've got to allow for at least a bit of space it's best to find a central vegetable garden position where the Sun can get access to the plants for most of the day without getting shaded out by other plants or trees you may need to build up your stock over several years you know to get this much turmeric it just doesn't happen overnight obviously all this started from just one plant in a small pot that I got from our local nursery three and a half years ago so it's possible take what you need preserve eat what you need and put the rest back into the garden and then you'll keep growing your stock like that tip number 4 crop rotation you may have heard about the benefits of crop rotation and how good it is to rotate your crops in a separate garden bed each year I've found it's only necessary to crop rotate every two seasons every few years to negate soil depletion and a buildup of pests so if you start off growing well and you find your plants are not doing so well ruk right worms borås slow growth etc consider moving to another bed and give it a fresh start that should do the trick tip number five harvesting let the plant die back fully because this is the time when the plant is dying back that it transfers all the energy into the rhizome and that prepares it for the dormant stage to come then when you harvest the roots it will be better tasting because it's more mature and it'll also store better on the shelf use these old stems back into the garden there's mulch because it rejuvenates the soil it protects the soil it also limits weed growth throughout the season try to harvest the turmeric before the new season starts in spring otherwise it will start shooting and you'll have to meet growing over the top of turmeric carefully dig up the turmeric rhizome with a garden fork it'll come out in clumps and with just a little bit of pulling and shaking it'll come apart quite easily you'll notice two distinct parts of the rhizome the often central mouth shaped part with side roots coming off it and also the finger parts I don't use the mouth shaped parts for eating I'd rather keep them for replanting you can eat them if you want but personally I think they're not as rich and tasty as the fingers our turmeric will store okay on the shelf or in the crisper to use fresh for several weeks but you can preserve it by freezing pickling or making your own powdered spice you can also store it in a bag or a tub or even just a box a little bit of soil or mulch over the top so that you can keep it for when you're ready to plant it out for the new coming season and that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of turmeric if you liked the video give me a big fat turmeric thumbs up and also share it like crazy all over the internet don't forget to subscribe and the website self-sufficient me.com thanks a lot for watching - ow [Music]


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subtitle:

