130
Views

5 Tips How to Grow a Ton of Limes on One Tree

Self Sufficient Me posted the article • 1 comments • 130 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

okay am i from self-sufficiently and yes I'm back with another how to grow a ton of video this time I want to give you guys my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of limes okay let me just put this down before I get a hernia and the basket breaks this Tahitian lime tree here is over a decade old and it's at least 6 meters tall which is probably the maximum of height a tree like this would get and apart from the first couple of years it has produced literally thousands of fruit and what's more even though the main fruiting season is now in our subtropical winter this tree produces fruit all year all year round we never have a time when we don't have a line so how does this lime tree do it well let's just get into it tip number one position where you position your lime tree is extremely important lime trees are a warm climate plant but yes you can grow them anywhere in the world as long as you keep their growing heritage in mind when you position the tree here I'm growing our lime tree in a subtropical climate so I don't really have to worry too much about positioning it against a warm wall or protected by a hedging plant or something like that from cold harsh winds but if you are growing in a cooler climate you want to think about planting it in the warmest place that you have in your garden simply put plenty of Sun is the key also with respect to positioning here is soil our tree is positioned on the high ground rather than down the lower end of our property the lower end of our property gets plenty of Sun but the soil is boggy and gets waterlogged the last thing you want is for a beautiful tree like this to be positioned where it's going to get wet feet for prolonged periods of time that will starve the tree of oxygen it won't get the nutrients it needs and you'll soon see the leaves falling off the leaves going yellow and that's a terrible sign if you want to grow a lot of limes so let's give a couple of examples say if your soil is really heavy and you haven't got hardly any topsoil at all what you could do is bring in some soil bringing plenty of organic matter and compost and make a little bit of a rise above the clay above the heavy soil you know a foot or two make a mound and then you can plant your tree into that and then over time you can improve that soil even further as the tree gets bigger the other extreme would be trying to plant a lime tree in really sandy soil where the nutrients and the water just drains straight through well in that case you want to bring in some soil compost heaps of organic matter and dig that in probably at least a meter around and about a foot deep you want to improve that hole and make sure that that sandy and light soil is more dense and able to hold water better and hold nutrients better and then over time again you keep adding to that post planting Giver that's all well and good mark but I don't have a space for a big tree like this how about pots that's no worries you can plant a lime tree easily in a nice large pot you'll want at least a forty liter size pot so you know a good probably foot diameter across the top and possibly a foot or two high so you want quite a large pot if you want to get a good productive lime tree that is fill it with really good potting mix give it plenty of water put it in a beautiful sheltered and sunny position and it should grow really well for you tip number two water now I've already touched on water in tip number one but I think it's worthy of its own tip because appropriate water at the best time is one of the keys to growing a lot of produce nature has inbuilt clever ways to ensure the best chance of survival and lime trees are no exception to anything else if your lime tree doesn't get enough water during say flowering and the initial fruit set phase it will think that it's in a drought period and it's survival mode will be not to produce as much fruit because it will think that it will use all its resources and it could jeopardize the actual tree itself which it obviously doesn't want to do doesn't want to kill itself so what it'll do is detect it's not getting off water and it'll shed fruit or you'll get fruit drop so with that and also keeping in mind what I said about water logging when the tree is flowering and when it's just setting its fruit and you can see with a little lime setting that is the time when you want to make sure it's getting enough water so give it plenty of water over that period especially if it's not getting much natural rainfall the other time water is critical is just at the end of fruiting when the fruit is starting to ripen and they're going from a dark green to a lighter green and they're starting to plump up that's when you also want to ensure it's getting enough water because it's at that time where the roots will draw the extra moisture and it'll pump up those limes if it gets a particularly dry spell during the final stages of fruit production well then you're going to get dry limes and that is pretty awful you want a nice big plump fruit tip number three pests or pest management keep test management to a bare minimum now I know that seems counterintuitive and I have my own story with this tree we nearly lost it about two years ago it got a citrus borer it bought into one of the main stems of the tree and my other main branches and to get rid of it I have to do some severe pruning nevertheless you can see the tree recovered fantastic I caught it in time and I managed it organically so yeah there's extreme cases where you really need to take extreme action but I didn't use any harsh pesticides and there's good reasons for going easy and making sure you don't use any harsh pesticides yes there's occasions when the tree might get some scale for example or a few aphids and they might be taking over some of the young growth and to combat that I might make up a remedy something like you know it's plenty of organic grant remedies that you can buy on the market or that you can make up yourself for example a quick and easy one that comes to mind is making a piss oil spray sprayed on the aphids and the scale and it'll smother them and the leaf miner for example you know that's the way to go but harsh pesticides nagawa things like citrus bugs I'll pick them off by hand and then just squash him underfoot gall wasp that's another nasty sort of pest but at the end of the day it just looks awful and it doesn't really impede the tree too much unless you get a huge outbreak but I managed that by pruning I don't put a big pesticide into the tree or on the tree the bottom line is your garden needs some tests so they can seed the good guys needs to feed the birds the predator insects and all those good bugs so if you want to create a great ecosystem in your garden where you don't have to spend a lot of money on pesticides and it's better organically and it's better for your health and it's better for everything and well then leave a few pests on the trees and don't get too worried about how the tree looks but really how it produces that's the main thing tip number four trace elements ensure the tree is getting enough vitamins and men I decided to make trace elements one of the top tips because it's often overlooked by backyard gardeners and it's almost always one of the reasons why their tree isn't growing as well as it should and not producing a lot of fruit when people add fertilizer to their tree they often forget that the tree also needs other things that that fertilizer often doesn't contain trace elements think of it as like humans we need certain vitamins and minerals you know vitamin C vitamin D from the Sun we need those things for our bodies to function properly and if we don't get them we get sick well it's the same with trees you don't need a lot they don't need a lot just enough so that they can absorb other important nutrients etc and just fit in and keep the building blocks of the tree good and healthy citrus trees are particularly vulnerable to lacking trace elements because they originated from areas with specific minerals and also soil where other areas around the world may not have you know naturally occurring therefore if a lime tree can't get those micro nutrients from the soil it will suffer and in some cases even die often citrus fertilizers have trace elements in them but many organic fertilizers may not so it's a good idea to give the tree a separate dose of general trace elements you know about once a year or if the tree is showing signs of stress such as yellowing or veiny leaves so you can buy trace elements from the store or online in a powdered or a liquid form the other thing that's worth noting is you know those seaweed applications like seaweed concentrate and how they say that's really good tonic for your plant in general well seaweed also contains lots of trace elements and if you're feeding your tree a good dose of seaweed concentrate you know mixed in a cane and etc as a foliage spray or around the base of the tree or the drip line well it may be getting enough trace elements just from that alone regardless the best way to see if your tree is needing any of these trace elements is just by observation look at the tree if it's looking sick if the foliage is sparse if there's a lot of veiny leaves or yellow leaves and perhaps it needs a good dose of trace elements a bit of a kick for a tree multi-vitamin tip number five what a nice spot to finish off my five top tips for how to grow a ton of limes we need to multiply crazy and fertilize to replenish those lost nutrients and food that the tree needs to grow a lot of fruit nothing is for free and in order for my tree to produce so much fruit like it does it needs to get an appropriate amount of food it doesn't need a lot some people have the misconception that you need to really fertilize heaps to get more fruit it doesn't work like that at all the tree just has to feel comfortable just has to have enough food and enough water it doesn't it doesn't mean the more you put in the more you're going to get out that's a myth energy from the Sun is free most of the water this tree gets now because it's mature is through rainfall but I do need to give it food and I do this wire mulch and fertilizer and I've grouped these two together because often my mulch is fertilizer or it contains fertilizer but let's just talk about multi washing is extremely important especially when the fruit tree is first planted and it's young because if you get the tree off to a good start it will often grow into a strong tree requiring then less attention and less nurturing later motioning itself is when you place organic materials around the tree to suppress weeds and grasses and you protect the surface feeder roots from the elements such as the hot Sun cold nights and retain soil moisture by slowing down evaporation and the act of the moles breaking down releases nutrients into the soil and that's where the feeder roots in particular can take up those nutrients and nourish the tree furthermore when you mulch and fertilize together and have plenty of mulch around that tree it prevents that fertilizer from being washed away if you just had the fertilizer on top of the soil and a bare patch you can imagine a big rainstorm would wash that fertilizer down the hill but the most traps again so it saves money and time and effort as well so you can see how important mulching and fertilizer are together if your tree isn't getting enough food it's not going to be able to output enough to produce a lot of fruit but mulching and fertilizer fixes that as far as the type of mulch goes you can use your imagination really you can use things such as dry grass clippings straw leaves a mixture of small debris like twigs wood chips even a mixture of molten compost can be very helpful if you're feeling like your tree needs a bit of an added boost or that soil needs some more onto it and more structure you can mix in a whole bunch of compost in with your mulch and that'll just feed itself into the soil one of my favorite moles fertilizer mixes is what I get from down at our poultry pen usually it's the chicken and duck manure out of the chicken coop this is a really highly nutritious mix of goodness containing manure doubling as the fertilizer and the old straw and mulch doubling as a mulch around the tree if you can't get enough fertilizer from your own animals I'd recommend getting an organic kite fertilizer and fertilize in spring or at the start of the growing season that's the best and I generally only fertilize once a year usually when that growing season is beginning although my tree sort of fruits and flowers all year round and if I'm going to most like this take the chicken and manure or quail manure or whatever and place it around the tree I don't do that every year sometimes it might be once every two years that I'll really mulch up a tree like this don't forget small animals as well guinea pigs and rabbits you can use their motion litter and their poop in and around the tree it's all good fertilizer and it's all perfect for getting a lot of fruit so there you have it those were my five top tips on how to grow a ton of limes remember position water pests trace elements and mulching including fertilizer do those five things right and you'll grow a ton of limes just like me don't forget to give this video a big thumbs up also share it around that helps a lot visit the website self-sufficient me calm and subscribe if you haven't already finally what's your favorite way of using limes I can tell you why I could use a bit of help in finding some good novel ways of using up all these lives so whack them down in the comment section below and I'll be interested to read them all thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


  view all
 


 
subtitle:

okay am i from self-sufficiently and yes I'm back with another how to grow a ton of video this time I want to give you guys my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of limes okay let me just put this down before I get a hernia and the basket breaks this Tahitian lime tree here is over a decade old and it's at least 6 meters tall which is probably the maximum of height a tree like this would get and apart from the first couple of years it has produced literally thousands of fruit and what's more even though the main fruiting season is now in our subtropical winter this tree produces fruit all year all year round we never have a time when we don't have a line so how does this lime tree do it well let's just get into it tip number one position where you position your lime tree is extremely important lime trees are a warm climate plant but yes you can grow them anywhere in the world as long as you keep their growing heritage in mind when you position the tree here I'm growing our lime tree in a subtropical climate so I don't really have to worry too much about positioning it against a warm wall or protected by a hedging plant or something like that from cold harsh winds but if you are growing in a cooler climate you want to think about planting it in the warmest place that you have in your garden simply put plenty of Sun is the key also with respect to positioning here is soil our tree is positioned on the high ground rather than down the lower end of our property the lower end of our property gets plenty of Sun but the soil is boggy and gets waterlogged the last thing you want is for a beautiful tree like this to be positioned where it's going to get wet feet for prolonged periods of time that will starve the tree of oxygen it won't get the nutrients it needs and you'll soon see the leaves falling off the leaves going yellow and that's a terrible sign if you want to grow a lot of limes so let's give a couple of examples say if your soil is really heavy and you haven't got hardly any topsoil at all what you could do is bring in some soil bringing plenty of organic matter and compost and make a little bit of a rise above the clay above the heavy soil you know a foot or two make a mound and then you can plant your tree into that and then over time you can improve that soil even further as the tree gets bigger the other extreme would be trying to plant a lime tree in really sandy soil where the nutrients and the water just drains straight through well in that case you want to bring in some soil compost heaps of organic matter and dig that in probably at least a meter around and about a foot deep you want to improve that hole and make sure that that sandy and light soil is more dense and able to hold water better and hold nutrients better and then over time again you keep adding to that post planting Giver that's all well and good mark but I don't have a space for a big tree like this how about pots that's no worries you can plant a lime tree easily in a nice large pot you'll want at least a forty liter size pot so you know a good probably foot diameter across the top and possibly a foot or two high so you want quite a large pot if you want to get a good productive lime tree that is fill it with really good potting mix give it plenty of water put it in a beautiful sheltered and sunny position and it should grow really well for you tip number two water now I've already touched on water in tip number one but I think it's worthy of its own tip because appropriate water at the best time is one of the keys to growing a lot of produce nature has inbuilt clever ways to ensure the best chance of survival and lime trees are no exception to anything else if your lime tree doesn't get enough water during say flowering and the initial fruit set phase it will think that it's in a drought period and it's survival mode will be not to produce as much fruit because it will think that it will use all its resources and it could jeopardize the actual tree itself which it obviously doesn't want to do doesn't want to kill itself so what it'll do is detect it's not getting off water and it'll shed fruit or you'll get fruit drop so with that and also keeping in mind what I said about water logging when the tree is flowering and when it's just setting its fruit and you can see with a little lime setting that is the time when you want to make sure it's getting enough water so give it plenty of water over that period especially if it's not getting much natural rainfall the other time water is critical is just at the end of fruiting when the fruit is starting to ripen and they're going from a dark green to a lighter green and they're starting to plump up that's when you also want to ensure it's getting enough water because it's at that time where the roots will draw the extra moisture and it'll pump up those limes if it gets a particularly dry spell during the final stages of fruit production well then you're going to get dry limes and that is pretty awful you want a nice big plump fruit tip number three pests or pest management keep test management to a bare minimum now I know that seems counterintuitive and I have my own story with this tree we nearly lost it about two years ago it got a citrus borer it bought into one of the main stems of the tree and my other main branches and to get rid of it I have to do some severe pruning nevertheless you can see the tree recovered fantastic I caught it in time and I managed it organically so yeah there's extreme cases where you really need to take extreme action but I didn't use any harsh pesticides and there's good reasons for going easy and making sure you don't use any harsh pesticides yes there's occasions when the tree might get some scale for example or a few aphids and they might be taking over some of the young growth and to combat that I might make up a remedy something like you know it's plenty of organic grant remedies that you can buy on the market or that you can make up yourself for example a quick and easy one that comes to mind is making a piss oil spray sprayed on the aphids and the scale and it'll smother them and the leaf miner for example you know that's the way to go but harsh pesticides nagawa things like citrus bugs I'll pick them off by hand and then just squash him underfoot gall wasp that's another nasty sort of pest but at the end of the day it just looks awful and it doesn't really impede the tree too much unless you get a huge outbreak but I managed that by pruning I don't put a big pesticide into the tree or on the tree the bottom line is your garden needs some tests so they can seed the good guys needs to feed the birds the predator insects and all those good bugs so if you want to create a great ecosystem in your garden where you don't have to spend a lot of money on pesticides and it's better organically and it's better for your health and it's better for everything and well then leave a few pests on the trees and don't get too worried about how the tree looks but really how it produces that's the main thing tip number four trace elements ensure the tree is getting enough vitamins and men I decided to make trace elements one of the top tips because it's often overlooked by backyard gardeners and it's almost always one of the reasons why their tree isn't growing as well as it should and not producing a lot of fruit when people add fertilizer to their tree they often forget that the tree also needs other things that that fertilizer often doesn't contain trace elements think of it as like humans we need certain vitamins and minerals you know vitamin C vitamin D from the Sun we need those things for our bodies to function properly and if we don't get them we get sick well it's the same with trees you don't need a lot they don't need a lot just enough so that they can absorb other important nutrients etc and just fit in and keep the building blocks of the tree good and healthy citrus trees are particularly vulnerable to lacking trace elements because they originated from areas with specific minerals and also soil where other areas around the world may not have you know naturally occurring therefore if a lime tree can't get those micro nutrients from the soil it will suffer and in some cases even die often citrus fertilizers have trace elements in them but many organic fertilizers may not so it's a good idea to give the tree a separate dose of general trace elements you know about once a year or if the tree is showing signs of stress such as yellowing or veiny leaves so you can buy trace elements from the store or online in a powdered or a liquid form the other thing that's worth noting is you know those seaweed applications like seaweed concentrate and how they say that's really good tonic for your plant in general well seaweed also contains lots of trace elements and if you're feeding your tree a good dose of seaweed concentrate you know mixed in a cane and etc as a foliage spray or around the base of the tree or the drip line well it may be getting enough trace elements just from that alone regardless the best way to see if your tree is needing any of these trace elements is just by observation look at the tree if it's looking sick if the foliage is sparse if there's a lot of veiny leaves or yellow leaves and perhaps it needs a good dose of trace elements a bit of a kick for a tree multi-vitamin tip number five what a nice spot to finish off my five top tips for how to grow a ton of limes we need to multiply crazy and fertilize to replenish those lost nutrients and food that the tree needs to grow a lot of fruit nothing is for free and in order for my tree to produce so much fruit like it does it needs to get an appropriate amount of food it doesn't need a lot some people have the misconception that you need to really fertilize heaps to get more fruit it doesn't work like that at all the tree just has to feel comfortable just has to have enough food and enough water it doesn't it doesn't mean the more you put in the more you're going to get out that's a myth energy from the Sun is free most of the water this tree gets now because it's mature is through rainfall but I do need to give it food and I do this wire mulch and fertilizer and I've grouped these two together because often my mulch is fertilizer or it contains fertilizer but let's just talk about multi washing is extremely important especially when the fruit tree is first planted and it's young because if you get the tree off to a good start it will often grow into a strong tree requiring then less attention and less nurturing later motioning itself is when you place organic materials around the tree to suppress weeds and grasses and you protect the surface feeder roots from the elements such as the hot Sun cold nights and retain soil moisture by slowing down evaporation and the act of the moles breaking down releases nutrients into the soil and that's where the feeder roots in particular can take up those nutrients and nourish the tree furthermore when you mulch and fertilize together and have plenty of mulch around that tree it prevents that fertilizer from being washed away if you just had the fertilizer on top of the soil and a bare patch you can imagine a big rainstorm would wash that fertilizer down the hill but the most traps again so it saves money and time and effort as well so you can see how important mulching and fertilizer are together if your tree isn't getting enough food it's not going to be able to output enough to produce a lot of fruit but mulching and fertilizer fixes that as far as the type of mulch goes you can use your imagination really you can use things such as dry grass clippings straw leaves a mixture of small debris like twigs wood chips even a mixture of molten compost can be very helpful if you're feeling like your tree needs a bit of an added boost or that soil needs some more onto it and more structure you can mix in a whole bunch of compost in with your mulch and that'll just feed itself into the soil one of my favorite moles fertilizer mixes is what I get from down at our poultry pen usually it's the chicken and duck manure out of the chicken coop this is a really highly nutritious mix of goodness containing manure doubling as the fertilizer and the old straw and mulch doubling as a mulch around the tree if you can't get enough fertilizer from your own animals I'd recommend getting an organic kite fertilizer and fertilize in spring or at the start of the growing season that's the best and I generally only fertilize once a year usually when that growing season is beginning although my tree sort of fruits and flowers all year round and if I'm going to most like this take the chicken and manure or quail manure or whatever and place it around the tree I don't do that every year sometimes it might be once every two years that I'll really mulch up a tree like this don't forget small animals as well guinea pigs and rabbits you can use their motion litter and their poop in and around the tree it's all good fertilizer and it's all perfect for getting a lot of fruit so there you have it those were my five top tips on how to grow a ton of limes remember position water pests trace elements and mulching including fertilizer do those five things right and you'll grow a ton of limes just like me don't forget to give this video a big thumbs up also share it around that helps a lot visit the website self-sufficient me calm and subscribe if you haven't already finally what's your favorite way of using limes I can tell you why I could use a bit of help in finding some good novel ways of using up all these lives so whack them down in the comment section below and I'll be interested to read them all thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


 
133
Views

how to grow a lot of dragon fruit (pitaya) in just one container.

Self Sufficient Me posted the article • 0 comments • 133 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
subtile:
get a I might from self-sufficiently and in this video I'm going to give you my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of dragon fruit all in just one container using the hanging down method that's right in this video I'm going to show you how you don't have to tie the dragon fruit up you don't have to build a trellis you don't have to do any of all that mucking around just sit it up like this and let it hang down like giant octopus arms and you won't believe how easy it is so let's get into it [Music] but before we get into the tips let's chat a little more about this exotic fruit and how it will set you back between three to five dollars in the supermarket dragon fruit is said to be extraordinarily high in antioxidants that prohibit the oxidization of other molecules that can cause cancer also the fruit contains photo nutrients plus omega 3 and 6 fatty acids that help keep the heart healthy best of all the fruit tastes great and how awesome does it look mmm now let's get into the tips tip number one plant selection the most common question I get from people wanting to grow dragon fruit or growing dragon fruit is why isn't my plant producing well there there's a lot of reasons for this but the main reason is simply the type of plant that they're growing by a cutting rather than a seedling because cuttings grow faster and they fruit faster than seedling plants do buy a plant that is a recognized good producer ask the seller does this variety of dragon fruit flower and set fruit easily does it need to be hand pollinated and if so that's okay but just realize hand pollinating dragon fruit flowers can be fickle and difficult as timing and technique are critical it's best to grow varieties known for easy fruit set rather than having to hand pollinate now a real bonus tip on pollination this is totally anecdotal but over the years I've realized a direct link between ants and successful fruit set in other words the more ants around the better chances of the flowers getting fertilized so where possible don't discourage ants around or on the plant this plant here has an ant's nest right in the base and you can see them coming in and out tip number two positioning dragon fruit are actually a cactus but it doesn't mean they like growing in the desert or on rocky outcrops they are actually a tropical plant liking the rainforest and plenty of rainfall if you put one of these near a large tree it'll grow right up to the top up to 10 or 20 metres before it starts branching out but having said that dragon fruit is typically farmed in the open but whilst they will grow well in full Sun dragon fruit do like some protection from the harsh afternoon sunlight and they seem to grow better when this is the case although the plant does prefer a tropical climate it can be successfully grown in subtropical and temperate areas to get this cascading effect I put our pot on this tree stump just an old tree stump but you could use a stand or a rock ledge rock face or whatever to get that height and then you let it grow down and this does two things it makes it easy to harvest and it also enables you to just let it grow its own way without having to do too much maintenance to the plant like you would if you were growing it on a trellis for example tip number three container dragon fruit vines love growing in containers but there are a few things you should know first of all size dragon fruit will grow well in the smallest of containers as long as it's given sufficient water however larger pots at least 40 centimetres or a foot across our best and will give the plant sufficient root room for good top growth and better fruit production the growing medium should be really free draining but a good quality potting mix remember it is a cactus so you don't want the thing getting too wet or wet feet otherwise the base of the plant will rot so free draining is the key but then it does want a lot of water as far as fertilizer goes I feed this plant about once a year a little bit of blood and bones and pelletized chicken manure and that's all that's really needed water it in well and it should be good to go tip number 4 water now we spoke a little bit about water in the last tip and just because it's a cactus and it can handle prolonged periods of no water or drought it doesn't mean it shouldn't be fed a lot of water due to the plant being in a container and because of the free draining growing medium you do need to water often even if the container does have a small self watering reservoir like this one water twice a week in summer and once a week in winter plenty of watering through summer will spur incredible growth spurts in this type of plant and that'll encourage branching flowering and subsequent extra fruiting tip number five pruning dragon fruit plants respond really well to pruning it keeps the plant healthy getting rid of any dead or diseased wood plus it generates more growth and then that'll generate more fruit generally prune the plant after fruiting so you're not accidentally removing any soon-to-be buds that potentially would be into wonderful flowers and then subsequent fruit shape the plant where possible to make an even spread around the container by removing crossing over branches and dead or diseased growth and giving a bit of room between each branch will help with airflow and limit disease dragon fruit vines grow fast so don't worry if you make a mistake or prune over it it won't take long to grow back and that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of dragon fruit fruit on one vine in just one small container like this remember plant selection position container water and pruning do those five things right and you'll grow a ton of fruit just like I have here if you'd like to know more about dragon fruit growing I've written one of the most read blogs and articles on dragon fruit growing on my website the link is in the description below I encourage you to go there and visit it don't forget if you haven't subscribed to the channel do so if you've got any questions or comments you'd like to make whack them down below give me a big thumbs up thanks a lot for watching bye for now and fertilizer I feed this rock and fertilizer I feed this plant once a year with a little bit of blood and bone and also a bit of chicken manure or purse up there better be neatly and as far as further [Music] view all
 


 
 
subtile:
get a I might from self-sufficiently and in this video I'm going to give you my 5 top tips on how to grow a ton of dragon fruit all in just one container using the hanging down method that's right in this video I'm going to show you how you don't have to tie the dragon fruit up you don't have to build a trellis you don't have to do any of all that mucking around just sit it up like this and let it hang down like giant octopus arms and you won't believe how easy it is so let's get into it [Music] but before we get into the tips let's chat a little more about this exotic fruit and how it will set you back between three to five dollars in the supermarket dragon fruit is said to be extraordinarily high in antioxidants that prohibit the oxidization of other molecules that can cause cancer also the fruit contains photo nutrients plus omega 3 and 6 fatty acids that help keep the heart healthy best of all the fruit tastes great and how awesome does it look mmm now let's get into the tips tip number one plant selection the most common question I get from people wanting to grow dragon fruit or growing dragon fruit is why isn't my plant producing well there there's a lot of reasons for this but the main reason is simply the type of plant that they're growing by a cutting rather than a seedling because cuttings grow faster and they fruit faster than seedling plants do buy a plant that is a recognized good producer ask the seller does this variety of dragon fruit flower and set fruit easily does it need to be hand pollinated and if so that's okay but just realize hand pollinating dragon fruit flowers can be fickle and difficult as timing and technique are critical it's best to grow varieties known for easy fruit set rather than having to hand pollinate now a real bonus tip on pollination this is totally anecdotal but over the years I've realized a direct link between ants and successful fruit set in other words the more ants around the better chances of the flowers getting fertilized so where possible don't discourage ants around or on the plant this plant here has an ant's nest right in the base and you can see them coming in and out tip number two positioning dragon fruit are actually a cactus but it doesn't mean they like growing in the desert or on rocky outcrops they are actually a tropical plant liking the rainforest and plenty of rainfall if you put one of these near a large tree it'll grow right up to the top up to 10 or 20 metres before it starts branching out but having said that dragon fruit is typically farmed in the open but whilst they will grow well in full Sun dragon fruit do like some protection from the harsh afternoon sunlight and they seem to grow better when this is the case although the plant does prefer a tropical climate it can be successfully grown in subtropical and temperate areas to get this cascading effect I put our pot on this tree stump just an old tree stump but you could use a stand or a rock ledge rock face or whatever to get that height and then you let it grow down and this does two things it makes it easy to harvest and it also enables you to just let it grow its own way without having to do too much maintenance to the plant like you would if you were growing it on a trellis for example tip number three container dragon fruit vines love growing in containers but there are a few things you should know first of all size dragon fruit will grow well in the smallest of containers as long as it's given sufficient water however larger pots at least 40 centimetres or a foot across our best and will give the plant sufficient root room for good top growth and better fruit production the growing medium should be really free draining but a good quality potting mix remember it is a cactus so you don't want the thing getting too wet or wet feet otherwise the base of the plant will rot so free draining is the key but then it does want a lot of water as far as fertilizer goes I feed this plant about once a year a little bit of blood and bones and pelletized chicken manure and that's all that's really needed water it in well and it should be good to go tip number 4 water now we spoke a little bit about water in the last tip and just because it's a cactus and it can handle prolonged periods of no water or drought it doesn't mean it shouldn't be fed a lot of water due to the plant being in a container and because of the free draining growing medium you do need to water often even if the container does have a small self watering reservoir like this one water twice a week in summer and once a week in winter plenty of watering through summer will spur incredible growth spurts in this type of plant and that'll encourage branching flowering and subsequent extra fruiting tip number five pruning dragon fruit plants respond really well to pruning it keeps the plant healthy getting rid of any dead or diseased wood plus it generates more growth and then that'll generate more fruit generally prune the plant after fruiting so you're not accidentally removing any soon-to-be buds that potentially would be into wonderful flowers and then subsequent fruit shape the plant where possible to make an even spread around the container by removing crossing over branches and dead or diseased growth and giving a bit of room between each branch will help with airflow and limit disease dragon fruit vines grow fast so don't worry if you make a mistake or prune over it it won't take long to grow back and that's it those are my five top tips on how to grow a ton of dragon fruit fruit on one vine in just one small container like this remember plant selection position container water and pruning do those five things right and you'll grow a ton of fruit just like I have here if you'd like to know more about dragon fruit growing I've written one of the most read blogs and articles on dragon fruit growing on my website the link is in the description below I encourage you to go there and visit it don't forget if you haven't subscribed to the channel do so if you've got any questions or comments you'd like to make whack them down below give me a big thumbs up thanks a lot for watching bye for now and fertilizer I feed this rock and fertilizer I feed this plant once a year with a little bit of blood and bone and also a bit of chicken manure or purse up there better be neatly and as far as further [Music]

105
Views

How to Make Weed Free Pathways Around Vegetable Garden

Self Sufficient Me posted the article • 0 comments • 105 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

get a a mark from self-sufficiently what I'm about to show will absolutely horrify you in this video you're gonna see how patch and it's absolute worst it's almost too embarassing but you'll see the weeds and the grasses through the pathways taking over everything but I'm also gonna show how we fix this issue and by doing so saved us hours each month not needing to weed the pathways around our raised beds so that we could spend more time doing the fun stuff in our vegetable garden you know like planting and harvesting and reaping the rewards of our labor let's get into it [Music] firstly let's go right back to the beginning when I initially built these beds I didn't foresee the access problems that we would encounter the main issue was during wet weather the pathways around our garden would become a muddy boggy mess it wasn't pleasant to visit the garden in severe weather to harvest crops or check the beds and it was even worse trying to work around the patch so after several years of putting up with this bog hole issue I finally decided to act by getting rid of the grass and replacing it with something that would not only provide good drainage withstand heavy rainfall and extended periods of wet weather but also not get washed away I knew wood chip or mulch wouldn't work so I decided on gravel which proved to be a mistake although in the end it became an unintentional master stroke anyway gravel it was to try and limit the grass and weed growth through the gravel I laid down porous biodegradable weed mat first and then sand to further assist drainage and help seat the gravel so it wouldn't move around as much underfoot to hold all this in and prevent wash away I made a rock border to divert or stop water rushing through with the small gaps in the olders allowing water to seep out and not pool after heavy downfalls initially this landscaping design worked great and looked good too in my opinion the gravel pathway has completely solved the boggy problem and for the first 12 months it was practically maintenance-free however our maintenance-free pathways were seen to prove anything but at first there was the odd breakout of weeds popping up through the gravel likely blown in from the surrounding bushland but quickly the outbreaks became widespread like someone deliberately hand-sewed weed and grass seed by the fistful I compounded this issue by laying more gravel because I thought maybe if the rocks were deeper the weeds wouldn't be able to grow up through I was wrong this didn't help at all pretty soon we were spending as much time weeding the pathways as time spent in the actual garden itself I began thinking back to what seemed to be the good old days when the pathways were grasped sure during the wet it got boggy but on the main all I needed to do was occasionally with a snip around the beds and made between the rows on my right on maintenance was a breeze the solution I thought long and hard about how to solve this problem I mean I was starting to hate gardening seriously I knew something had to be done I considered paving but the area is too big and I knew weeds would just grow through between the pavers anyway concreting was out of the question for several reasons not least the cost and then I began to think about grass again and the drainage issue then the obvious hit me I've got drainage late already so if I grass over the top surely this would work I gave it a go I measured up the area and I purchased enough topsoil and turf to fully cover it the grass I used was nullable couch it's one of the cheapest to buy an incredibly Hardy and good underfoot all up we needed a hundred and three squares of grass costing $700 yes you could use the much cheaper seed option but laying turf is much easier and faster I removed the rocks and repurpose them to make another garden bed in our front yard spread the topsoil about two or three inches deep and then laid the grass over the top kept it watered well for the first month and to my relief the grass grew perfectly in the middle here of our raised garden beds I decided to lay down children's playground rubber matting it's made from recycled tires the reason why I didn't grass it was due to the closeness of the beds and the fact that I couldn't get a mower in here to mow the lawn anyway plus to whip a snip around the internals of these beds although it's possible is still too finicky for what I wanted these rubber mats here are pretty expensive at around twenty five to thirty dollars Australian each for a meter by meter square but they're heavy and durable and they make a really excellent outdoor surface I guess that's what I use them in children's playgrounds laying them down was easy and cutting them to fit the odd sizes can be done to the box cutter so is a straightforward process we do still get some weed growth between the cracks but it's not a drama to get rid of them this project was completed in January 2016 and nearly two years later there's no doubt it was a complete success even though it did take a while to get there in the end we couldn't be happier with the results and that's it you know if I had to name just one major achievement in our vegetable garden it would be the free draining anti bog grass pathways and of course the play Jim rubber matting in the center where the mail couldn't go our maintenance time to manage weeds and grasses in and around our raised beds has been cut by around 70 percent and it's no longer an arduous task to be conducted or be dreaded hey we could even go bare feet and feel the grass underneath our naked Tootsie's just like nature intended how cool is that if you've got any questions comments or tips about pathways around your vegetable garden please welcome down below don't forget to visit my blog self-sufficient me.com subscribe to the channel if you haven't already and give a big thumbs up thanks a lot for watching bye for now how good is this [Music] [Music]


 
  view all
 


 
subtitle:

get a a mark from self-sufficiently what I'm about to show will absolutely horrify you in this video you're gonna see how patch and it's absolute worst it's almost too embarassing but you'll see the weeds and the grasses through the pathways taking over everything but I'm also gonna show how we fix this issue and by doing so saved us hours each month not needing to weed the pathways around our raised beds so that we could spend more time doing the fun stuff in our vegetable garden you know like planting and harvesting and reaping the rewards of our labor let's get into it [Music] firstly let's go right back to the beginning when I initially built these beds I didn't foresee the access problems that we would encounter the main issue was during wet weather the pathways around our garden would become a muddy boggy mess it wasn't pleasant to visit the garden in severe weather to harvest crops or check the beds and it was even worse trying to work around the patch so after several years of putting up with this bog hole issue I finally decided to act by getting rid of the grass and replacing it with something that would not only provide good drainage withstand heavy rainfall and extended periods of wet weather but also not get washed away I knew wood chip or mulch wouldn't work so I decided on gravel which proved to be a mistake although in the end it became an unintentional master stroke anyway gravel it was to try and limit the grass and weed growth through the gravel I laid down porous biodegradable weed mat first and then sand to further assist drainage and help seat the gravel so it wouldn't move around as much underfoot to hold all this in and prevent wash away I made a rock border to divert or stop water rushing through with the small gaps in the olders allowing water to seep out and not pool after heavy downfalls initially this landscaping design worked great and looked good too in my opinion the gravel pathway has completely solved the boggy problem and for the first 12 months it was practically maintenance-free however our maintenance-free pathways were seen to prove anything but at first there was the odd breakout of weeds popping up through the gravel likely blown in from the surrounding bushland but quickly the outbreaks became widespread like someone deliberately hand-sewed weed and grass seed by the fistful I compounded this issue by laying more gravel because I thought maybe if the rocks were deeper the weeds wouldn't be able to grow up through I was wrong this didn't help at all pretty soon we were spending as much time weeding the pathways as time spent in the actual garden itself I began thinking back to what seemed to be the good old days when the pathways were grasped sure during the wet it got boggy but on the main all I needed to do was occasionally with a snip around the beds and made between the rows on my right on maintenance was a breeze the solution I thought long and hard about how to solve this problem I mean I was starting to hate gardening seriously I knew something had to be done I considered paving but the area is too big and I knew weeds would just grow through between the pavers anyway concreting was out of the question for several reasons not least the cost and then I began to think about grass again and the drainage issue then the obvious hit me I've got drainage late already so if I grass over the top surely this would work I gave it a go I measured up the area and I purchased enough topsoil and turf to fully cover it the grass I used was nullable couch it's one of the cheapest to buy an incredibly Hardy and good underfoot all up we needed a hundred and three squares of grass costing $700 yes you could use the much cheaper seed option but laying turf is much easier and faster I removed the rocks and repurpose them to make another garden bed in our front yard spread the topsoil about two or three inches deep and then laid the grass over the top kept it watered well for the first month and to my relief the grass grew perfectly in the middle here of our raised garden beds I decided to lay down children's playground rubber matting it's made from recycled tires the reason why I didn't grass it was due to the closeness of the beds and the fact that I couldn't get a mower in here to mow the lawn anyway plus to whip a snip around the internals of these beds although it's possible is still too finicky for what I wanted these rubber mats here are pretty expensive at around twenty five to thirty dollars Australian each for a meter by meter square but they're heavy and durable and they make a really excellent outdoor surface I guess that's what I use them in children's playgrounds laying them down was easy and cutting them to fit the odd sizes can be done to the box cutter so is a straightforward process we do still get some weed growth between the cracks but it's not a drama to get rid of them this project was completed in January 2016 and nearly two years later there's no doubt it was a complete success even though it did take a while to get there in the end we couldn't be happier with the results and that's it you know if I had to name just one major achievement in our vegetable garden it would be the free draining anti bog grass pathways and of course the play Jim rubber matting in the center where the mail couldn't go our maintenance time to manage weeds and grasses in and around our raised beds has been cut by around 70 percent and it's no longer an arduous task to be conducted or be dreaded hey we could even go bare feet and feel the grass underneath our naked Tootsie's just like nature intended how cool is that if you've got any questions comments or tips about pathways around your vegetable garden please welcome down below don't forget to visit my blog self-sufficient me.com subscribe to the channel if you haven't already and give a big thumbs up thanks a lot for watching bye for now how good is this [Music] [Music]


