336
Views

Four groups of hazards that MIGHT make you ill

winlaw posted the article • 0 comments • 336 views • 2016-10-24 12:02 • came from similar tags

The first group is the chemical hazards You could be poisoned by a pesticide if this is present on your apple or by a natural toxin, patulin, that fungi can produce on these fruits.
And if you use this apple in a cake and overheat it, cancer inducing chemicals may be formed.
And what about the artificial colour on top of the cake. Couldn’t such colour be poisonous as well?
These poisons are all CHEMICAL hazards and can be either man-made or naturally produced.
And they can be added to food on purpose or have accidently contaminated your food.
Chemical hazards are dealt with in weeks 4 and 5.
The second group are the biological hazards.
These hazards are living creatures that can harm the consumer who eats them or their toxic products.
Biological hazards include bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites.
BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS are dealt with in weeks 3 and 6.
But there is more than chemical hazards and bugs: Quite a few problems in foods are caused by physical hazards.
Those are objects in foods that can harm the consumer.
Examples are glass splinters and metals particles, such as screws or needles.
Those hazards are sometimes referred to as ‘foreign objects’ but that does not mean that they come from abroad.
Fish bones and splinters of a wooden candy stick may also become a hazard.
And candies of 3 or 4 cm diameters may become a choking hazard for kids and sticky rice balls have become fatal for kids and adults alike.
A special group of hazards is those that are hazardous only to a specific group of consumers: ALLERGENS cause an adverse reaction in people who are sensitive to that specific allergen.
The effects range from relatively mild to very severe and fatal.
Most allergens are proteins. Milk, eggs, seafood, nuts, but also fruits and cereals are known to cause allergic reactions in parts of the population.
If you are not allergic those foods are just fine, but for allergic consumers it is vital that they know when the allergen is in there so it can be avoided.
In this MOOC we will focus on the chemical and biological hazards. view all
The first group is the chemical hazards You could be poisoned by a pesticide if this is present on your apple or by a natural toxin, patulin, that fungi can produce on these fruits.
And if you use this apple in a cake and overheat it, cancer inducing chemicals may be formed.
And what about the artificial colour on top of the cake. Couldn’t such colour be poisonous as well?
These poisons are all CHEMICAL hazards and can be either man-made or naturally produced.
And they can be added to food on purpose or have accidently contaminated your food.
Chemical hazards are dealt with in weeks 4 and 5.
The second group are the biological hazards.
These hazards are living creatures that can harm the consumer who eats them or their toxic products.
Biological hazards include bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites.
BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS are dealt with in weeks 3 and 6.
But there is more than chemical hazards and bugs: Quite a few problems in foods are caused by physical hazards.
Those are objects in foods that can harm the consumer.
Examples are glass splinters and metals particles, such as screws or needles.
Those hazards are sometimes referred to as ‘foreign objects’ but that does not mean that they come from abroad.
Fish bones and splinters of a wooden candy stick may also become a hazard.
And candies of 3 or 4 cm diameters may become a choking hazard for kids and sticky rice balls have become fatal for kids and adults alike.
A special group of hazards is those that are hazardous only to a specific group of consumers: ALLERGENS cause an adverse reaction in people who are sensitive to that specific allergen.
The effects range from relatively mild to very severe and fatal.
Most allergens are proteins. Milk, eggs, seafood, nuts, but also fruits and cereals are known to cause allergic reactions in parts of the population.
If you are not allergic those foods are just fine, but for allergic consumers it is vital that they know when the allergen is in there so it can be avoided.
In this MOOC we will focus on the chemical and biological hazards.