could I I'm mark from self-sufficiently and in this video I'm going to show you how to grow all of this tumeric all this here in just three square feet of garden bed that's right just in that little corner all this turmeric and you won't believe how easy it is to do this is the rhizome or root of the turmeric plant technically it's part of the ginger family it's one of the most famous foods in the world particularly due to its versatility in cooking it's used in a whole range of foods but also its medicinal qualities scientific tests have shown turmeric to stimulate cancer fighting genes in human cells and the best way to eat it is fresh or powdered in food such as a curry rather than in a tablet supplement but health qualities aside I just love it because it adds flavor to home cooking and it tastes great so fresh turmeric is best a well let's get into my five top tips on how to grow a ton of it tip number one planting turmeric is a really Hardy crop it's easy to grow you can even abuse it and it'll still find a way but to get the best out of your turmeric crop and to grow the most of it try doing these things first of all compost prepare the soil before planting by adding lots of rich compost turmeric loves a lot of food like I said it will grow miserly if it has to but give it lots of food and I tell you what it'll love you back use pieces of the rhizome roughly 2 or 3 inches square smaller pieces will grow also but the bigger the piece the more energy reserves it has to grow well plant it in free-draining crumbly soil that has been well tilled otherwise in hard compacted soil the root will find it harder to expand and it may also rot plant about six inches apart or there abouts but turmeric does grow well crowded so don't worry too much if it's a little crowded in bury the rhizome about an inch or two underneath the surface and fertilize with a good few handfuls of organic fertilizer such as blood and bone and chicken pellet manure or you can use well rotted animal manures if you've got them handy you should mulch over the top of the turmeric once you plant say about two or three inches sugar cane mulch or even its own stems that have died back from the last season because this will stop weeds competing with the new shoots of the turmeric tries to grow through and for those of you who like growing in pots and containers just like ginger turmeric will grow really well in those environments also the same principles apply tip number two water turmeric originates from Southeast Asia which is primarily a tropical climate it loves it hot and wet but just because trimmer it comes from a tropical region doesn't mean you can't grow it all around the world grow it at the hottest time of the year in a position where as plenty of Sun and water it regularly water more especially if you are growing in pots or containers because they tend to dry out faster and that's the balance you have to make you need it free draining because that's what Tremec likes but you also need to give it plenty of water so if your soil is too heavy in whatever container you use or garden bed you're going to try to water it and give it the water it needs but then if it's too boggy the tubers might just rot in the soil so the key really is more free draining than anything even if it means you have to water it daily tip number three the growing area I'm sitting in it to grow this much turmeric you really need a fair-sized growing area yes this is only 3 feet by 3 feet just where I'm sitting now and I grew this much but of course logically you can't grow this much turmeric in a tiny pot like this so you've got to allow for at least a bit of space it's best to find a central vegetable garden position where the Sun can get access to the plants for most of the day without getting shaded out by other plants or trees you may need to build up your stock over several years you know to get this much turmeric it just doesn't happen overnight obviously all this started from just one plant in a small pot that I got from our local nursery three and a half years ago so it's possible take what you need preserve eat what you need and put the rest back into the garden and then you'll keep growing your stock like that tip number 4 crop rotation you may have heard about the benefits of crop rotation and how good it is to rotate your crops in a separate garden bed each year I've found it's only necessary to crop rotate every two seasons every few years to negate soil depletion and a buildup of pests so if you start off growing well and you find your plants are not doing so well ruk right worms borås slow growth etc consider moving to another bed and give it a fresh start that should do the trick tip number five harvesting let the plant die back fully because this is the time when the plant is dying back that it transfers all the energy into the rhizome and that prepares it for the dormant stage to come then when you harvest the roots it will be better tasting because it's more mature and it'll also store better on the shelf use these old stems back into the garden there's mulch because it rejuvenates the soil it protects the soil it also limits weed growth throughout the season try to harvest the turmeric before the new season starts in spring otherwise it will start shooting and you'll have to meet growing over the top of turmeric carefully dig up the turmeric rhizome with a garden fork it'll come out in clumps and with just a little bit of pulling and shaking it'll come apart quite easily you'll notice two distinct parts of the rhizome the often central mouth shaped part with side roots coming off it and also the finger parts I don't use the mouth shaped parts for eating I'd rather keep them for replanting you can eat them if you want but personally I think they're not as rich and tasty as the fingers our turmeric will store okay on the shelf or in the crisper to use fresh for several weeks but you can preserve it by freezing pickling or making your own powdered spice you can also store it in a bag or a tub or even just a box a little bit of soil or mulch over the top so that you can keep it for when you're ready to plant it out for the new coming season and that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of turmeric if you liked the video give me a big fat turmeric thumbs up and also share it like crazy all over the internet don't forget to subscribe and the website self-sufficient me.com thanks a lot for watching - ow [Music]


 
152
Views

how I typically espalier single tomato plants that have self-seeded in the garden by making a simple mini trellis from reo mesh and a star picket.