 
 
135
Views

Asparagus Citrus Tomatoes Eggplant Cucumber Beans Pruning Duck

Self Sufficient Me posted the article • 0 comments • 135 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

today I'm not from self-sufficiently and it's a beautiful sunny day here for our first week of spring and there's a lot going on it's really windy today so I'll try my best to struggle and cope with that wind so that it doesn't disrupt the video too much but there's several things that I wanted to show you and I meant to show you this midweek around about Wednesday and I'd get a lot of shooting and a lot of govern off the problem was I didn't I didn't tend to like on so I had no microphone then when I went and played it back you know all excited on how I was going to edit this video out there was no it was no sound so that was a bit of a bummer but here I am I'm not going to give up I'm still gonna put out a video this weekend but my midweek video is gonna be the end of the week but like I said there's lots of want to show you so let's get into it okay the first thing I wanted to show you guys is see how I'm standing underneath this grapevine it's still in its dormant stage this is the one that I did a video on a few years ago on how to prune and grow a grape vine off your house and it's going great guns but pruning speaking of needs to be done all over the place here at the moment and I really should have got my pruning done through winter before spring had sprung Bernie way this is got to be pruned back and all my fruit trees have to be pruned back as well these things I'm going to mention in this video are things that you're going to see in videos coming up and then you'll be able to later go oh yeah yeah I remember that video mark done of all those several madness things that were going on in his yard at the time so that was how that turned out etc etc those so that's the aim of this video is to give you an update and and also really just show you what's going on at the moment because it is a busy time the start of spring even in the subtropical climate remember we're coming out of winter which is a growing time for us particularly with all those salad crops we grow all year it's just that it's different crops that we grow I'm just gonna grab the camera and we'll go around and have a look yeah that toilet kangaroo thing has been getting a beating going around around on top of our clothesline here boy that must be 20 20 years old or something I was here way before we got here anyway citrus starts at this part of the orchard and goes all the way back all these trees will need to be pruned even though they're staying to flower I've got to prune them but are they're just beautiful the lime tree which you've seen my lime video where you may have flowering again and small fruit it's always in fruit the Meyer lemon I love the Meyer lemon flowers they're different got that purple to them purple tinge look at the bees just love them a Valencia orange which is our last orange tree that we use we leave the fruit on the Valencia I've mentioned this many times but just look how many flowers are on it it is just pumping pumping with flowers we've got a few pests turning up if you follow my videos you know that I don't get to wrap around the axles when it comes to pest management you see a few aphids on the tree I monitor it i watch and see how many predator insects there are around because that's important things like the lady birds and the hover flies if there's a lot of them around how generally we'll just wait and I won't you know break out the organic pesticide organic sprays so I'll monitor this tree I see that it's got some clusters of aphids and that on it and if it gets too overwhelming then I might actually spray it but I'll spray it probably right at the end of the day when I know there's no bees around or maybe even after it's finished flowering you know I want to keep the predator insects and the pollinating insects in mind whenever I do any type of spraying even if it's organic these larger trees I can take a little bit of pest infestation and on the younger trees if you've got all the new spring growth that's getting eaten by bugs well then yeah it's probably a good idea to hit it straight away so that that young tree isn't challenged when it's just trying to grow and become you know a good stable tree otherwise nine times out of 10 it fixes itself up okay let's not go off too much more about citrus we've got plenty that's going I can see that our mandarine is is flowering which is a good sign last year we've got no fruit out of it because it's a biannual fruit oh so it looks like we're going to get a good harvest out of that this season we normally do in the second year Washington Orange behind that and several others but anyway let's move on to the asparagus how cool is this or the asparagus coming up I just love this time of year at the start of spring asparagus it never fails within that first week boom it just starts shooting up this one was a little early because we've had some hot days through winter so there was a few sprigs of asparagus that were coming through earlier than I expected while it prompted me into getting this bed prepared and knocking down all the old-growth remoulding and getting stuck into it before all these started coming through just wonderful I love eating asparagus fresh even raw there's nothing better than fresh asparagus on the table and being spring means Tomatoes look at how green and fresh these Tomatoes look this whole bet is cherry tomatoes the reason why I'm concentrating on them now is because it is coming into spring summer and it's fruit fly season and the fruit flies then target all large tomato so even though you can grow them here and I've got a couple on the guide to be honest I have to watch them because otherwise the fruit flower get them and some of the larger varieties if they're growing well into you know mid spring I'm gonna have to start netting them otherwise we'll lose every one of them whereas the cherry tomatoes even the pears and the the ones in our plum size they don't get hit at all in this bed here I grew tomatoes all winter and they're they've just about had it now and they're dying off because they've had their season I've still got a couple of larger ones like these black Russians or black cream but those little spots on there worry me because that looks like a fruit fly sting sometimes they don't the maggot doesn't grow inside but when it does it ruins the whole fruit it's not that easy ground tomato through winter here you have to look after them to make sure they're in a good warm spot as long as you start them when it's still warm and let them grow into the color putana of the year you can do it in the subtropics no worries but yeah the best time of year is coming into spring now and they should give us some really great Tomatoes all through mid spring and into summer when then it'll get too hot in the tomatoes to die back again so essentially it's sort of two times a year where I get the tomatoes up to speed and it's similar with the eggplant normally I start my eggplants off light winter so that they're getting a good start and then they grow into spring and into summer and they do really well but these ones self seeded several of them that I've got in the garden at the moment and they grew all through winter and gave us eggplants in winter and now they're picking up again getting their second wind so I don't think I need even need to grow or plant any new eggplants for this season I'm really impressed and I'm definitely going to keep the seed out of these guys and say them again because it seems like they're gonna get eggplant all year round we've got a couple more over here as well so when you when you get a variety in your garden that sort of just pops up and does well at an unusual time of the year well then save that seed because it's adapting to your garden and those are the type of plants that you want so now moving on to the cucumbers and the beans that I wanted to talk about the beans over here but there's a similar type of concept here's the cucumbers now these ki-- comes you'll notice there's no trellis that's because they're Bush cucumbers I'll only get a couple of feet high and the intent is see this round bed the intent is for the plants to grow up and then eventually on their own weight they're going to flop down and they're going to hang to about half of three cords of the way down that bed so you're going to get a cascading effect of Bush cucumbers and I think that is going to be really cool it's going to be less maintenance and I'm thinking it's going to be a great growing method to show you guys hopefully it works in the center there I'm going to plant some maybe some chilies or capsicums or you know sweet peppers but we'll see but I haven't decided exactly what I'm going to put in the bed there yet but I reckon it's going to work a treat maximize the growing space because you've got plants cascading down able to plant more other plants in the center there and plus you're limiting your gardening workload because you don't have to constantly tie them up or trellis them up I think it's going to work well and they've got the same concept going over here with these beans these are dwarf beans they're not growing up beans like these were and they needed to beat relased these are all purple beans I'll keep the seeds for that and grown again soon but here these are Dwarfs and you can see they're getting to a fair size I'll get a little bigger than that and then I'm just going to train them to flop over they'll get probably two-foot high they'll flop over they'll get the ends about there and I'll be able to plant other things around the inside here like I've already got some coriander some other herbs that's the flat leaf coriander and I've got a tomato in the middle here the last thing I wanted to show you or talk about is the zucchinis here you can see that they grew all through winter if you watch my videos you'd know that I did a video on pickling zucchinis got a few still left so it's it's chugging along but it is getting towards the end of life these plants here but what I wanted to say was I tasted some of that lacto-fermented zucchinis that I showed you in the video and I tell you what they came up a treat they were absolutely beautiful lessons learnt on the larger ones I wouldn't keep the seeds and the center because they went a little mushy but not not out of hand mushy but I'd say a better way to pickle them would be in strips or take out the seeds in the middle and cut them in halves and half slices without the seeds and they'd probably pickle more crunch here and better than that way but apart from that they are going to be great those pickled zucchinis and curry dishes just as a side or mixed in with your favorite dip you know may be mixed with some soft cheese and turn it into a beautiful lacto zucchini dip which we like to do with all sorts of lacto fermented foods and the last thing I wanted to show you guys was down the back here we've got a duck that's sitting on her eggs anyway I took some footage of that so let's have a look at that now that she is sitting on two sets of eggs the one over here and one inside the chicken coop I accidentally walked in on her that's why she is up to date she seems to be settling down a bit here comes the Drake I've stepped back out of the way Drake's coming in a la she's now gone and started eating some lettuce that I put down she's in there eating I'm I can't have a look at her nest okay so it's one two three four yeah it is there is a nice little nest made up twigs and sticks she's done well they're all off down to the dam there but I still reckon it's gonna be amazing if she actually produces any ducklings at all out of that nest we'll see have a look at this man go be haami isn't it fantastic when I do my pruning that I was talking about the beginning of the video I probably won't hit any of these smaller mango trees but I am going to really smash the larger mango tree and cut it right back that's a bone over there this one here I think this wasn't a qualm or maybe a Glen but I'm not too sure it have to have a look at my notes but it is in beautiful flower I think it's the best I've seen the mangos flower for many years here so hopefully we will get a good harvest this summer anyway that's the end of this update video will show you what's going on video and show you what's coming up in the future video I hope you enjoyed it don't forget to give a thumbs up if you did because I can do more of these type of update videos that are bitten more adlib rather than the structured ones which I am going to bring a more scripted video this weekend as well so that's maybe tomorrow or the next day you'll see another one from me how cool is that don't forget to share it as well visit the website self-sufficient me calm I just wrote an article about a courage lifestyle and living you might be interested in reading that and subscribe if you haven't already thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


 
 
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subtitle:

today I'm not from self-sufficiently and it's a beautiful sunny day here for our first week of spring and there's a lot going on it's really windy today so I'll try my best to struggle and cope with that wind so that it doesn't disrupt the video too much but there's several things that I wanted to show you and I meant to show you this midweek around about Wednesday and I'd get a lot of shooting and a lot of govern off the problem was I didn't I didn't tend to like on so I had no microphone then when I went and played it back you know all excited on how I was going to edit this video out there was no it was no sound so that was a bit of a bummer but here I am I'm not going to give up I'm still gonna put out a video this weekend but my midweek video is gonna be the end of the week but like I said there's lots of want to show you so let's get into it okay the first thing I wanted to show you guys is see how I'm standing underneath this grapevine it's still in its dormant stage this is the one that I did a video on a few years ago on how to prune and grow a grape vine off your house and it's going great guns but pruning speaking of needs to be done all over the place here at the moment and I really should have got my pruning done through winter before spring had sprung Bernie way this is got to be pruned back and all my fruit trees have to be pruned back as well these things I'm going to mention in this video are things that you're going to see in videos coming up and then you'll be able to later go oh yeah yeah I remember that video mark done of all those several madness things that were going on in his yard at the time so that was how that turned out etc etc those so that's the aim of this video is to give you an update and and also really just show you what's going on at the moment because it is a busy time the start of spring even in the subtropical climate remember we're coming out of winter which is a growing time for us particularly with all those salad crops we grow all year it's just that it's different crops that we grow I'm just gonna grab the camera and we'll go around and have a look yeah that toilet kangaroo thing has been getting a beating going around around on top of our clothesline here boy that must be 20 20 years old or something I was here way before we got here anyway citrus starts at this part of the orchard and goes all the way back all these trees will need to be pruned even though they're staying to flower I've got to prune them but are they're just beautiful the lime tree which you've seen my lime video where you may have flowering again and small fruit it's always in fruit the Meyer lemon I love the Meyer lemon flowers they're different got that purple to them purple tinge look at the bees just love them a Valencia orange which is our last orange tree that we use we leave the fruit on the Valencia I've mentioned this many times but just look how many flowers are on it it is just pumping pumping with flowers we've got a few pests turning up if you follow my videos you know that I don't get to wrap around the axles when it comes to pest management you see a few aphids on the tree I monitor it i watch and see how many predator insects there are around because that's important things like the lady birds and the hover flies if there's a lot of them around how generally we'll just wait and I won't you know break out the organic pesticide organic sprays so I'll monitor this tree I see that it's got some clusters of aphids and that on it and if it gets too overwhelming then I might actually spray it but I'll spray it probably right at the end of the day when I know there's no bees around or maybe even after it's finished flowering you know I want to keep the predator insects and the pollinating insects in mind whenever I do any type of spraying even if it's organic these larger trees I can take a little bit of pest infestation and on the younger trees if you've got all the new spring growth that's getting eaten by bugs well then yeah it's probably a good idea to hit it straight away so that that young tree isn't challenged when it's just trying to grow and become you know a good stable tree otherwise nine times out of 10 it fixes itself up okay let's not go off too much more about citrus we've got plenty that's going I can see that our mandarine is is flowering which is a good sign last year we've got no fruit out of it because it's a biannual fruit oh so it looks like we're going to get a good harvest out of that this season we normally do in the second year Washington Orange behind that and several others but anyway let's move on to the asparagus how cool is this or the asparagus coming up I just love this time of year at the start of spring asparagus it never fails within that first week boom it just starts shooting up this one was a little early because we've had some hot days through winter so there was a few sprigs of asparagus that were coming through earlier than I expected while it prompted me into getting this bed prepared and knocking down all the old-growth remoulding and getting stuck into it before all these started coming through just wonderful I love eating asparagus fresh even raw there's nothing better than fresh asparagus on the table and being spring means Tomatoes look at how green and fresh these Tomatoes look this whole bet is cherry tomatoes the reason why I'm concentrating on them now is because it is coming into spring summer and it's fruit fly season and the fruit flies then target all large tomato so even though you can grow them here and I've got a couple on the guide to be honest I have to watch them because otherwise the fruit flower get them and some of the larger varieties if they're growing well into you know mid spring I'm gonna have to start netting them otherwise we'll lose every one of them whereas the cherry tomatoes even the pears and the the ones in our plum size they don't get hit at all in this bed here I grew tomatoes all winter and they're they've just about had it now and they're dying off because they've had their season I've still got a couple of larger ones like these black Russians or black cream but those little spots on there worry me because that looks like a fruit fly sting sometimes they don't the maggot doesn't grow inside but when it does it ruins the whole fruit it's not that easy ground tomato through winter here you have to look after them to make sure they're in a good warm spot as long as you start them when it's still warm and let them grow into the color putana of the year you can do it in the subtropics no worries but yeah the best time of year is coming into spring now and they should give us some really great Tomatoes all through mid spring and into summer when then it'll get too hot in the tomatoes to die back again so essentially it's sort of two times a year where I get the tomatoes up to speed and it's similar with the eggplant normally I start my eggplants off light winter so that they're getting a good start and then they grow into spring and into summer and they do really well but these ones self seeded several of them that I've got in the garden at the moment and they grew all through winter and gave us eggplants in winter and now they're picking up again getting their second wind so I don't think I need even need to grow or plant any new eggplants for this season I'm really impressed and I'm definitely going to keep the seed out of these guys and say them again because it seems like they're gonna get eggplant all year round we've got a couple more over here as well so when you when you get a variety in your garden that sort of just pops up and does well at an unusual time of the year well then save that seed because it's adapting to your garden and those are the type of plants that you want so now moving on to the cucumbers and the beans that I wanted to talk about the beans over here but there's a similar type of concept here's the cucumbers now these ki-- comes you'll notice there's no trellis that's because they're Bush cucumbers I'll only get a couple of feet high and the intent is see this round bed the intent is for the plants to grow up and then eventually on their own weight they're going to flop down and they're going to hang to about half of three cords of the way down that bed so you're going to get a cascading effect of Bush cucumbers and I think that is going to be really cool it's going to be less maintenance and I'm thinking it's going to be a great growing method to show you guys hopefully it works in the center there I'm going to plant some maybe some chilies or capsicums or you know sweet peppers but we'll see but I haven't decided exactly what I'm going to put in the bed there yet but I reckon it's going to work a treat maximize the growing space because you've got plants cascading down able to plant more other plants in the center there and plus you're limiting your gardening workload because you don't have to constantly tie them up or trellis them up I think it's going to work well and they've got the same concept going over here with these beans these are dwarf beans they're not growing up beans like these were and they needed to beat relased these are all purple beans I'll keep the seeds for that and grown again soon but here these are Dwarfs and you can see they're getting to a fair size I'll get a little bigger than that and then I'm just going to train them to flop over they'll get probably two-foot high they'll flop over they'll get the ends about there and I'll be able to plant other things around the inside here like I've already got some coriander some other herbs that's the flat leaf coriander and I've got a tomato in the middle here the last thing I wanted to show you or talk about is the zucchinis here you can see that they grew all through winter if you watch my videos you'd know that I did a video on pickling zucchinis got a few still left so it's it's chugging along but it is getting towards the end of life these plants here but what I wanted to say was I tasted some of that lacto-fermented zucchinis that I showed you in the video and I tell you what they came up a treat they were absolutely beautiful lessons learnt on the larger ones I wouldn't keep the seeds and the center because they went a little mushy but not not out of hand mushy but I'd say a better way to pickle them would be in strips or take out the seeds in the middle and cut them in halves and half slices without the seeds and they'd probably pickle more crunch here and better than that way but apart from that they are going to be great those pickled zucchinis and curry dishes just as a side or mixed in with your favorite dip you know may be mixed with some soft cheese and turn it into a beautiful lacto zucchini dip which we like to do with all sorts of lacto fermented foods and the last thing I wanted to show you guys was down the back here we've got a duck that's sitting on her eggs anyway I took some footage of that so let's have a look at that now that she is sitting on two sets of eggs the one over here and one inside the chicken coop I accidentally walked in on her that's why she is up to date she seems to be settling down a bit here comes the Drake I've stepped back out of the way Drake's coming in a la she's now gone and started eating some lettuce that I put down she's in there eating I'm I can't have a look at her nest okay so it's one two three four yeah it is there is a nice little nest made up twigs and sticks she's done well they're all off down to the dam there but I still reckon it's gonna be amazing if she actually produces any ducklings at all out of that nest we'll see have a look at this man go be haami isn't it fantastic when I do my pruning that I was talking about the beginning of the video I probably won't hit any of these smaller mango trees but I am going to really smash the larger mango tree and cut it right back that's a bone over there this one here I think this wasn't a qualm or maybe a Glen but I'm not too sure it have to have a look at my notes but it is in beautiful flower I think it's the best I've seen the mangos flower for many years here so hopefully we will get a good harvest this summer anyway that's the end of this update video will show you what's going on video and show you what's coming up in the future video I hope you enjoyed it don't forget to give a thumbs up if you did because I can do more of these type of update videos that are bitten more adlib rather than the structured ones which I am going to bring a more scripted video this weekend as well so that's maybe tomorrow or the next day you'll see another one from me how cool is that don't forget to share it as well visit the website self-sufficient me calm I just wrote an article about a courage lifestyle and living you might be interested in reading that and subscribe if you haven't already thanks a lot for watching bye for now [Music] [Music]


 
 
 
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5 tips on how I grow several varieties of salad plants in just one small raised garden bed

Self Sufficient Me posted the article • 0 comments • 106 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
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how I typically espalier single tomato plants that have self-seeded in the garden by making a simple mini trellis from reo mesh and a star picket.

Self Sufficient Me posted the article • 0 comments • 196 views • 2017-09-27 16:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:


today I'm like from self-sufficient me and I'm in the garden here I was just working on this mini tomato trellis and I thought you know what what I'd do some filming you guys might be interested in what I'm doing here and yeah let's just get right on into it a month ago or so there was this seedling that just popped up out of nowhere tomato seedling this is it here it's grown into quite a nice sizable tomato bush it looks like it's some type of larger variety what I need to do is trellis it up it's only one plant and I thought I'd show you how easy it is to knock up one of these many espalier tomato trellises just out of Rio mesh and a simple star picket the end of the day it's pretty easy yeah yeah whack the star pick it into the ground so it's you know fairly sold maybe a better foot down so it won't fall over too easy and I've got these smaller pieces of mesh just for individual plants like this just cut out and I've folded the sides over so that they're you know that I poked anyone's eye out when they're sort of getting in the garden it's only about a meter wide three feet or less than that and about the same square high well I like about this rear mesh is it's strong it lasts forever this is probably 10 years old this piece or more on the top of these stuff it gets you know how you have a slot from where normal wire goes when you're doing fencing well the Rio bar or the Rio mesh just fits nicely into that and if you line up the star picket with the center of the mesh just use a couple of zip ties or a piece of wire if you want but zip ties are nice and easy to get on and off you zip it together at the top together at the bottom through these holes here in the star picket and it becomes quite ace secure and fast way to set up a mini trellis so what I've got to do now is just pick this tomato plant up and attach it to the trellis so that it can grow and espalier out and of course if you leave it just flop into the garden like this it's just the fruits going to right because it's going to touch the green and slugs and snails will be able to get to the fruit easier so it's best off picking a plant up like this and obviously growing it up something as with most tomato plants use some of this twine that I've got here just blue gardening twine it degrades in the Sun after a while and I will tie the plant up to this and we'll see how we go so this is the main central leader and I'll try to centralize that main leader up the strongest part here so that the weight is distributed in the middle so you basically want to tie a knot that doesn't slip so a non-slip granny knot so that it doesn't shake the bottom of the stem off and we'll just start wrapping that through and twisting it around the main leader stem careful that I don't burn the plant or cut through it going in between the laterals the laterals will help support the twine as well though that what twine doesn't slide up it's bending over because of the position it's in he doesn't know which way to gray because it wasn't being supported in in any way at all the way it was so this will help straighten that leader stem up as well there we go now I can easily pull that up see right up to the top here go around and cut off any diseased leaves I can see and now I've got that secondary that I can that's all so you can see starting to curl around because it was going nowhere it was just sort of spiraling in the bed here it's still gonna grow out that way so I'll keep it sort of going on that trajectory another one on the other side here got some good fruit there what I'll do is I'll trim that it looks a bit bushy and train that up this side see even the kookaburras are happy and then pull that up and that'll train up to that and that's pretty much it nice and short keep it simple that plant there was myself cedar came out of nowhere I don't know how it got to that part of the garden but I'm glad I kept it because I'm interested to see how this fruit turns out looks like it's going to be a really nice variety and this is the right time for tomatoes now coming into our spring although we can grow them through winter and I do but they don't grow as well as this warmer time of the year is you're coming into spring before summer hits so I'm keen to see how this one works out I think it's going to be a good plant yeah thanks a lot for watching hope you enjoyed the video if you did give it a thumbs up go to self-sufficient muqaam subscribe obviously if you haven't already bye for now
 
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subtitle:


today I'm like from self-sufficient me and I'm in the garden here I was just working on this mini tomato trellis and I thought you know what what I'd do some filming you guys might be interested in what I'm doing here and yeah let's just get right on into it a month ago or so there was this seedling that just popped up out of nowhere tomato seedling this is it here it's grown into quite a nice sizable tomato bush it looks like it's some type of larger variety what I need to do is trellis it up it's only one plant and I thought I'd show you how easy it is to knock up one of these many espalier tomato trellises just out of Rio mesh and a simple star picket the end of the day it's pretty easy yeah yeah whack the star pick it into the ground so it's you know fairly sold maybe a better foot down so it won't fall over too easy and I've got these smaller pieces of mesh just for individual plants like this just cut out and I've folded the sides over so that they're you know that I poked anyone's eye out when they're sort of getting in the garden it's only about a meter wide three feet or less than that and about the same square high well I like about this rear mesh is it's strong it lasts forever this is probably 10 years old this piece or more on the top of these stuff it gets you know how you have a slot from where normal wire goes when you're doing fencing well the Rio bar or the Rio mesh just fits nicely into that and if you line up the star picket with the center of the mesh just use a couple of zip ties or a piece of wire if you want but zip ties are nice and easy to get on and off you zip it together at the top together at the bottom through these holes here in the star picket and it becomes quite ace secure and fast way to set up a mini trellis so what I've got to do now is just pick this tomato plant up and attach it to the trellis so that it can grow and espalier out and of course if you leave it just flop into the garden like this it's just the fruits going to right because it's going to touch the green and slugs and snails will be able to get to the fruit easier so it's best off picking a plant up like this and obviously growing it up something as with most tomato plants use some of this twine that I've got here just blue gardening twine it degrades in the Sun after a while and I will tie the plant up to this and we'll see how we go so this is the main central leader and I'll try to centralize that main leader up the strongest part here so that the weight is distributed in the middle so you basically want to tie a knot that doesn't slip so a non-slip granny knot so that it doesn't shake the bottom of the stem off and we'll just start wrapping that through and twisting it around the main leader stem careful that I don't burn the plant or cut through it going in between the laterals the laterals will help support the twine as well though that what twine doesn't slide up it's bending over because of the position it's in he doesn't know which way to gray because it wasn't being supported in in any way at all the way it was so this will help straighten that leader stem up as well there we go now I can easily pull that up see right up to the top here go around and cut off any diseased leaves I can see and now I've got that secondary that I can that's all so you can see starting to curl around because it was going nowhere it was just sort of spiraling in the bed here it's still gonna grow out that way so I'll keep it sort of going on that trajectory another one on the other side here got some good fruit there what I'll do is I'll trim that it looks a bit bushy and train that up this side see even the kookaburras are happy and then pull that up and that'll train up to that and that's pretty much it nice and short keep it simple that plant there was myself cedar came out of nowhere I don't know how it got to that part of the garden but I'm glad I kept it because I'm interested to see how this fruit turns out looks like it's going to be a really nice variety and this is the right time for tomatoes now coming into our spring although we can grow them through winter and I do but they don't grow as well as this warmer time of the year is you're coming into spring before summer hits so I'm keen to see how this one works out I think it's going to be a good plant yeah thanks a lot for watching hope you enjoyed the video if you did give it a thumbs up go to self-sufficient muqaam subscribe obviously if you haven't already bye for now
 
 
105
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4 Homemade Organic Pesticide That Every Gardener Must Know

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 105 views • 2017-09-27 05:13 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
Homemade Organic Pesticide: Aphids, spider mites, and other pests can cause serious damage to flowers, fruits, and vegetables. These creatures attack your garden in swarms, literally draining the life from your crops and often inviting disease in the process. Many chemical pesticides can prove unsafe for the environment or may make fruits and vegetables unsafe for consumption, however. Thankfully, there are many homemade, organic options for you to turn to in your war against pests. Remedy 1 using chilies & Garlic • Combine 1/2 cup (113 grams) of hot peppers with 1/2 cup (113 grams) of garlic cloves or onions. You may also use both onions and garlic. All the vegetables should be chopped prior to use • Blend the vegetables together in a blender to form a thick, chunky paste. • Add the vegetable paste to half a liter of warm water mixing the ingredients together Thoroughly. • Pour the solution into a plastic or glass container and allow it to sit for 24 hours. If possible, keep it in a sunny location. If not, at least keep the mixture in a warm spot. • Next, Pour the solution through a strainer, removing the vegetables and collecting the vegetable-infused water into another container. This water is your pesticide. • Pour your pesticide into a squirt bottle and spray on the affected plants Remedy 2 using orange peels • Peel an orange and Place the peels into a glass container and pour 2 cups (500 milliliters) of boiling water over the peels, Allowing the solution to sit in a warm spot for 24 hours. • Next, Pour the solution into a strainer, removing the peels and saving the citrus-infused water • Add a few drops of castile soap. Peppermint-scented castile soap may prove especially effective. Mix the solution thoroughly to combine • Pour the pesticide into a large squirt bottle and Spray the entire plant to ward off most soft-bodied pests Remedy 3 Using neem • Combine 15 milliliters of neem oil with 1/2 teaspoon mild soap. Many believe neem oil, which comes from a bitter tree leaf, to be one of the most effective natural pesticides in existence • Mix the neem and soap into 2 liters of warm water Stirring slowly but thoroughly. • Pour the pesticide into a spray bottle and spray on spots where you can clearly see pests or signs of pests. Remedy 4 using tobacco • Mix 1 cup of tobacco into 2 liters of water.  • Sit the mixture out in the sun or in warm location, allowing it to rest for 24 hours. • Check the color of the mixture. Ideally, the pesticide will look similar to the hue of a light tea. If it is too dark, dilute it with water. If it is too light to see, allow it to sit an additional few hours • Add 3 tablespoons of mild liquid dish soap to the solution and Mix thoroughly. • Pour the mixture into a large squirt bottle. Shake the solution inside the bottle once more to combine it further and spray on affected plants. view all
 


 
 
Homemade Organic Pesticide: Aphids, spider mites, and other pests can cause serious damage to flowers, fruits, and vegetables. These creatures attack your garden in swarms, literally draining the life from your crops and often inviting disease in the process. Many chemical pesticides can prove unsafe for the environment or may make fruits and vegetables unsafe for consumption, however. Thankfully, there are many homemade, organic options for you to turn to in your war against pests. Remedy 1 using chilies & Garlic • Combine 1/2 cup (113 grams) of hot peppers with 1/2 cup (113 grams) of garlic cloves or onions. You may also use both onions and garlic. All the vegetables should be chopped prior to use • Blend the vegetables together in a blender to form a thick, chunky paste. • Add the vegetable paste to half a liter of warm water mixing the ingredients together Thoroughly. • Pour the solution into a plastic or glass container and allow it to sit for 24 hours. If possible, keep it in a sunny location. If not, at least keep the mixture in a warm spot. • Next, Pour the solution through a strainer, removing the vegetables and collecting the vegetable-infused water into another container. This water is your pesticide. • Pour your pesticide into a squirt bottle and spray on the affected plants Remedy 2 using orange peels • Peel an orange and Place the peels into a glass container and pour 2 cups (500 milliliters) of boiling water over the peels, Allowing the solution to sit in a warm spot for 24 hours. • Next, Pour the solution into a strainer, removing the peels and saving the citrus-infused water • Add a few drops of castile soap. Peppermint-scented castile soap may prove especially effective. Mix the solution thoroughly to combine • Pour the pesticide into a large squirt bottle and Spray the entire plant to ward off most soft-bodied pests Remedy 3 Using neem • Combine 15 milliliters of neem oil with 1/2 teaspoon mild soap. Many believe neem oil, which comes from a bitter tree leaf, to be one of the most effective natural pesticides in existence • Mix the neem and soap into 2 liters of warm water Stirring slowly but thoroughly. • Pour the pesticide into a spray bottle and spray on spots where you can clearly see pests or signs of pests. Remedy 4 using tobacco • Mix 1 cup of tobacco into 2 liters of water.  • Sit the mixture out in the sun or in warm location, allowing it to rest for 24 hours. • Check the color of the mixture. Ideally, the pesticide will look similar to the hue of a light tea. If it is too dark, dilute it with water. If it is too light to see, allow it to sit an additional few hours • Add 3 tablespoons of mild liquid dish soap to the solution and Mix thoroughly. • Pour the mixture into a large squirt bottle. Shake the solution inside the bottle once more to combine it further and spray on affected plants.
104
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7 Unusual Things that will keep your Garden blooming forever

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 104 views • 2017-09-27 05:13 • came from similar tags

 

Healthy soil, just like healthy people, requires a balanced combination of elements. Each of those elements has a key role in the various processes of your plant. For example, iron serves as the ignition for the plants to produce chlorophyll and is crucial for photosynthesis. Here are number of rather unusual things that are known to improve the health of soil and make it nutrient rich. 1.Water from boiling eggs Using the water from boiling eggs may be unusual. All you need to do is reserve the water used after boiling eggs – when the eggs boil, calcium leaches into the water, making excellent feed for your plants. Make sure you let it cool completely before using.  2.Oyster shells If you happen to live in a coastal-area where there are lots of oysters, you can crush the shells to make a slow-release fertilizer to keep the soil healthy. Just use a rolling pin to crush them up, making the pieces as small as possible. They contain calcium-carbonate which helps make the soil more alkaline, so you’ll want to use it around plants that thrive in alkaline-soil. 3.Aspirin Research has found that when water containing aspirin was sprayed onto seeds sown directly in the ground, there was 100 percent seed germination. To use it, simply add 2 aspirins to 2-gallons of water. Pour it into a spray-bottle and then spray your plants every three weeks. it not only helps to boost the immune-system of your plants , but it can stimulate flowering. 4.Eggshells You can make good use of the shells too, as they’re also loaded with calcium. Placing crushed-eggshells in soil that’s around your tomato plants can help prevent blossom-end rot. Sprinkle them around the base of plants to help keep those pesky snails and slugs away, and add them to your compost bin, as their lime content helps to reduce acidity 5.Banana-skins Banana peels are great for putting to use in your garden soil as they make one of the best fertilizers around, as they’re high in calcium, phosphorus, and potassium, as well as a host of other minerals, that are essential to the soil’s health. Chop them up, throw them into your compost-pile or add them directly to the soil, burying them anywhere from just beneath the surface, up to four inches down. 6.Tea You’ll need to save your used tea bags, and make sure they’re made from paper, silk or muslin as bags made up of polypropylene won’t decompose. You can still use them, but you’d have to throw out the actual bag and save the damp tea leaves. Not only can you compost tea bags as fertilizer in the compost-bin, but you can dig loose leaf teas and compostable tea bags around your plants. 7.Coffee grounds. The grounds contain a large amount of nitrogen and can help your plants grow faster, whether it’s tomatoes or grass. They also contain potassium and phosphorus, which means the grounds offer all three of the essential ingredients for fertilizer. view all
 


Healthy soil, just like healthy people, requires a balanced combination of elements. Each of those elements has a key role in the various processes of your plant. For example, iron serves as the ignition for the plants to produce chlorophyll and is crucial for photosynthesis. Here are number of rather unusual things that are known to improve the health of soil and make it nutrient rich. 1.Water from boiling eggs Using the water from boiling eggs may be unusual. All you need to do is reserve the water used after boiling eggs – when the eggs boil, calcium leaches into the water, making excellent feed for your plants. Make sure you let it cool completely before using.  2.Oyster shells If you happen to live in a coastal-area where there are lots of oysters, you can crush the shells to make a slow-release fertilizer to keep the soil healthy. Just use a rolling pin to crush them up, making the pieces as small as possible. They contain calcium-carbonate which helps make the soil more alkaline, so you’ll want to use it around plants that thrive in alkaline-soil. 3.Aspirin Research has found that when water containing aspirin was sprayed onto seeds sown directly in the ground, there was 100 percent seed germination. To use it, simply add 2 aspirins to 2-gallons of water. Pour it into a spray-bottle and then spray your plants every three weeks. it not only helps to boost the immune-system of your plants , but it can stimulate flowering. 4.Eggshells You can make good use of the shells too, as they’re also loaded with calcium. Placing crushed-eggshells in soil that’s around your tomato plants can help prevent blossom-end rot. Sprinkle them around the base of plants to help keep those pesky snails and slugs away, and add them to your compost bin, as their lime content helps to reduce acidity 5.Banana-skins Banana peels are great for putting to use in your garden soil as they make one of the best fertilizers around, as they’re high in calcium, phosphorus, and potassium, as well as a host of other minerals, that are essential to the soil’s health. Chop them up, throw them into your compost-pile or add them directly to the soil, burying them anywhere from just beneath the surface, up to four inches down. 6.Tea You’ll need to save your used tea bags, and make sure they’re made from paper, silk or muslin as bags made up of polypropylene won’t decompose. You can still use them, but you’d have to throw out the actual bag and save the damp tea leaves. Not only can you compost tea bags as fertilizer in the compost-bin, but you can dig loose leaf teas and compostable tea bags around your plants. 7.Coffee grounds. The grounds contain a large amount of nitrogen and can help your plants grow faster, whether it’s tomatoes or grass. They also contain potassium and phosphorus, which means the grounds offer all three of the essential ingredients for fertilizer.
103
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How To Grow Ton Of Mushrooms Even If You Have No Garden

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 103 views • 2017-09-27 05:13 • came from similar tags

 

 
Mushrooms grow quickly compared to most fruits and vegetables, and don't take up precious space in your garden. Most hobbyists start out with oyster mushrooms because they are the easiest to grow. Mushrooms are a healthy addition to any diet, as they are low in calories and fat, high in fiber, and contain high amounts of potassium and selenium Mushrooms are best grown indoors where the temperature and light conditions can be more readily managed. Things You’ll Need to grow your own oyster mushrooms are: • Straw (Wheat Straw Works Best) • Robust plastic bags, medium or large size • Oyster mushroom spawn (which you can get online or You may need to find your local supplier) • Spray bottle and water Method. Before you begin, wash your hands and clean all your surfaces well. It’s very important to be hygienic when cultivating mushrooms, as you do not want to grow the wrong types of fungi. Once you’ve got all the materials, the first thing you need to do is pasteurize the straw. this essentially means heating the straw in water to around 70-75 degrees Celsius and holding it at that temperature for around 45-60 minutes. Pasteurization kills the bacteria. Before you put the straw in the pot, cut up into small pieces, around 1 to 3 inches in length. Once you’ve pasteurized the straw, take it out of the heating pot with tongs and let it sit in a clean tub while it cools down. It’s important you don’t put the mushroom spawn into the straw until the straw is at room temperature otherwise you will kill the spawn. When the straw has cooled down, pack your robust plastic bags with straw quite tightly, and then distribute some of the mushroom spawn throughout the straw. put about three or four pieces of spawn-covered dowel in each bag. The straw should not be dripping wet, but it should still be damp from the pasteurization. At this stage, sterilize a skewer or a nail by pouring boiling water over it and jab holes in the bags every 3 inches or so. This lets some air in, but not too much. The mouth of the bag should be closed with rubber-band or tread. You now have to find a home for you mushrooms. Keep them out of direct sunlight. They like some indirect light and grows best at around 15-20 degrees Celsius. Now you wait while the mushroom spawn develops into mycelium and begins taking over the entire bag. Mycelium looks a bit like white furry cobwebs, and you should start seeing it develop in the first couple of weeks. It’s important that your bags of straw stay moist, but not dripping wet. spray some water if required. About 4 weeks later the mycelium should have spread across the entire bag of straw and your mushrooms should start forming. cut some slightly larger holes in the bag if necessary. The mushrooms will decide that they want to grow out of one or more of the holes you’ve created, and they’ll usually grow in one or two clusters. Now comes the fun part. The mushrooms essentially double in size every day, so within a week or so you should have good-sized oyster mushrooms. Mist them with water two or three times a day over this period – again, not so they are dripping, just so they are moist. The mushrooms should be harvested while their rims are still curled over a little and pointing downwards. If their rims seem to be turning upward, it’s probably time to harvest. To harvest the mushrooms give them a twist at the base. This ensures that you leave the very bottom of the mushroom still in the bag. You want to leave that part behind as it is needed for the subsequent flushes of mushrooms. If you keep the mushrooms moist and in suitable conditions, you should get three or four flushes of mushrooms, When your bags stop producing, the straw can be used as mulch for the garden. Alternatively, you can distribute some of your straw into new bags of fresh straw and the growing process begins again. If there are any mushroom experts out there, be sure to share your advice in the comments below.
 