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 152 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm like from self-sufficient me and I'm in the garden here I was just working on this mini tomato trellis and I thought you know what what I'd do some filming you guys might be interested in what I'm doing here and yeah let's just get right on into it a month ago or so there was this seedling that just popped up out of nowhere tomato seedling this is it here it's grown into quite a nice sizable tomato bush it looks like it's some type of larger variety what I need to do is trellis it up it's only one plant and I thought I'd show you how easy it is to knock up one of these many espalier tomato trellises just out of Rio mesh and a simple star picket the end of the day it's pretty easy yeah yeah whack the star pick it into the ground so it's you know fairly sold maybe a better foot down so it won't fall over too easy and I've got these smaller pieces of mesh just for individual plants like this just cut out and I've folded the sides over so that they're you know that I poked anyone's eye out when they're sort of getting in the garden it's only about a meter wide three feet or less than that and about the same square high well I like about this rear mesh is it's strong it lasts forever this is probably 10 years old this piece or more on the top of these stuff it gets you know how you have a slot from where normal wire goes when you're doing fencing well the Rio bar or the Rio mesh just fits nicely into that and if you line up the star picket with the center of the mesh just use a couple of zip ties or a piece of wire if you want but zip ties are nice and easy to get on and off you zip it together at the top together at the bottom through these holes here in the star picket and it becomes quite ace secure and fast way to set up a mini trellis so what I've got to do now is just pick this tomato plant up and attach it to the trellis so that it can grow and espalier out and of course if you leave it just flop into the garden like this it's just the fruits going to right because it's going to touch the green and slugs and snails will be able to get to the fruit easier so it's best off picking a plant up like this and obviously growing it up something as with most tomato plants use some of this twine that I've got here just blue gardening twine it degrades in the Sun after a while and I will tie the plant up to this and we'll see how we go so this is the main central leader and I'll try to centralize that main leader up the strongest part here so that the weight is distributed in the middle so you basically want to tie a knot that doesn't slip so a non-slip granny knot so that it doesn't shake the bottom of the stem off and we'll just start wrapping that through and twisting it around the main leader stem careful that I don't burn the plant or cut through it going in between the laterals the laterals will help support the twine as well though that what twine doesn't slide up it's bending over because of the position it's in he doesn't know which way to gray because it wasn't being supported in in any way at all the way it was so this will help straighten that leader stem up as well there we go now I can easily pull that up see right up to the top here go around and cut off any diseased leaves I can see and now I've got that secondary that I can that's all so you can see starting to curl around because it was going nowhere it was just sort of spiraling in the bed here it's still gonna grow out that way so I'll keep it sort of going on that trajectory another one on the other side here got some good fruit there what I'll do is I'll trim that it looks a bit bushy and train that up this side see even the kookaburras are happy and then pull that up and that'll train up to that and that's pretty much it nice and short keep it simple that plant there was myself cedar came out of nowhere I don't know how it got to that part of the garden but I'm glad I kept it because I'm interested to see how this fruit turns out looks like it's going to be a really nice variety and this is the right time for tomatoes now coming into our spring although we can grow them through winter and I do but they don't grow as well as this warmer time of the year is you're coming into spring before summer hits so I'm keen to see how this one works out I think it's going to be a good plant yeah thanks a lot for watching hope you enjoyed the video if you did give it a thumbs up go to self-sufficient muqaam subscribe obviously if you haven't already bye for now
 
  view all
 


 
subtitle:


today I'm like from self-sufficient me and I'm in the garden here I was just working on this mini tomato trellis and I thought you know what what I'd do some filming you guys might be interested in what I'm doing here and yeah let's just get right on into it a month ago or so there was this seedling that just popped up out of nowhere tomato seedling this is it here it's grown into quite a nice sizable tomato bush it looks like it's some type of larger variety what I need to do is trellis it up it's only one plant and I thought I'd show you how easy it is to knock up one of these many espalier tomato trellises just out of Rio mesh and a simple star picket the end of the day it's pretty easy yeah yeah whack the star pick it into the ground so it's you know fairly sold maybe a better foot down so it won't fall over too easy and I've got these smaller pieces of mesh just for individual plants like this just cut out and I've folded the sides over so that they're you know that I poked anyone's eye out when they're sort of getting in the garden it's only about a meter wide three feet or less than that and about the same square high well I like about this rear mesh is it's strong it lasts forever this is probably 10 years old this piece or more on the top of these stuff it gets you know how you have a slot from where normal wire goes when you're doing fencing well the Rio bar or the Rio mesh just fits nicely into that and if you line up the star picket with the center of the mesh just use a couple of zip ties or a piece of wire if you want but zip ties are nice and easy to get on and off you zip it together at the top together at the bottom through these holes here in the star picket and it becomes quite ace secure and fast way to set up a mini trellis so what I've got to do now is just pick this tomato plant up and attach it to the trellis so that it can grow and espalier out and of course if you leave it just flop into the garden like this it's just the fruits going to right because it's going to touch the green and slugs and snails will be able to get to the fruit easier so it's best off picking a plant up like this and obviously growing it up something as with most tomato plants use some of this twine that I've got here just blue gardening twine it degrades in the Sun after a while and I will tie the plant up to this and we'll see how we go so this is the main central leader and I'll try to centralize that main leader up the strongest part here so that the weight is distributed in the middle so you basically want to tie a knot that doesn't slip so a non-slip granny knot so that it doesn't shake the bottom of the stem off and we'll just start wrapping that through and twisting it around the main leader stem careful that I don't burn the plant or cut through it going in between the laterals the laterals will help support the twine as well though that what twine doesn't slide up it's bending over because of the position it's in he doesn't know which way to gray because it wasn't being supported in in any way at all the way it was so this will help straighten that leader stem up as well there we go now I can easily pull that up see right up to the top here go around and cut off any diseased leaves I can see and now I've got that secondary that I can that's all so you can see starting to curl around because it was going nowhere it was just sort of spiraling in the bed here it's still gonna grow out that way so I'll keep it sort of going on that trajectory another one on the other side here got some good fruit there what I'll do is I'll trim that it looks a bit bushy and train that up this side see even the kookaburras are happy and then pull that up and that'll train up to that and that's pretty much it nice and short keep it simple that plant there was myself cedar came out of nowhere I don't know how it got to that part of the garden but I'm glad I kept it because I'm interested to see how this fruit turns out looks like it's going to be a really nice variety and this is the right time for tomatoes now coming into our spring although we can grow them through winter and I do but they don't grow as well as this warmer time of the year is you're coming into spring before summer hits so I'm keen to see how this one works out I think it's going to be a good plant yeah thanks a lot for watching hope you enjoyed the video if you did give it a thumbs up go to self-sufficient muqaam subscribe obviously if you haven't already bye for now
 