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Mushrooms grow quickly compared to most fruits and vegetables, and don't take up precious space in your garden. Most hobbyists start out with oyster mushrooms because they are the easiest to grow. Mushrooms are a healthy addition to any diet, as they are low in calories and fat, high in fiber, and contain high amounts of potassium and selenium Mushrooms are best grown indoors where the temperature and light conditions can be more readily managed. Things You’ll Need to grow your own oyster mushrooms are: • Straw (Wheat Straw Works Best) • Robust plastic bags, medium or large size • Oyster mushroom spawn (which you can get online or You may need to find your local supplier) • Spray bottle and water Method. Before you begin, wash your hands and clean all your surfaces well. It’s very important to be hygienic when cultivating mushrooms, as you do not want to grow the wrong types of fungi. Once you’ve got all the materials, the first thing you need to do is pasteurize the straw. this essentially means heating the straw in water to around 70-75 degrees Celsius and holding it at that temperature for around 45-60 minutes. Pasteurization kills the bacteria. Before you put the straw in the pot, cut up into small pieces, around 1 to 3 inches in length. Once you’ve pasteurized the straw, take it out of the heating pot with tongs and let it sit in a clean tub while it cools down. It’s important you don’t put the mushroom spawn into the straw until the straw is at room temperature otherwise you will kill the spawn. When the straw has cooled down, pack your robust plastic bags with straw quite tightly, and then distribute some of the mushroom spawn throughout the straw. put about three or four pieces of spawn-covered dowel in each bag. The straw should not be dripping wet, but it should still be damp from the pasteurization. At this stage, sterilize a skewer or a nail by pouring boiling water over it and jab holes in the bags every 3 inches or so. This lets some air in, but not too much. The mouth of the bag should be closed with rubber-band or tread. You now have to find a home for you mushrooms. Keep them out of direct sunlight. They like some indirect light and grows best at around 15-20 degrees Celsius. Now you wait while the mushroom spawn develops into mycelium and begins taking over the entire bag. Mycelium looks a bit like white furry cobwebs, and you should start seeing it develop in the first couple of weeks. It’s important that your bags of straw stay moist, but not dripping wet. spray some water if required. About 4 weeks later the mycelium should have spread across the entire bag of straw and your mushrooms should start forming. cut some slightly larger holes in the bag if necessary. The mushrooms will decide that they want to grow out of one or more of the holes you’ve created, and they’ll usually grow in one or two clusters. Now comes the fun part. The mushrooms essentially double in size every day, so within a week or so you should have good-sized oyster mushrooms. Mist them with water two or three times a day over this period – again, not so they are dripping, just so they are moist. The mushrooms should be harvested while their rims are still curled over a little and pointing downwards. If their rims seem to be turning upward, it’s probably time to harvest. To harvest the mushrooms give them a twist at the base. This ensures that you leave the very bottom of the mushroom still in the bag. You want to leave that part behind as it is needed for the subsequent flushes of mushrooms. If you keep the mushrooms moist and in suitable conditions, you should get three or four flushes of mushrooms, When your bags stop producing, the straw can be used as mulch for the garden. Alternatively, you can distribute some of your straw into new bags of fresh straw and the growing process begins again. If there are any mushroom experts out there, be sure to share your advice in the comments below.
 
 
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How to Pick a Sweet Watermelon Every Single Time - Top 8 Tips

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 195 views • 2017-09-27 05:13 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

Alright! This is John Kohler with OKRAW.COM Today I have another exciting episode for you today. Im at the national heirloom expo 2016 and We are in the hall with all the different fruits and vegetables, I got displays of like garlic, tomatoes and pepper, eggplants and melons and squash and watermelons and more squash as you guys can see the squash tarred behind me but what am going to show you guys today is how to pick out a ripe water melon, I know many of you guys have had this problem before and it really bothers me a lot when I get unripe water melon or when it doesn’t taste sweet, it’s not good, its standard camera’s it will be good, but when you look at the stores there are up to pick really and they just ship and truck and they are sold. so I encourage you to grow your own melons, they are the highest quality melons, maybe you go look right there at farmer’s market, where they can be even better but not always because I have gotten some, local melons in my area that have actually been worse than store bought, but anyways in this episode I am going to show you guys my 21 years of picking out water melons and learning and getting better every year and share you guys my top tips and you guys could pick a ripe sweet water melon the first time, anyways let’s go ahead and head over to the heirloom water melon section showed you guys my tips on the water melon we have on display today. So now am in the water melon section as you guys can see there is a tables upon tables and tables of eatable water melons being grown. Now first of all let you guys know that there are many varieties of water melons and if you are buying water melons in the store, generally they are a couple of categories, those are seedless water melons, seeable water melons and personal watermelons there are only three kinds, but here they several tables of even over a hundred varieties of melons. This one right here is actually the orange flesh tender sweet, and you couldn’t tell from just looking at the outside because it’s still the green color there are some water melon that are actually yellow on the outside, ones that are yellow on the inside and there are even ones that are white on the inside and all a little bit different and they are all amazing. Now what encourage you to visit the local Asian market they may actually have the yellow water melons which are actually one of my favorite ones instead of red I prefer the yellow water melons, and I always encourage you guys to get the seeded water melons, there is nutrition in the seed, so a seeded water melon is more nutritious than the seedless because if you eat the seed you are getting the nutrition from the seeds and the more you get that from the seed, if the seeds you plant them in your garden to grow water melon the next year and save yourself the hassles and cost of buying a seed packets. Anyways what we are going to do next is go down and show you guys my top tips on selecting a ripe water melon and this is going to be in other from most important to least important. So let’s head down and show you my first tip. So the first I want to show you guys and that’s the most important is use your nose to select a ripe fruit, most fruits actually has some kind of odor smell good floral when they are ripe. And that includes water melon even though you may think water melon don’t smell nice because most of the water melons you guys ever smell are picked unripe so they don’t actually have a scent yet, the scent comes out when the fruit is more matured and more sweet, so try that. Snip the whole bend over selections of water melons and I know that’s kind of going to look weird to a lot of people and find the ripe one, so what am looking at here is their strawberry water melon, and of all the melons here, like when I walked by the section, I instantly smelled like wow something in this area smell good and then I was like smelling all the different water melons in that area and this one when I smelled it, it actually smelled kind of like it actually smelt kind of sweet, I don’t know why If I saw this one in the place but yes it smelt really good, and that gives me like the first indicator, if it smelt good, that’s definitely good indicator that it’s ripe, I don’t want you guys to use any one of these tips that I am showing you guys to pick a ripe one. You want to try to get all the different tips in one melon, if it smell good and meet some of the other criteria that I am going to show to you guys in the minute and that’s definitely a good candidate in what I generally what I do when I go to a store is that you use all the tips and kind of like find ones that meet my criteria and bring them to a certain area and five out of the whole of display and then like go down through them, touch, feel, smell each one to find the best one that I am going to end up buying and then eating. So let’s move on and show you guys the next tip. So the next tip I want to show to you guys is actually really important and for water melon demonstrates this and actually I don’t buy it, so what we are looking at here are actually the white wonders, so this water melons are called the white wonders, they just look like a seed of water melon on the inside, but if we cut this into half and it opens up, it actually white on the inside, there are so many amazing qualities in the water melons, and if we are not familiar with them I do encourage you guys to visit reallseeds.com get their free seed catalogue, and in all these catalogues, you get all of the seeds to grow these melons plus they have many awesome pictures and you can actually see what they look like. Unfortunately, you can’t taste what they look like unless you buy them. So anyway the tip now is actually you want to find a water melon, you want to press into it, like pressing into it, you guys can’t quite see that, but when I press into it, it actually gives, it’s kind of like mildly ripe avocado. In avocado actually, you can be able to press into it to know that it is ripe so that you can eat it, the water melon on the other hand are the complete opposites, if it presses in, to me that means it has actually been off the vine so long, it’s been kind of past its prime. Not to say that it is becoming bad but if it is definitely press able, it is not one that is generally would want to buy or try to find one that is actually affirm that you can’t depress so another important tip for you guys. Third tip I want to show to you guys on picking out ripe water melon is like this garage here, this is actually called the jumbo black diamond, look at this guy, we are trying to be pressing , this guy is heavy must be quite 50 plus pounds its insane so the next tip is actually you want to get a water melon that is not like the largest in the bunch but you want to get one that is heavy for the same size so you pick up two water melon at the same exact size, one is lighter, one is heavier right, get the one that is heavier guess why because that’s more water content , it’s fresher, there’s more liquid in there and then if it is kind of lighter, then there is not going to be as ripe or maybe drying out on the inside or maybe not going to be sweet for sure. Next tip get one heavy for its size. Even if it is not a jumbo black diamond. So the next tip I want to show you guys is just one in my arsenal of tips that I want to share with you guys, it’s one of the one I use the most, and it’s kind of the easiest, it’s kind of separate out the good from the bad but of course you want to in cooperate more other tips in the selecting a water melon for you and your family. So basically that is the top test for example this guy right here is actually called the Mc. Cain water melon if we tap it and put it over on the mic and put it on the same layer actually, we tap it. You hear how that sounds it’s kind of like. It’s not like super high not super low it’s kind of like in the middle like just a tap on your chest it kind of sound the same now hear this one it’s kind of higher pitched . we wanted somewhere between this range and if we go over this one next door, this is actually called the smooner and we tap this guy you hear it like it does not really you hear t he difference, that one, this one is alright but this one is better, and this one is like the worst, use the tap test kind of like you are beating on your chest if you keep forgetting what it should sound like. Just another indicator that the water melon may be ripe. The next tip I want to show to you guys is also a good indicator, but this alone does not necessarily mean it’s going to be a good water melon, I want you guys to take note of all these factors into consideration and find a melon with all these things I a showing to you guys and then you will have a high probability of getting a really good water melon for you and your family. The next tip, this is actually a called the down dark blue striped melon, that’s a nice tap, listen to that. That’s a good sign, I push on it, it doesn’t depress another good sign, now that s kind of heavy for its weight maybe a little bit lighter than I would like but it has the next indicator, which I don’t know if you guys can see that but its right here, I just knocked it, don’t know if you guys can see that but basically what happens is like this it isn’t a black….. It dropped there are some more, don’t worry. There is a little black spot and this is like the sugar spot and so also an end tip we are taking up the vine and you guys can see around here a little bit of like it’s like brown, it looks like dried like syrup or sap dried molasses, something like that, that’s another good sign that it’s going to be definitely a good water melon, but just because you see this doesn’t mean it’s going to be good, you want to look for the other indicators as well, so I will just move on and show you guys the next indicator. But definitely good melon. Now I want to show to you guys the next tip or indicator for finding a good melon and once again this tip relates to like check in the same variety of melon like you can’t compare this melon to the one next to it. It’s like you know a different color or a different variety right? But basically amongst the same variety of melons, this is actually called the ash kiered gizzard, something like that, you guys can see they are all in certain colors, this kind of colors aren’t like super dark green but that’s alright because melon comes in all different colors but what is important is when you find the melons that are supposed to be in a certain way, you are going to see ones that are kind of deeper rich colors and ones that are lighter in colors so clearly look at this, like this looks like a deep one, and if you look at this one here, you guys can see, it looks like a little bit more white, it’s not maybe full color this can be an indicator for ripeness like immature fruits not going to be fully colored up and more matured fruit maybe having full color to it . In this case this is probably one that I actually would not get and the one here that has a much better color even if it is one next door a little bit deeper richer color. more stimulating to my eye would also be a good choice, now I want to show to you guys a common tips given people for selecting water melon and I haven’t necessarily found this to be true, but it may be accurate for you so what we have here, is we actually have a water melon that is actually called the pie melon and one of the big tips that people like to say is that the you want to look for the yellow spot on the bottom. That’s what it’s like sitting on the ground, they didn’t actually get the sun and if it has a big yellow spot then it’s going to be sweeter. I personally actually haven’t found that to be true personally but definitely use the other tips that I showed to you guys in this video before I just like oh it has a big yellow spot I am getting and I don’t know about that one, but I will go ahead and show my last and final tip to you guys and in fact one of the most important ones so that you can guarantee you will get a good water melon. so my last and final tip for you guys, what we are looking at now is actually the new arm show rigid water melon and once again you know just because a water melon is small, you don’t like john says that one is bad, you need the big giant one, no you want a biggest one for the size so like ….. melons are actually quite small ones that is actually a little bit bigger and actually heavy for its size so these melons are like a little bit over and not so good because they are kind of lighter, so here’s the final tip, I share with to you guys, if you guys are not buying a whole water melon, it’s always easier and better to buy a cut water melon, because with a cut water melon, you can instantly see if it’s ripe or not, you can be able to smell it, easier and you can see what the flesh looks like right, so this one Is actually broken open, from the inside, I don’t know if you guys can see that, but on the inside, look this is like a deep press, it’s spongy on the inside, right, this one, as I am pressing on the outside, it’s actually deep presses like a ripe avocado, so that’s a not a good thing. Also this is light, it’s weight, that’s another thing, and we open it up, it’s spongy on the inside not going to be good, if I bought this one which I wouldn’t but if I got it for like free they are giving away, I could actually juice it up to make water melon juice in my juicer and it would be quite delicious to drink still but maybe not so sweet and may not be the ultimate water melon, but if it’s a cut melon and you have to go for it and remember one smell it and if it smell pretty good but not like super different or sweet you would have to be able see if it looks like melon on the inside, it will be able to depressive if your finger goes in really easy, that’s not going to be a good melon and wont encourage you guys, if you don’t know how to pick a melon and want to make sure you get a good one, I am going to cut this guy and have to pick one, and then you can cut it half way and then you can cut a water melon, that’s a lot safer method to ensure you get a ripe water melon, despite all my tips, remember I showed you guys all my tips, and how to pick a water melon and I am going to go ahead to put my tips to the test. Because here at the Elle’s we emphasize on the display of the other water melons to have a whole bunch of extra ones that there are selling for just five bucks. I am hungry for lunch, I haven’t eaten yet, so this is going to be my lunch today, I am going to pick it out and use some of the techniques I just showed you guys so I am going to visit different pallets of water melons here, so the first step is just kind of like look at them all, and if it’s the same variety which in most cases it’s going to be the same exact variety you want to get the colored one but the way I kind of go by first to kind of like separate out the good from the bad is just tap on them, so I am going to go around and over the different palette and tap, and find a couple of nice ones that I really like, I take off the nice ones and put them in a certain area, and then I will like pick from those best nice ones and throw them at the back put you know lift it and to check the weight and see if I will see the sugar marks, and also put it up to my face and smell it, to see if it smells pretty good, you can also smell as you tap on them to see if there is a good waft odor because smell is quite one of the most important things to determine a ripe watermelon, so I am going to go around to determine so I will tap it, right there, you guys can do that, it sounds kind of like hollow, I will also press it’s a little bit soft, not a good sign, this one is really soft you guys can see me press on it, I don’t know if it’s soft I don’t like that so much, this one definitely not sounding too good. Play the drums, play the water melon drums. Alright I have been looking through all these water melons, at least we have found one, that sound pretty nice, and actually have that tag most of them don’t have a tag, this is actually called refined sugar so for a name like that, it got to be sweet, provided it’s ripe. I don’t encourage you guys to even find sugar unless it’s refined sugar water melons. So let’s smell this guy I mean here is a very mild odor and we are looking at it, I don’t know if you guys are going to see that but right now in the stems there, some of those are sugars marks that I tell you guys about coming at the end. So that looks like that it might be pretty good, for its size it’s a pretty small water melon, it’s actually quite heavy, so that’s a good sign as well and once we try to push on it, it doesn’t give like ripe avocado, if you don’t want it like that enjoy any of those categories so there is no St mark yellow sport on it But this one looks like a good one for me pay for it and I will cut open and taste it on the camera so you guys know how it is. So now I selected and bought the refined sugar water melon, we are going to cut it open for you, and show you guys some tips and let you know how it works. Okay it’s pretty good I got my ceramic knife here, I like ceramic knives it doesn’t import flavor to your food like stainless steel made plus it’s sharper and longer and you don’t sharpen the knives regularly so that is why I like the ceramic, so I put this in the melon and it starts to crack even if I am not cutting it, so that’s definitely a good sign. Alright let’s see what it looks like on the inside, alright look at that, nice, deep, rich, red melon, we are smelling it, thin odor on the inside, here I want to explain to you guys the sweetest part of the melon, the sweetest part of the melon is not by the rime it’s always like right in the middle of it, so if you are like digging it yourself, you could always dig out the melon and serve the rest to the other people, or the other day the technique I use sometimes is to start eating at the middle first to get the sweetest part and then eat the outside around the edges first and then eat the middle to the end. so we are going to go ahead and take the knife here, we are going to slice that little section here, definitely think I did good this time it could be sweeter but definitely happy with my approaches and this is going to feed me more than many people here. Lunch today, and the food boot area all the food behind me, you could buy a plate of food for like 10 bucks, but you can buy a water melon for 5 bucks, this is more than a meal for me. If you guys enjoyed this episode of learning about how to pick a water melon with my tips I shared with you guys, then give me thumbs up. You should let me know or be sure to come out to the 2017 Ellen expo. You guys should eat some of these crazy delicious Ellen water melon and know more about elien and grow your own food at home, home grown foods are some of the best food that money can’t buy. Visit some of my past episodes I have over four hundred episodes now on this you tube channel dedicated to teaching you guys how to eat fruit and vegetables, because they are my favorite food, in the whole entire world and be sure to share this video with somebody that doesn’t know how to pick water melons so they could improve their skills, be sure to click the subscribe so you don’t miss out on any of my upcoming episode, upcoming about five to seven days you never know where I will show up or what you will be learning on my you tube channels . Once again my name is john Kohler with okraw.com we will see next time, till then remember keep eating your fruit and vegetable because they are the best. view all
 


 
subtitle:

Alright! This is John Kohler with OKRAW.COM Today I have another exciting episode for you today. Im at the national heirloom expo 2016 and We are in the hall with all the different fruits and vegetables, I got displays of like garlic, tomatoes and pepper, eggplants and melons and squash and watermelons and more squash as you guys can see the squash tarred behind me but what am going to show you guys today is how to pick out a ripe water melon, I know many of you guys have had this problem before and it really bothers me a lot when I get unripe water melon or when it doesn’t taste sweet, it’s not good, its standard camera’s it will be good, but when you look at the stores there are up to pick really and they just ship and truck and they are sold. so I encourage you to grow your own melons, they are the highest quality melons, maybe you go look right there at farmer’s market, where they can be even better but not always because I have gotten some, local melons in my area that have actually been worse than store bought, but anyways in this episode I am going to show you guys my 21 years of picking out water melons and learning and getting better every year and share you guys my top tips and you guys could pick a ripe sweet water melon the first time, anyways let’s go ahead and head over to the heirloom water melon section showed you guys my tips on the water melon we have on display today. So now am in the water melon section as you guys can see there is a tables upon tables and tables of eatable water melons being grown. Now first of all let you guys know that there are many varieties of water melons and if you are buying water melons in the store, generally they are a couple of categories, those are seedless water melons, seeable water melons and personal watermelons there are only three kinds, but here they several tables of even over a hundred varieties of melons. This one right here is actually the orange flesh tender sweet, and you couldn’t tell from just looking at the outside because it’s still the green color there are some water melon that are actually yellow on the outside, ones that are yellow on the inside and there are even ones that are white on the inside and all a little bit different and they are all amazing. Now what encourage you to visit the local Asian market they may actually have the yellow water melons which are actually one of my favorite ones instead of red I prefer the yellow water melons, and I always encourage you guys to get the seeded water melons, there is nutrition in the seed, so a seeded water melon is more nutritious than the seedless because if you eat the seed you are getting the nutrition from the seeds and the more you get that from the seed, if the seeds you plant them in your garden to grow water melon the next year and save yourself the hassles and cost of buying a seed packets. Anyways what we are going to do next is go down and show you guys my top tips on selecting a ripe water melon and this is going to be in other from most important to least important. So let’s head down and show you my first tip. So the first I want to show you guys and that’s the most important is use your nose to select a ripe fruit, most fruits actually has some kind of odor smell good floral when they are ripe. And that includes water melon even though you may think water melon don’t smell nice because most of the water melons you guys ever smell are picked unripe so they don’t actually have a scent yet, the scent comes out when the fruit is more matured and more sweet, so try that. Snip the whole bend over selections of water melons and I know that’s kind of going to look weird to a lot of people and find the ripe one, so what am looking at here is their strawberry water melon, and of all the melons here, like when I walked by the section, I instantly smelled like wow something in this area smell good and then I was like smelling all the different water melons in that area and this one when I smelled it, it actually smelled kind of like it actually smelt kind of sweet, I don’t know why If I saw this one in the place but yes it smelt really good, and that gives me like the first indicator, if it smelt good, that’s definitely good indicator that it’s ripe, I don’t want you guys to use any one of these tips that I am showing you guys to pick a ripe one. You want to try to get all the different tips in one melon, if it smell good and meet some of the other criteria that I am going to show to you guys in the minute and that’s definitely a good candidate in what I generally what I do when I go to a store is that you use all the tips and kind of like find ones that meet my criteria and bring them to a certain area and five out of the whole of display and then like go down through them, touch, feel, smell each one to find the best one that I am going to end up buying and then eating. So let’s move on and show you guys the next tip. So the next tip I want to show to you guys is actually really important and for water melon demonstrates this and actually I don’t buy it, so what we are looking at here are actually the white wonders, so this water melons are called the white wonders, they just look like a seed of water melon on the inside, but if we cut this into half and it opens up, it actually white on the inside, there are so many amazing qualities in the water melons, and if we are not familiar with them I do encourage you guys to visit reallseeds.com get their free seed catalogue, and in all these catalogues, you get all of the seeds to grow these melons plus they have many awesome pictures and you can actually see what they look like. Unfortunately, you can’t taste what they look like unless you buy them. So anyway the tip now is actually you want to find a water melon, you want to press into it, like pressing into it, you guys can’t quite see that, but when I press into it, it actually gives, it’s kind of like mildly ripe avocado. In avocado actually, you can be able to press into it to know that it is ripe so that you can eat it, the water melon on the other hand are the complete opposites, if it presses in, to me that means it has actually been off the vine so long, it’s been kind of past its prime. Not to say that it is becoming bad but if it is definitely press able, it is not one that is generally would want to buy or try to find one that is actually affirm that you can’t depress so another important tip for you guys. Third tip I want to show to you guys on picking out ripe water melon is like this garage here, this is actually called the jumbo black diamond, look at this guy, we are trying to be pressing , this guy is heavy must be quite 50 plus pounds its insane so the next tip is actually you want to get a water melon that is not like the largest in the bunch but you want to get one that is heavy for the same size so you pick up two water melon at the same exact size, one is lighter, one is heavier right, get the one that is heavier guess why because that’s more water content , it’s fresher, there’s more liquid in there and then if it is kind of lighter, then there is not going to be as ripe or maybe drying out on the inside or maybe not going to be sweet for sure. Next tip get one heavy for its size. Even if it is not a jumbo black diamond. So the next tip I want to show you guys is just one in my arsenal of tips that I want to share with you guys, it’s one of the one I use the most, and it’s kind of the easiest, it’s kind of separate out the good from the bad but of course you want to in cooperate more other tips in the selecting a water melon for you and your family. So basically that is the top test for example this guy right here is actually called the Mc. Cain water melon if we tap it and put it over on the mic and put it on the same layer actually, we tap it. You hear how that sounds it’s kind of like. It’s not like super high not super low it’s kind of like in the middle like just a tap on your chest it kind of sound the same now hear this one it’s kind of higher pitched . we wanted somewhere between this range and if we go over this one next door, this is actually called the smooner and we tap this guy you hear it like it does not really you hear t he difference, that one, this one is alright but this one is better, and this one is like the worst, use the tap test kind of like you are beating on your chest if you keep forgetting what it should sound like. Just another indicator that the water melon may be ripe. The next tip I want to show to you guys is also a good indicator, but this alone does not necessarily mean it’s going to be a good water melon, I want you guys to take note of all these factors into consideration and find a melon with all these things I a showing to you guys and then you will have a high probability of getting a really good water melon for you and your family. The next tip, this is actually a called the down dark blue striped melon, that’s a nice tap, listen to that. That’s a good sign, I push on it, it doesn’t depress another good sign, now that s kind of heavy for its weight maybe a little bit lighter than I would like but it has the next indicator, which I don’t know if you guys can see that but its right here, I just knocked it, don’t know if you guys can see that but basically what happens is like this it isn’t a black….. It dropped there are some more, don’t worry. There is a little black spot and this is like the sugar spot and so also an end tip we are taking up the vine and you guys can see around here a little bit of like it’s like brown, it looks like dried like syrup or sap dried molasses, something like that, that’s another good sign that it’s going to be definitely a good water melon, but just because you see this doesn’t mean it’s going to be good, you want to look for the other indicators as well, so I will just move on and show you guys the next indicator. But definitely good melon. Now I want to show to you guys the next tip or indicator for finding a good melon and once again this tip relates to like check in the same variety of melon like you can’t compare this melon to the one next to it. It’s like you know a different color or a different variety right? But basically amongst the same variety of melons, this is actually called the ash kiered gizzard, something like that, you guys can see they are all in certain colors, this kind of colors aren’t like super dark green but that’s alright because melon comes in all different colors but what is important is when you find the melons that are supposed to be in a certain way, you are going to see ones that are kind of deeper rich colors and ones that are lighter in colors so clearly look at this, like this looks like a deep one, and if you look at this one here, you guys can see, it looks like a little bit more white, it’s not maybe full color this can be an indicator for ripeness like immature fruits not going to be fully colored up and more matured fruit maybe having full color to it . In this case this is probably one that I actually would not get and the one here that has a much better color even if it is one next door a little bit deeper richer color. more stimulating to my eye would also be a good choice, now I want to show to you guys a common tips given people for selecting water melon and I haven’t necessarily found this to be true, but it may be accurate for you so what we have here, is we actually have a water melon that is actually called the pie melon and one of the big tips that people like to say is that the you want to look for the yellow spot on the bottom. That’s what it’s like sitting on the ground, they didn’t actually get the sun and if it has a big yellow spot then it’s going to be sweeter. I personally actually haven’t found that to be true personally but definitely use the other tips that I showed to you guys in this video before I just like oh it has a big yellow spot I am getting and I don’t know about that one, but I will go ahead and show my last and final tip to you guys and in fact one of the most important ones so that you can guarantee you will get a good water melon. so my last and final tip for you guys, what we are looking at now is actually the new arm show rigid water melon and once again you know just because a water melon is small, you don’t like john says that one is bad, you need the big giant one, no you want a biggest one for the size so like ….. melons are actually quite small ones that is actually a little bit bigger and actually heavy for its size so these melons are like a little bit over and not so good because they are kind of lighter, so here’s the final tip, I share with to you guys, if you guys are not buying a whole water melon, it’s always easier and better to buy a cut water melon, because with a cut water melon, you can instantly see if it’s ripe or not, you can be able to smell it, easier and you can see what the flesh looks like right, so this one Is actually broken open, from the inside, I don’t know if you guys can see that, but on the inside, look this is like a deep press, it’s spongy on the inside, right, this one, as I am pressing on the outside, it’s actually deep presses like a ripe avocado, so that’s a not a good thing. Also this is light, it’s weight, that’s another thing, and we open it up, it’s spongy on the inside not going to be good, if I bought this one which I wouldn’t but if I got it for like free they are giving away, I could actually juice it up to make water melon juice in my juicer and it would be quite delicious to drink still but maybe not so sweet and may not be the ultimate water melon, but if it’s a cut melon and you have to go for it and remember one smell it and if it smell pretty good but not like super different or sweet you would have to be able see if it looks like melon on the inside, it will be able to depressive if your finger goes in really easy, that’s not going to be a good melon and wont encourage you guys, if you don’t know how to pick a melon and want to make sure you get a good one, I am going to cut this guy and have to pick one, and then you can cut it half way and then you can cut a water melon, that’s a lot safer method to ensure you get a ripe water melon, despite all my tips, remember I showed you guys all my tips, and how to pick a water melon and I am going to go ahead to put my tips to the test. Because here at the Elle’s we emphasize on the display of the other water melons to have a whole bunch of extra ones that there are selling for just five bucks. I am hungry for lunch, I haven’t eaten yet, so this is going to be my lunch today, I am going to pick it out and use some of the techniques I just showed you guys so I am going to visit different pallets of water melons here, so the first step is just kind of like look at them all, and if it’s the same variety which in most cases it’s going to be the same exact variety you want to get the colored one but the way I kind of go by first to kind of like separate out the good from the bad is just tap on them, so I am going to go around and over the different palette and tap, and find a couple of nice ones that I really like, I take off the nice ones and put them in a certain area, and then I will like pick from those best nice ones and throw them at the back put you know lift it and to check the weight and see if I will see the sugar marks, and also put it up to my face and smell it, to see if it smells pretty good, you can also smell as you tap on them to see if there is a good waft odor because smell is quite one of the most important things to determine a ripe watermelon, so I am going to go around to determine so I will tap it, right there, you guys can do that, it sounds kind of like hollow, I will also press it’s a little bit soft, not a good sign, this one is really soft you guys can see me press on it, I don’t know if it’s soft I don’t like that so much, this one definitely not sounding too good. Play the drums, play the water melon drums. Alright I have been looking through all these water melons, at least we have found one, that sound pretty nice, and actually have that tag most of them don’t have a tag, this is actually called refined sugar so for a name like that, it got to be sweet, provided it’s ripe. I don’t encourage you guys to even find sugar unless it’s refined sugar water melons. So let’s smell this guy I mean here is a very mild odor and we are looking at it, I don’t know if you guys are going to see that but right now in the stems there, some of those are sugars marks that I tell you guys about coming at the end. So that looks like that it might be pretty good, for its size it’s a pretty small water melon, it’s actually quite heavy, so that’s a good sign as well and once we try to push on it, it doesn’t give like ripe avocado, if you don’t want it like that enjoy any of those categories so there is no St mark yellow sport on it But this one looks like a good one for me pay for it and I will cut open and taste it on the camera so you guys know how it is. So now I selected and bought the refined sugar water melon, we are going to cut it open for you, and show you guys some tips and let you know how it works. Okay it’s pretty good I got my ceramic knife here, I like ceramic knives it doesn’t import flavor to your food like stainless steel made plus it’s sharper and longer and you don’t sharpen the knives regularly so that is why I like the ceramic, so I put this in the melon and it starts to crack even if I am not cutting it, so that’s definitely a good sign. Alright let’s see what it looks like on the inside, alright look at that, nice, deep, rich, red melon, we are smelling it, thin odor on the inside, here I want to explain to you guys the sweetest part of the melon, the sweetest part of the melon is not by the rime it’s always like right in the middle of it, so if you are like digging it yourself, you could always dig out the melon and serve the rest to the other people, or the other day the technique I use sometimes is to start eating at the middle first to get the sweetest part and then eat the outside around the edges first and then eat the middle to the end. so we are going to go ahead and take the knife here, we are going to slice that little section here, definitely think I did good this time it could be sweeter but definitely happy with my approaches and this is going to feed me more than many people here. Lunch today, and the food boot area all the food behind me, you could buy a plate of food for like 10 bucks, but you can buy a water melon for 5 bucks, this is more than a meal for me. If you guys enjoyed this episode of learning about how to pick a water melon with my tips I shared with you guys, then give me thumbs up. You should let me know or be sure to come out to the 2017 Ellen expo. You guys should eat some of these crazy delicious Ellen water melon and know more about elien and grow your own food at home, home grown foods are some of the best food that money can’t buy. Visit some of my past episodes I have over four hundred episodes now on this you tube channel dedicated to teaching you guys how to eat fruit and vegetables, because they are my favorite food, in the whole entire world and be sure to share this video with somebody that doesn’t know how to pick water melons so they could improve their skills, be sure to click the subscribe so you don’t miss out on any of my upcoming episode, upcoming about five to seven days you never know where I will show up or what you will be learning on my you tube channels . Once again my name is john Kohler with okraw.com we will see next time, till then remember keep eating your fruit and vegetable because they are the best.

147
Views

How To Pick The Sweetest Watermelon Every Single Time

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 147 views • 2017-09-27 05:13 • came from similar tags

 

 
It isn't summer until you've had your first watermelon of the season. Chances are though, it's been about a year since you've bought your last watermelon. Do you remember how to pick out a good one? Many people have no idea how to select a watermelon. They just knock on this over-sized fruit as if they know what they are doing. Although it can be difficult to know how ripe the interior is just by inspecting the outside, there are several clever tricks you can learn to help you pick the perfect watermelon. 1.Lift a few The watermelon should be heavy for its size, as this indicates that it is full of water and therefore nice and ripe. Try comparing the weight of your watermelon with another of equal size - the heavier one will be the riper. This advice goes for most fruits and vegetables. 2.Look for the field spot. The underside of the watermelon should have a creamy yellow spot, known as the field spot. This is where the melon sat on the ground and ripened in the sun, so the darker it is the better! This one is no wives' tale. If the field spot is white, or even nonexistent, this probably means that the watermelon was picked too soon, and will not be ripe. 3.Inspect the color. A perfect, ripe watermelon should be dark green in color and dull in appearance, rather than shiny. A shiny watermelon will usually be under ripe. 4.Say no to stem If the melon still has a stem on it, move along. This means the melon didn't come off the vine easily so it wasn't quite ripe. You could look for a melon with a slightly indented end. This indicates that the melon came off the vine on its own. 5.What about knocking? knocking is pointless, however you can hold the watermelon like you're cradling a baby and give it a good thwap, you'll feel the vibrations in your bottom hand if the watermelon is right. 6.What about selecting a pre-cut melon? If you're purchasing pre-cut watermelon, there are also certain things to look out for. Choose pieces with bright red flesh and dark brown or black seeds. Avoid pieces with white streaks and an abundance of white seeds. You should also steer clear if the flesh looks dried out or mealy, or is separating from the seeds. Now, What about you? Do you have any tricks to pick a perfect watermelon? Please share it in the comments below.
  view all
 


 
It isn't summer until you've had your first watermelon of the season. Chances are though, it's been about a year since you've bought your last watermelon. Do you remember how to pick out a good one? Many people have no idea how to select a watermelon. They just knock on this over-sized fruit as if they know what they are doing. Although it can be difficult to know how ripe the interior is just by inspecting the outside, there are several clever tricks you can learn to help you pick the perfect watermelon. 1.Lift a few The watermelon should be heavy for its size, as this indicates that it is full of water and therefore nice and ripe. Try comparing the weight of your watermelon with another of equal size - the heavier one will be the riper. This advice goes for most fruits and vegetables. 2.Look for the field spot. The underside of the watermelon should have a creamy yellow spot, known as the field spot. This is where the melon sat on the ground and ripened in the sun, so the darker it is the better! This one is no wives' tale. If the field spot is white, or even nonexistent, this probably means that the watermelon was picked too soon, and will not be ripe. 3.Inspect the color. A perfect, ripe watermelon should be dark green in color and dull in appearance, rather than shiny. A shiny watermelon will usually be under ripe. 4.Say no to stem If the melon still has a stem on it, move along. This means the melon didn't come off the vine easily so it wasn't quite ripe. You could look for a melon with a slightly indented end. This indicates that the melon came off the vine on its own. 5.What about knocking? knocking is pointless, however you can hold the watermelon like you're cradling a baby and give it a good thwap, you'll feel the vibrations in your bottom hand if the watermelon is right. 6.What about selecting a pre-cut melon? If you're purchasing pre-cut watermelon, there are also certain things to look out for. Choose pieces with bright red flesh and dark brown or black seeds. Avoid pieces with white streaks and an abundance of white seeds. You should also steer clear if the flesh looks dried out or mealy, or is separating from the seeds. Now, What about you? Do you have any tricks to pick a perfect watermelon? Please share it in the comments below.
 