 
86
Views

5 tips on how I grow several varieties of salad plants in just one small raised garden bed

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 86 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
97
Views

Asparagus Citrus Tomatoes Eggplant Cucumber Beans Pruning Duck

ExperienceSelf Sufficient Me Published the article • 0 comments • 97 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

today I'm not from self-sufficiently and it's a beautiful sunny day here for our first week of spring and there's a lot going on it's really windy today so I'll try my best to struggle and cope with that wind so that it doesn't disrupt the video too much but there's several things that I wanted to show you and I meant to show you this midweek around about Wednesday and I'd get a lot of shooting and a lot of govern off the problem was I didn't I didn't tend to like on so I had no microphone then when I went and played it back you know all excited on how I was going to edit this video out there was no it was no sound so that was a bit of a bummer but here I am I'm not going to give up I'm still gonna put out a video this weekend but my midweek video is gonna be the end of the week but like I said there's lots of want to show you so let's get into it okay the first thing I wanted to show you guys is see how I'm standing underneath this grapevine it's still in its dormant stage this is the one that I did a video on a few years ago on how to prune and grow a grape vine off your house and it's going great guns but pruning speaking of needs to be done all over the place here at the moment and I really should have got my pruning done through winter before spring had sprung Bernie way this is got to be pruned back and all my fruit trees have to be pruned back as well these things I'm going to mention in this video are things that you're going to see in videos coming up and then you'll be able to later go oh yeah yeah I remember that video mark done of all those several madness things that were going on in his yard at the time so that was how that turned out etc etc those so that's the aim of this video is to give you an update and and also really just show you what's going on at the moment because it is a busy time the start of spring even in the subtropical climate remember we're coming out of winter which is a growing time for us particularly with all those salad crops we grow all year it's just that it's different crops that we grow I'm just gonna grab the camera and we'll go around and have a look yeah that toilet kangaroo thing has been getting a beating going around around on top of our clothesline here boy that must be 20 20 years old or something I was here way before we got here anyway citrus starts at this part of the orchard and goes all the way back all these trees will need to be pruned even though they're staying to flower I've got to prune them but are they're just beautiful the lime tree which you've seen my lime video where you may have flowering again and small fruit it's always in fruit the Meyer lemon I love the Meyer lemon flowers they're different got that purple to them purple tinge look at the bees just love them a Valencia orange which is our last orange tree that we use we leave the fruit on the Valencia I've mentioned this many times but just look how many flowers are on it it is just pumping pumping with flowers we've got a few pests turning up if you follow my videos you know that I don't get to wrap around the axles when it comes to pest management you see a few aphids on the tree I monitor it i watch and see how many predator insects there are around because that's important things like the lady birds and the hover flies if there's a lot of them around how generally we'll just wait and I won't you know break out the organic pesticide organic sprays so I'll monitor this tree I see that it's got some clusters of aphids and that on it and if it gets too overwhelming then I might actually spray it but I'll spray it probably right at the end of the day when I know there's no bees around or maybe even after it's finished flowering you know I want to keep the predator insects and the pollinating insects in mind whenever I do any type of spraying even if it's organic these larger trees I can take a little bit of pest infestation and on the younger trees if you've got all the new spring growth that's getting eaten by bugs well then yeah it's probably a good idea to hit it straight away so that that young tree isn't challenged when it's just trying to grow and become you know a good stable tree otherwise nine times out of 10 it fixes itself up okay let's not go off too much more about citrus we've got plenty that's going I can see that our mandarine is is flowering which is a good sign last year we've got no fruit out of it because it's a biannual fruit oh so it looks like we're going to get a good harvest out of that this season we normally do in the second year Washington Orange behind that and several others but anyway let's move on to the asparagus how cool is this or the asparagus coming up I just love this time of year at the start of spring asparagus it never fails within that first week boom it just starts shooting up this one was a little early because we've had some hot days through winter so there was a few sprigs of asparagus that were coming through earlier than I expected while it prompted me into getting this bed prepared and knocking down all the old-growth remoulding and getting stuck into it before all these started coming through just wonderful I love eating asparagus fresh even raw there's nothing better than fresh asparagus on the table and being spring means Tomatoes look at how green and fresh these Tomatoes look this whole bet is cherry tomatoes the reason why I'm concentrating on them now is because it is coming into spring summer and it's fruit fly season and the fruit flies then target all large tomato so even though you can grow them here and I've got a couple on the guide to be honest I have to watch them because otherwise the fruit flower get them and some of the larger varieties if they're growing well into you know mid spring I'm gonna have to start netting them otherwise we'll lose every one of them whereas the cherry tomatoes even the pears and the the ones in our plum size they don't get hit at all in this bed here I grew tomatoes all winter and they're they've just about had it now and they're dying off because they've had their season I've still got a couple of larger ones like these black Russians or black cream but those little spots on there worry me because that looks like a fruit fly sting sometimes they don't the maggot doesn't grow inside but when it does it ruins the whole fruit it's not that easy ground tomato through winter here you have to look after them to make sure they're in a good warm spot as long as you start them when it's still warm and let them grow into the color putana of the year you can do it in the subtropics no worries but yeah the best time of year is coming into spring now and they should give us some really great Tomatoes all through mid spring and into summer when then it'll get too hot in the tomatoes to die back again so essentially it's sort of two times a year where I get the tomatoes up to speed and it's similar with the eggplant normally I start my eggplants off light winter so that they're getting a good start and then they grow into spring and into summer and they do really well but these ones self seeded several of them that I've got in the garden at the moment and they grew all through winter and gave us eggplants in winter and now they're picking up again getting their second wind so I don't think I need even need to grow or plant any new eggplants for this season I'm really impressed and I'm definitely going to keep the seed out of these guys and say them again because it seems like they're gonna get eggplant all year round we've got a couple more over here as well so when you when you get a variety in your garden that sort of just pops up and does well at an unusual time of the year well then save that seed because it's adapting to your garden and those are the type of plants that you want so now moving on to the cucumbers and the beans that I wanted to talk about the beans over here but there's a similar type of concept here's the cucumbers now these ki-- comes you'll notice there's no trellis that's because they're Bush cucumbers I'll only get a couple of feet high and the intent is see this round bed the intent is for the plants to grow up and then eventually on their own weight they're going to flop down and they're going to hang to about half of three cords of the way down that bed so you're going to get a cascading effect of Bush cucumbers and I think that is going to be really cool it's going to be less maintenance and I'm thinking it's going to be a great growing method to show you guys hopefully it works in the center there I'm going to plant some maybe some chilies or capsicums or you know sweet peppers but we'll see but I haven't decided exactly what I'm going to put in the bed there yet but I reckon it's going to work a treat maximize the growing space because you've got plants cascading down able to plant more other plants in the center there and plus you're limiting your gardening workload because you don't have to constantly tie them up or trellis them up I think it's going to work well and they've got the same concept going over here with these beans these are dwarf beans they're not growing up beans like these were and they needed to beat relased these are all purple beans I'll keep the seeds for that and grown again soon but here these are Dwarfs and you can see they're getting to a fair size I'll get a little bigger than that and then I'm just going to train them to flop over they'll get probably two-foot high they'll flop over they'll get the ends about there and I'll be able to plant other things around the inside here like I've already got some coriander some other herbs that's the flat leaf coriander and I've got a tomato in the middle here the last thing I wanted to show you or talk about is the zucchinis here you can see that they grew all through winter if you watch my videos you'd know that I did a video on pickling zucchinis got a few still left so it's it's chugging along but it is getting towards the end of life these plants here but what I wanted to say was I tasted some of that lacto-fermented zucchinis that I showed you in the video and I tell you what they came up a treat they were absolutely beautiful lessons learnt on the larger ones I wouldn't keep the seeds and the center because they went a little mushy but not not out of hand mushy but I'd say a better way to pickle them would be in strips or take out the seeds in the middle and cut them in halves and half slices without the seeds and they'd probably pickle more crunch here and better than that way but apart from that they are going to be great those pickled zucchinis and curry dishes just as a side or mixed in with your favorite dip you know may be mixed with some soft cheese and turn it into a beautiful lacto zucchini dip which we like to do with all sorts of lacto fermented foods and the last thing I wanted to show you guys was down the back here we've got a duck that's sitting on her eggs anyway I took some footage of that so let's have a look at that now that she is sitting on two sets of eggs the one over here and one inside the chicken coop I accidentally walked in on her that's why she is up to date she seems to be settling down a bit here comes the Drake I've stepped back out of the way Drake's coming in a la she's now gone and started eating some lettuce that I put down she's in there eating I'm I can't have a look at her nest okay so it's one two three four yeah it is there is a nice little nest made up twigs and sticks she's done well they're all off down to the dam there but I still reckon it's gonna be amazing if she actually produces any ducklings at all out of that nest we'll see have a look at this man go be haami isn't it fantastic when I do my pruning that I was talking about the beginning of the video I probably won't hit any of these smaller mango trees but I am going to really smash the larger mango tree and cut it right back that's a bone over there this one here I think this wasn't a qualm or maybe a Glen but I'm not too sure it have to have a look at my notes but it is in beautiful flower I think it's the best I've seen the mangos flower for many years here so hopefully we will get a good harvest this summer anyway that's the end of this update video will show you what's going on video and show you what's coming up in the future video I hope you enjoyed it don't forget to give a thumbs up if you did because I can do more of these type of update videos that are bitten more adlib rather than the structured ones which I am going to bring a more scripted video this weekend as well so that's maybe tomorrow or the next day you'll see another one from me how cool is that don't forget to share it as well visit the website self-sufficient me calm I just wrote an article about a courage lifestyle and living you might be interested in reading that and subscribe if you haven't already thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