99
Views

You Will Never Throw Away Grass Clippings After Watching This

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 99 views • 2017-09-27 05:01 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
1.Add to Compost Grass-clippings are a great source of nitrogen and break-down quickly. A proper compost-pile requires a mix of green and brown materials. Freshly cut-grass is considered ‘green’, and so will need to be balanced out by the addition of some brown-material, like dry-leaves, branches, twigs or paper. When adding fresh grass-clippings, make sure to turn the grass into the pile to enhance aeration and prevent compaction. Microbes will break the pile down quickly and you will have a rich-pile to spread in a short amount of time. 2.Lawn-Clipping-Tea Liquid organic fertilizers are seemingly more popular year on year in the store, but you can make your own liquid plant feed at home. To brew a lawn-clipping tea, place your freshly cut-grass in a bucket of water and allow to steep. Beneficial nutrients like potassium, nitrogen, phosphorous, chlorophyll and amino-acids will leech from the grass into the water. After 4-days or so, strain off the liquid and use it to feed your plants by pouring onto the roots or spraying on the leaves. 3.Leave-Them-on-the-Lawn If you’re striving for a perfect-lawn, you probably remove your grass clippings every time you mow. But you’re actually robbing the grass of certain nutrients that it needs to thrive. In future, leave your short clippings lie, as they will break-down quickly, nourishing the grass and turning it a perfect shade of green. In fact, grass-clippings can add back-up to 25 % of the nutrients that growth removes from soil! These clippings also encourage beneficial microorganisms and earthworms that digest this grass and maintain healthy-soil. 4.Container-Mulch Moisture is always an issue when it comes to Container-Gardening. Containers need a lot of Watering. Add a thick-layer of grass clippings on top of your potting-soil to hold in extra moisture. Grass-clippings either fresh or dried, make an excellent organic mulch which contains high amounts of nitrogen, something all plants need to grow and flourish. 5.Livestock-Feed If your grass is cut with an electric or hand-push mower, you could use the cut grass to supplement diets of herbivores. I have fond memories of grabbing handfuls to feed the guinea-pig and rabbit as a child and how excited they would get. You would not want to use wet-clippings since they spoil quickly and can make animals sick. And 6. Layer-in-a-Raised-Bed If you are building a raised-bed or a hugelkultur bed, you can use a thick layer of grass-clippings to provide nutrients and build-up the bed which will use less compost to make up the volume.  The added bonus is that the grass-clippings help to break-down the carbon rich fibrous material in a raised-bed. These were my 6-uses of grass-clippings. If you’ve got any other uses of grass-clippings, please share them in the comments below. NOTE: The materials and the information contained on Natural ways channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. None of the information on our videos is a substitute for a diagnosis and treatment by your health professional. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provide. view all
 


 
 
1.Add to Compost Grass-clippings are a great source of nitrogen and break-down quickly. A proper compost-pile requires a mix of green and brown materials. Freshly cut-grass is considered ‘green’, and so will need to be balanced out by the addition of some brown-material, like dry-leaves, branches, twigs or paper. When adding fresh grass-clippings, make sure to turn the grass into the pile to enhance aeration and prevent compaction. Microbes will break the pile down quickly and you will have a rich-pile to spread in a short amount of time. 2.Lawn-Clipping-Tea Liquid organic fertilizers are seemingly more popular year on year in the store, but you can make your own liquid plant feed at home. To brew a lawn-clipping tea, place your freshly cut-grass in a bucket of water and allow to steep. Beneficial nutrients like potassium, nitrogen, phosphorous, chlorophyll and amino-acids will leech from the grass into the water. After 4-days or so, strain off the liquid and use it to feed your plants by pouring onto the roots or spraying on the leaves. 3.Leave-Them-on-the-Lawn If you’re striving for a perfect-lawn, you probably remove your grass clippings every time you mow. But you’re actually robbing the grass of certain nutrients that it needs to thrive. In future, leave your short clippings lie, as they will break-down quickly, nourishing the grass and turning it a perfect shade of green. In fact, grass-clippings can add back-up to 25 % of the nutrients that growth removes from soil! These clippings also encourage beneficial microorganisms and earthworms that digest this grass and maintain healthy-soil. 4.Container-Mulch Moisture is always an issue when it comes to Container-Gardening. Containers need a lot of Watering. Add a thick-layer of grass clippings on top of your potting-soil to hold in extra moisture. Grass-clippings either fresh or dried, make an excellent organic mulch which contains high amounts of nitrogen, something all plants need to grow and flourish. 5.Livestock-Feed If your grass is cut with an electric or hand-push mower, you could use the cut grass to supplement diets of herbivores. I have fond memories of grabbing handfuls to feed the guinea-pig and rabbit as a child and how excited they would get. You would not want to use wet-clippings since they spoil quickly and can make animals sick. And 6. Layer-in-a-Raised-Bed If you are building a raised-bed or a hugelkultur bed, you can use a thick layer of grass-clippings to provide nutrients and build-up the bed which will use less compost to make up the volume.  The added bonus is that the grass-clippings help to break-down the carbon rich fibrous material in a raised-bed. These were my 6-uses of grass-clippings. If you’ve got any other uses of grass-clippings, please share them in the comments below. NOTE: The materials and the information contained on Natural ways channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. None of the information on our videos is a substitute for a diagnosis and treatment by your health professional. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provide.
90
Views

7 Micro Greens That Can be Harvested in few Days

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 90 views • 2017-09-27 05:01 • came from similar tags

 

 
Microgreens or “vegetable confetti” are greens that are harvested just a few weeks after propagation. Like sprouts, micro greens are easy to grow in your kitchen or beside a sunny window in your home. Unlike sprouts, micro greens are grown in soil. You can grow herbs, salad greens, vegetables and edible flowers as micro greens. Some micro greens can be harvested in just a couple of weeks, whereas others will take a month to grow. Here are some popular microgreens anyone can grow indoors. 1.Beet: You can get beets that give microgreens with red and purple stems. Getting ready in about 15 days, they are such a delight to grow and to use in any dish to add visual appeal. Bull’s Blood and Detroit Dark Red are popular Beet microgreens varieties. 2.Garden cress: Cress sprouts are a staple in the egg and mayonnaise sandwiches of the English. The micro greens with a peppery taste can be used in soups and salads as well. They are harvested within two weeks of sowing. American cress and Upland cress also has a similar taste and flavor. 3.Mustards: You have several mustards to choose from besides the regular green ones. The Osaka Purple and Red Giant give greens with purplish stems and reddish leaves respectively. Irrespective of the color, they pack as much pungency as you would expect from mustards. Growing 1 ½ to 2 inches, they become ready for harvest in 14-16 days when the first true leaves appear in most of the plants. 4.Radish: One of the quickest growing among micro greens, they can be harvested within 12 days of sowing the seeds. Sango, Red Arrow, Japanese Daikon, and Triton are popular for their contrasting leaf and stem colors. 5.Onion/chives These are monocots and have a grass-like appearance, with the first leaf of each sprout tipped with the empty seed coat. They take a month to reach the micro green stage. If they are harvested by snipping off just the top 1-2 inches, you can continue to get a few more harvests. Wheatgrass is another example of monocot micro greens that can give more than one harvest. 6.Orach The bright red color of the Fire Red variety of Orach is extremely striking, but it tastes rather mild, like its relative spinach. 7.Kohlrabi:  Another member of the brassica group ready to be harvested in 14 days. The leaves are dark green with light purple stems. Now, On the other hand, carrot, cabbage, broccoli, chard and spinach give milder micro greens and a mixture of them can make a veritable salad on their own. This is your chance to grow some plants that you wouldn’t normally have in your garden. Komatsuna, mizuna, red amaranth and Tatsoi are worth a try if you can source their seeds.
  view all
 


 
Microgreens or “vegetable confetti” are greens that are harvested just a few weeks after propagation. Like sprouts, micro greens are easy to grow in your kitchen or beside a sunny window in your home. Unlike sprouts, micro greens are grown in soil. You can grow herbs, salad greens, vegetables and edible flowers as micro greens. Some micro greens can be harvested in just a couple of weeks, whereas others will take a month to grow. Here are some popular microgreens anyone can grow indoors. 1.Beet: You can get beets that give microgreens with red and purple stems. Getting ready in about 15 days, they are such a delight to grow and to use in any dish to add visual appeal. Bull’s Blood and Detroit Dark Red are popular Beet microgreens varieties. 2.Garden cress: Cress sprouts are a staple in the egg and mayonnaise sandwiches of the English. The micro greens with a peppery taste can be used in soups and salads as well. They are harvested within two weeks of sowing. American cress and Upland cress also has a similar taste and flavor. 3.Mustards: You have several mustards to choose from besides the regular green ones. The Osaka Purple and Red Giant give greens with purplish stems and reddish leaves respectively. Irrespective of the color, they pack as much pungency as you would expect from mustards. Growing 1 ½ to 2 inches, they become ready for harvest in 14-16 days when the first true leaves appear in most of the plants. 4.Radish: One of the quickest growing among micro greens, they can be harvested within 12 days of sowing the seeds. Sango, Red Arrow, Japanese Daikon, and Triton are popular for their contrasting leaf and stem colors. 5.Onion/chives These are monocots and have a grass-like appearance, with the first leaf of each sprout tipped with the empty seed coat. They take a month to reach the micro green stage. If they are harvested by snipping off just the top 1-2 inches, you can continue to get a few more harvests. Wheatgrass is another example of monocot micro greens that can give more than one harvest. 6.Orach The bright red color of the Fire Red variety of Orach is extremely striking, but it tastes rather mild, like its relative spinach. 7.Kohlrabi:  Another member of the brassica group ready to be harvested in 14 days. The leaves are dark green with light purple stems. Now, On the other hand, carrot, cabbage, broccoli, chard and spinach give milder micro greens and a mixture of them can make a veritable salad on their own. This is your chance to grow some plants that you wouldn’t normally have in your garden. Komatsuna, mizuna, red amaranth and Tatsoi are worth a try if you can source their seeds.
 
107
Views

5 Spices Anyone Can Grow At Home Over And Over Again

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 107 views • 2017-09-27 05:01 • came from similar tags

 

 
Spices are frequently used in cooking in combination with herbs. Here are some of the spices you can try growing at home: 1.Ginger. Ginger is often referred to as ginger root. Ginger is popularly used in savory curries as well as herbal teas not only for flavor but its medicinal-value. The rhizome has a branching habit and sends out new shoots as it grows and spreads. The plant can be easily propagated from 1” to 2” pieces of the rhizome containing, at least, one ‘eye’ or growing-bud. Fill a large tub with rich, well-draining potting-mix. Sow-in several pieces of ginger 6” apart in the tub. Keep the tub in a well-lit area or under grow lights. Water regularly when the soil feels dry. 2.Turmeric. Turmeric is a colored relative of ginger. This Indian native can be grown much the same way as ginger. If the antimicrobial and anti-tumor properties of turmeric do not prompt you to use it more liberally in your cooking, growing your own just might. Turmeric is more often sold and used in its dried-form. However, if you can get a few pieces of the rhizome to start with, they will multiply every year, providing you with more than you’d need. 3. Garlic. Garlic is a very easy bulb to grow indoors or outdoors. All it takes is separating the cloves and sticking them into moist, well-draining soil. You can start the bulbs indoors any time of the year, but fall planting is best for outdoor beds. Longer growing season gives the plants enough time to develop good-sized bulbs. Keep the soil evenly moist, but water logging can result in bulb rot. The leaves of the garlic can be used as an herb. The mature bulbs can be harvested when the leaves start to wilt in summer. 4. mustard. Mustard is an excellent spice to grow at home because you can make your own mustard sauces with it. Start the seeds in a shallow tray and transplant them into pots when the plants develop two sets of true leaves. The seedlings, as well as the young leaves, can be used as greens, so you can thin them out as necessary. Keep the pots in a sunny-location and water them regularly. The thin, long seed pods that follow the flowers contain several seeds. They should be harvested before they burst open. Cut-off the stalks while they are still green and dry them in the shade inside a sack. The seeds will require winnowing to clean them. Use whole-seeds for tempering or grind them with vinegar to make your own mustard-sauce. 5.Coriander. The name Coriander can mean an herb and a spice. The Leaves Are called cilantro whereas The spice is the dried seeds of the same plant, which are very different in taste. it thrives as an herb during the cool season, but when the temperature rises, the plant bolts, sending-up a long stem carrying the flowers that would eventually develop into coriander-seeds. view all
 


 
Spices are frequently used in cooking in combination with herbs. Here are some of the spices you can try growing at home: 1.Ginger. Ginger is often referred to as ginger root. Ginger is popularly used in savory curries as well as herbal teas not only for flavor but its medicinal-value. The rhizome has a branching habit and sends out new shoots as it grows and spreads. The plant can be easily propagated from 1” to 2” pieces of the rhizome containing, at least, one ‘eye’ or growing-bud. Fill a large tub with rich, well-draining potting-mix. Sow-in several pieces of ginger 6” apart in the tub. Keep the tub in a well-lit area or under grow lights. Water regularly when the soil feels dry. 2.Turmeric. Turmeric is a colored relative of ginger. This Indian native can be grown much the same way as ginger. If the antimicrobial and anti-tumor properties of turmeric do not prompt you to use it more liberally in your cooking, growing your own just might. Turmeric is more often sold and used in its dried-form. However, if you can get a few pieces of the rhizome to start with, they will multiply every year, providing you with more than you’d need. 3. Garlic. Garlic is a very easy bulb to grow indoors or outdoors. All it takes is separating the cloves and sticking them into moist, well-draining soil. You can start the bulbs indoors any time of the year, but fall planting is best for outdoor beds. Longer growing season gives the plants enough time to develop good-sized bulbs. Keep the soil evenly moist, but water logging can result in bulb rot. The leaves of the garlic can be used as an herb. The mature bulbs can be harvested when the leaves start to wilt in summer. 4. mustard. Mustard is an excellent spice to grow at home because you can make your own mustard sauces with it. Start the seeds in a shallow tray and transplant them into pots when the plants develop two sets of true leaves. The seedlings, as well as the young leaves, can be used as greens, so you can thin them out as necessary. Keep the pots in a sunny-location and water them regularly. The thin, long seed pods that follow the flowers contain several seeds. They should be harvested before they burst open. Cut-off the stalks while they are still green and dry them in the shade inside a sack. The seeds will require winnowing to clean them. Use whole-seeds for tempering or grind them with vinegar to make your own mustard-sauce. 5.Coriander. The name Coriander can mean an herb and a spice. The Leaves Are called cilantro whereas The spice is the dried seeds of the same plant, which are very different in taste. it thrives as an herb during the cool season, but when the temperature rises, the plant bolts, sending-up a long stem carrying the flowers that would eventually develop into coriander-seeds.
92
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Plants You Can Grow From Cuttings and Leaves That increases your stock in a relatively short time.

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 92 views • 2017-09-27 04:54 • came from similar tags

 

 
When selecting a stem from the mother-plant, you should look for young, green growth. Young stems will always root better than more mature, woodier stems. Cut just below a node (the joint where a leaf meets the stem) with a sharp pair of scissors. As an added precaution against contamination You could also sterilize them with rubbing alcohol. Plants send out new roots from nodes, so by exposing some of the node's interior, you increase the chances of your new plant sending out a root from that node. While the new plant need leaves to provide energy through photosynthesis, too many leaves will compete with the plant's efforts to send out new roots. Leaving only 2-leaves is a good option. Following plant cuttings give excellent results. 1. Rose. Take 10-inch long hardwood cuttings of pencil thickness in fall and plant out in the chosen location. Water the cuttings thoroughly until winter. 2. Hydrangea. Take 4-inch long tip cuttings carrying 3-4 pairs of leaves. Remove the lowest pair and trim the stem closer to the node. Insert into moist rooting medium and cover with plastic sheet. You can trim the larger-leaves by 3/4th to reduce water-loss through evaporation. 3.Geranium. 6-8 inches long cuttings can be rooted, but it helps if the parent plant is allowed to wilt slightly prior to taking the cuttings. Withdraw water for a week and then take the cuttings 12-hours after watering the plant. The rehydrated stems take root more easily. 4.Snake-plant. 2-3 inch sections of the leaf can be used to make new plants. You can thus make a large number of plants from one parent plant. The only problem with this method of propagation is that the new plants will not carry the original variegation. Sections of rhizomes should be planted to retain the variegation. 5.Rex Begonia. All you need to grow these big-leaved beauties is a single leaf. Make a few slashes on the prominent veins on the underside of the leaf and lay it on a moist bed of peat-moss and sharp sand in equal proportions. Weight the leaf down with a few pebbles so that the cut edges remain in contact with the bed. Keep in a warm, well-lit place and watch the new plants appearing at these cut edges. Some of the other popular plants that can be grown from cuttings include: lavender, Comfrey, Philodendrons, Holly, Fuchsia and many others. Almost all herbs can be grown from cuttings and can be even grown in water. Check out my other video on herbs that can be grown in water on your kitchen window-sill.
  view all
 


 
When selecting a stem from the mother-plant, you should look for young, green growth. Young stems will always root better than more mature, woodier stems. Cut just below a node (the joint where a leaf meets the stem) with a sharp pair of scissors. As an added precaution against contamination You could also sterilize them with rubbing alcohol. Plants send out new roots from nodes, so by exposing some of the node's interior, you increase the chances of your new plant sending out a root from that node. While the new plant need leaves to provide energy through photosynthesis, too many leaves will compete with the plant's efforts to send out new roots. Leaving only 2-leaves is a good option. Following plant cuttings give excellent results. 1. Rose. Take 10-inch long hardwood cuttings of pencil thickness in fall and plant out in the chosen location. Water the cuttings thoroughly until winter. 2. Hydrangea. Take 4-inch long tip cuttings carrying 3-4 pairs of leaves. Remove the lowest pair and trim the stem closer to the node. Insert into moist rooting medium and cover with plastic sheet. You can trim the larger-leaves by 3/4th to reduce water-loss through evaporation. 3.Geranium. 6-8 inches long cuttings can be rooted, but it helps if the parent plant is allowed to wilt slightly prior to taking the cuttings. Withdraw water for a week and then take the cuttings 12-hours after watering the plant. The rehydrated stems take root more easily. 4.Snake-plant. 2-3 inch sections of the leaf can be used to make new plants. You can thus make a large number of plants from one parent plant. The only problem with this method of propagation is that the new plants will not carry the original variegation. Sections of rhizomes should be planted to retain the variegation. 5.Rex Begonia. All you need to grow these big-leaved beauties is a single leaf. Make a few slashes on the prominent veins on the underside of the leaf and lay it on a moist bed of peat-moss and sharp sand in equal proportions. Weight the leaf down with a few pebbles so that the cut edges remain in contact with the bed. Keep in a warm, well-lit place and watch the new plants appearing at these cut edges. Some of the other popular plants that can be grown from cuttings include: lavender, Comfrey, Philodendrons, Holly, Fuchsia and many others. Almost all herbs can be grown from cuttings and can be even grown in water. Check out my other video on herbs that can be grown in water on your kitchen window-sill.
 
91
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Your Fruit Trees Will Produce 10 times More Fruits if You Do This

Natural Ways posted the article • 0 comments • 91 views • 2017-09-27 04:54 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
1.Go with Dwarfs. If you don’t want to wait several years to get fruit from your garden, consider planting dwarf varieties of your favorite trees.  Dwarfs don’t grow as tall or as wide as a full-size tree so they begin to bear fruit within the first 2-3 years. These smaller trees also don’t require as much space, making them perfect for gardeners who want to grow their own fruit but don’t have a lot of land. 2.Prune as Needed. Fruit-trees ideally need to be trained in their first few years of growth into the shape you want them to maintain throughout their productive lives.  Pruning should be done at the end of winter, before the tree comes out of dormancy. 3.Root-Suckers and Water-Sprouts. it is important to recognize that not all growth is good-growth. The production of flowers and fruit require a huge investment of nutrients and energy from your plants so you want to be certain that these resources aren’t being wasted where they aren’t needed. Root-suckers and water sprouts are two such wastes. New shoots that grow from the rootstock of a grafted fruit tree are known as root-suckers. These growths often look like a new plant that has taken root at the base of the existing parent. On the other hand, Water-sprouts are vertical shoots that grow straight-up from the established limbs of trees. While these growths aren’t nearly as undesirable as root-suckers, they can still be a waste of nutrients if they aren’t properly controlled. 4.Encourage Pollination Among your native plants, make sure something is blooming each season. Beneficial animals like bees, hummingbirds, butterflies, and bats are a few of the top-pollinators. For this reason, it is important to keep your garden hospitable for wildlife.  Avoid overuse of pesticides which can kill beneficial-insects. 5.Know Your Soil. Plants are a lot like people in that different varieties and species have different tastes.  It is important to know what balance of nutrients and trace minerals is best for each plant. Soil-pH can also play a big part in maximizing fruit yields. If you aren’t sure what kind of soil you have, it’s always better to test samples from around your trees and shrubs.  Once you know what’s missing, you can amend the soil to boost future fruit-production. 6.Harvest Everything. This is perhaps the easiest advice to follow when it comes to growing successful fruit trees.  Still, it bears mentioning.  Unharvested fruit left-on the branch at the end of the season actually signals to the tree or bush that it made too much that-year. During the next growing season, the plant will actually produce less as a result.  So make sure to pick-all of the fruit that your garden grows and let your plants know that you just can’t get enough! NOTE: The materials and the information contained on Natural ways channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. None of the information on our videos is a substitute for a diagnosis and treatment by your health professional. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provide. view all
 


 
 
 
1.Go with Dwarfs. If you don’t want to wait several years to get fruit from your garden, consider planting dwarf varieties of your favorite trees.  Dwarfs don’t grow as tall or as wide as a full-size tree so they begin to bear fruit within the first 2-3 years. These smaller trees also don’t require as much space, making them perfect for gardeners who want to grow their own fruit but don’t have a lot of land. 2.Prune as Needed. Fruit-trees ideally need to be trained in their first few years of growth into the shape you want them to maintain throughout their productive lives.  Pruning should be done at the end of winter, before the tree comes out of dormancy. 3.Root-Suckers and Water-Sprouts. it is important to recognize that not all growth is good-growth. The production of flowers and fruit require a huge investment of nutrients and energy from your plants so you want to be certain that these resources aren’t being wasted where they aren’t needed. Root-suckers and water sprouts are two such wastes. New shoots that grow from the rootstock of a grafted fruit tree are known as root-suckers. These growths often look like a new plant that has taken root at the base of the existing parent. On the other hand, Water-sprouts are vertical shoots that grow straight-up from the established limbs of trees. While these growths aren’t nearly as undesirable as root-suckers, they can still be a waste of nutrients if they aren’t properly controlled. 4.Encourage Pollination Among your native plants, make sure something is blooming each season. Beneficial animals like bees, hummingbirds, butterflies, and bats are a few of the top-pollinators. For this reason, it is important to keep your garden hospitable for wildlife.  Avoid overuse of pesticides which can kill beneficial-insects. 5.Know Your Soil. Plants are a lot like people in that different varieties and species have different tastes.  It is important to know what balance of nutrients and trace minerals is best for each plant. Soil-pH can also play a big part in maximizing fruit yields. If you aren’t sure what kind of soil you have, it’s always better to test samples from around your trees and shrubs.  Once you know what’s missing, you can amend the soil to boost future fruit-production. 6.Harvest Everything. This is perhaps the easiest advice to follow when it comes to growing successful fruit trees.  Still, it bears mentioning.  Unharvested fruit left-on the branch at the end of the season actually signals to the tree or bush that it made too much that-year. During the next growing season, the plant will actually produce less as a result.  So make sure to pick-all of the fruit that your garden grows and let your plants know that you just can’t get enough! NOTE: The materials and the information contained on Natural ways channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. None of the information on our videos is a substitute for a diagnosis and treatment by your health professional. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provide.
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9 Of The Fastest Growing Veggies You Can Harvest In No Time

Ingemar posted the article • 0 comments • 116 views • 2017-09-27 04:44 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
1.Garden Cress – 14 Days Ready to harvest in as little as 2-weeks, garden cress can be planted in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Also a garden space-saver, a small (1 or 2 feet square) patch of cress will supply you with an abundance of this tangy herb. 2.Radishes – 21 Days A cool season crop, spring radishes grow best in 50⁰F to 65⁰F weather. Once sown, you’ll see leafy green shoots above the soil in just three or four days. Keep planting seeds every week or two for a constant harvest through spring and autumn. 3.Green-Onions – 21 Days Also called scallions, green-onions are quick-growing plants that can be cut back to their base again and again throughout the season. Once their green shoots reach a height of 6-inches, they are ready for the first round of harvesting. 4.Tatsoi – 25 Days A low-growing mustard green, tatsoi is a wonderful addition to salads and soups. Baby tatsoi leaves can be harvested when they reach 4-inches in length, or you can wait the full 40-days for tatsoi to mature to full size. 5.Lettuce – 30 Days Another cool-weather vegetable that prefers temperatures between 60⁰F and 70⁰F, lettuce seeds should be sown in early spring and late-summer. Of the five types of lettuce – loose-leaf, cos, crisphead, butterhead, and stem. leaf lettuce varieties like green leaf and red leaf are among the easiest to cultivate and are more tolerant of hot weather. Planting new seeds every 14-days will provide a continuous harvest. 6.Spinach – 30 Days Able to survive in temperatures as low as 15⁰F, spinach is a cold hardy-vegetable that can be planted as soon as the ground-thaws. Pluck outer spinach leaves from the plant as it grows or re-sow seeds every 2-weeks for successive harvests. Don’t wait too long to gather spinach because its leaves will become bitter once the plant reaches maturity. 7.Arugula – 30 Days Since arugula seeds germinate well in cooler-soil, they can be planted as soon as the garden bed can be worked after the spring thaw. Sow seeds every two to three weeks for continuous-harvesting. 8.Kale – 30 Days A “cut-and-come-again” plant, kale’s young and tender leaves can be culled continually throughout the growing-season once the plant is about 2-inches tall. Avoid picking the central bud, since this keeps kale growing and productive. And 9. Swiss-Chard – 45 Days A member of the beet family, Swiss-chard can be harvested throughout the season by cutting-off the outer leaves when they are about 3-inches long and are still young and tender. In addition to using the fresh-leaves in salads, you can cut Swiss-chard stems from the leaf and cook them like you would asparagus
 
subtitle:

not all vegetables take from spring to fall to mature if you're getting a late start on your home garden or live in a region with a short growing season you're not there are many healthy delicious vegetables that are quick to harvest here are the nine fastest growing vegetables to get your garden jump-started one garden cress 14 days ready to harvest in as little as two weeks garden cress can be planted in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked also a garden space saver a small one or two feet patch of crests will supply you with an abundance of this tangy herb to radishes 21 days a cool season crop spring radishes grow best in 50 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit weather once sown you'll see leafy greens shoot above the soil in just three or four days keep planting seeds every week or two for a constant harvest through spring and autumn 3 green onions 21 days also called scallions green onions are quick growing plants that can be cut back to their base again and again throughout the season once their green shoots reach a height of 6 inches they are ready for the first round of harvesting for tatsoi 25 days a low-growing mustard green Joshua is a wonderful addition to salads and soups baby tatsoi leaves can be harvested when they reach 4 inches in length or you can wait the full 40 days for tax way to mature to full size 5 lettuce 30 days another cool weather vegetable that prefers temperatures between 60 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit lettuce seeds should be sown in early spring and late summer of the 5 types of lettuce loose leaf costs crisp head butter head and stem leaf lettuce varieties like green leaf and red leaf are among the easiest to cultivate and are more tolerant of hot weather planting new seeds every 14 days will provide a continuous harvest 6 spinach 30 days able to survive in temperatures as low as 15 degrees Fahrenheit spinach is a cold hardy vegetable that can be planted as soon as the ground thaws pluck out ur spinach leaves remove plant as it grows or reso seeds every two weeks for successive harvests don't wait too long to gather spinach because its leaves will become bitter once the plant reaches maturity seven arugula 30 days since arugula seeds germinate well in cooler soil they can be planted as soon as the garden bed can be worked after the spring saw sow seeds every two to three weeks for continuous harvesting 8 kale 30 days a cut and come again plant kales young and tender leaves can be culled continually throughout the growing season once the plant is about 2 inches tall avoid picking the central blood since this keeps kale growing and productive and 9 Swiss chard 45 days a member of the beet family Swiss chard can be harvested throughout the season by cutting off the outer leaves when they are about 3 inches long and are still young and tender in addition to using fresh leaves and salads you can cut Swiss chard stems from the leaf and cook them like you would asparagus now if you liked the video give it a thumbs up and if this is your first time visiting my channel please subscribe for more videos [Music] you


  view all
 


 
 
1.Garden Cress – 14 Days Ready to harvest in as little as 2-weeks, garden cress can be planted in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Also a garden space-saver, a small (1 or 2 feet square) patch of cress will supply you with an abundance of this tangy herb. 2.Radishes – 21 Days A cool season crop, spring radishes grow best in 50⁰F to 65⁰F weather. Once sown, you’ll see leafy green shoots above the soil in just three or four days. Keep planting seeds every week or two for a constant harvest through spring and autumn. 3.Green-Onions – 21 Days Also called scallions, green-onions are quick-growing plants that can be cut back to their base again and again throughout the season. Once their green shoots reach a height of 6-inches, they are ready for the first round of harvesting. 4.Tatsoi – 25 Days A low-growing mustard green, tatsoi is a wonderful addition to salads and soups. Baby tatsoi leaves can be harvested when they reach 4-inches in length, or you can wait the full 40-days for tatsoi to mature to full size. 5.Lettuce – 30 Days Another cool-weather vegetable that prefers temperatures between 60⁰F and 70⁰F, lettuce seeds should be sown in early spring and late-summer. Of the five types of lettuce – loose-leaf, cos, crisphead, butterhead, and stem. leaf lettuce varieties like green leaf and red leaf are among the easiest to cultivate and are more tolerant of hot weather. Planting new seeds every 14-days will provide a continuous harvest. 6.Spinach – 30 Days Able to survive in temperatures as low as 15⁰F, spinach is a cold hardy-vegetable that can be planted as soon as the ground-thaws. Pluck outer spinach leaves from the plant as it grows or re-sow seeds every 2-weeks for successive harvests. Don’t wait too long to gather spinach because its leaves will become bitter once the plant reaches maturity. 7.Arugula – 30 Days Since arugula seeds germinate well in cooler-soil, they can be planted as soon as the garden bed can be worked after the spring thaw. Sow seeds every two to three weeks for continuous-harvesting. 8.Kale – 30 Days A “cut-and-come-again” plant, kale’s young and tender leaves can be culled continually throughout the growing-season once the plant is about 2-inches tall. Avoid picking the central bud, since this keeps kale growing and productive. And 9. Swiss-Chard – 45 Days A member of the beet family, Swiss-chard can be harvested throughout the season by cutting-off the outer leaves when they are about 3-inches long and are still young and tender. In addition to using the fresh-leaves in salads, you can cut Swiss-chard stems from the leaf and cook them like you would asparagus
 
subtitle:

not all vegetables take from spring to fall to mature if you're getting a late start on your home garden or live in a region with a short growing season you're not there are many healthy delicious vegetables that are quick to harvest here are the nine fastest growing vegetables to get your garden jump-started one garden cress 14 days ready to harvest in as little as two weeks garden cress can be planted in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked also a garden space saver a small one or two feet patch of crests will supply you with an abundance of this tangy herb to radishes 21 days a cool season crop spring radishes grow best in 50 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit weather once sown you'll see leafy greens shoot above the soil in just three or four days keep planting seeds every week or two for a constant harvest through spring and autumn 3 green onions 21 days also called scallions green onions are quick growing plants that can be cut back to their base again and again throughout the season once their green shoots reach a height of 6 inches they are ready for the first round of harvesting for tatsoi 25 days a low-growing mustard green Joshua is a wonderful addition to salads and soups baby tatsoi leaves can be harvested when they reach 4 inches in length or you can wait the full 40 days for tax way to mature to full size 5 lettuce 30 days another cool weather vegetable that prefers temperatures between 60 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit lettuce seeds should be sown in early spring and late summer of the 5 types of lettuce loose leaf costs crisp head butter head and stem leaf lettuce varieties like green leaf and red leaf are among the easiest to cultivate and are more tolerant of hot weather planting new seeds every 14 days will provide a continuous harvest 6 spinach 30 days able to survive in temperatures as low as 15 degrees Fahrenheit spinach is a cold hardy vegetable that can be planted as soon as the ground thaws pluck out ur spinach leaves remove plant as it grows or reso seeds every two weeks for successive harvests don't wait too long to gather spinach because its leaves will become bitter once the plant reaches maturity seven arugula 30 days since arugula seeds germinate well in cooler soil they can be planted as soon as the garden bed can be worked after the spring saw sow seeds every two to three weeks for continuous harvesting 8 kale 30 days a cut and come again plant kales young and tender leaves can be culled continually throughout the growing season once the plant is about 2 inches tall avoid picking the central blood since this keeps kale growing and productive and 9 Swiss chard 45 days a member of the beet family Swiss chard can be harvested throughout the season by cutting off the outer leaves when they are about 3 inches long and are still young and tender in addition to using fresh leaves and salads you can cut Swiss chard stems from the leaf and cook them like you would asparagus now if you liked the video give it a thumbs up and if this is your first time visiting my channel please subscribe for more videos [Music] you


 
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How To Grow Garlic - BEST Way To Grow And Plant Garlic In Garden

Ingemar posted the article • 0 comments • 116 views • 2017-09-26 18:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
subtitle:

hey gardeners I am Brandon this is April hi and we are with botanical interests today we are planting garlic how should you choose garlic garlic falls into two main categories hard neck and soft neck hardneck garlic is more closely related to wild garlic's it has more complex flavors but it also requires a cold period for bulb production that's known as vernalization it also has larger cloves a slightly shorter storage period from 4 to 6 months on average they're easier to peel hardneck garlic also develops an edible flower stock called escape the scape should be harvested to allow energy to go into creating a larger bulb southern gardeners can grow hardneck garlic as well if they put bulbs through a cold treatment before planting we have specific instructions about that on the website soft neck garlic is more what you see in the grocery store it's adapted to grow in any climate and doesn't need that cold period to bulb up it has a milder flavor and because it has a soft neck it can be braided it also has a longer storage period of up to 9 months and has more but somewhat smaller cloves when should garlic be planted garlic should be planted 4 to 6 weeks before your first hard freeze in most places this is mid September to mid November but in warmer winter climates you can plant until January April what are your best tips for garlic planting garlic's a heavy feeder and it likes good drainage so you're going to want to amend your soil with compost and create a nice fluffy weed free planting bed keep bulbs intact until you're ready to plant then break apart bulbs leaving the protective skins on the cloves plant the cloves wide end down 4 inches deep in your well amended soil cover with soil then water you can mulch your planting with leaves or straw plan to pull away the mulch as temperatures warm up in the spring ok so April how do we know when these are ready to be harvested garlic's ready to be harvested when one-third to one-half of the leaves have browned and dried and at that point when you start seeing the leaves dry you want to cut back water okay so it looks like this one right here is ready you're right okay so what kind of tools do we need to do this you're going to want a pair of sturdy gloves and a digging fork which is different than a pitch fork oh it's not a pitch fork a digging fork has flat times and they won't Bend when you dig them into the soil that's right here okay so where do you put the digging fork initially oh you don't want to put it too close to the plant because you could pierce the ball so I kind of back it up maybe four inches or so okay and the trick is is you want pretty straight to again trying to avoid Pierce on those bulbs that are under there about four inches okay I try to put it in straight and then we gently lift up the bulbs look at that and there we go they look great now you can kind of knock the major parts of the soil off while we're here in the garden but the big cleaning doesn't come until after they're cured okay so once you've pulled it out of the soil what do you have to do the bulb you don't want to damage the skin because that's protecting it for long-term storage so we just knock the dirt off of the roots keep the roots intact keep the skin intact and now we'll hang it for three to five weeks to let it cure and while it cures the flavor intensifies and we just sit and wait to enjoy our garlic after it's done whoo that's kind of making me hungry right now thinking about that now that we have cleaned it what's the next step well now we prep it for the curing process so we hang it I hang mine in the garage you don't want a place that's too hot or definitely not near freezing you can hang them in bundles of up to 20 I use a simple slip knot here so as the garlic dries and gets smaller it'll continue to tighten as it hangs you hang it in that space with good ventilation with up to 20 bulbs for three to five weeks and then you'll you'll note that the the leaves and the stems will become crackly and very dry and that's when it's done that's great ready to eat yeah yeah I guess you have to make sure that you label it if you have several different varieties growing so that you remember good point Brandon you do want to label it and I would say that this is a good opportunity to look over all the bulbs make sure that there's no damage that you don't see any mold because of course you wouldn't want to include those in the bunch because they could infect the others okay our garlic's been sitting for three to five weeks it's dry and cure the leaves are papery crunchy and when you cut it you'll see there's no green on the inside anymore so it's ready to be eaten so we do our final cleanup which means cut it from the stem you can see I still leave about an inch and a half or so on top and then I also cut off the roots leaving about a quarter of an inch from the bulb you definitely don't want to cut into the bulb as it can leave it open for infection and there's some dirt on the outside we just take off one layer of the skin because the more skin it has the longer it'll store and voila better than grocery store remember this study in which garlic one out is the number one anti-cancer vegetable well let's see what it can do this is what's called a comet assay currently the standard technique for the evaluation of DNA damage what you're looking at is the DNA of a single cell a normal human breast cell as visualized under a fluorescence microscope it's in electric field trying to pull the negative charged DNA to the right but our DNA is normally super coiled tightly together but you add a carcinogen like in this case the cooked meat chemical FIP that literally breaks up our DNA you can see the chopped pieces of DNA breaking away and flowing out and kind of like the tail of a comet which is why they call it the comet tail test the larger the tail the more DNA has been broken off into pieces but if you repeat the experiment and this time what if you had the same amount of carcinogen but also add in some garlic phytonutrients at the same time you get some damage some DNA breakage but not as much as before which kind of garlic would be expected to work the best garlic or elephant garlic the so-called garlic for people who don't like garlic and the answer appears to be garlic garlic is best what about flavonoid phytonutrients found in fruits vegetables nuts and grains here are the top 100 sources in the world do they have a protective effect on the mute meat mutagen induced DNA damage they took a white blood cells from healthy individuals and colon cancer patients and expose them to increasing doses of too cooked meat carcinogens IQ found mostly in fried bacon and baked fish and FIP found mostly in fried bacon fish and and chicken they use the comet assay again measuring how much DNA has broke it broken off in the tail and as you can see as the concentration of meat mutagens increases so does the DNA damage they then continued to pump in that meat mutagen at the highest level but started adding some plant phytonutrients queer sidin found in foods like apples red onions and berries and Rutten found in like citrus buckwheat and asparagus even as the highest carcinogen dose continues adding plant phytonutrients starts to bring the damage down that happened to both healthy individuals the solid line and cancer patients the dashed line but I want you to notice something else even at a zero concentration of cooked meat chemicals there was more DNA damage present in the white blood cells circulating in cancer patients and they did not like blood cancer they had colon cancer even though the cancer was just in their colon their whole body was affected by the disease state their whole body was under increased oxidative stress inflicting significantly higher DNA damage or maybe the DNA damage came first and is one of the reasons they have cancer in the first place either way cancer patients experience less reduction of induced DNA damage suggesting that higher concentrations of flavonoid would be required to achieve the same protective effect so cancer and other chronic disease victims need even more fruits and vegetables to reduce the damage done by carcinogens


 
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subtitle:

hey gardeners I am Brandon this is April hi and we are with botanical interests today we are planting garlic how should you choose garlic garlic falls into two main categories hard neck and soft neck hardneck garlic is more closely related to wild garlic's it has more complex flavors but it also requires a cold period for bulb production that's known as vernalization it also has larger cloves a slightly shorter storage period from 4 to 6 months on average they're easier to peel hardneck garlic also develops an edible flower stock called escape the scape should be harvested to allow energy to go into creating a larger bulb southern gardeners can grow hardneck garlic as well if they put bulbs through a cold treatment before planting we have specific instructions about that on the website soft neck garlic is more what you see in the grocery store it's adapted to grow in any climate and doesn't need that cold period to bulb up it has a milder flavor and because it has a soft neck it can be braided it also has a longer storage period of up to 9 months and has more but somewhat smaller cloves when should garlic be planted garlic should be planted 4 to 6 weeks before your first hard freeze in most places this is mid September to mid November but in warmer winter climates you can plant until January April what are your best tips for garlic planting garlic's a heavy feeder and it likes good drainage so you're going to want to amend your soil with compost and create a nice fluffy weed free planting bed keep bulbs intact until you're ready to plant then break apart bulbs leaving the protective skins on the cloves plant the cloves wide end down 4 inches deep in your well amended soil cover with soil then water you can mulch your planting with leaves or straw plan to pull away the mulch as temperatures warm up in the spring ok so April how do we know when these are ready to be harvested garlic's ready to be harvested when one-third to one-half of the leaves have browned and dried and at that point when you start seeing the leaves dry you want to cut back water okay so it looks like this one right here is ready you're right okay so what kind of tools do we need to do this you're going to want a pair of sturdy gloves and a digging fork which is different than a pitch fork oh it's not a pitch fork a digging fork has flat times and they won't Bend when you dig them into the soil that's right here okay so where do you put the digging fork initially oh you don't want to put it too close to the plant because you could pierce the ball so I kind of back it up maybe four inches or so okay and the trick is is you want pretty straight to again trying to avoid Pierce on those bulbs that are under there about four inches okay I try to put it in straight and then we gently lift up the bulbs look at that and there we go they look great now you can kind of knock the major parts of the soil off while we're here in the garden but the big cleaning doesn't come until after they're cured okay so once you've pulled it out of the soil what do you have to do the bulb you don't want to damage the skin because that's protecting it for long-term storage so we just knock the dirt off of the roots keep the roots intact keep the skin intact and now we'll hang it for three to five weeks to let it cure and while it cures the flavor intensifies and we just sit and wait to enjoy our garlic after it's done whoo that's kind of making me hungry right now thinking about that now that we have cleaned it what's the next step well now we prep it for the curing process so we hang it I hang mine in the garage you don't want a place that's too hot or definitely not near freezing you can hang them in bundles of up to 20 I use a simple slip knot here so as the garlic dries and gets smaller it'll continue to tighten as it hangs you hang it in that space with good ventilation with up to 20 bulbs for three to five weeks and then you'll you'll note that the the leaves and the stems will become crackly and very dry and that's when it's done that's great ready to eat yeah yeah I guess you have to make sure that you label it if you have several different varieties growing so that you remember good point Brandon you do want to label it and I would say that this is a good opportunity to look over all the bulbs make sure that there's no damage that you don't see any mold because of course you wouldn't want to include those in the bunch because they could infect the others okay our garlic's been sitting for three to five weeks it's dry and cure the leaves are papery crunchy and when you cut it you'll see there's no green on the inside anymore so it's ready to be eaten so we do our final cleanup which means cut it from the stem you can see I still leave about an inch and a half or so on top and then I also cut off the roots leaving about a quarter of an inch from the bulb you definitely don't want to cut into the bulb as it can leave it open for infection and there's some dirt on the outside we just take off one layer of the skin because the more skin it has the longer it'll store and voila better than grocery store remember this study in which garlic one out is the number one anti-cancer vegetable well let's see what it can do this is what's called a comet assay currently the standard technique for the evaluation of DNA damage what you're looking at is the DNA of a single cell a normal human breast cell as visualized under a fluorescence microscope it's in electric field trying to pull the negative charged DNA to the right but our DNA is normally super coiled tightly together but you add a carcinogen like in this case the cooked meat chemical FIP that literally breaks up our DNA you can see the chopped pieces of DNA breaking away and flowing out and kind of like the tail of a comet which is why they call it the comet tail test the larger the tail the more DNA has been broken off into pieces but if you repeat the experiment and this time what if you had the same amount of carcinogen but also add in some garlic phytonutrients at the same time you get some damage some DNA breakage but not as much as before which kind of garlic would be expected to work the best garlic or elephant garlic the so-called garlic for people who don't like garlic and the answer appears to be garlic garlic is best what about flavonoid phytonutrients found in fruits vegetables nuts and grains here are the top 100 sources in the world do they have a protective effect on the mute meat mutagen induced DNA damage they took a white blood cells from healthy individuals and colon cancer patients and expose them to increasing doses of too cooked meat carcinogens IQ found mostly in fried bacon and baked fish and FIP found mostly in fried bacon fish and and chicken they use the comet assay again measuring how much DNA has broke it broken off in the tail and as you can see as the concentration of meat mutagens increases so does the DNA damage they then continued to pump in that meat mutagen at the highest level but started adding some plant phytonutrients queer sidin found in foods like apples red onions and berries and Rutten found in like citrus buckwheat and asparagus even as the highest carcinogen dose continues adding plant phytonutrients starts to bring the damage down that happened to both healthy individuals the solid line and cancer patients the dashed line but I want you to notice something else even at a zero concentration of cooked meat chemicals there was more DNA damage present in the white blood cells circulating in cancer patients and they did not like blood cancer they had colon cancer even though the cancer was just in their colon their whole body was affected by the disease state their whole body was under increased oxidative stress inflicting significantly higher DNA damage or maybe the DNA damage came first and is one of the reasons they have cancer in the first place either way cancer patients experience less reduction of induced DNA damage suggesting that higher concentrations of flavonoid would be required to achieve the same protective effect so cancer and other chronic disease victims need even more fruits and vegetables to reduce the damage done by carcinogens


 
 
130
Views

How to Identify Tomato Disease Problems

Ingemar posted the article • 0 comments • 130 views • 2017-09-26 18:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

Our little garden isn't so little anymore! We've got a lot of stuff to cover in this video, but before we do, check this out! Look at those beauties! We're getting lots of tomato clusters on these tomato plants, our early girls are looking good! As for our sweet 100s, we've got a lot of good vines showing up like this one. And we've got a ton of good peppers growing on all of our plants! I mean just look at these beauties right here! Gorgeous. Absolutely gorgeous! Really rainy and wet outside today, so we're not going to get a whole lot of action going on in the garden, but it's not going to stop us from talking about what I want to touch on today, pest and disease problems! Fortunately, we don't have any pest or disease problems but it's not going to stop us from touching on them, and specifically talking about the signs of and things to look out for when it comes to pest and disease in your raised garden bed. As far as applying a pesticide, that should be your last line of defense if all other disease prevention options have failed. Most vegetables in raised garden beds like ours can thrive on their own, without the use of pesticides. However, the use of fungicides as a preventative measure can be an option. Especially if certain disease problems have been problematic in years past, and certain management options have not been effective. Healthy plants are absolutely the best prevention against disease and pests. To achieve that, simply use gardening best practices to promote and keep healthy plants thriving. Things like simply pinching off suckers and pruning will do that for you. Again pruning dead or dying plant material is going to reduce the risk of disease problems setting into your garden. Another thing that you can do after you've harvested your vegetables and fruits, uproot plants completely if at all possible. And if you do have diseased and dying plants, you should uproot those and remove them from the garden bed so that it doesn't spread to your other plants, if at all possible. And it's raining again! Thanks mother nature! So now let's touch on some of the most common disease problems that you find in a garden bed, specifically as they relate to tomato plants. So let's first talk about bacterial wilt or southern bacterial blight. Now this is a disease that survives in the soil for extended periods of time and enters the roots through wounds made by either transplanting, cultivation, or insects. Controlling infected soil, can be pretty difficult but it is achievable. One way to achieve this is simply rotating your crops. You can put in some corn or beans and cabbage and do that for at least three years to try and gain control. And simply removing and destroying any infected plants is going to help you get this under control or prevent it from happening in the first place. Early blight disease is first observed as small, brown lesions mostly on older foliage. Spots in a bulls eye pattern my be seen in the center of a diseased area and tissues surrounding the spots may turn yellow. If high temperature or humidity occurs at this time, much of the foliage is killed. The lesions on the stems are similar to those on the leaves and sometimes girdle the plant if they occur near the soil line, which is also known as collar rot. On the fruits the lesions can get to a considerable size. They usually involve nearly the entire fruit and most often, infected fruit drops off the plant. Some of the things that you can do to prevent early blight, again, using some crop rotation. You can eradicate weeds and take out tomato plants that might be infected. Space your plants out in a way to where they're not touching. Mulch plants, fertilize properly, and don't wet any of the tomato plants with irrigation water. Trim off and dispose of any lower branches and leaves that might be touching the ground. And pinch off suckers to make sure your plants are still thriving and growing vigorously. Now late blight is a potentially serious disease problem in tomato plants. It's especially damaging during cold, wet weather. And the fungus can infect the entire plant. All plants parts. Young leaf lesions are small and appear as dark water soaked spots. Now these leaf spots will quickly enlarge and a white mold will appear at the margins of the effected area on the lower surface of the leaves. Complete browning and shriveling of the leaves and stems can occur within 14 days from the first symptoms. Infected tomato fruits develop shiny, dark, or even olive colored lesions which may cover pretty big areas on the fruit. The fungal spores can be spread through the garden and plants by either rain or wind. You got average day time temperatures of 70 degrees plus and high humidity, perfect for this problem. As far as minimizing late blight problems, here's some guidelines you can follow. You should try and keep your foliage dry, so when you're setting up your garden bed, make sure it's in an area that gets plenty of sunlight. We've already touched on this, but make sure you've got extra room between each of the plants so that they can grow out and also avoid any kind of over head irrigation, especially late in the evening. The extension office recommends that you destroy voluntary tomato plants and night shade weeds that might harbor the fungus. If the disease problem is serious enough, you can got a chemical control route. We would recommend you using something like a cooper fungicide to take care of the problem. Next up on the list, Septoria Leaf Spot! Now this is a destructive disease that targets tomato foliage. More specifically, it targets lower leaves that are near or touching the ground and after fruit has already started to set in. Numerous small circle spots with dark boarders surrounding a beige colored center appear on older leaves. Tiny black specks which are spore producing bodies, can be seen in the center of the spots. Now severally spotted leaves will turn yellow, die and fall off the plant. Now the perfect combination for this fungus is when temperatures range between 68 and 77 degrees, you've got high humidity, over head irrigation or lots of rain fall. Now while you do want to remove these leaves, something that you have to keep in mind is, defoliation can weaken the plant. It will reduce the size and quality of the fruit and might also open it up to some sun scalding. The fungus is not soil born but it can over winter on previous crops, decaying vegetation and some wild hosts related to tomatoes. There goes Brian! Say hi Brian! Brian: Hey, hey! Co-worker! And last but most certainly not least, blossom end rot! Blossom end rot is a physiological disorder of tomatoes. Symptoms are water soaked spots in the blossom end of the fruit, and these spots enlarge and become black. Secondary infection by decay causing organisms usually follows. Now usually the biggest cause of this problem is calcium deficiency in the end of the developing fruit. Extreme fluctuation in moisture, like too much rain fall, insufficient soil calcium, root pruning from near by cultivation, and excessive nitrogen, potassium and magnesium fertilization can lead to this problem. Some tips for preventing and treating for blossom end rot, well one, late spring planting of tomatoes should be with in the date range of your specific area. I would reach out to your extension office and see what they recommend. Perform a soil test and see where your pH level is at, and if needed, lime the soil. That report will tell you how much lime you need to add to your soil to bring that pH level up, but something to keep in mind, you want to do it about three to six months prior to planting in the garden. The soil report will also recommend what kind of fertilizers that you should till into that soil to get it prepped and ready for plants to go in it. If calcium levels are not sufficient but the pH is correct, gypsum might be in order. You should till that into the ground about one to two pounds per 100 square feet. Again, just get a soil report from your extension office and get their recommendations on what you should do. So that's it! That's your most common disease problems that you'll find with in a raised garden bed, and specifically tomato plants. Hope you found all of that information helpful. As always, if you have any other further questions or you want clarification on some of these disease problems, leave them in the comments section below, email them over to our customer service staff, or pick up the phone and have a nice little chat with them. The garden is thriving and looking good, tomatoes are looking excellent! We're just playing the waiting game so that they can ripen and we can harvest them. When harvest time does come, you'll won't want to miss it. So subscribe to the channel by clicking this button. You can click this playlist to see all of the videos in the garden series, and click this playlist to see all the videos in the Do My Own Lawn Care Series! And as always, thanks for watching!


  view all
 


 
subtitle:

Our little garden isn't so little anymore! We've got a lot of stuff to cover in this video, but before we do, check this out! Look at those beauties! We're getting lots of tomato clusters on these tomato plants, our early girls are looking good! As for our sweet 100s, we've got a lot of good vines showing up like this one. And we've got a ton of good peppers growing on all of our plants! I mean just look at these beauties right here! Gorgeous. Absolutely gorgeous! Really rainy and wet outside today, so we're not going to get a whole lot of action going on in the garden, but it's not going to stop us from talking about what I want to touch on today, pest and disease problems! Fortunately, we don't have any pest or disease problems but it's not going to stop us from touching on them, and specifically talking about the signs of and things to look out for when it comes to pest and disease in your raised garden bed. As far as applying a pesticide, that should be your last line of defense if all other disease prevention options have failed. Most vegetables in raised garden beds like ours can thrive on their own, without the use of pesticides. However, the use of fungicides as a preventative measure can be an option. Especially if certain disease problems have been problematic in years past, and certain management options have not been effective. Healthy plants are absolutely the best prevention against disease and pests. To achieve that, simply use gardening best practices to promote and keep healthy plants thriving. Things like simply pinching off suckers and pruning will do that for you. Again pruning dead or dying plant material is going to reduce the risk of disease problems setting into your garden. Another thing that you can do after you've harvested your vegetables and fruits, uproot plants completely if at all possible. And if you do have diseased and dying plants, you should uproot those and remove them from the garden bed so that it doesn't spread to your other plants, if at all possible. And it's raining again! Thanks mother nature! So now let's touch on some of the most common disease problems that you find in a garden bed, specifically as they relate to tomato plants. So let's first talk about bacterial wilt or southern bacterial blight. Now this is a disease that survives in the soil for extended periods of time and enters the roots through wounds made by either transplanting, cultivation, or insects. Controlling infected soil, can be pretty difficult but it is achievable. One way to achieve this is simply rotating your crops. You can put in some corn or beans and cabbage and do that for at least three years to try and gain control. And simply removing and destroying any infected plants is going to help you get this under control or prevent it from happening in the first place. Early blight disease is first observed as small, brown lesions mostly on older foliage. Spots in a bulls eye pattern my be seen in the center of a diseased area and tissues surrounding the spots may turn yellow. If high temperature or humidity occurs at this time, much of the foliage is killed. The lesions on the stems are similar to those on the leaves and sometimes girdle the plant if they occur near the soil line, which is also known as collar rot. On the fruits the lesions can get to a considerable size. They usually involve nearly the entire fruit and most often, infected fruit drops off the plant. Some of the things that you can do to prevent early blight, again, using some crop rotation. You can eradicate weeds and take out tomato plants that might be infected. Space your plants out in a way to where they're not touching. Mulch plants, fertilize properly, and don't wet any of the tomato plants with irrigation water. Trim off and dispose of any lower branches and leaves that might be touching the ground. And pinch off suckers to make sure your plants are still thriving and growing vigorously. Now late blight is a potentially serious disease problem in tomato plants. It's especially damaging during cold, wet weather. And the fungus can infect the entire plant. All plants parts. Young leaf lesions are small and appear as dark water soaked spots. Now these leaf spots will quickly enlarge and a white mold will appear at the margins of the effected area on the lower surface of the leaves. Complete browning and shriveling of the leaves and stems can occur within 14 days from the first symptoms. Infected tomato fruits develop shiny, dark, or even olive colored lesions which may cover pretty big areas on the fruit. The fungal spores can be spread through the garden and plants by either rain or wind. You got average day time temperatures of 70 degrees plus and high humidity, perfect for this problem. As far as minimizing late blight problems, here's some guidelines you can follow. You should try and keep your foliage dry, so when you're setting up your garden bed, make sure it's in an area that gets plenty of sunlight. We've already touched on this, but make sure you've got extra room between each of the plants so that they can grow out and also avoid any kind of over head irrigation, especially late in the evening. The extension office recommends that you destroy voluntary tomato plants and night shade weeds that might harbor the fungus. If the disease problem is serious enough, you can got a chemical control route. We would recommend you using something like a cooper fungicide to take care of the problem. Next up on the list, Septoria Leaf Spot! Now this is a destructive disease that targets tomato foliage. More specifically, it targets lower leaves that are near or touching the ground and after fruit has already started to set in. Numerous small circle spots with dark boarders surrounding a beige colored center appear on older leaves. Tiny black specks which are spore producing bodies, can be seen in the center of the spots. Now severally spotted leaves will turn yellow, die and fall off the plant. Now the perfect combination for this fungus is when temperatures range between 68 and 77 degrees, you've got high humidity, over head irrigation or lots of rain fall. Now while you do want to remove these leaves, something that you have to keep in mind is, defoliation can weaken the plant. It will reduce the size and quality of the fruit and might also open it up to some sun scalding. The fungus is not soil born but it can over winter on previous crops, decaying vegetation and some wild hosts related to tomatoes. There goes Brian! Say hi Brian! Brian: Hey, hey! Co-worker! And last but most certainly not least, blossom end rot! Blossom end rot is a physiological disorder of tomatoes. Symptoms are water soaked spots in the blossom end of the fruit, and these spots enlarge and become black. Secondary infection by decay causing organisms usually follows. Now usually the biggest cause of this problem is calcium deficiency in the end of the developing fruit. Extreme fluctuation in moisture, like too much rain fall, insufficient soil calcium, root pruning from near by cultivation, and excessive nitrogen, potassium and magnesium fertilization can lead to this problem. Some tips for preventing and treating for blossom end rot, well one, late spring planting of tomatoes should be with in the date range of your specific area. I would reach out to your extension office and see what they recommend. Perform a soil test and see where your pH level is at, and if needed, lime the soil. That report will tell you how much lime you need to add to your soil to bring that pH level up, but something to keep in mind, you want to do it about three to six months prior to planting in the garden. The soil report will also recommend what kind of fertilizers that you should till into that soil to get it prepped and ready for plants to go in it. If calcium levels are not sufficient but the pH is correct, gypsum might be in order. You should till that into the ground about one to two pounds per 100 square feet. Again, just get a soil report from your extension office and get their recommendations on what you should do. So that's it! That's your most common disease problems that you'll find with in a raised garden bed, and specifically tomato plants. Hope you found all of that information helpful. As always, if you have any other further questions or you want clarification on some of these disease problems, leave them in the comments section below, email them over to our customer service staff, or pick up the phone and have a nice little chat with them. The garden is thriving and looking good, tomatoes are looking excellent! We're just playing the waiting game so that they can ripen and we can harvest them. When harvest time does come, you'll won't want to miss it. So subscribe to the channel by clicking this button. You can click this playlist to see all of the videos in the garden series, and click this playlist to see all the videos in the Do My Own Lawn Care Series! And as always, thanks for watching!


 
163
Views

How To Optimize Hydroponics Farming

Ingemar posted the article • 0 comments • 163 views • 2017-09-26 18:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

my name's Cali seaman I'm a hydroponics specialist studying for a PhD in fertilizer chemistry at Sheffield Hallam University hydroponics allows the control of a complete control over what is delivered to the plants you are in full control because you are actually mixing up a solution with a given concentration in there of whatever element you're looking at for example I'm looking at selenium I can mix up a particular type of saline with in that solution and deliver that to the plants selenium is an element that's required for human health though in very very small quantities and is not very well known about it stops diseases such as myopathy so I've been looking at feeding different levels of selenium to broccoli sprouts and monitoring the uptake of the selenium and the compounds that that selenium then produces some of those such as the Celino amino acids can be used to help treat cancer now this system as well also is a hydroponic system so the water that goes into a Kamui cycle background and what you've got is a sprayer at the top which sprays either a solution of nutrient that you're wanting on there or just water it sprays the solution directly onto the seeds they then germinate over a six day period we can then pull out and it's placed between two pieces of paper and I can then freeze-dry them to be able to image those or I can just actually drag them out and then grind them up and digest them and then analyze them there's a number of instruments you can use to manage my monitor what's in there we'd normally get the sample of the plant material we'd crush that open usually it's a liquid nitrogen and that will then instantly freeze it and then crush that up and then we put it into a microwave we add some acid and some hydrogen peroxide to that that then digests down we then filter that through and then we can inject that into the icp-ms that will allow us to be able to measure the particular elements within that solution and that gives you an idea of what's actually in that plant material that you've got there icp-ms just deals with elements so that deals with the iron you cop your potassium that deals with that though those kinds of things the malady will deal with compounds so you can look at they look for metabolites the searcher things like aspirin with in willow plants you could use that for mal DMS stands for matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and basically what that is is you apply what is known as a matrix so a solution contain a particular compound you apply that to your plant your actual plant material or any kind of material that you want into sorts of monitor you spray that on to it you then place that into an instrument which will then fire a laser that affaires lines of it overlays there backwards and forwards and there that laser then releases very small particles from the the actual surface of that and tissue which then enters the mass spectrometer which then can manage of those particular particles that you've got the actual mass of the actual compound and will produce a different spectra so depending on that mask depending on how long it will take for that particular particle to go down a particular tube which then allows you to assign what it is to it so Barr than just looking for one compound it will allow you to look from anything from the mass of 50 to 1,000 and even larger if you wanting depending on what you're looking for in turn we can then move on and process that data and turn that into an image because the actual malady itself doesn't produce the image you just produces data we then take that over to another piece of software which then turns that data into a beautiful image I'm now working on using the techniques that I've actually learnt over the last six years doing my PhD to actually develop new nutrients for the market for the hobby market and for the commercial market as well so if we could produce fertilizers deliver nutrients more efficiently that's what I'm aiming to do and hopefully use these techniques in the future to allow the morning the tracking of it and teach other people to do it as well [Music] you my name's Robert Horton and I'm the vertical farm technician here at Wigan University Technical College vertical farming is rather than continue to expand our farms outwards to expand them what woods so rather than build 10 acre greenhouse and have 10 acres physically taken off why not build an acre greenhouse and do 10 layers on top of it due to the increase in population which is gonna hit 9 billion by 2050 we're gonna rely heavily on future technologies and that's what a hydroponics plays a massive part this specific vertical farm can grow plants that you would normally grow on and ain't gonna have in the space of the room behind us first we sold them and then the place in the propagation room and after a few weeks they are placed on the hydroponic unit in the in the troughs and after that was they're fully grown they are harvested we grow a wide variety of things we focus mainly on herbs because that's what we use downstairs in the production kitchen however we have grown lettuce we've grown chillies we've grown peppers we grow a lot of Chinese herbs for a local Chinese restaurant so throughout the park joy a choice on mckylie we grow in a hydroponic conveyor belt it does one revolution every half hour we use that system to water the plants so that each plant gets a amount of water also we use it so they can share the Sun lighting at the same amounts of sunlight funds are grown in a synthetic soil and he's done this way so that you can monitor how much watts is going through it and how much water the plants absorb in growing rate it basically recycles the water they it uses so plants taking the amount of water that they need but then the remainder water which would normally be drained into the earth it's collected and pumps around the system back into plants again it's 90% less water than what you'd use in a natural field well I originally come from a farming family and we're very limited by the seasons so we have to sell everything in the spring and then harvest it throughout the year here we can be sowing all year round harvesting all year round if you're a farmer you can have a bad day you can have a good day it just depends and what the weather wants but you can control with a vertical farm and grow vertically we can grow on rooftops we can grow in the buildings such as this where traditionally you would need acres and acres of fields to do such a thing hydroponics is still evolving as to how we're using it in so Japan for example where's a lot of people in a small space they've started turning all the old technology factories were these to make floppy drives and CD drives which are now obsolete and they've started creating plant factories where they literally just grow nothing but one crop so say the growing within but lettuce on try if she's given them lots of fresh healthy vegetables since the growing population and especially in the current future I definitely think that the vertical farm hydroponics will definitely be used more more and more around the world food security is something that's becoming very important very quickly we're an expanding population in England there's more and more people and what building houses all the time which means this less farmland we all have to ship it in from abroad which means you through this week two weeks old by the time it gets dear or you can grow it here in a vertical farm we can harvest food here and be using it cooking it have it delivered in an hour [Music] you a remain Maryellen tailor sells her produce at weekend farmers markets near Washington DC the heads of lettuce still attached to their roots are popular and she has many regular customers like Betsey Kulik lettuce just tastes fabulous that we can come year-round even in January February and March her lettuce is very green and and tastes just as good then as it does in the summer Taylor grows the lettuce and other salad greens on her family farm in Loudoun County Virginia about 80 kilometres from Washington isn't this beautiful I mean it is so clean no stand or soil or pests down in there it is just like a perfectly formed green rose that's edible Taylor harvests four thousand of those in her two hydroponic greenhouses each week all year round that's why she named her farm endless summer harvest she has a dozen part-time employees and frequent visitors from around the world several weeks ago investor group from Botswana came to visit with us we have had farmers from Afghanistan here that we're visiting because this would be ideal controlled environment to bring to Afghanistan where the climate is so harsh the hydroponic crops here are protected from the harsh elements from planting to harvest what she is doing here is she is loaded this cedar with watercress seeds and is planting them in the rock wall after they germinate these little plants stay in the nursery for two weeks then they're moved to a greenhouse and placed into gutters where they'll grow to market size they are nourished sustainably using recycled water that tank has 600 gallons of water with the nutrients it continuously flows in and out of that tank after it has gone through the system and all of the plants roots Taylor says the two greenhouses take up a little over 1,000 square meters of land but produce the equivalent of a conventional five hectare farm we've established that it's so productive on small pieces of land so they can be closer to make major metropolitan areas so besides farmers markets Taylor can tell her fresh produce to specialty grocery stores it's incredibly popular we have a great following and local restaurants chef Anthony Lombardo uses the hydroponic lettuces in his signature salads they really like the salad a lot we've had a lot of positive feedback about the salad people are so into buying local food 90% of Americans eat lettuce every day we are a retail farm phenomena here in America Taylor says she enjoys being known as the lettuce lady and is planning to double her farm size this year for producer Jun so Amy Katz VOA news you 


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subtitle:

my name's Cali seaman I'm a hydroponics specialist studying for a PhD in fertilizer chemistry at Sheffield Hallam University hydroponics allows the control of a complete control over what is delivered to the plants you are in full control because you are actually mixing up a solution with a given concentration in there of whatever element you're looking at for example I'm looking at selenium I can mix up a particular type of saline with in that solution and deliver that to the plants selenium is an element that's required for human health though in very very small quantities and is not very well known about it stops diseases such as myopathy so I've been looking at feeding different levels of selenium to broccoli sprouts and monitoring the uptake of the selenium and the compounds that that selenium then produces some of those such as the Celino amino acids can be used to help treat cancer now this system as well also is a hydroponic system so the water that goes into a Kamui cycle background and what you've got is a sprayer at the top which sprays either a solution of nutrient that you're wanting on there or just water it sprays the solution directly onto the seeds they then germinate over a six day period we can then pull out and it's placed between two pieces of paper and I can then freeze-dry them to be able to image those or I can just actually drag them out and then grind them up and digest them and then analyze them there's a number of instruments you can use to manage my monitor what's in there we'd normally get the sample of the plant material we'd crush that open usually it's a liquid nitrogen and that will then instantly freeze it and then crush that up and then we put it into a microwave we add some acid and some hydrogen peroxide to that that then digests down we then filter that through and then we can inject that into the icp-ms that will allow us to be able to measure the particular elements within that solution and that gives you an idea of what's actually in that plant material that you've got there icp-ms just deals with elements so that deals with the iron you cop your potassium that deals with that though those kinds of things the malady will deal with compounds so you can look at they look for metabolites the searcher things like aspirin with in willow plants you could use that for mal DMS stands for matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and basically what that is is you apply what is known as a matrix so a solution contain a particular compound you apply that to your plant your actual plant material or any kind of material that you want into sorts of monitor you spray that on to it you then place that into an instrument which will then fire a laser that affaires lines of it overlays there backwards and forwards and there that laser then releases very small particles from the the actual surface of that and tissue which then enters the mass spectrometer which then can manage of those particular particles that you've got the actual mass of the actual compound and will produce a different spectra so depending on that mask depending on how long it will take for that particular particle to go down a particular tube which then allows you to assign what it is to it so Barr than just looking for one compound it will allow you to look from anything from the mass of 50 to 1,000 and even larger if you wanting depending on what you're looking for in turn we can then move on and process that data and turn that into an image because the actual malady itself doesn't produce the image you just produces data we then take that over to another piece of software which then turns that data into a beautiful image I'm now working on using the techniques that I've actually learnt over the last six years doing my PhD to actually develop new nutrients for the market for the hobby market and for the commercial market as well so if we could produce fertilizers deliver nutrients more efficiently that's what I'm aiming to do and hopefully use these techniques in the future to allow the morning the tracking of it and teach other people to do it as well [Music] you my name's Robert Horton and I'm the vertical farm technician here at Wigan University Technical College vertical farming is rather than continue to expand our farms outwards to expand them what woods so rather than build 10 acre greenhouse and have 10 acres physically taken off why not build an acre greenhouse and do 10 layers on top of it due to the increase in population which is gonna hit 9 billion by 2050 we're gonna rely heavily on future technologies and that's what a hydroponics plays a massive part this specific vertical farm can grow plants that you would normally grow on and ain't gonna have in the space of the room behind us first we sold them and then the place in the propagation room and after a few weeks they are placed on the hydroponic unit in the in the troughs and after that was they're fully grown they are harvested we grow a wide variety of things we focus mainly on herbs because that's what we use downstairs in the production kitchen however we have grown lettuce we've grown chillies we've grown peppers we grow a lot of Chinese herbs for a local Chinese restaurant so throughout the park joy a choice on mckylie we grow in a hydroponic conveyor belt it does one revolution every half hour we use that system to water the plants so that each plant gets a amount of water also we use it so they can share the Sun lighting at the same amounts of sunlight funds are grown in a synthetic soil and he's done this way so that you can monitor how much watts is going through it and how much water the plants absorb in growing rate it basically recycles the water they it uses so plants taking the amount of water that they need but then the remainder water which would normally be drained into the earth it's collected and pumps around the system back into plants again it's 90% less water than what you'd use in a natural field well I originally come from a farming family and we're very limited by the seasons so we have to sell everything in the spring and then harvest it throughout the year here we can be sowing all year round harvesting all year round if you're a farmer you can have a bad day you can have a good day it just depends and what the weather wants but you can control with a vertical farm and grow vertically we can grow on rooftops we can grow in the buildings such as this where traditionally you would need acres and acres of fields to do such a thing hydroponics is still evolving as to how we're using it in so Japan for example where's a lot of people in a small space they've started turning all the old technology factories were these to make floppy drives and CD drives which are now obsolete and they've started creating plant factories where they literally just grow nothing but one crop so say the growing within but lettuce on try if she's given them lots of fresh healthy vegetables since the growing population and especially in the current future I definitely think that the vertical farm hydroponics will definitely be used more more and more around the world food security is something that's becoming very important very quickly we're an expanding population in England there's more and more people and what building houses all the time which means this less farmland we all have to ship it in from abroad which means you through this week two weeks old by the time it gets dear or you can grow it here in a vertical farm we can harvest food here and be using it cooking it have it delivered in an hour [Music] you a remain Maryellen tailor sells her produce at weekend farmers markets near Washington DC the heads of lettuce still attached to their roots are popular and she has many regular customers like Betsey Kulik lettuce just tastes fabulous that we can come year-round even in January February and March her lettuce is very green and and tastes just as good then as it does in the summer Taylor grows the lettuce and other salad greens on her family farm in Loudoun County Virginia about 80 kilometres from Washington isn't this beautiful I mean it is so clean no stand or soil or pests down in there it is just like a perfectly formed green rose that's edible Taylor harvests four thousand of those in her two hydroponic greenhouses each week all year round that's why she named her farm endless summer harvest she has a dozen part-time employees and frequent visitors from around the world several weeks ago investor group from Botswana came to visit with us we have had farmers from Afghanistan here that we're visiting because this would be ideal controlled environment to bring to Afghanistan where the climate is so harsh the hydroponic crops here are protected from the harsh elements from planting to harvest what she is doing here is she is loaded this cedar with watercress seeds and is planting them in the rock wall after they germinate these little plants stay in the nursery for two weeks then they're moved to a greenhouse and placed into gutters where they'll grow to market size they are nourished sustainably using recycled water that tank has 600 gallons of water with the nutrients it continuously flows in and out of that tank after it has gone through the system and all of the plants roots Taylor says the two greenhouses take up a little over 1,000 square meters of land but produce the equivalent of a conventional five hectare farm we've established that it's so productive on small pieces of land so they can be closer to make major metropolitan areas so besides farmers markets Taylor can tell her fresh produce to specialty grocery stores it's incredibly popular we have a great following and local restaurants chef Anthony Lombardo uses the hydroponic lettuces in his signature salads they really like the salad a lot we've had a lot of positive feedback about the salad people are so into buying local food 90% of Americans eat lettuce every day we are a retail farm phenomena here in America Taylor says she enjoys being known as the lettuce lady and is planning to double her farm size this year for producer Jun so Amy Katz VOA news you 


 
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how we plant and harvested thousands of plants using our aquaponics systems and how you can start doing this yourself hassle free.