 
 
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subtitle:

today I'm not from self-sufficiently and it's a beautiful sunny day here for our first week of spring and there's a lot going on it's really windy today so I'll try my best to struggle and cope with that wind so that it doesn't disrupt the video too much but there's several things that I wanted to show you and I meant to show you this midweek around about Wednesday and I'd get a lot of shooting and a lot of govern off the problem was I didn't I didn't tend to like on so I had no microphone then when I went and played it back you know all excited on how I was going to edit this video out there was no it was no sound so that was a bit of a bummer but here I am I'm not going to give up I'm still gonna put out a video this weekend but my midweek video is gonna be the end of the week but like I said there's lots of want to show you so let's get into it okay the first thing I wanted to show you guys is see how I'm standing underneath this grapevine it's still in its dormant stage this is the one that I did a video on a few years ago on how to prune and grow a grape vine off your house and it's going great guns but pruning speaking of needs to be done all over the place here at the moment and I really should have got my pruning done through winter before spring had sprung Bernie way this is got to be pruned back and all my fruit trees have to be pruned back as well these things I'm going to mention in this video are things that you're going to see in videos coming up and then you'll be able to later go oh yeah yeah I remember that video mark done of all those several madness things that were going on in his yard at the time so that was how that turned out etc etc those so that's the aim of this video is to give you an update and and also really just show you what's going on at the moment because it is a busy time the start of spring even in the subtropical climate remember we're coming out of winter which is a growing time for us particularly with all those salad crops we grow all year it's just that it's different crops that we grow I'm just gonna grab the camera and we'll go around and have a look yeah that toilet kangaroo thing has been getting a beating going around around on top of our clothesline here boy that must be 20 20 years old or something I was here way before we got here anyway citrus starts at this part of the orchard and goes all the way back all these trees will need to be pruned even though they're staying to flower I've got to prune them but are they're just beautiful the lime tree which you've seen my lime video where you may have flowering again and small fruit it's always in fruit the Meyer lemon I love the Meyer lemon flowers they're different got that purple to them purple tinge look at the bees just love them a Valencia orange which is our last orange tree that we use we leave the fruit on the Valencia I've mentioned this many times but just look how many flowers are on it it is just pumping pumping with flowers we've got a few pests turning up if you follow my videos you know that I don't get to wrap around the axles when it comes to pest management you see a few aphids on the tree I monitor it i watch and see how many predator insects there are around because that's important things like the lady birds and the hover flies if there's a lot of them around how generally we'll just wait and I won't you know break out the organic pesticide organic sprays so I'll monitor this tree I see that it's got some clusters of aphids and that on it and if it gets too overwhelming then I might actually spray it but I'll spray it probably right at the end of the day when I know there's no bees around or maybe even after it's finished flowering you know I want to keep the predator insects and the pollinating insects in mind whenever I do any type of spraying even if it's organic these larger trees I can take a little bit of pest infestation and on the younger trees if you've got all the new spring growth that's getting eaten by bugs well then yeah it's probably a good idea to hit it straight away so that that young tree isn't challenged when it's just trying to grow and become you know a good stable tree otherwise nine times out of 10 it fixes itself up okay let's not go off too much more about citrus we've got plenty that's going I can see that our mandarine is is flowering which is a good sign last year we've got no fruit out of it because it's a biannual fruit oh so it looks like we're going to get a good harvest out of that this season we normally do in the second year Washington Orange behind that and several others but anyway let's move on to the asparagus how cool is this or the asparagus coming up I just love this time of year at the start of spring asparagus it never fails within that first week boom it just starts shooting up this one was a little early because we've had some hot days through winter so there was a few sprigs of asparagus that were coming through earlier than I expected while it prompted me into getting this bed prepared and knocking down all the old-growth remoulding and getting stuck into it before all these started coming through just wonderful I love eating asparagus fresh even raw there's nothing better than fresh asparagus on the table and being spring means Tomatoes look at how green and fresh these Tomatoes look this whole bet is cherry tomatoes the reason why I'm concentrating on them now is because it is coming into spring summer and it's fruit fly season and the fruit flies then target all large tomato so even though you can grow them here and I've got a couple on the guide to be honest I have to watch them because otherwise the fruit flower get them and some of the larger varieties if they're growing well into you know mid spring I'm gonna have to start netting them otherwise we'll lose every one of them whereas the cherry tomatoes even the pears and the the ones in our plum size they don't get hit at all in this bed here I grew tomatoes all winter and they're they've just about had it now and they're dying off because they've had their season I've still got a couple of larger ones like these black Russians or black cream but those little spots on there worry me because that looks like a fruit fly sting sometimes they don't the maggot doesn't grow inside but when it does it ruins the whole fruit it's not that easy ground tomato through winter here you have to look after them to make sure they're in a good warm spot as long as you start them when it's still warm and let them grow into the color putana of the year you can do it in the subtropics no worries but yeah the best time of year is coming into spring now and they should give us some really great Tomatoes all through mid spring and into summer when then it'll get too hot in the tomatoes to die back again so essentially it's sort of two times a year where I get the tomatoes up to speed and it's similar with the eggplant normally I start my eggplants off light winter so that they're getting a good start and then they grow into spring and into summer and they do really well but these ones self seeded several of them that I've got in the garden at the moment and they grew all through winter and gave us eggplants in winter and now they're picking up again getting their second wind so I don't think I need even need to grow or plant any new eggplants for this season I'm really impressed and I'm definitely going to keep the seed out of these guys and say them again because it seems like they're gonna get eggplant all year round we've got a couple more over here as well so when you when you get a variety in your garden that sort of just pops up and does well at an unusual time of the year well then save that seed because it's adapting to your garden and those are the type of plants that you want so now moving on to the cucumbers and the beans that I wanted to talk about the beans over here but there's a similar type of concept here's the cucumbers now these ki-- comes you'll notice there's no trellis that's because they're Bush cucumbers I'll only get a couple of feet high and the intent is see this round bed the intent is for the plants to grow up and then eventually on their own weight they're going to flop down and they're going to hang to about half of three cords of the way down that bed so you're going to get a cascading effect of Bush cucumbers and I think that is going to be really cool it's going to be less maintenance and I'm thinking it's going to be a great growing method to show you guys hopefully it works in the center there I'm going to plant some maybe some chilies or capsicums or you know sweet peppers but we'll see but I haven't decided exactly what I'm going to put in the bed there yet but I reckon it's going to work a treat maximize the growing space because you've got plants cascading down able to plant more other plants in the center there and plus you're limiting your gardening workload because you don't have to constantly tie them up or trellis them up I think it's going to work well and they've got the same concept going over here with these beans these are dwarf beans they're not growing up beans like these were and they needed to beat relased these are all purple beans I'll keep the seeds for that and grown again soon but here these are Dwarfs and you can see they're getting to a fair size I'll get a little bigger than that and then I'm just going to train them to flop over they'll get probably two-foot high they'll flop over they'll get the ends about there and I'll be able to plant other things around the inside here like I've already got some coriander some other herbs that's the flat leaf coriander and I've got a tomato in the middle here the last thing I wanted to show you or talk about is the zucchinis here you can see that they grew all through winter if you watch my videos you'd know that I did a video on pickling zucchinis got a few still left so it's it's chugging along but it is getting towards the end of life these plants here but what I wanted to say was I tasted some of that lacto-fermented zucchinis that I showed you in the video and I tell you what they came up a treat they were absolutely beautiful lessons learnt on the larger ones I wouldn't keep the seeds and the center because they went a little mushy but not not out of hand mushy but I'd say a better way to pickle them would be in strips or take out the seeds in the middle and cut them in halves and half slices without the seeds and they'd probably pickle more crunch here and better than that way but apart from that they are going to be great those pickled zucchinis and curry dishes just as a side or mixed in with your favorite dip you know may be mixed with some soft cheese and turn it into a beautiful lacto zucchini dip which we like to do with all sorts of lacto fermented foods and the last thing I wanted to show you guys was down the back here we've got a duck that's sitting on her eggs anyway I took some footage of that so let's have a look at that now that she is sitting on two sets of eggs the one over here and one inside the chicken coop I accidentally walked in on her that's why she is up to date she seems to be settling down a bit here comes the Drake I've stepped back out of the way Drake's coming in a la she's now gone and started eating some lettuce that I put down she's in there eating I'm I can't have a look at her nest okay so it's one two three four yeah it is there is a nice little nest made up twigs and sticks she's done well they're all off down to the dam there but I still reckon it's gonna be amazing if she actually produces any ducklings at all out of that nest we'll see have a look at this man go be haami isn't it fantastic when I do my pruning that I was talking about the beginning of the video I probably won't hit any of these smaller mango trees but I am going to really smash the larger mango tree and cut it right back that's a bone over there this one here I think this wasn't a qualm or maybe a Glen but I'm not too sure it have to have a look at my notes but it is in beautiful flower I think it's the best I've seen the mangos flower for many years here so hopefully we will get a good harvest this summer anyway that's the end of this update video will show you what's going on video and show you what's coming up in the future video I hope you enjoyed it don't forget to give a thumbs up if you did because I can do more of these type of update videos that are bitten more adlib rather than the structured ones which I am going to bring a more scripted video this weekend as well so that's maybe tomorrow or the next day you'll see another one from me how cool is that don't forget to share it as well visit the website self-sufficient me calm I just wrote an article about a courage lifestyle and living you might be interested in reading that and subscribe if you haven't already thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]