Ingemar posted the article • 0 comments • 116 views • 2017-09-26 18:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

hi I'm drew Hopkins and I'm John Parr we are veerudu soccer ponics we have a vision put an aquaponics greenhouse in every school in the United States the way that we've been dealing with food on a global scale neat needs a change with this greenhouse and this volume we can feed everybody with a tiny footprint we're here in the middle of this great big commercial greenhouse and we'd like to take all the components that surround us and bring it into a small greenhouse that can fit in a schoolyard you'll see there's occurrence in the water and it's circular the aquaponics greenhouse project provides a perfect learning platform for teachers and students they can study anything from agriculture biology science chemistry and because ancient civilizations use this method to grow in thousands of years ago they can study history also so you guys what do you think of aquaponics it's healthier we use water impact environmental healthier foods yeah less chemicals in my food yeah the fact that one of these systems could exist in an urban environment was a huge draw to me and interest in aquaponics they say it takes a village to feed a family and that's certainly been the case here my wife and our three kids and Drew and his family have been instrumental in getting this thing done John had a great deal of knowledge he's a guru of aquaponics and matt has made amazing technological advances our plan was to start with 5,000 square feet per month and just expand into it but then for months we've completed this 90,000 square feet 2 acres that's so I think that's what let's put on our hair back the most is how much this can produce and how fast what can we do to change agriculture to make our planet better and right now there's so many people that are passionate about green Living recycling composting and eating better and more healthy that it's the perfect time to introduce aquaponics aquaponics is the combination of two industries aquaculture and hydroponics it all starts right here for the tank of fish this fish was planted nine months ago at an inch-long and that beautiful sturgeon the sturgeon provide the nutrition by eating the fish food which then is passed through a number of filters finally it falls into this ladder see this is a bladder bag of water it's just a big bag of mud and as the water flows through here it's available to these plants which wick the water up and grow like crazy it comes across here under the ground into the stream of water and it comes up here like a spring where everything that a plant needs is bioavailable in this teeth of water flows back and forth through these streams until it's deficient of nutrition again and then it's circulated from here right back up to where it gets bubbles and falls like a waterfall and oxygenates the fish again so the entire system is closed and healthy because clean water goes in and fertilizer water comes out this is aquaponics I would say the three things over conventional farming that aquaponics provides is one sustainability aquaponics must cherish the ecosystem so we're really conscious of that we don't put anything on these plants that we couldn't eat to the yield per square foot out in the field they get three heads of lettuce per year here we do four per month three the water conservation we're using five percent of the water of all the farms around us to produce more food there you go to bite into that thing so this area of the table represents five thousand seats which are planted every day we plant five thousand seeds a day and we harvest five thousand plants a day in each acre with this greenhouse and the capacity to grow food at this scale is an amazing gift to put in the hands of children teachers and communities okay here we are same system really being used and here is a review let me see if I can catch some fish there as you can see we got tilapia look at that catfish some goldfish goldfish are great because they help prevent mosquitoes then here's that second when I was telling them look at the plants styrofoam ah you can buy that at Walmart ah but you'd buy containers to hold up I use a big container of ice anyway you want to there you are but we're looking at a system there it is again as you can see it goes down here and right there putting air into it see it's nice and flow and what I did here is I did something a little different because those straight pipes the water was going all the way in here I didn't want that so I just put again I spent 25 cents oh no 35 cents for these and look at that it just goes straight there this is where it was I just made it just in case the second one in case it was too powerful because there is a pump again a $15 pump as you can see it's just doing it to the filters on the outside instead of inside and as you notice personally I'm using the food grade tubing right here because I want people to see what's doing as as we teach them as you see it goes straight there right there all the way down into the system let me back up and it's on a pallet just like there those are something I found you can find anything you want to hold it up can be a table it can be anything and there we are is an aquaponic system that you can build and I'm going to say realistically I say 70 $75 thank you very much this is chaplain Ian Perry wishing you very much luck as my son is saying goodbye if you have any questions feel free to email me at ki4 ngz that's a numeral number for ki for ng z at yahoo.com and may God bless you and your family


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subtitle:

hi I'm drew Hopkins and I'm John Parr we are veerudu soccer ponics we have a vision put an aquaponics greenhouse in every school in the United States the way that we've been dealing with food on a global scale neat needs a change with this greenhouse and this volume we can feed everybody with a tiny footprint we're here in the middle of this great big commercial greenhouse and we'd like to take all the components that surround us and bring it into a small greenhouse that can fit in a schoolyard you'll see there's occurrence in the water and it's circular the aquaponics greenhouse project provides a perfect learning platform for teachers and students they can study anything from agriculture biology science chemistry and because ancient civilizations use this method to grow in thousands of years ago they can study history also so you guys what do you think of aquaponics it's healthier we use water impact environmental healthier foods yeah less chemicals in my food yeah the fact that one of these systems could exist in an urban environment was a huge draw to me and interest in aquaponics they say it takes a village to feed a family and that's certainly been the case here my wife and our three kids and Drew and his family have been instrumental in getting this thing done John had a great deal of knowledge he's a guru of aquaponics and matt has made amazing technological advances our plan was to start with 5,000 square feet per month and just expand into it but then for months we've completed this 90,000 square feet 2 acres that's so I think that's what let's put on our hair back the most is how much this can produce and how fast what can we do to change agriculture to make our planet better and right now there's so many people that are passionate about green Living recycling composting and eating better and more healthy that it's the perfect time to introduce aquaponics aquaponics is the combination of two industries aquaculture and hydroponics it all starts right here for the tank of fish this fish was planted nine months ago at an inch-long and that beautiful sturgeon the sturgeon provide the nutrition by eating the fish food which then is passed through a number of filters finally it falls into this ladder see this is a bladder bag of water it's just a big bag of mud and as the water flows through here it's available to these plants which wick the water up and grow like crazy it comes across here under the ground into the stream of water and it comes up here like a spring where everything that a plant needs is bioavailable in this teeth of water flows back and forth through these streams until it's deficient of nutrition again and then it's circulated from here right back up to where it gets bubbles and falls like a waterfall and oxygenates the fish again so the entire system is closed and healthy because clean water goes in and fertilizer water comes out this is aquaponics I would say the three things over conventional farming that aquaponics provides is one sustainability aquaponics must cherish the ecosystem so we're really conscious of that we don't put anything on these plants that we couldn't eat to the yield per square foot out in the field they get three heads of lettuce per year here we do four per month three the water conservation we're using five percent of the water of all the farms around us to produce more food there you go to bite into that thing so this area of the table represents five thousand seats which are planted every day we plant five thousand seeds a day and we harvest five thousand plants a day in each acre with this greenhouse and the capacity to grow food at this scale is an amazing gift to put in the hands of children teachers and communities okay here we are same system really being used and here is a review let me see if I can catch some fish there as you can see we got tilapia look at that catfish some goldfish goldfish are great because they help prevent mosquitoes then here's that second when I was telling them look at the plants styrofoam ah you can buy that at Walmart ah but you'd buy containers to hold up I use a big container of ice anyway you want to there you are but we're looking at a system there it is again as you can see it goes down here and right there putting air into it see it's nice and flow and what I did here is I did something a little different because those straight pipes the water was going all the way in here I didn't want that so I just put again I spent 25 cents oh no 35 cents for these and look at that it just goes straight there this is where it was I just made it just in case the second one in case it was too powerful because there is a pump again a $15 pump as you can see it's just doing it to the filters on the outside instead of inside and as you notice personally I'm using the food grade tubing right here because I want people to see what's doing as as we teach them as you see it goes straight there right there all the way down into the system let me back up and it's on a pallet just like there those are something I found you can find anything you want to hold it up can be a table it can be anything and there we are is an aquaponic system that you can build and I'm going to say realistically I say 70 $75 thank you very much this is chaplain Ian Perry wishing you very much luck as my son is saying goodbye if you have any questions feel free to email me at ki4 ngz that's a numeral number for ki for ng z at yahoo.com and may God bless you and your family


 
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How To Build Raised Garden Beds by following these step by step instructions in the video.

Ingemar posted the article • 0 comments • 99 views • 2017-09-26 18:14 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
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Monthly Garden Series - July 2017 - Summer Harvest Month

John posted the article • 0 comments • 89 views • 2017-09-25 18:01 • came from similar tags

 

Welcome to the California Garden in July 2017. In today's episode we have a lot of gardening tips for you. We first take a tour of the Southern California garden located in Irvine, California, Zone 10. We then look at all the plants - fruits, vegetables and herbs that are growing in the California garden. We then look at all the harvests we made, including Bell Peppers, Strawberries, Blackberries, Chillies, Curry Leaf, Eggplants, Grapes, Kale, Okra, Onions, Potatoes, Pumpkins and Tomatoes. We then look at the things to do in your garden this month
 
subtitle:

welcome to the California Garden in the month of July the heat of the summer is on and the garden is providing abundant harvest of summer vegetables and fruits so sit back and enjoy this journey as we take a tour of the garden we look at what's growing in the July garden all the harvests we made some things for you to do in your garden this month and some awesome gardening products available in your local stores so let's begin with the tour of the garden there's a big pumpkin hiding behind this pumpkin plant that you see here followed by these onions which are the small bulb in kind of onions followed by our bitter gourd plant that is growing on this trellis and it hasn't produced heavily this year but we'll see how it goes for the first time in many years I am trying to grow cluster beans and cluster beans is something I've not been very successful at growing so again we'll see how that goes this season and now let's move on to the tomato bed as you can see here lots and lots of tomatoes and the missing foliage is because of a spider mite problem I had and more on that later followed by some okra plants now we were growing the nombo giant okra that you see on the right side and then we have a new batch of okra that I just showed and planted as well so that should give me a good supply of okra late in the season and I just hope it is long enough for the okra plant to produce good pods on the other side we have some more tomato plants again loaded with tomatoes this is the big boy and the San Marzano tomatoes absolutely loaded followed by the bed that has a lot of sweet potatoes peppers and some taro root plants the sweet potato plant has pretty much taken over the bed and is growing like crazy and this is another batch of okra and I love growing okras because it's very expensive at the grocery store and fresh okra is just amazing and we do eat a lot of okra as well followed by some pepper plants as you can see now the overwintered eggplants were removed this year because they were not doing that well and I planted a batch of tomatoes and this batch of tomatoes will give me enough Tomatoes late in the season and it's a good idea to plant a new batch somewhere around June or July so that you get a steady supply of tomatoes in your garden this one that you see here is the kabocha plant it's a type of pumpkin but it's actually a squash it's an amazing tasting vegetable it's like a cross between a sweet potato and a pumpkin it's just amazing to taste and this is the first time I'm growing it in my garden and it's been pretty good so that concludes the tour of our vegetable garden in our container garden tour we first have the pineapple plant in my previous video someone commented that you need to keep a banana near the pineapple plant which encourages production of fruit so we'll see how that goes this is something I don't identify I might take this plant out later if you know which plant it is let me know in the comments and this pepper variety is a new pepper variety that I'm trying out it's called the pubescens pepper which is a very interesting paper variety I'll see how that comes up now this is a cherry tomato plant and this had a spider mite problem and what we did was we removed most of the leaves of this plant and then sprayed it with rosemary oil and the plant has recovered pretty well as you can see it's producing a lot of cherry tomatoes and it's loaded with tomatoes right now moving on to the next container we have the cucumbers growing this is the white cucumber one of my favorite varieties you can see that large pumpkin on the back of the container from our only pumpkin plant it's a huge one this is the Jupiter pepper variety that is growing in the container it has yielded a lot of peppers and it continues to grow and produce more peppers and finally we have the hyacinth beans this is a new hyacinth bean variety that I'm trying out it has a bush type growth and I'm interested to see how it goes and on the other side we have our Meyer lemon plant some curry leaves that are growing in a container we have our pineapple plant which has taken off pretty well and some strawberry plants that have given us a good strawberry harvest we have a Malabar spinach plant and these are the two strawberry plants that are in front and this is the mulberry tree that's growing pretty well hope to get some mulberries next season and this tomato plant is san marzano had a spider mite problem and i had to remove that plant and it's trying to grow back now the mint plant has grown very large and I probably need to prune it make sure it stays well and then we have the chilies we did harvest a lot of chilies this season and this is lemongrass plant again in the summer season it's grown pretty well and the curry leaf plant that is growing behind that is doing well so that concludes the tour of the container garden I know a lot of you like this container tour so I'll keep it coming in my monthly gardening series videos moving on to what's growing in our garden this month we have the tropical plants like bananas and Moringa that are doing very well in this hot summer season followed by the kabocha which I just mentioned very good variety of squash to grow it's actually called the kabocha squash and followed by a new entrant in a garden which is the stevia plant now the stevia or the sugar plant has leaves that are extremely sweet and you can actually just substitute them for sugar there's that sweet so you can add them teas you can even squeeze the leaves and extract the juice to form a nice sweet liquid which is an organic and very natural substitute for sugar so I'm going to planting this stevia plant in this container and a lot of you I know have planted stevia plant in your garden so if you have planted a stevia plant do let me know in the comments below and let me know how you use it and once I planted the stevia plant it had some old leaves and it had some stems that were not doing very well so the next step was to prune it so what I did is I just removed all the old leaves and the stem and by pruning it the plant should grow a little more bushy compared to what it is right now and I'm hoping that it grows more bushy so that it can be used the next plant that we have here is the tomatoes now the summer season is amazing for tomatoes and I did have a spider mite problem with these tomato plants and within about four or five days all the foliage had turned yellowish white and I'd to remove the foliage some of the plants recovered quickly like this cherry tomato that was growing in the container absolutely loaded with tomatoes as well so we're already productive but I did have to spider my problem now let's look at the harvest we made this month bell peppers we were trying out a lot of bell pepper varieties this year and all of them did very well these were the ones that were growing in the raised bed amazing quality peppers pretty large in size we also planted the Jupiter pepper variety we planted them in both the raised beds as well as the containers and they did very well too so all in all a great year for growing peppers and tomatoes here is the Jupiter pepper variety that is growing in this whiskey barrel container again it grew very well and you can see the peppers here they're amazing peppers very delicious as well so overall I'm very happy with all the summer vegetables we grew this season and the harvest was just amazing now moving on to the other plants we harvested a lot of berries strawberries to start with these strawberries are growing in these small containers and they did produce a lot of strawberries never had any issues with growing strawberries here in my home garden we did harvest a lot of them strawberries were delicious and homegrown strawberries are just so fresh and so delicious that you do have to try growing it in your home garden we also harvested the blackberries if you remember the blackberry plant I actually gave that away to a friend but I did remove one plant from that and then planted it separately and that's ilding some delicious blackberries as of now we also harvested a lot of chilies this is the hot chili variety the hot Indian chili variety and when this turns red it is very hot it is extremely spicy it's extremely hot pepper variety and you can have this them green if you want less of the heat but once these turn red they are extremely hot and they are very delicious as well it got it's got a very nice flavor and it's a type of cayenne pepper originates from India and it's a pretty good variety to grow in your home it's a very productive pepper variety that's easily growing in this container I haven't even provided any support to this plant but it seems to be doing well and it's producing a lot of these peppers and this is how the harvest looks like the red peppers are hotter the green peppers are slightly mild but still very hot and this was the other pepper variety that we were growing this was overwintered from last year and this is another kind pepper variety that did very well so we overwintered it and even in this season it's producing a lot of peppers once again these peppers are hotter when they are red when they ripen and turn into this bright red color and this year has been very good for all kinds of peppers that have grown in the garden and now moving on to the curry leaves harvest so we did grow a lot of curry leaves we have them in containers and we were able to harvest a lot of these curry leaves the eggplants also did very well and they had the same spider mite problem these are the overwintered eggplants and we were able to harvest a lot of eggplants this month too but eventually we got rid of the eggplants because of the abundance of spider mites they're just very hard to get rid of so I will be planting a new batch of eggplants next season and so far the eggplants have yielded very well and have served me very well for the last two years and now let's move on to the grapes we had an abundance of grapes growing on our grape vine this is the flame seedless variety of grape that I've covered in my previous video and it's been growing very well we were able to harvest a lot of grapes throughout the month end of June all of July and there are still plenty of grapes on the grape vine and they start off as green they turn yellow and eventually red so you can just pick some of the red grapes to start with so you can just pick those that are red and these are the sweetest grapes and if you see any bunches that are mostly red like this one here you can harvest the entire bunch as you see here the ones that are dark green or a little bit tangy to taste but the ones that are yellow bright yellow and red are the ones that are most delicious and sweet here you can see that towards the end of July the grapes have turned mostly red and at this stage the grapes are the sweetest the ones that we harvesting here are just amazing to taste now it's best not to grow cool season crops during the summer and this kale plant that we had produced abundantly we have a should a lot of kale and now what we are doing is harvesting the kale but while harvesting I saw that this kale plant had a white fly problem I could just get rid of the white flies and still use the kale for some time but I also needed to harvest it and use the container to plant some other plants so we did harvest most of the scale so that we could first of all use a lot of kale and then also use the container to plant some summer vegetables and that's why you should plant crops that are adequate or appropriate for the season that way you grow the best plants in your garden now the okra that we were growing this is an nombo giant variety of okra which we grew from seeds from last year and they did extremely well we harvested about 2 or 3 pods every day from this okra patch and there were about five or six plants that were growing in this patch and the nombo giant variety of okra is a large okra variety so you need to make sure that you harvest it when it's tender otherwise it's going to be a little stringy and not so good to taste so what you're seeing here is pretty much the ideal time you should harvest your okra and as you can see here the plant has a lot of okras even after harvesting almost everyday we were able to get a lot of okra from these plants and that's why I started a new batch so that we have adequate okra for the rest of the season and here you can see our harvest and you can clearly see that this is the okra that was harvested a little late you can see it turned slightly yellow and when you eat this kind of okra it's going to feel a little stringy and not so good to taste so with okra it's very important that you harvest them soon like this okra that you see here there are two okra here that were harvested a little late and the rest of them were harvested in time so these are the two that were a little larger than we expected and onions we are going to spend a lot of time discussing onions in today's video so the onions that we were growing were in raised beds as well as in containers as you see here the ones that we were growing in a whisky barrel container this is the Utah jumbo yellow variety of onions we have to break the necks of these onion plants so that they go into building the bulbs as you can see here some onion plants will automatically bend over and fall down but if they don't you can just bend them at their tops which is called breaking their necks so that the plant thinks that it's the end of the season and it's going to start producing very large bulbs from that time onwards so after you break the necks and let them be for about a week or ten days you can then pull them out and then leave them wherever they are you can leave them on the raised beds or in the container where they were growing and what this does is it gets rid of the excess moisture that the onions have and you need to make sure that you stop watering your onions now once you turn them over and leave them on your beds or containers the curing process starts now there are two things that are happening the bulbs are growing larger and the onion is growing or like a thick coat around it to protect itself from the elements so what you do is just remove the part that has the dirt some of the outside part that has the dirt some of the peels and in term of the roots and this is one way to clean your onions just with your hands just remove the excess dirt and prepare them for braiding which is what I will be trying for the first time this year so you can leave them to dry in the Sun if they are extremely moist like the container plants or like these raised bed onions that you see here just make sure you clean them and we're going to start braiding them now so all I've done is I've attached a mason's line something you can easily find at any hardware store Walmart or any other place or Amazon I'll provide a link to that in the video description and you just start tying the onions the top now Mason line is strong enough to hold quite a lot of pounds it's quite strong actually but I'm still going to put about a few onions and then move on to the next batch or the next braid and as you can see here this is going to dry in the Sun for about a week or so now if you have onions that are very moist like the ones that you see here they've not been fully cured what I would recommend is you trim the leaves and then remove the roots or remove all the dirty peels from the bottom and then you can dry them in the Sun for about a week or so what that does is it gives the onion a little bit of a better outside peel which will help you preserve the onions for a longer time now once you've completed this process the next step is to leave them out in a nice sunny location for about a week or so and you'll see that within about a week they have developed this nice brown skin on the outside and then you can do the same thing you can just braid them and then hang them outside for about five to seven days and once they have been fully cured you can then move them to your garage or shaded place where you can hang them till you use them and now let's move on to harvesting the kabocha that's actually not a pumpkin it looks like a pumpkin it tastes like a pumpkin but it's more of a squash and the right time to harvest the kabocha is to wait till it turns completely orange but I'm going to show you how the kabocha looks like even if you harvest it when it's partially orange so we're going to be harvesting this kabocha this has some stripes on it but it's not fully ripe and I'll tell you how do you check your pumpkin so that it's ripe now we didn't need a pumpkin or squash for our cooking so we did harvest this one and it wasn't bad it still turned orange when we kept it outside for a few days but you can see here beautiful looking squash and this is how it looks like once it's turned a little orange and let's see how it looks like from the inside now this is not the best tasting pumpkins or squashes that I've had it's like a cross between a sweet potato and a pumpkin very delicious it's one of the sweetest pumpkins or squashes you can grow in your garden it has a nice orange color lots of seeds which I'm going to be saving for the next season and this plant actually came from the compost so I might have purchased a kabocha sometime threw it in the compost and one of the seeds was still viable and it came out as a plant in North America this is called the kabocha squash and not only a pumpkin although it looks like one now here is one that is actually ready for harvest and you can see here it's turned completely orange on the outside and to test whether your pumpkin or squash is ready for harvest or not you just try to drive your nail on the outer part of the pumpkin and if it goes right in that means your pumpkin is not ready yet but if it resists your nail and you're not able to like really get your nail inside the pumpkin or the squash then it's ready for harvest so that's how you decide if your pumpkin or squash is ready for harvest or not and once it turns this color it's ripe and it's extremely delicious here's the nail test and now we move on to the king of the summer vegetables thats Tomatoes when we came back from a vacation last month the tomatoes were somewhat ripe but we harvested a lot of tomatoes after that and in July you can see here this plant is the big boy tomato again produced a lot of tomatoes on this small plant but the plant actually died in July and we were still able to harvest a lot of tomatoes from this plant as you can see here but because of the lack of foliage you can see that some of these Tomatoes have some scales on them the Sun just burned see tomatoes so not that good for some Tomatoes but overall I was pretty happy because we did get a lot of tomatoes from this plant and they were pretty big sized Tomatoes in fact we now have so many tomatoes at home that I have to give it out to friends and neighbors and they're all very happy and the cherry tomatoes were the ones that grew the best you can see a little bit of spider mite damage on this cherry tomato plant as well and after the spider my treatment which I will cover probably in another video I was able to harvest a lot of tomatoes and the plant grew back as well this is the big boy tomato again lot of large sized Tomatoes produced by this plant not very sweet perfect for cooking and very juicy as well so you can slice it you can use it in sandwiches you can use it for cooking so a lot of uses for this big boy tomato plant and unlike the cherry plant which is sweet this is not sweet and we have some san marzano tomatoes as well that we harvested so here is what the harvest looks like we harvested these tomatoes like almost every day and our plants give us a abundant harvest of tomatoes so great year to grow tomatoes here in Southern California now let's look at the things to do in your garden this month you can start a new batch of okra best done in June or July because you need some time for the plants to grow but the sea is dominated very quickly and due to the temperatures outside they were also growing very fast and you can also start some more goods you still have got three or four months of warm weather left so they should do well and we also started some cucumber plants this is the white cucumber varieties a very nice cucumber variety very delicious as well it's a barrier to plant a second round of tomatoes in July or even June if you can I was not here in June this is the Cherokee carbon variety which is a cross between the Cherokee purple and beefsteak this is the celebrity tomato variety which is a determinate tomato variety that produces very good Tomatoes and the benefit of planting another round of tomatoes is that you get Tomatoes late in the season here in Southern California it does stay warm for quite a few months beyond the summer season so take advantage of that and the final variety of tomato that we are planting here is called the German Queen which I have heard is a very good tomato variety I haven't planted this tomato variety yet and I'm going to try it this season I'm using some all-purpose organic fertilizer when I'm planting and then I will be adding some tomato fertilizer as the plant grows larger and this technique has always worked out for me very well when the plants are small you use a high nitrogen fertilizer like the one you see here plant your Tomatoes deep make sure that the plant is as deep as possible so that it grows roots around the tomato plant where the stem meets the soil and this is something which is very unique about the tomato plant that the deeper you planted the better the plant grows so uniform roots all around and that's something which is unique to Tomatoes doesn't really work for other plants now in the planting hole what you need to do is put the organic fertilizer around the base of the planting hole I just eyeball it and then I always remove my plan from the peat pot although they recommend that you can plant your peat pot directly I really don't like planting it with the plastic part and the peat pot I just plant the plant directly in the soil and then I remove the peat pot and through it this organic fertilizer will suffice for at least about a month after which I will be adding some tomato fertilizer that will have some more things that the tomato plant needs to grow so pretty much an easy technique we just dig a planting hole just like that and then plant a tomato plant now one of the recommendations from one of our youtube viewers was to inter plant basil along with tomatoes now my wife was actually asking me to plant some basil in the home garden anyways so we got some Thai basil plants and we're planning to inter plant this without tomato plants and we'll see how that goes now the rationale behind that is that the basil actually improves the flavor of the tomatoes so whether that works or not I'm not really sure but I'm doing this as a part of recommendation by one of our YouTube viewers so I'm going to try it out and see how that goes but the basil should at least keep some critters away and hopefully it should be nice for the tomato bed so you can see here I'm interplanted the basil plants like you see here tomato plants and not only will I get a good supply of basil the tomatoes will share the basil plants as they grow now they need a thorough watering and then they're all set to grow if you live around the beach seaweed is one of the best free things you can get for your garden now my son was at a summer camp and he got this surprise for me he just packed some seaweed and got in a bag and I was pleasantly surprised what we did is we washed the seaweed very nicely in water and then chopped it up into fine pieces and then added them to the compost bin now you can add this directly to the soil to your raised beds to your containers but I just thought I will put it in the compost bin so that it's composted well and we can use it later as we need it and now let's look at the garden products that you can buy locally online or wherever you want to so let's start with the seed starting mix I saw these Burpee seed starting mix in our local Home Depot and there were just about two dollars and eighty-eight cents now I thought I'd try them out and see how they are as a seed starting mix and this brick is similar to the other go Kubrick's you just add some water and then it expands [music] now what I do is I just take the coconut core that's ready and put them in a ziploc bag this is a gallon ziplock bag and I was able to create two bags which is a lot of seed starting mix for what you need so for the price it's good I wouldn't say it's very economical but coconut coir is one of the best see starting mixes I've used it is better than any other mixed set of you so far and usually it's very expensive that if I don't buy it but at this price I think it's a good deal but if you want more mix then you should definitely buy a bigger sized bag and this is how it looks like once the seeds germinate in the coconut core and now let us look at some plants that are available this is at Home Depot and there are tropical plants like the pineapple plant which you can grow indoors I am not really sure if this is an edible pineapple it could be but it looked very small and the plant looked like an indoor plant we also had some coconuts that were growing very pretty coconut plants and they make really good indoor plants and they can be kept indoors and grown in bright light the next product we saw was from black magic at Home Depot and they had the Lord of products and they were very interesting they have this coconut coir mix and large bags they also had some nutrient solutions this is the base solution which is pretty much an all-purpose solution and although the price looks expensive remember that liquid nutrients are actually pretty economical because you have to use very less of these nutrients and this is the bloom booster mix with just a different NPK ratio and this is another one right here and since you have to use very less you know you can still buy it and it won't break your bank so overall very good products from black magic and it was very interesting to see a company come out with these products so there we have it folks that was our episode on the California Garden in the month of July let me know what you are doing in your garden this month is it too hot in your garden is it raining or are you just enjoying the weather in your garden and having a good time do let me know your thoughts put in a comment below give us a thumbs up if you liked this video and see you again soon happy gardening


 
 
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Welcome to the California Garden in July 2017. In today's episode we have a lot of gardening tips for you. We first take a tour of the Southern California garden located in Irvine, California, Zone 10. We then look at all the plants - fruits, vegetables and herbs that are growing in the California garden. We then look at all the harvests we made, including Bell Peppers, Strawberries, Blackberries, Chillies, Curry Leaf, Eggplants, Grapes, Kale, Okra, Onions, Potatoes, Pumpkins and Tomatoes. We then look at the things to do in your garden this month
 
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welcome to the California Garden in the month of July the heat of the summer is on and the garden is providing abundant harvest of summer vegetables and fruits so sit back and enjoy this journey as we take a tour of the garden we look at what's growing in the July garden all the harvests we made some things for you to do in your garden this month and some awesome gardening products available in your local stores so let's begin with the tour of the garden there's a big pumpkin hiding behind this pumpkin plant that you see here followed by these onions which are the small bulb in kind of onions followed by our bitter gourd plant that is growing on this trellis and it hasn't produced heavily this year but we'll see how it goes for the first time in many years I am trying to grow cluster beans and cluster beans is something I've not been very successful at growing so again we'll see how that goes this season and now let's move on to the tomato bed as you can see here lots and lots of tomatoes and the missing foliage is because of a spider mite problem I had and more on that later followed by some okra plants now we were growing the nombo giant okra that you see on the right side and then we have a new batch of okra that I just showed and planted as well so that should give me a good supply of okra late in the season and I just hope it is long enough for the okra plant to produce good pods on the other side we have some more tomato plants again loaded with tomatoes this is the big boy and the San Marzano tomatoes absolutely loaded followed by the bed that has a lot of sweet potatoes peppers and some taro root plants the sweet potato plant has pretty much taken over the bed and is growing like crazy and this is another batch of okra and I love growing okras because it's very expensive at the grocery store and fresh okra is just amazing and we do eat a lot of okra as well followed by some pepper plants as you can see now the overwintered eggplants were removed this year because they were not doing that well and I planted a batch of tomatoes and this batch of tomatoes will give me enough Tomatoes late in the season and it's a good idea to plant a new batch somewhere around June or July so that you get a steady supply of tomatoes in your garden this one that you see here is the kabocha plant it's a type of pumpkin but it's actually a squash it's an amazing tasting vegetable it's like a cross between a sweet potato and a pumpkin it's just amazing to taste and this is the first time I'm growing it in my garden and it's been pretty good so that concludes the tour of our vegetable garden in our container garden tour we first have the pineapple plant in my previous video someone commented that you need to keep a banana near the pineapple plant which encourages production of fruit so we'll see how that goes this is something I don't identify I might take this plant out later if you know which plant it is let me know in the comments and this pepper variety is a new pepper variety that I'm trying out it's called the pubescens pepper which is a very interesting paper variety I'll see how that comes up now this is a cherry tomato plant and this had a spider mite problem and what we did was we removed most of the leaves of this plant and then sprayed it with rosemary oil and the plant has recovered pretty well as you can see it's producing a lot of cherry tomatoes and it's loaded with tomatoes right now moving on to the next container we have the cucumbers growing this is the white cucumber one of my favorite varieties you can see that large pumpkin on the back of the container from our only pumpkin plant it's a huge one this is the Jupiter pepper variety that is growing in the container it has yielded a lot of peppers and it continues to grow and produce more peppers and finally we have the hyacinth beans this is a new hyacinth bean variety that I'm trying out it has a bush type growth and I'm interested to see how it goes and on the other side we have our Meyer lemon plant some curry leaves that are growing in a container we have our pineapple plant which has taken off pretty well and some strawberry plants that have given us a good strawberry harvest we have a Malabar spinach plant and these are the two strawberry plants that are in front and this is the mulberry tree that's growing pretty well hope to get some mulberries next season and this tomato plant is san marzano had a spider mite problem and i had to remove that plant and it's trying to grow back now the mint plant has grown very large and I probably need to prune it make sure it stays well and then we have the chilies we did harvest a lot of chilies this season and this is lemongrass plant again in the summer season it's grown pretty well and the curry leaf plant that is growing behind that is doing well so that concludes the tour of the container garden I know a lot of you like this container tour so I'll keep it coming in my monthly gardening series videos moving on to what's growing in our garden this month we have the tropical plants like bananas and Moringa that are doing very well in this hot summer season followed by the kabocha which I just mentioned very good variety of squash to grow it's actually called the kabocha squash and followed by a new entrant in a garden which is the stevia plant now the stevia or the sugar plant has leaves that are extremely sweet and you can actually just substitute them for sugar there's that sweet so you can add them teas you can even squeeze the leaves and extract the juice to form a nice sweet liquid which is an organic and very natural substitute for sugar so I'm going to planting this stevia plant in this container and a lot of you I know have planted stevia plant in your garden so if you have planted a stevia plant do let me know in the comments below and let me know how you use it and once I planted the stevia plant it had some old leaves and it had some stems that were not doing very well so the next step was to prune it so what I did is I just removed all the old leaves and the stem and by pruning it the plant should grow a little more bushy compared to what it is right now and I'm hoping that it grows more bushy so that it can be used the next plant that we have here is the tomatoes now the summer season is amazing for tomatoes and I did have a spider mite problem with these tomato plants and within about four or five days all the foliage had turned yellowish white and I'd to remove the foliage some of the plants recovered quickly like this cherry tomato that was growing in the container absolutely loaded with tomatoes as well so we're already productive but I did have to spider my problem now let's look at the harvest we made this month bell peppers we were trying out a lot of bell pepper varieties this year and all of them did very well these were the ones that were growing in the raised bed amazing quality peppers pretty large in size we also planted the Jupiter pepper variety we planted them in both the raised beds as well as the containers and they did very well too so all in all a great year for growing peppers and tomatoes here is the Jupiter pepper variety that is growing in this whiskey barrel container again it grew very well and you can see the peppers here they're amazing peppers very delicious as well so overall I'm very happy with all the summer vegetables we grew this season and the harvest was just amazing now moving on to the other plants we harvested a lot of berries strawberries to start with these strawberries are growing in these small containers and they did produce a lot of strawberries never had any issues with growing strawberries here in my home garden we did harvest a lot of them strawberries were delicious and homegrown strawberries are just so fresh and so delicious that you do have to try growing it in your home garden we also harvested the blackberries if you remember the blackberry plant I actually gave that away to a friend but I did remove one plant from that and then planted it separately and that's ilding some delicious blackberries as of now we also harvested a lot of chilies this is the hot chili variety the hot Indian chili variety and when this turns red it is very hot it is extremely spicy it's extremely hot pepper variety and you can have this them green if you want less of the heat but once these turn red they are extremely hot and they are very delicious as well it got it's got a very nice flavor and it's a type of cayenne pepper originates from India and it's a pretty good variety to grow in your home it's a very productive pepper variety that's easily growing in this container I haven't even provided any support to this plant but it seems to be doing well and it's producing a lot of these peppers and this is how the harvest looks like the red peppers are hotter the green peppers are slightly mild but still very hot and this was the other pepper variety that we were growing this was overwintered from last year and this is another kind pepper variety that did very well so we overwintered it and even in this season it's producing a lot of peppers once again these peppers are hotter when they are red when they ripen and turn into this bright red color and this year has been very good for all kinds of peppers that have grown in the garden and now moving on to the curry leaves harvest so we did grow a lot of curry leaves we have them in containers and we were able to harvest a lot of these curry leaves the eggplants also did very well and they had the same spider mite problem these are the overwintered eggplants and we were able to harvest a lot of eggplants this month too but eventually we got rid of the eggplants because of the abundance of spider mites they're just very hard to get rid of so I will be planting a new batch of eggplants next season and so far the eggplants have yielded very well and have served me very well for the last two years and now let's move on to the grapes we had an abundance of grapes growing on our grape vine this is the flame seedless variety of grape that I've covered in my previous video and it's been growing very well we were able to harvest a lot of grapes throughout the month end of June all of July and there are still plenty of grapes on the grape vine and they start off as green they turn yellow and eventually red so you can just pick some of the red grapes to start with so you can just pick those that are red and these are the sweetest grapes and if you see any bunches that are mostly red like this one here you can harvest the entire bunch as you see here the ones that are dark green or a little bit tangy to taste but the ones that are yellow bright yellow and red are the ones that are most delicious and sweet here you can see that towards the end of July the grapes have turned mostly red and at this stage the grapes are the sweetest the ones that we harvesting here are just amazing to taste now it's best not to grow cool season crops during the summer and this kale plant that we had produced abundantly we have a should a lot of kale and now what we are doing is harvesting the kale but while harvesting I saw that this kale plant had a white fly problem I could just get rid of the white flies and still use the kale for some time but I also needed to harvest it and use the container to plant some other plants so we did harvest most of the scale so that we could first of all use a lot of kale and then also use the container to plant some summer vegetables and that's why you should plant crops that are adequate or appropriate for the season that way you grow the best plants in your garden now the okra that we were growing this is an nombo giant variety of okra which we grew from seeds from last year and they did extremely well we harvested about 2 or 3 pods every day from this okra patch and there were about five or six plants that were growing in this patch and the nombo giant variety of okra is a large okra variety so you need to make sure that you harvest it when it's tender otherwise it's going to be a little stringy and not so good to taste so what you're seeing here is pretty much the ideal time you should harvest your okra and as you can see here the plant has a lot of okras even after harvesting almost everyday we were able to get a lot of okra from these plants and that's why I started a new batch so that we have adequate okra for the rest of the season and here you can see our harvest and you can clearly see that this is the okra that was harvested a little late you can see it turned slightly yellow and when you eat this kind of okra it's going to feel a little stringy and not so good to taste so with okra it's very important that you harvest them soon like this okra that you see here there are two okra here that were harvested a little late and the rest of them were harvested in time so these are the two that were a little larger than we expected and onions we are going to spend a lot of time discussing onions in today's video so the onions that we were growing were in raised beds as well as in containers as you see here the ones that we were growing in a whisky barrel container this is the Utah jumbo yellow variety of onions we have to break the necks of these onion plants so that they go into building the bulbs as you can see here some onion plants will automatically bend over and fall down but if they don't you can just bend them at their tops which is called breaking their necks so that the plant thinks that it's the end of the season and it's going to start producing very large bulbs from that time onwards so after you break the necks and let them be for about a week or ten days you can then pull them out and then leave them wherever they are you can leave them on the raised beds or in the container where they were growing and what this does is it gets rid of the excess moisture that the onions have and you need to make sure that you stop watering your onions now once you turn them over and leave them on your beds or containers the curing process starts now there are two things that are happening the bulbs are growing larger and the onion is growing or like a thick coat around it to protect itself from the elements so what you do is just remove the part that has the dirt some of the outside part that has the dirt some of the peels and in term of the roots and this is one way to clean your onions just with your hands just remove the excess dirt and prepare them for braiding which is what I will be trying for the first time this year so you can leave them to dry in the Sun if they are extremely moist like the container plants or like these raised bed onions that you see here just make sure you clean them and we're going to start braiding them now so all I've done is I've attached a mason's line something you can easily find at any hardware store Walmart or any other place or Amazon I'll provide a link to that in the video description and you just start tying the onions the top now Mason line is strong enough to hold quite a lot of pounds it's quite strong actually but I'm still going to put about a few onions and then move on to the next batch or the next braid and as you can see here this is going to dry in the Sun for about a week or so now if you have onions that are very moist like the ones that you see here they've not been fully cured what I would recommend is you trim the leaves and then remove the roots or remove all the dirty peels from the bottom and then you can dry them in the Sun for about a week or so what that does is it gives the onion a little bit of a better outside peel which will help you preserve the onions for a longer time now once you've completed this process the next step is to leave them out in a nice sunny location for about a week or so and you'll see that within about a week they have developed this nice brown skin on the outside and then you can do the same thing you can just braid them and then hang them outside for about five to seven days and once they have been fully cured you can then move them to your garage or shaded place where you can hang them till you use them and now let's move on to harvesting the kabocha that's actually not a pumpkin it looks like a pumpkin it tastes like a pumpkin but it's more of a squash and the right time to harvest the kabocha is to wait till it turns completely orange but I'm going to show you how the kabocha looks like even if you harvest it when it's partially orange so we're going to be harvesting this kabocha this has some stripes on it but it's not fully ripe and I'll tell you how do you check your pumpkin so that it's ripe now we didn't need a pumpkin or squash for our cooking so we did harvest this one and it wasn't bad it still turned orange when we kept it outside for a few days but you can see here beautiful looking squash and this is how it looks like once it's turned a little orange and let's see how it looks like from the inside now this is not the best tasting pumpkins or squashes that I've had it's like a cross between a sweet potato and a pumpkin very delicious it's one of the sweetest pumpkins or squashes you can grow in your garden it has a nice orange color lots of seeds which I'm going to be saving for the next season and this plant actually came from the compost so I might have purchased a kabocha sometime threw it in the compost and one of the seeds was still viable and it came out as a plant in North America this is called the kabocha squash and not only a pumpkin although it looks like one now here is one that is actually ready for harvest and you can see here it's turned completely orange on the outside and to test whether your pumpkin or squash is ready for harvest or not you just try to drive your nail on the outer part of the pumpkin and if it goes right in that means your pumpkin is not ready yet but if it resists your nail and you're not able to like really get your nail inside the pumpkin or the squash then it's ready for harvest so that's how you decide if your pumpkin or squash is ready for harvest or not and once it turns this color it's ripe and it's extremely delicious here's the nail test and now we move on to the king of the summer vegetables thats Tomatoes when we came back from a vacation last month the tomatoes were somewhat ripe but we harvested a lot of tomatoes after that and in July you can see here this plant is the big boy tomato again produced a lot of tomatoes on this small plant but the plant actually died in July and we were still able to harvest a lot of tomatoes from this plant as you can see here but because of the lack of foliage you can see that some of these Tomatoes have some scales on them the Sun just burned see tomatoes so not that good for some Tomatoes but overall I was pretty happy because we did get a lot of tomatoes from this plant and they were pretty big sized Tomatoes in fact we now have so many tomatoes at home that I have to give it out to friends and neighbors and they're all very happy and the cherry tomatoes were the ones that grew the best you can see a little bit of spider mite damage on this cherry tomato plant as well and after the spider my treatment which I will cover probably in another video I was able to harvest a lot of tomatoes and the plant grew back as well this is the big boy tomato again lot of large sized Tomatoes produced by this plant not very sweet perfect for cooking and very juicy as well so you can slice it you can use it in sandwiches you can use it for cooking so a lot of uses for this big boy tomato plant and unlike the cherry plant which is sweet this is not sweet and we have some san marzano tomatoes as well that we harvested so here is what the harvest looks like we harvested these tomatoes like almost every day and our plants give us a abundant harvest of tomatoes so great year to grow tomatoes here in Southern California now let's look at the things to do in your garden this month you can start a new batch of okra best done in June or July because you need some time for the plants to grow but the sea is dominated very quickly and due to the temperatures outside they were also growing very fast and you can also start some more goods you still have got three or four months of warm weather left so they should do well and we also started some cucumber plants this is the white cucumber varieties a very nice cucumber variety very delicious as well it's a barrier to plant a second round of tomatoes in July or even June if you can I was not here in June this is the Cherokee carbon variety which is a cross between the Cherokee purple and beefsteak this is the celebrity tomato variety which is a determinate tomato variety that produces very good Tomatoes and the benefit of planting another round of tomatoes is that you get Tomatoes late in the season here in Southern California it does stay warm for quite a few months beyond the summer season so take advantage of that and the final variety of tomato that we are planting here is called the German Queen which I have heard is a very good tomato variety I haven't planted this tomato variety yet and I'm going to try it this season I'm using some all-purpose organic fertilizer when I'm planting and then I will be adding some tomato fertilizer as the plant grows larger and this technique has always worked out for me very well when the plants are small you use a high nitrogen fertilizer like the one you see here plant your Tomatoes deep make sure that the plant is as deep as possible so that it grows roots around the tomato plant where the stem meets the soil and this is something which is very unique about the tomato plant that the deeper you planted the better the plant grows so uniform roots all around and that's something which is unique to Tomatoes doesn't really work for other plants now in the planting hole what you need to do is put the organic fertilizer around the base of the planting hole I just eyeball it and then I always remove my plan from the peat pot although they recommend that you can plant your peat pot directly I really don't like planting it with the plastic part and the peat pot I just plant the plant directly in the soil and then I remove the peat pot and through it this organic fertilizer will suffice for at least about a month after which I will be adding some tomato fertilizer that will have some more things that the tomato plant needs to grow so pretty much an easy technique we just dig a planting hole just like that and then plant a tomato plant now one of the recommendations from one of our youtube viewers was to inter plant basil along with tomatoes now my wife was actually asking me to plant some basil in the home garden anyways so we got some Thai basil plants and we're planning to inter plant this without tomato plants and we'll see how that goes now the rationale behind that is that the basil actually improves the flavor of the tomatoes so whether that works or not I'm not really sure but I'm doing this as a part of recommendation by one of our YouTube viewers so I'm going to try it out and see how that goes but the basil should at least keep some critters away and hopefully it should be nice for the tomato bed so you can see here I'm interplanted the basil plants like you see here tomato plants and not only will I get a good supply of basil the tomatoes will share the basil plants as they grow now they need a thorough watering and then they're all set to grow if you live around the beach seaweed is one of the best free things you can get for your garden now my son was at a summer camp and he got this surprise for me he just packed some seaweed and got in a bag and I was pleasantly surprised what we did is we washed the seaweed very nicely in water and then chopped it up into fine pieces and then added them to the compost bin now you can add this directly to the soil to your raised beds to your containers but I just thought I will put it in the compost bin so that it's composted well and we can use it later as we need it and now let's look at the garden products that you can buy locally online or wherever you want to so let's start with the seed starting mix I saw these Burpee seed starting mix in our local Home Depot and there were just about two dollars and eighty-eight cents now I thought I'd try them out and see how they are as a seed starting mix and this brick is similar to the other go Kubrick's you just add some water and then it expands [music] now what I do is I just take the coconut core that's ready and put them in a ziploc bag this is a gallon ziplock bag and I was able to create two bags which is a lot of seed starting mix for what you need so for the price it's good I wouldn't say it's very economical but coconut coir is one of the best see starting mixes I've used it is better than any other mixed set of you so far and usually it's very expensive that if I don't buy it but at this price I think it's a good deal but if you want more mix then you should definitely buy a bigger sized bag and this is how it looks like once the seeds germinate in the coconut core and now let us look at some plants that are available this is at Home Depot and there are tropical plants like the pineapple plant which you can grow indoors I am not really sure if this is an edible pineapple it could be but it looked very small and the plant looked like an indoor plant we also had some coconuts that were growing very pretty coconut plants and they make really good indoor plants and they can be kept indoors and grown in bright light the next product we saw was from black magic at Home Depot and they had the Lord of products and they were very interesting they have this coconut coir mix and large bags they also had some nutrient solutions this is the base solution which is pretty much an all-purpose solution and although the price looks expensive remember that liquid nutrients are actually pretty economical because you have to use very less of these nutrients and this is the bloom booster mix with just a different NPK ratio and this is another one right here and since you have to use very less you know you can still buy it and it won't break your bank so overall very good products from black magic and it was very interesting to see a company come out with these products so there we have it folks that was our episode on the California Garden in the month of July let me know what you are doing in your garden this month is it too hot in your garden is it raining or are you just enjoying the weather in your garden and having a good time do let me know your thoughts put in a comment below give us a thumbs up if you liked this video and see you again soon happy gardening


 
 
 
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Permaculture Garden Design Courses - Oregon Family Farm, Suburban and Hugelkultur

John posted the article • 0 comments • 91 views • 2017-09-25 18:01 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
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How to set up the Garden Tower Vertical Container Garden that allows you to grow 50+ plants in just 4 square feet of space.

John posted the article • 0 comments • 119 views • 2017-09-25 18:01 • came from similar tags

 

In this episode, John will share why the Garden Tower is unique and why it is the best vertical tower garden system he has found to date. The Garden Tower will allow you to have a vegetable garden where your normally couldn't such as on a patio, balcony, deck, sidewalk or driveway. While watching this episode, 
you will learn:
 1. How to assemble the Garden Tower 
2. Where to place your Garden Tower
 3. How to make a nutritious potting soil your plants will love. 
4. How to fill and plant out the Garden Tower in one easy step. 
5. How the Garden Tower Conserves and Recycles Water 
6. How to add Red Wiggler Composting Worms to Your Garden Tower 
7. If John Prefers the Garden Tower Project or the Garden Tower After watching this episode you will learn the benefits and how to set up the Garden Tower so you too can grow a vegetable garden in a limited amount of space.
 
subtitle:

This is John Kohler with growing your greens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you. I just got a new toy in the mail it's the right hear check it out. This is actually called the garden tower project and it's known as a garden tower. And what it is basically, it looks like a 55 gallon drum with a heavy modification to grow food in. But why I like this so much is because it has 45 planting spots all up and down through this whole barrel. In addition you can plant some plants up the top so you can plant over 50 plants in just 4 ft.² off space. So literally, that's a lot of planets for it just a small area. So this is especially good if you have a patio, deck, little apartment or a condo and you don't have a lot of space. Maybe if you just have a little bit of space on your patio outside. You could grow a lot of food in the sky. I have seen other tower gardens, which I don't particularly care for but this guy let's you grow a lot more and he lets you roll it in soil. Plus, this is very intelligently designed. It's part of the best vertical tower garden system I've ever seen. Let me go ahead and explain why. Besides the 45 planting holes, what's unique about this system is, it's got this Center tube hear in middle and what they do in the center tube is your going to put food scraps and red wiggler worms or composting worms. The worm is going to eat the food scraps, break it down, spread the worm compos or Vermeer compost all throughout the unit to help fertilize the plants in there. Plus on the bottom of this unit is a place that you can actually take out the food scraps out of the bottom. So that's really cool. This vertical tower garden makes its own fertilizer. You can't say that for other ones. Another thing is that this is water conserving. So water is a very precious resource especially depending on where you live in this day and age. And this one conserves water. How does it do that? Well Very simply. You pour the water on or water up to the top while the plant will get water the water will drain down all the different plant planted in all of these pocket things are going to get water then the water goes to the bottom, once it get to the bottom it's basically funnel out certain whole and you're going to put little buckets underneath and all the water that goes through, now your going to have it in a bucket. You can re-use this water to water it again so that there is minimal water loss. Many just standard garden pots or whatever. You know you will just water and it just run out on the deck or down below. The excess water on your deck can actually ruin your deck. If you live on a three-story apartment building and you have to water your plants. When you over water them the stuff will drip down to your neighbor which isn't cool either. This you could collect the water and reuse it. So this is a well thought out design so I'm happy to be setting one up and sharing this up with you guys and showing you how it works and how I'm going to set it up. So this just came to me as you guys can see there is a US Post Office label on there. I mean it literally came shaped like this through the mail without even any raping. It was not damaged our anything. It looks totally perfectly fine. So in this video what we're going to do is to set this guy up and show you guys how easy it is to set up. I'm going to make a specific potting soil mixture. I'm going show you guys that as well. Plus you'll see me plant out my plants. And by the end of his video you'll see how easy it is to set one of these garden Tower projects up if you want to grow avertable At home. So I guess with that, let's get into un-boxing and assembling. So let's see what we got in the box here. Sounds like some hard work so construction is super simple super easy. I think pretty much what were going to need to do is to bolt down a few legs and put a couple of bolts in there. In the box you get some instructions. It's definitely important to follow the instructions. I might read them or look at them but I'm just going to just do my own thing. Looks pretty basic. Next we got some stainless steel hardware. If you use standard hardware on something like this outdoors it's going to rust, not cool. I like the providing of heavy-duty stainless hardware. In addition we have the wood legs. These stand it up off the ground so that you can put a bucket underneath to collect all the water. Plus it also allows you to garden whether you're sitting or standing. So if you're in a wheelchair you can still garden in this garden tower project. So definitely really cool. There's three legs and look to be a nice hardwood here. In addition we have two more parts, a standard pot looks like it's made out of pbc, and the top basically goes on here. And it doesn't set all the way down. It kind of just sits on the top; it doesn't go all the way down because in the end you wouldn't be able to get it back off. The top has some holes in it for air ration. And you want to learn more about this at gardentowerproject.com. Finally we have this big thing here. This is some kind of compression plug. What this does is go underneath the bottom of the whole unit. The club actually fits in the bottom of this tube here. You can remove this plug for a harvest in your worm casting from under neath. This is definitely well thought out. I like it for sure. So next let's get in to the actual assembly. It's going to be a breeze. So for the assemble we are going to need a few things. We're going to need a small table or something else I like, a 7 gallon bucket. What were going to do is take this guy and put it on the top of the bucket to get it off the ground. And I hope this holds us in now. And some other things will need of source are some tools. We got us some half inch ratchet and a half inch driver. That's going to basically bolt on these legs. These legs have special cutouts and they are labeled. This one's labeled C. You're going to look for the labels c on the unit itself. And it's just going to sit like that and you're going to bolt them in. So that's it. You don't want to over tighten. Just finger tighten and that would be good. We're going to go ahead and take it off the bucket here. It's fairly light. We are going to go ahead and take our little plug here and unscrew this guy. Then when you unscrew it is going to lose the tension on this rubber bushing thing in here. And then you take it and put it underneath and shove it in the hole. And then you go-ahead and screwed tight and it'll lock in place. So once you have your garden tower fully assemble and is actually quite a breeze to assemble. You're going to want to do a few things. Number one, you're going to want to find the right location place your garden tower. I recommend placing it in the sunniest place possible. The more son your plant receive, the faster it will grow for you. Don't worry. Even if you have a place that doesn't get enough sun, that's alright because you can still grow some things. Shady spot is better to grow herbs and leapy which will do okay but not exilent. Just won't grow and yield as fast. So you want to find the right location before filling it up. Because if you fill it up and try to move it is going to be quite heavy. Besides the location you're going to want to get somewhere nice and level. If your location is on grass or dirt you're going to want to put it on some metal bricks to keep it off the wet ground. After you have selected your location the most important thing that you need to do is to fill it with the proper and appropriate soil mix. I cannot emphasize enough how important this is. If you fill it up with just any old dirt from your yard your plants probably won't do as well. Plus because this is a container garden you need to have proper air ration, proper moisture holding capabilities in there. So for that reason I recommend using a potting soil mix. There many potting soil mixes of the marketplace and some of definitely better than others. Usually in potting soils but not always, you get what you payed for. If you paid a good amount for a potted soil mix you get quality stuff. If the potted mix is pretty cheap then normally the ingredients aren't so good. You want to get a nice fine potted soil it's going to want to contain things like, coconut core, perlite and compost. If you buy a pre-bagged one that's great, because that's going to make it easy for beginners. I like to personally make my own blend. And that's what I'm going to show you now to make your own blend of a good potting soil. It's going to work excellent in the garden tower that I'm assembling behind me. So what I want to do is to have a nice fluffy mixture. If you want to get some dirt, stand, dirt, mud or clay. It's going to flip in there and the roots won't be able to grow optimally. The plan routes don't grow through the soil, they'd grow between the airspace in the soil. And that's why good fluffy mix is going to be optimal for this. That's what most potting mix provides. That's what I'm pretty much going to duplicate doing my own thing. I'm going to cheat a little bit. Most potting mixes, as I've mentioned earlier containing, perlite, coconut core or Pete moss plus compost and other ingredience. I'm going to make up a mix myself making the perlite separate from the Pete moss or coconut core. I've got some product that has already done that for me. Many of you guys might know this stuff right here it's called Pro mix BX with mycorrhizae. This is perlite with the Pete Moss and it's from Canada and it's premade. It also has the beneficial fun guy, the mycorrhizae which is really going to supercharge plant growth. It will help plants get more nutrition out of the soil that you're planting in. So while you could use something like this I find a much better alternative to using something like the Pro mix as the base to my potting soil that I'm going to create in the wheelbarrow behind me. Now this guy is actually called in air Max. So instead of just having the perlite and the Pete Moss which I'm not a super huge fan of. I still use it absolutely and it's a great medium. But I prefer coconut core as a much better medium. Coconut core is more sustainable than the Pete Moss and it's more renewable. A coconut palm will produce over a 100 knots a year. And we'll eat the food and drink the water out of that. It's one of my favorite foods. But also you're left with the husk on the outside that can be put into a product like this to be reused. There is a never ending resource as long as the coconut tree is abound. I like the earmarks because it has the quadruple wash Coconut fiber and this is important that you get a high quality coconut core. Many coconut core can be of often low-quality and things will not grow in them or grow that well. Not being properly balanced. The coconut core it's a great product but it needs to be washed to get out all the different nutrients out of it that may have been sitting there from being in brackish water or whatnot. I like this as triple washed coconut core. In addition it also has the pure light that is also definitely really good. It also has Pairo magnetic rock. Definitely really good. It also has the mycorrhizae and humic acid in seaweed. So these are some of my favorite product that I won't have to add to the mixture because it's already in the back. So what I'm going to do next is put in two of the bags its one point five cubic feet each. That's going to be a total of 3 ft.³ I think the garden tower holds 8 ft.³ or so. That's going to be three bags that's a good portion of it. The other things that were going to add in their is the compost, worm casting, fungal-based compost and a few other things like the rock dost and some other things that I like. I'm going to show you guys how to mix it up behind me. Now we're going to make up the soil mix. This is my favorite part actually because I get to get my hands dirty. We got the wheelbarrow here that holds 4 1/2 ft.³ of soil. We are going to Make two batches to fill the garden tower there. The first ingredients were going to use is the airmax. We're going to cut open the bag here. It's definitely nice to, rich and black. Lots of porelite and cocnut coure in there. There is no smelling in there and I like that a lot. So we're going to dump this in as our base ingredient. If you can't get the air Max or can't find it you're going to want the use a good washed coconut core or a purlight to make up for it. You can also use the makariser the calp the seaweed the paramagnetic rock and the other stuff that are in here. I like that they put it together for me and they formulate an excellent blend and they have done a lot of testing on it to get excellent results if you know what I mean. I'm not going to go around and reinvent the wheel when I can find a product that can really kick some butt. Let's go head and dump this guy out. This stuff is nice and rich. I want to show you guys the difference between this stuff here and the standard potting stuff that you might buy. Here's a standard potting soil and it's made by Kellogg's. So we're going to go ahead and open this stuff up. We're going to put about a quarter of what's in the bag in here just to get volume and masse to our mixture. It's also kind of fluffy because this is a standard potting mix. I want to share this with you guys and compare to the stuff I put in. And also give you some ideas on what is normally put in potting soil mixes. You might want to look for it or you might not want out of it. I'm going to read you guys the ingredients on the bag. Composted Forest product, composted rice halls, composted porched manure, pearlite, caltmeal, worm castings and iron saltfate. And this is an organic potting mix. I always recommend that you guys purchase organic Potting mix without chemically derived altered factory mixtures. If it says organic usually it's from natural material that I would actually use in my garden. This is actually 0MRI certified so that's definitely a good certification to look for it if you can't find it in your area. Let's pour out some of this stuff here. Once again it's nice and black.We will put in about that much right here. And unlike the stuff you just saw before it's nice sun block. I don't know if you can see it on the camera. And if we dig up the air Max you can see the difference. This stuff looks to me like it has a lot of uncomposted Forest product. I'm not a fan of uncomposted Forest product which includes pieces off little wood ships and barks and stuff like this. This would not be my first choice for a potting soil to fill out my garden tower. That's why I'm just mixing this stuff in. I mean some of this stuff is good. A little bit of compostd monour in there. But I'm not a fan of that stuff either. So besides this stuff that where going to mix in, we're going to go ahead and put in one of my favorite ingredients. Compost that I made myself. I recommend that you guys make your own compost. If you can't make your own compost, buy from a reputable store. A lot of compost in the store are not really of high quality and that are from things that I wouldn't necessarily use. alot off compost that are mostly made from animal monoures which are from the factory and those I wouldn't use. The compost that I made here is made out of food scraps and yard clippings, pine pellets and sawdust and also some coconut core that I've added in addition. Let's pour this stuff out. I have sieved it all. This is definitely a heavier soil cause I added all that perlight and coconut core in the air Max product. We're going to mix this altogether. It has a nice mutual smell. I like that a lot. Nothing better than your homemade compost. The next thing we're going to add to our mixture is something I'm a big fan of is the rock dost. I have about four different kind of rock dust. So where do not add them One at a time. You might be asking which rock dust is the base to have. I recommend any rock dost. It is best to combine all the rock dost so that the plants get all the minerals. I have the azurites version and the micro bits version of powdered up version. If you can only find azurites in the powdered version that's the one I would recommend. The granola version is also cool. It doesn't dissolve quite so easily. It's what's available in the local area because azurites can be hard to find. If you are looking for azurites and unable to find it in a local nursery, don't be alarmed. You can actually order it online. I have a small video and entitled the lowest price on rock dust. Actually that's where I got my stuff. I'm just going to use of standard little cup here and where to take a couple of each of the rock dost and pour it in my mixture. Be aware when dealing with the power of rock dust it is a fine particulate so you would want to wear a dust mask. I'm going to carefully pour out some into my mixture and continue adding stuff. Next we are going to go ahead and add a whole bunch of the grainier. And I do have a video comparing the grainier to the micronized version if you're interested. But this step is actually a lot larger. So we're going to go once again put this on our mixture as well. Next we have another rock dust called the volcanic mineral plus. We going to go once again and put our scoop in here. This is not quite as fine as the azurites so it is not as dusty. This is more of a sandy type texture, its still a bit dusty my favorite thing to do is to blend all different type of rock dust. If you can only find one use one. You can find many kinds then use smaller amounts of each kind to get that synergistic effect to ensure that your plants are going to have the minerals they need to succeed. School the Spanish made their carbonate may be available if you live up in Canada on the East Coast of the US or up in Ontario. I like this one a lot; it's a well-balanced rock dust that I've found. And I am happy to have included it in my garden. Let's go ahead and get another rock dust. The next rock dust is called guy green glacial rock dust found in British Columbia area of Canada. So if you're on the west coast of Canada you may be able to find the guy green glacial rock dust. This is one of the oldest this rock dust that I've been using for the longest time. This is actually the micronized version about as fine as the azurite once again we're going to get a nice scoop out of here. This one is quite powdered up so you want to wear a respirator and try not to make it dust off too much. Next we have a trace in or product .And this is how serious I am about rock dust I don't just use one I use many kinds. To make sure my plants are going to be happy, it's like a if you go to a buffet, would you to go a buffet would like to go to a buffet that just had salad bar or would rather go to a buffet that has a salad bar, pizza station, spaghetti station, hamburger station, the Taco station and it's a lot of station right well you get my point. Your plants want all these different stations and I'm providing it to them by giving them a little bit of all these different kinds of rock dust and I'm glad I'm able to do this. This one's thanks to the viewer, this is actually called the cascade mineral it's actually from the pacific North West. We're going to go ahead and grab a scoop this is actually a dark black rock dust it's not quite as fine as the other ones its maybe a little more coarse than the Spanish river carbonate. Well it looks good nonetheless, I'm glad I'm adding this next venture as well. Next we have another trace mineral product it's actually called the egg when mineral fertilizer so yet another trace segmentation I hear this one actually comes from Europe. But the country is actually distributing it out of California. This is a nice red color it be cool to show all these colors on the camera there. All the different colors of the different rock dust means different nutrients are in there. So the next mineral product we have is called jumbo maximize not only does it contain the minerals it contains beneficial microbes that help basically break down the minerals and allow your plants to absorb them. So were going to put in a scoop of the jumbo maximize in our mixture. I mean all that comes in these products are simply amazing so another way to add minerals back into the soil is by using something called humid acid this is some soil humid right here in this bag I got it at the local feed store. And it's like black pebble things it has minerals that will be added back into the soil. Some of this is actually a powder you can see some of it constantly blowing off. I definitely think this is a good thing to add as well. Another thing I've talked about on my show in the past has been zealight. We have some powdered up zealight in here. Once again zeolite is just another mineral. That's what I'm big on, adding minerals. Most people add NPK which three minerals back in there soil. I'm adding a host of over seventy dirt mineral in all these different basically grown or braux. The zealight acts as as a really fine particulate. So you want to were a respirator for some of these things and try not to make it dust up so much. We have another mineral with mostly carbon. I'm using bio char one of these days I will make a specific video on the bio char far you guys and hopefully I can get you a special price. They can be hard to find and very expensive. Okay let's go ahead and put the scoop off this stuff. This is pre-inoculate bio char if you're using char it's basically carbin and the carbin. Carbin can set new nutrients out of the soil. That's why I like preinoculated bia char. We're going to add the tool scoops of this bio char. The bio char is good because it gave the microbes a place to hide. You think of bio char as if you're thinking of a sponge with the needs of no ax and the greans well that's how it is under a microscope. Oh but the bacteria can hide in there and give them a nice home plus it adds carbon to the soil which is really important for the plants growth. There's this soil called teripredi soil from South America it's like dark nice rich soil I found that it contains a nice percentage of biocharg it's a good thing to add to your garden. I'm adding it into my soil mix. And here's a another product called soil optimizer . I start using it this year and I'm getting some amazing results in my garden by just adding some of the products. We are just going to go ahead and add a half couple. This product is once again the hemi acids. These are very important for the optimal soil fertility once it relates to the bacteria. Once again that's what I'm trying to here. I'm trying to build the best soil. The soil microbes help to break down all the nurturance in the soil so you can feed your plant so they can dance. Just to ensure my plants get off to a good start I'm going to add a organic based fertilizer. Not from manors. It's called the nourish bio salt this is a seven to one. And we are going to go ahead and take a scoop of this stuff and put it in the mix. The next thing we are going to add are merle hipon. It's the earth worm casting. The earth worm casting are one of the best things you could add to increase the bio diversity of the beneficial bacteria and funguy that could probably obtain locally if not make yourself at home in a worm bin. We are going to take about five scoops of this worm castings and to the mixture. This is nice dark and rich castings. Use different casting from different suppliers that are feeding their worms different things because the nutrients in the worm castings are going to be a little bit different. Maybe I put too much in mine but you can't put too much casting. It will not burn your plants. Next lets add another kind of casting. The next thing is insect frash and this is organic certified and what this is going to do is not only add nutrition it going to add some beneficial micros, beneficial fugue and bacteria back into the soil that going to help convert nutrition out of the soil and take it in the plant. Plus the intake fras is high on the kiting which will help your plant build their defense against insects. So we throw some out in our mixture. The next ingredient in my opinion is also very important to add which is what many gardeners maybe leaving out. What we have in this day and age is called the boogy humas. And this is a basically wood chip composts made at a low temperature. It takes years for this wood to develop from rotten trees. This basically gets the fugile into my soil. Add half of bag into the mixture. Many people do not know that many trees in the forest are fungal dominated. It's always a mixture. It is important to have a right mixture. After adding all the ingredient we are just going to mix it up. So I have all my soil mixed up. It's nice and fluffy. Some of you are asking what ratio I use. I just go by gardener's inter wishing. If you don't feel good making this mixture yourself that's all right you can go buy a reputable potting mixture. I just want to dive in and get best and most explosive growth and highest product produce I can grow that's why I add a lot of these things. I know some of these things are hard to find or expensive. You want to defiantly use a coconut core and per light. You also want to defiantly use a compost. A termafilic compost, heat base compost, fungal dominated compost, rock dust and the worm castings. That's my bear minimum. The next step is to put the mixture in my garden tower and start planting out. I full up the tower little by little and then I put the plant in it as I go along. Whenever planting in your garden tower you want to plant the appropriate plant. We are into the fog approaching the winter so I'm going to plant plants that can deal with the weather that we are going to be getting here. Certain plant can't deal with certain weather. Another thing that I', notice is the spaces of these holes are not too large I find that it is best to get the standard small six packs work best to trance plant from. I was planting these jumbo sixers here. The jumbo sixers have a larger space and these are probably three inch or two inch in diameter. I will have to sqees them in but yet they fit very nicely. If you are trying to trance plant from a four incher it might be a challenge to get it into the garden tower. I recommend trance planting from six packs. I recommend you start from trance plant for a higher chance of success. So I'm continuing to plant up my tower here and I found some approaches that work very well. An average person would dump all the soil in there. If you do that you're going to half to dig out the hole to get your trance plant in there. I'm going to show you my favorite way to put plants in here that are larger than the hole. You're going to plant from the inside. Take out the plant put it on the inside and stick the plant out through the hole and cover the root with the soil mix. You just repeat that for the next nine holes. I got all the plants in there and the roots are hanging on the inside. We are going to plant lattice for the final transplant. So I got all the levels planted in super simple super easy. So now that we got all the different plants in place, we level off the soil mix carefully on the top of the tower. I think I will plant some spinach on top. We got eight pots of spinach on top. I like to space them out. This tower has about fifty three plants .In just four square feet of space. That's amazing. Plus it pretty much recycles the water. So we just water the tower until it starts come out of the bottom. This might take a bit. These guys definitely wanted a drink. It reminds me of a song when I was younger. Have a drink on me plants. So we are watering and what happens when we water is we are distributing it evenly around. You should try and water closer to the outside so it can ketch the baby roots. It's like a sponge so it takes a while for the water to soak in. oh man finally I'm don't took me about five minute for it to start dripping into the bucket under the tower. You need to find a place you want it because after you water it you won't be able to move it. As you can see it is leaking out through the bottom along with some of the nurturance. When it's don you can throw it back in the tower to keep the nurturance. So a week has past and it's looking really beautiful. Some of the plants had some plant shots but they are getting over it now. Everything is lush and doing pretty good especially the spinach. The spinach really filled out since I've put it in there. Everything is pushing out a lot of leaves like they are ready to harvest. I like that the larger plants I put in there is doing much better. They are flourishing better than the smaller ones. I always encourage you guys to start out with some larger size trance plant. With the larger size transplant you won't have to plant them from the back side. The final stage I couldn't film earlier because I didn't have the things to do it. That is to fill up the tube in the center of the tube. The center tube is where the magic happens. This is why I like this garden tower system because it allows you to keep you own worms. The worms will eat your old produce scraps and make fertilizer or the rich worm casting which are very beneficial to your plants. So the theory is if you full this up with some bedding and some food scraps and some bunch of worms in there are going to go down on the food scraps and they're going to basically go through the holes in the thing to go into the composted all-around and you will have a living system in here that will create it's own fertilizer. Like I said earlier you want to start with a really good soil mixture that is really rich and nutritious. I don't want to leave this to a hand full of worms to give nurturance to all 50 plants here in this tower garden. So the reason why I couldn't finish this project is because I didn't have any worms. So I had to figure out how to get the wiggler worm which you know is the composting worms that is the red worms. The often time sold at bait shops which are used for fishing. I called a few place around here and they didn't have any. So luckily I found a lady on craigslist who sold the worms for compost and she is big in keeping her worm. And I'm glad I can support here. She sells five hundred worm for $15 or a thousand worm for $30. I went ahead and bought the worms. It came in a dish thing that you do your dishes in. she said the worms can be kept in this. She said I should take out some of the worms because 500 worms should not be kept in there it's better for about 200. She gave me directions and everything . This is a very good business for you entrepreneurs. The earthworms create some of the best fertilizer on earth for your plants. This is how nature works. Why did nature god or whatever put the earth worms in the grown to eat up and decompose the organic matter and make nurturance for the plants to keep the cycle going. It's all about systems. A tip she gave me is I want to keep it in light for couple of days. What that will do is the light keeps them in there and prevents them from crowing out. It looks like a bunch of shredded news paper. I don't know how she counts out 500 worms. Or maybe she just weighs them. Basically she put some shredded news paper in it and a card board mat at the bottom. There is a whole bunch of them under the cardboard. What we are going to do is throw some of these worms down the tower tube. We are going to remove the PVC cap here. I see the tub go all the way down to the bottom. There looks like there is an overflow of soil mixture that I filled it with. The thing is this step is really optional. I highly encourage you guys to do this step to keep some live worms in here. If you don't want to do this step with the worms you could just fill it up with your standard potting mix that you used to fill it up. I recommend that you fill it up with food scraps about one third of the way up and then add about a hand full or two of worms in there. I'm going to do it little different. Worms like a good bedding to sleep like shredded news paper. You should use the black and white news paper not the colored because it is glossy. This is what I'm going to use, coconut core. I think they like the coconut core more. If you put in food scraps and it's rotting the coconut core will absorb the moister to help keep the moister level balance out right. The next thing we want to do is to give the worms some food. We have some dehydrated peppers. It's not good to put citric peels in. if you just put food scraps in here you may get food flies and all kind of other stuff. I'm going to do something reel cook that I learned in the past video out in Baltimore area Aberdeen. They don't feed their worms food scraps they feed them finished compost. So we are going to give the worms concentrated food scraps in the form of the compost that I made here. Here is some compost that I made some rich delicious stuff. You want to make shore you put some finished compost to feed your worms. When you smell it, it shouldn't have a smell it should just have a neutral smell. You want to fill about a third up. This is literally all that you going to want to feed your worm. The next thing is we are going to add some worms. Only for good measure I'm going to put about a hand full of some more cores. I'm sure this is going to work the way it is because we got the worms in there we got the food in there they got the bedding there going to be totally happy. We just want to make sure it maintains a proper moister level. So by adding the fresh food scraps and vegetable scraps e may have a moister level. In addition I've been watering this every day by using the drip offs and re watering. It actually stays fairly well watered especially establishing your plants. Watering it is very important. I've been top watering it and for the first couple of days I've been watering each plant. Some of the water would over flow in the beginning but know that I'm watering it, it seems like the roots are starting to grow and starting to seek out water. Because that's what the roots do they seek out the water. So you don't have water at the plant you just need to water where it's at. Well we are at the last step. So we put the top back on. If you want to learn more about the garden tower you should check out the website gardentowerproject.com. I think that's pretty much it for my garden tower setup. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this video showing you how to set up one of these garden towers. I think that this is an amazing setup and defiantly important. You should try to buy one if you don't have a large yard to garden in. I like that it holds fifty plus plants in one small four square root of space and plus it also has a worm bin. The main thing you want to remember is that you want this to have as much sun as possible. Try to make it be able to rotate to get even sun light. So all and all, this is defiantly a success with the garden tower project. Recommend you get one if you have a small space or just a patio. I defiantly recommend the garden tower over the tower garden. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this episode once again my name is John Kohler with growing your greens.com see you next time and remember keep on growing. view all
 


In this episode, John will share why the Garden Tower is unique and why it is the best vertical tower garden system he has found to date. The Garden Tower will allow you to have a vegetable garden where your normally couldn't such as on a patio, balcony, deck, sidewalk or driveway. While watching this episode, 
you will learn:
 1. How to assemble the Garden Tower 
2. Where to place your Garden Tower
 3. How to make a nutritious potting soil your plants will love. 
4. How to fill and plant out the Garden Tower in one easy step. 
5. How the Garden Tower Conserves and Recycles Water 
6. How to add Red Wiggler Composting Worms to Your Garden Tower 
7. If John Prefers the Garden Tower Project or the Garden Tower After watching this episode you will learn the benefits and how to set up the Garden Tower so you too can grow a vegetable garden in a limited amount of space.
 
subtitle:

This is John Kohler with growing your greens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you. I just got a new toy in the mail it's the right hear check it out. This is actually called the garden tower project and it's known as a garden tower. And what it is basically, it looks like a 55 gallon drum with a heavy modification to grow food in. But why I like this so much is because it has 45 planting spots all up and down through this whole barrel. In addition you can plant some plants up the top so you can plant over 50 plants in just 4 ft.² off space. So literally, that's a lot of planets for it just a small area. So this is especially good if you have a patio, deck, little apartment or a condo and you don't have a lot of space. Maybe if you just have a little bit of space on your patio outside. You could grow a lot of food in the sky. I have seen other tower gardens, which I don't particularly care for but this guy let's you grow a lot more and he lets you roll it in soil. Plus, this is very intelligently designed. It's part of the best vertical tower garden system I've ever seen. Let me go ahead and explain why. Besides the 45 planting holes, what's unique about this system is, it's got this Center tube hear in middle and what they do in the center tube is your going to put food scraps and red wiggler worms or composting worms. The worm is going to eat the food scraps, break it down, spread the worm compos or Vermeer compost all throughout the unit to help fertilize the plants in there. Plus on the bottom of this unit is a place that you can actually take out the food scraps out of the bottom. So that's really cool. This vertical tower garden makes its own fertilizer. You can't say that for other ones. Another thing is that this is water conserving. So water is a very precious resource especially depending on where you live in this day and age. And this one conserves water. How does it do that? Well Very simply. You pour the water on or water up to the top while the plant will get water the water will drain down all the different plant planted in all of these pocket things are going to get water then the water goes to the bottom, once it get to the bottom it's basically funnel out certain whole and you're going to put little buckets underneath and all the water that goes through, now your going to have it in a bucket. You can re-use this water to water it again so that there is minimal water loss. Many just standard garden pots or whatever. You know you will just water and it just run out on the deck or down below. The excess water on your deck can actually ruin your deck. If you live on a three-story apartment building and you have to water your plants. When you over water them the stuff will drip down to your neighbor which isn't cool either. This you could collect the water and reuse it. So this is a well thought out design so I'm happy to be setting one up and sharing this up with you guys and showing you how it works and how I'm going to set it up. So this just came to me as you guys can see there is a US Post Office label on there. I mean it literally came shaped like this through the mail without even any raping. It was not damaged our anything. It looks totally perfectly fine. So in this video what we're going to do is to set this guy up and show you guys how easy it is to set up. I'm going to make a specific potting soil mixture. I'm going show you guys that as well. Plus you'll see me plant out my plants. And by the end of his video you'll see how easy it is to set one of these garden Tower projects up if you want to grow avertable At home. So I guess with that, let's get into un-boxing and assembling. So let's see what we got in the box here. Sounds like some hard work so construction is super simple super easy. I think pretty much what were going to need to do is to bolt down a few legs and put a couple of bolts in there. In the box you get some instructions. It's definitely important to follow the instructions. I might read them or look at them but I'm just going to just do my own thing. Looks pretty basic. Next we got some stainless steel hardware. If you use standard hardware on something like this outdoors it's going to rust, not cool. I like the providing of heavy-duty stainless hardware. In addition we have the wood legs. These stand it up off the ground so that you can put a bucket underneath to collect all the water. Plus it also allows you to garden whether you're sitting or standing. So if you're in a wheelchair you can still garden in this garden tower project. So definitely really cool. There's three legs and look to be a nice hardwood here. In addition we have two more parts, a standard pot looks like it's made out of pbc, and the top basically goes on here. And it doesn't set all the way down. It kind of just sits on the top; it doesn't go all the way down because in the end you wouldn't be able to get it back off. The top has some holes in it for air ration. And you want to learn more about this at gardentowerproject.com. Finally we have this big thing here. This is some kind of compression plug. What this does is go underneath the bottom of the whole unit. The club actually fits in the bottom of this tube here. You can remove this plug for a harvest in your worm casting from under neath. This is definitely well thought out. I like it for sure. So next let's get in to the actual assembly. It's going to be a breeze. So for the assemble we are going to need a few things. We're going to need a small table or something else I like, a 7 gallon bucket. What were going to do is take this guy and put it on the top of the bucket to get it off the ground. And I hope this holds us in now. And some other things will need of source are some tools. We got us some half inch ratchet and a half inch driver. That's going to basically bolt on these legs. These legs have special cutouts and they are labeled. This one's labeled C. You're going to look for the labels c on the unit itself. And it's just going to sit like that and you're going to bolt them in. So that's it. You don't want to over tighten. Just finger tighten and that would be good. We're going to go ahead and take it off the bucket here. It's fairly light. We are going to go ahead and take our little plug here and unscrew this guy. Then when you unscrew it is going to lose the tension on this rubber bushing thing in here. And then you take it and put it underneath and shove it in the hole. And then you go-ahead and screwed tight and it'll lock in place. So once you have your garden tower fully assemble and is actually quite a breeze to assemble. You're going to want to do a few things. Number one, you're going to want to find the right location place your garden tower. I recommend placing it in the sunniest place possible. The more son your plant receive, the faster it will grow for you. Don't worry. Even if you have a place that doesn't get enough sun, that's alright because you can still grow some things. Shady spot is better to grow herbs and leapy which will do okay but not exilent. Just won't grow and yield as fast. So you want to find the right location before filling it up. Because if you fill it up and try to move it is going to be quite heavy. Besides the location you're going to want to get somewhere nice and level. If your location is on grass or dirt you're going to want to put it on some metal bricks to keep it off the wet ground. After you have selected your location the most important thing that you need to do is to fill it with the proper and appropriate soil mix. I cannot emphasize enough how important this is. If you fill it up with just any old dirt from your yard your plants probably won't do as well. Plus because this is a container garden you need to have proper air ration, proper moisture holding capabilities in there. So for that reason I recommend using a potting soil mix. There many potting soil mixes of the marketplace and some of definitely better than others. Usually in potting soils but not always, you get what you payed for. If you paid a good amount for a potted soil mix you get quality stuff. If the potted mix is pretty cheap then normally the ingredients aren't so good. You want to get a nice fine potted soil it's going to want to contain things like, coconut core, perlite and compost. If you buy a pre-bagged one that's great, because that's going to make it easy for beginners. I like to personally make my own blend. And that's what I'm going to show you now to make your own blend of a good potting soil. It's going to work excellent in the garden tower that I'm assembling behind me. So what I want to do is to have a nice fluffy mixture. If you want to get some dirt, stand, dirt, mud or clay. It's going to flip in there and the roots won't be able to grow optimally. The plan routes don't grow through the soil, they'd grow between the airspace in the soil. And that's why good fluffy mix is going to be optimal for this. That's what most potting mix provides. That's what I'm pretty much going to duplicate doing my own thing. I'm going to cheat a little bit. Most potting mixes, as I've mentioned earlier containing, perlite, coconut core or Pete moss plus compost and other ingredience. I'm going to make up a mix myself making the perlite separate from the Pete moss or coconut core. I've got some product that has already done that for me. Many of you guys might know this stuff right here it's called Pro mix BX with mycorrhizae. This is perlite with the Pete Moss and it's from Canada and it's premade. It also has the beneficial fun guy, the mycorrhizae which is really going to supercharge plant growth. It will help plants get more nutrition out of the soil that you're planting in. So while you could use something like this I find a much better alternative to using something like the Pro mix as the base to my potting soil that I'm going to create in the wheelbarrow behind me. Now this guy is actually called in air Max. So instead of just having the perlite and the Pete Moss which I'm not a super huge fan of. I still use it absolutely and it's a great medium. But I prefer coconut core as a much better medium. Coconut core is more sustainable than the Pete Moss and it's more renewable. A coconut palm will produce over a 100 knots a year. And we'll eat the food and drink the water out of that. It's one of my favorite foods. But also you're left with the husk on the outside that can be put into a product like this to be reused. There is a never ending resource as long as the coconut tree is abound. I like the earmarks because it has the quadruple wash Coconut fiber and this is important that you get a high quality coconut core. Many coconut core can be of often low-quality and things will not grow in them or grow that well. Not being properly balanced. The coconut core it's a great product but it needs to be washed to get out all the different nutrients out of it that may have been sitting there from being in brackish water or whatnot. I like this as triple washed coconut core. In addition it also has the pure light that is also definitely really good. It also has Pairo magnetic rock. Definitely really good. It also has the mycorrhizae and humic acid in seaweed. So these are some of my favorite product that I won't have to add to the mixture because it's already in the back. So what I'm going to do next is put in two of the bags its one point five cubic feet each. That's going to be a total of 3 ft.³ I think the garden tower holds 8 ft.³ or so. That's going to be three bags that's a good portion of it. The other things that were going to add in their is the compost, worm casting, fungal-based compost and a few other things like the rock dost and some other things that I like. I'm going to show you guys how to mix it up behind me. Now we're going to make up the soil mix. This is my favorite part actually because I get to get my hands dirty. We got the wheelbarrow here that holds 4 1/2 ft.³ of soil. We are going to Make two batches to fill the garden tower there. The first ingredients were going to use is the airmax. We're going to cut open the bag here. It's definitely nice to, rich and black. Lots of porelite and cocnut coure in there. There is no smelling in there and I like that a lot. So we're going to dump this in as our base ingredient. If you can't get the air Max or can't find it you're going to want the use a good washed coconut core or a purlight to make up for it. You can also use the makariser the calp the seaweed the paramagnetic rock and the other stuff that are in here. I like that they put it together for me and they formulate an excellent blend and they have done a lot of testing on it to get excellent results if you know what I mean. I'm not going to go around and reinvent the wheel when I can find a product that can really kick some butt. Let's go head and dump this guy out. This stuff is nice and rich. I want to show you guys the difference between this stuff here and the standard potting stuff that you might buy. Here's a standard potting soil and it's made by Kellogg's. So we're going to go ahead and open this stuff up. We're going to put about a quarter of what's in the bag in here just to get volume and masse to our mixture. It's also kind of fluffy because this is a standard potting mix. I want to share this with you guys and compare to the stuff I put in. And also give you some ideas on what is normally put in potting soil mixes. You might want to look for it or you might not want out of it. I'm going to read you guys the ingredients on the bag. Composted Forest product, composted rice halls, composted porched manure, pearlite, caltmeal, worm castings and iron saltfate. And this is an organic potting mix. I always recommend that you guys purchase organic Potting mix without chemically derived altered factory mixtures. If it says organic usually it's from natural material that I would actually use in my garden. This is actually 0MRI certified so that's definitely a good certification to look for it if you can't find it in your area. Let's pour out some of this stuff here. Once again it's nice and black.We will put in about that much right here. And unlike the stuff you just saw before it's nice sun block. I don't know if you can see it on the camera. And if we dig up the air Max you can see the difference. This stuff looks to me like it has a lot of uncomposted Forest product. I'm not a fan of uncomposted Forest product which includes pieces off little wood ships and barks and stuff like this. This would not be my first choice for a potting soil to fill out my garden tower. That's why I'm just mixing this stuff in. I mean some of this stuff is good. A little bit of compostd monour in there. But I'm not a fan of that stuff either. So besides this stuff that where going to mix in, we're going to go ahead and put in one of my favorite ingredients. Compost that I made myself. I recommend that you guys make your own compost. If you can't make your own compost, buy from a reputable store. A lot of compost in the store are not really of high quality and that are from things that I wouldn't necessarily use. alot off compost that are mostly made from animal monoures which are from the factory and those I wouldn't use. The compost that I made here is made out of food scraps and yard clippings, pine pellets and sawdust and also some coconut core that I've added in addition. Let's pour this stuff out. I have sieved it all. This is definitely a heavier soil cause I added all that perlight and coconut core in the air Max product. We're going to mix this altogether. It has a nice mutual smell. I like that a lot. Nothing better than your homemade compost. The next thing we're going to add to our mixture is something I'm a big fan of is the rock dost. I have about four different kind of rock dust. So where do not add them One at a time. You might be asking which rock dust is the base to have. I recommend any rock dost. It is best to combine all the rock dost so that the plants get all the minerals. I have the azurites version and the micro bits version of powdered up version. If you can only find azurites in the powdered version that's the one I would recommend. The granola version is also cool. It doesn't dissolve quite so easily. It's what's available in the local area because azurites can be hard to find. If you are looking for azurites and unable to find it in a local nursery, don't be alarmed. You can actually order it online. I have a small video and entitled the lowest price on rock dust. Actually that's where I got my stuff. I'm just going to use of standard little cup here and where to take a couple of each of the rock dost and pour it in my mixture. Be aware when dealing with the power of rock dust it is a fine particulate so you would want to wear a dust mask. I'm going to carefully pour out some into my mixture and continue adding stuff. Next we are going to go ahead and add a whole bunch of the grainier. And I do have a video comparing the grainier to the micronized version if you're interested. But this step is actually a lot larger. So we're going to go once again put this on our mixture as well. Next we have another rock dust called the volcanic mineral plus. We going to go once again and put our scoop in here. This is not quite as fine as the azurites so it is not as dusty. This is more of a sandy type texture, its still a bit dusty my favorite thing to do is to blend all different type of rock dust. If you can only find one use one. You can find many kinds then use smaller amounts of each kind to get that synergistic effect to ensure that your plants are going to have the minerals they need to succeed. School the Spanish made their carbonate may be available if you live up in Canada on the East Coast of the US or up in Ontario. I like this one a lot; it's a well-balanced rock dust that I've found. And I am happy to have included it in my garden. Let's go ahead and get another rock dust. The next rock dust is called guy green glacial rock dust found in British Columbia area of Canada. So if you're on the west coast of Canada you may be able to find the guy green glacial rock dust. This is one of the oldest this rock dust that I've been using for the longest time. This is actually the micronized version about as fine as the azurite once again we're going to get a nice scoop out of here. This one is quite powdered up so you want to wear a respirator and try not to make it dust off too much. Next we have a trace in or product .And this is how serious I am about rock dust I don't just use one I use many kinds. To make sure my plants are going to be happy, it's like a if you go to a buffet, would you to go a buffet would like to go to a buffet that just had salad bar or would rather go to a buffet that has a salad bar, pizza station, spaghetti station, hamburger station, the Taco station and it's a lot of station right well you get my point. Your plants want all these different stations and I'm providing it to them by giving them a little bit of all these different kinds of rock dust and I'm glad I'm able to do this. This one's thanks to the viewer, this is actually called the cascade mineral it's actually from the pacific North West. We're going to go ahead and grab a scoop this is actually a dark black rock dust it's not quite as fine as the other ones its maybe a little more coarse than the Spanish river carbonate. Well it looks good nonetheless, I'm glad I'm adding this next venture as well. Next we have another trace mineral product it's actually called the egg when mineral fertilizer so yet another trace segmentation I hear this one actually comes from Europe. But the country is actually distributing it out of California. This is a nice red color it be cool to show all these colors on the camera there. All the different colors of the different rock dust means different nutrients are in there. So the next mineral product we have is called jumbo maximize not only does it contain the minerals it contains beneficial microbes that help basically break down the minerals and allow your plants to absorb them. So were going to put in a scoop of the jumbo maximize in our mixture. I mean all that comes in these products are simply amazing so another way to add minerals back into the soil is by using something called humid acid this is some soil humid right here in this bag I got it at the local feed store. And it's like black pebble things it has minerals that will be added back into the soil. Some of this is actually a powder you can see some of it constantly blowing off. I definitely think this is a good thing to add as well. Another thing I've talked about on my show in the past has been zealight. We have some powdered up zealight in here. Once again zeolite is just another mineral. That's what I'm big on, adding minerals. Most people add NPK which three minerals back in there soil. I'm adding a host of over seventy dirt mineral in all these different basically grown or braux. The zealight acts as as a really fine particulate. So you want to were a respirator for some of these things and try not to make it dust up so much. We have another mineral with mostly carbon. I'm using bio char one of these days I will make a specific video on the bio char far you guys and hopefully I can get you a special price. They can be hard to find and very expensive. Okay let's go ahead and put the scoop off this stuff. This is pre-inoculate bio char if you're using char it's basically carbin and the carbin. Carbin can set new nutrients out of the soil. That's why I like preinoculated bia char. We're going to add the tool scoops of this bio char. The bio char is good because it gave the microbes a place to hide. You think of bio char as if you're thinking of a sponge with the needs of no ax and the greans well that's how it is under a microscope. Oh but the bacteria can hide in there and give them a nice home plus it adds carbon to the soil which is really important for the plants growth. There's this soil called teripredi soil from South America it's like dark nice rich soil I found that it contains a nice percentage of biocharg it's a good thing to add to your garden. I'm adding it into my soil mix. And here's a another product called soil optimizer . I start using it this year and I'm getting some amazing results in my garden by just adding some of the products. We are just going to go ahead and add a half couple. This product is once again the hemi acids. These are very important for the optimal soil fertility once it relates to the bacteria. Once again that's what I'm trying to here. I'm trying to build the best soil. The soil microbes help to break down all the nurturance in the soil so you can feed your plant so they can dance. Just to ensure my plants get off to a good start I'm going to add a organic based fertilizer. Not from manors. It's called the nourish bio salt this is a seven to one. And we are going to go ahead and take a scoop of this stuff and put it in the mix. The next thing we are going to add are merle hipon. It's the earth worm casting. The earth worm casting are one of the best things you could add to increase the bio diversity of the beneficial bacteria and funguy that could probably obtain locally if not make yourself at home in a worm bin. We are going to take about five scoops of this worm castings and to the mixture. This is nice dark and rich castings. Use different casting from different suppliers that are feeding their worms different things because the nutrients in the worm castings are going to be a little bit different. Maybe I put too much in mine but you can't put too much casting. It will not burn your plants. Next lets add another kind of casting. The next thing is insect frash and this is organic certified and what this is going to do is not only add nutrition it going to add some beneficial micros, beneficial fugue and bacteria back into the soil that going to help convert nutrition out of the soil and take it in the plant. Plus the intake fras is high on the kiting which will help your plant build their defense against insects. So we throw some out in our mixture. The next ingredient in my opinion is also very important to add which is what many gardeners maybe leaving out. What we have in this day and age is called the boogy humas. And this is a basically wood chip composts made at a low temperature. It takes years for this wood to develop from rotten trees. This basically gets the fugile into my soil. Add half of bag into the mixture. Many people do not know that many trees in the forest are fungal dominated. It's always a mixture. It is important to have a right mixture. After adding all the ingredient we are just going to mix it up. So I have all my soil mixed up. It's nice and fluffy. Some of you are asking what ratio I use. I just go by gardener's inter wishing. If you don't feel good making this mixture yourself that's all right you can go buy a reputable potting mixture. I just want to dive in and get best and most explosive growth and highest product produce I can grow that's why I add a lot of these things. I know some of these things are hard to find or expensive. You want to defiantly use a coconut core and per light. You also want to defiantly use a compost. A termafilic compost, heat base compost, fungal dominated compost, rock dust and the worm castings. That's my bear minimum. The next step is to put the mixture in my garden tower and start planting out. I full up the tower little by little and then I put the plant in it as I go along. Whenever planting in your garden tower you want to plant the appropriate plant. We are into the fog approaching the winter so I'm going to plant plants that can deal with the weather that we are going to be getting here. Certain plant can't deal with certain weather. Another thing that I', notice is the spaces of these holes are not too large I find that it is best to get the standard small six packs work best to trance plant from. I was planting these jumbo sixers here. The jumbo sixers have a larger space and these are probably three inch or two inch in diameter. I will have to sqees them in but yet they fit very nicely. If you are trying to trance plant from a four incher it might be a challenge to get it into the garden tower. I recommend trance planting from six packs. I recommend you start from trance plant for a higher chance of success. So I'm continuing to plant up my tower here and I found some approaches that work very well. An average person would dump all the soil in there. If you do that you're going to half to dig out the hole to get your trance plant in there. I'm going to show you my favorite way to put plants in here that are larger than the hole. You're going to plant from the inside. Take out the plant put it on the inside and stick the plant out through the hole and cover the root with the soil mix. You just repeat that for the next nine holes. I got all the plants in there and the roots are hanging on the inside. We are going to plant lattice for the final transplant. So I got all the levels planted in super simple super easy. So now that we got all the different plants in place, we level off the soil mix carefully on the top of the tower. I think I will plant some spinach on top. We got eight pots of spinach on top. I like to space them out. This tower has about fifty three plants .In just four square feet of space. That's amazing. Plus it pretty much recycles the water. So we just water the tower until it starts come out of the bottom. This might take a bit. These guys definitely wanted a drink. It reminds me of a song when I was younger. Have a drink on me plants. So we are watering and what happens when we water is we are distributing it evenly around. You should try and water closer to the outside so it can ketch the baby roots. It's like a sponge so it takes a while for the water to soak in. oh man finally I'm don't took me about five minute for it to start dripping into the bucket under the tower. You need to find a place you want it because after you water it you won't be able to move it. As you can see it is leaking out through the bottom along with some of the nurturance. When it's don you can throw it back in the tower to keep the nurturance. So a week has past and it's looking really beautiful. Some of the plants had some plant shots but they are getting over it now. Everything is lush and doing pretty good especially the spinach. The spinach really filled out since I've put it in there. Everything is pushing out a lot of leaves like they are ready to harvest. I like that the larger plants I put in there is doing much better. They are flourishing better than the smaller ones. I always encourage you guys to start out with some larger size trance plant. With the larger size transplant you won't have to plant them from the back side. The final stage I couldn't film earlier because I didn't have the things to do it. That is to fill up the tube in the center of the tube. The center tube is where the magic happens. This is why I like this garden tower system because it allows you to keep you own worms. The worms will eat your old produce scraps and make fertilizer or the rich worm casting which are very beneficial to your plants. So the theory is if you full this up with some bedding and some food scraps and some bunch of worms in there are going to go down on the food scraps and they're going to basically go through the holes in the thing to go into the composted all-around and you will have a living system in here that will create it's own fertilizer. Like I said earlier you want to start with a really good soil mixture that is really rich and nutritious. I don't want to leave this to a hand full of worms to give nurturance to all 50 plants here in this tower garden. So the reason why I couldn't finish this project is because I didn't have any worms. So I had to figure out how to get the wiggler worm which you know is the composting worms that is the red worms. The often time sold at bait shops which are used for fishing. I called a few place around here and they didn't have any. So luckily I found a lady on craigslist who sold the worms for compost and she is big in keeping her worm. And I'm glad I can support here. She sells five hundred worm for $15 or a thousand worm for $30. I went ahead and bought the worms. It came in a dish thing that you do your dishes in. she said the worms can be kept in this. She said I should take out some of the worms because 500 worms should not be kept in there it's better for about 200. She gave me directions and everything . This is a very good business for you entrepreneurs. The earthworms create some of the best fertilizer on earth for your plants. This is how nature works. Why did nature god or whatever put the earth worms in the grown to eat up and decompose the organic matter and make nurturance for the plants to keep the cycle going. It's all about systems. A tip she gave me is I want to keep it in light for couple of days. What that will do is the light keeps them in there and prevents them from crowing out. It looks like a bunch of shredded news paper. I don't know how she counts out 500 worms. Or maybe she just weighs them. Basically she put some shredded news paper in it and a card board mat at the bottom. There is a whole bunch of them under the cardboard. What we are going to do is throw some of these worms down the tower tube. We are going to remove the PVC cap here. I see the tub go all the way down to the bottom. There looks like there is an overflow of soil mixture that I filled it with. The thing is this step is really optional. I highly encourage you guys to do this step to keep some live worms in here. If you don't want to do this step with the worms you could just fill it up with your standard potting mix that you used to fill it up. I recommend that you fill it up with food scraps about one third of the way up and then add about a hand full or two of worms in there. I'm going to do it little different. Worms like a good bedding to sleep like shredded news paper. You should use the black and white news paper not the colored because it is glossy. This is what I'm going to use, coconut core. I think they like the coconut core more. If you put in food scraps and it's rotting the coconut core will absorb the moister to help keep the moister level balance out right. The next thing we want to do is to give the worms some food. We have some dehydrated peppers. It's not good to put citric peels in. if you just put food scraps in here you may get food flies and all kind of other stuff. I'm going to do something reel cook that I learned in the past video out in Baltimore area Aberdeen. They don't feed their worms food scraps they feed them finished compost. So we are going to give the worms concentrated food scraps in the form of the compost that I made here. Here is some compost that I made some rich delicious stuff. You want to make shore you put some finished compost to feed your worms. When you smell it, it shouldn't have a smell it should just have a neutral smell. You want to fill about a third up. This is literally all that you going to want to feed your worm. The next thing is we are going to add some worms. Only for good measure I'm going to put about a hand full of some more cores. I'm sure this is going to work the way it is because we got the worms in there we got the food in there they got the bedding there going to be totally happy. We just want to make sure it maintains a proper moister level. So by adding the fresh food scraps and vegetable scraps e may have a moister level. In addition I've been watering this every day by using the drip offs and re watering. It actually stays fairly well watered especially establishing your plants. Watering it is very important. I've been top watering it and for the first couple of days I've been watering each plant. Some of the water would over flow in the beginning but know that I'm watering it, it seems like the roots are starting to grow and starting to seek out water. Because that's what the roots do they seek out the water. So you don't have water at the plant you just need to water where it's at. Well we are at the last step. So we put the top back on. If you want to learn more about the garden tower you should check out the website gardentowerproject.com. I think that's pretty much it for my garden tower setup. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this video showing you how to set up one of these garden towers. I think that this is an amazing setup and defiantly important. You should try to buy one if you don't have a large yard to garden in. I like that it holds fifty plus plants in one small four square root of space and plus it also has a worm bin. The main thing you want to remember is that you want this to have as much sun as possible. Try to make it be able to rotate to get even sun light. So all and all, this is defiantly a success with the garden tower project. Recommend you get one if you have a small space or just a patio. I defiantly recommend the garden tower over the tower garden. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this episode once again my name is John Kohler with growing your greens.com see you next time and remember keep on growing.

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How to Be a Back Yard Vegetable Gardener to Grow Food

John posted the article • 0 comments • 113 views • 2017-09-25 18:01 • came from similar tags

 

 
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JOHN: Alright this is John Kohler with Growingyourgreens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you and this one is a very special one for you guys out there that actually wasn’t able to be here today, because what I’m going to do today in just a few minutes, a bunch of people are coming over. I’m actually having a local garden tour for the first time ever. I’ve rarely ever opened up my home for people to come and give a tour. My place is not set up to give tours. I mean I don’t give tours. I share with you guys what I do online, but I really want to have a tour to show local people what is possible and how you can grow food here in the Las Vegas desert, because it really isn’t that hard if you set it up and do it properly. And besides from the people at the tour, who got personal attention, who got to see my garden in person, I also want to film it for you guys. All you guys across the whole world that may live in similar climates. Even if you don’t, a lot of the techniques that I share with you guys in this video will be applicable wherever you live. So anyways, stay tuned for upcoming episode that I’m going to go into next. This is probably one of my best episodes, because it’s just me off the cuff talking and sharing information and attempting to get people to grow their own food and eat a healthier diet. And I believe by doing this, I will be changing the world one person at a time. So anyways, without further ado, let’s go ahead and get into my tour video today. JOHN: Alright, welcome everybody. Today I’m going to give you a tour of my backyard garden. I do want to let you guys know that my backyard garden, or I guess you can call it a farm, it’s my farm, and for me and for me growing my food. And my sole intention is to grow the highest quality food so please be forewarned. This is not designed for giving tours. It’s really tight, constricted spaces. There’s hoses in places. I tried to pick up a little bit this morning but there’s things around that you could trip over, so be careful where you walk and there’s bushes and trees into the walkways, so push them aside. If you’ve got to break a branch, do it. I don’t want you guys getting hurt or falling or anything like that. And I think in this day and age, it’s really important to have the highest quality food because we are what we eat. And I think the majority of Americans in this day and age are just eating poor quality food, especially fast food and junk food and things with high fructose corn syrup and GMO foods. Those are the lowest foods that I don’t even recommend people eat. I mean at least if you’re eating fresh fruits and fresh vegetables, whole foods, plant-based foods, that’s some of the best foods, but take it to the next level. You could eat more fruits and vegetables and even organic fruits and vegetables, which I would recommend. There’s some standard out there that I don’t necessarily agree with because there are some standard practices that might not be necessarily good and organics tell you what you can’t do. It doesn’t tell you what you should do, or should be doing, so I try to grow in an organic fashion so I’m abiding by organic rules, but then I do things as you guys will learn today that organic farmers simply are not doing. Here in Las Vegas, people may think it’s difficult to grow a garden and if you look at my neighbors on both sides, you could see they just, this neighbor just has weeds, and not using any water, which is great. And the other neighbor just has a rocked in yard, which is low maintenance. And you know that’s cool, but I think we all need to eat and especially with the drought in California, many people have heard about that, but luckily we’re not really in that much of a drought although we have been in water conservation mode. What people in the news media neglect to say in many cases is that the majority of California water is not being consumed for residential uses. Does anybody know what it’s being consumed by? Agriculture. So agriculture, to grow food and more specifically, animals. So animals take way more water to grow an animal out, to get them, because they also excrete waste, which is wasted water. And also wasted manure and whatnot. It’s very intensive, so I think people should eat far less animals, they should raise less animals and raise more fruits and vegetables and that’s what people should eat for the water crisis, instead of trying to have people conserve water. Which is important. People should change their diet, which is a more important thing to do, to a more plant-based diet. So then taking it from that point that our diets have to waste a lot of water, even better than having a farm in California use the water where they’re overhead watering and wasting water in many cases, because they can’t do drip irrigation on a whole farm in most cases because it’s just a lot of infrastructure. It’d be far better, and once it’s grown in California and ship it here with all the petroleum fuel products, it’s just better to grow it here as best as you can. So I started growing back in California over 10 years ago now, and northern California, and I had a wonderful time growing there because it’s just so easy. Everything I seemed to plant and the compost and the resources I had there seem to do very well. And when I moved to Vegas, at first things didn’t go so well because I didn’t have the exact same resources. I didn’t have the same compost material, the weather’s similar but a lot different, and I was planting things that I would plant back in California and it wouldn’t work. And I moved here, it was like a big learning curve, so I had to learn and I had videos on YouTube setting up my garden. It was like an hour-long video setting up four circular beds that you’ll see, the original four, but you’ll also see another 16 more that I filled up that side, and last year I started this new side which is doing significantly better because I’ve learned from my mistakes and if you guys are gardeners or haven’t gardened yet and are going to embark on this journey, I encourage you guys to always learn from your mistakes because that’s how we learn and grow as people. If you think oh I’m going to mess up, it’s not cool, I’m not going to do it, I’m not even going to try, messing up is good. You learn successfully what does not work, then you can try something a little bit different. That’s kind of what I’ve done. I was like oh wait, I’ll use the bagged stuff from Home Depot. Stuff grows, but not that well compared to California so let’s try to switch up the soil mix, do something different, let’s do different irrigation systems and see how this works. So now I’m happy to say once you go in my garden you’ll see one side looks more vibrant and abundant in my opinion than the other side and that’s the side where I have the new subsoil irrigation system, better soil mixture, and basically it’s the same plants. I planted lettuce on this side, which I’ll show you later and the lettuce placed on the other side, but with the drip system, different soil. It’s just working better on this side, so if you haven’t set up a system yet, I would recommend emulating this side until I find something better. I’m still tweaking. I’ve unfortunately run out of room because it’s tight back there, but maybe I’ll get to, if my neighbor, expand, get all caught up. Gardening does not have to be a lot of work. It’s as much time as you want to put into it, and the more time you put into it the better of a garden you’re going to have. Like for me personally, I like to be in the garden half the way. I’m working half the day and then I’m in the garden the rest of the half the day. Sometimes I’m there more than a half a day, and there’s always things to do. The most important thing that I want to let you guys know is that the most important thing when you’re gardening is to set up infrastructure and set it up properly because if you don’t set it up properly, it’s going to make more work for you in the long run and if you set it up properly, you could almost have hands off. One point I would just visit here once a month and check on my garden, and most things were self-sufficient and work on their own with the automatic watering system. My yields weren’t as good as if I were here all the time, like I am now. There’s always a way to garden. Anyways, let’s go ahead and head back. We’re going to go to a few different spots where I’ll stop and I’ll talk about different aspects and if you do have any questions, please hold your questions to the end and I’ll answer for you. Let’s have everybody come in, maybe if everybody single file against this side. Once again my place is not made for garden tours with a dozen people here. So this is two different sides of my garden. This is the later side, where I used concrete blocks that I have an episode on if you guys want to learn how to make it. I had a guy come in and help me level it all out and it works very well. A couple of places I stepped on and they fell over, but even with no mortar they’re holding pretty good. Right there there’s a spot you can kind of see it’s popping out and that’s because of the plants there. You have the roots that are popping them out. Those are called akira or edible canna, which are beautiful. They’re banana-like plants. They have edible, starchy roots that they make arrowhead root or something out of, and they can be cooked or they can also be eaten raw. So one of the things I do is I try to grow things for the most part, except I’m going to start growing some potatoes for fun, I like to grow things that can be consumed in their raw and natural state without any heating or cooking because if you do it in the raw state you get a lot more and higher food values. And so a lot of things that you’ll see I juice. I juice, blend, and eat things whole. So here’s a whole bed of lettuce which you guys are each going to get to take home four heads from today, any four heads you’d like. And what I’ve been doing, since I have so much lettuce, I’ve just been juicing this as my juice and also I’ve been making cream of lettuce soup. So I juice one cucumber, a whole bunch of lettuce, and have like 32 ounces of liquid, and I take some of the lettuce, the nice tender hearts, and chop it up, put it into the soup with some seaweed and some spices and herbs and some chunks of avocado, and it’s totally delicious. Having a garden and having over 100 heads of lettuce in one bed that you can harvest, I’ve been harvesting over there and I still got the other side, you have the flexibility to include these healthy things because who can afford going a whole paycheck and buy heads of lettuce for a couple bucks, especially when they just don’t look that healthy or that fresh. They’re just the center hearts because they cull all the outside leaves because they’ve gone bad. And one of the other things that’s really cool is if you have your own garden, you don’t need a refrigerator, because this is my refrigerator. I’m not eating it until I’m picking it. I pick it, I take it inside and eat it. I don’t harvest everything and put it in my fridge, although later if I have a lot of lettuce left over and I can’t eat it and I want to change out the bed, I might do some of that because some of the crops that I grow, like the lettuce, will store easily for two weeks when you put it in the fridge. And that’s why a lot of the foods we have sold in the grocery store, the cold-tolerant crops are the winter crops, like the lettuce, the brassica family, that I have the majority of planted, and I’m starting to plant out my summer stuff. As you can see here a whole bed peppers, and I’ve got a bit of fencing on it because my little dog likes to jump in here and go poop and I don’t like for him to do that in my beds. So those are all started out and just planted out and I’m pretty methodical with how I plant my things out. I get bamboo stake and I cut it to size and I space it 11 inches and I space it and every 11 inches I plant one. It’s pretty symmetrical and between every plant is like 11 inches so we can fit the maximum amount of plants in there and I do this for a few reasons. Number one, to maximize my space because my lot is about 5200 square feet. A lot of it is the front yard and my house and I have just a bit in the backyard, so I try to plant as much as I can and also, the other thing that’s very important to me is you could notice I’m not using any kind of mulch or wood chips or hay or straw or anything on the top of the soil and there’s pros and cons to every method in gardening you may learn. I’m not necessarily against mulch; I just don’t personally like to use mulch because the wood chips get mixed in with the soil and the wood chips could suck nutrients out of your soil. What instead I like to use for mulch is fresh compost. So every year I top off my beds with compost and that acts as a kind of mulch on top and the other thing that I do because I plant so close, these plants will grow out and they will spread out and as you guys can see, if you see this when it was planted out, every lettuce was planted and then a pretty big space. Maybe like eight inches in between the lettuces, and now you can see you can’t see the ground because the lettuces are filled out. That’s the goal with the peppers. So instead of having mulch on the ground that the sun still hits, my goal is to not have mulch and then have plants so tight and close together that the sun’s hitting all the leaves and not the ground. In addition this entire side has the whole subsoil irrigation system that I’ll show you guys in a second and an example of what it looks like. So that means I water under the ground and optimally that system should be set about four inches under the ground and so I don’t get a lot of evaporation loss. You can see some of the top is a little bit wet. That’s because the water will capillate up a little, it goes up a little bit and then falls down to the root zone, where the plants need it. So that’s been working really well for me aside from a few small issues I have had, which I recommend checking my videos for a complete story on that. So let’s go ahead and come in the back. And the other thing you’ll notice is that, if you notice, I’ve pretty much focused on vegetable plants. I just started some fruit trees that I got on clearance in Home Depot and the goal for my front yard since I have HOA and I can’t plant a garden like this in the front yard, I’m just going to plant all edible fruit trees. And the other thing I want to go over real quick is I just cut down some trees right there and this bed used to get half shade, so I cut those down so this would get full sun because some plants like full sun, some like shade, but still this first bed is a bit more of a shady bed so I planted more perennial, long-lasting plants that I literally just plant once. There’s a difference between annuals, such as the lettuce or the peppers here that you have to plant every season and pull up and you gotta replant. Then with the perennials you literally plant once and they grow yearround, year after year, day after day. My favorite plant in my garden is the ashitaba. If you look at the stem, you can see it’s kind of bleeding a yellow sap and those are known as chalcones. Right here, the tall one. The one next to it. So I clipped off a leaf and now it just bleeds this yellow sap which is rich in antioxidants and it’s cancer-fighting and all this stuff. So you can eat the stalks and you can also eat the leaf. Everybody take a piece of the leaf and pass it around. Taste it a little. And you’ll see the stem will start to bleed this yellow color. So this is from Japan and it’s a plant from Japan that grows excellent in Vegas. This is the first year I’m giving them more sun. I have grown them in pots under the overhang, getting some direct sun, but they’ve done fine, so this is a new planting. They start out growing slowly, very slowly, and then they once they get to this size they grow pretty fast. You could juice it. Once again, this is not a lettuce. Think of it like a kale. It has a different flavor. To me it tastes something like gotu kola and maybe if you eat the stalk, that kind of tastes celeryish to me. And also if you notice the ones I’m growing in California are a little bit sweeter than the ones here. Maybe it’s due to the climate, due to soil, due to the watering. I don’t exactly know what. And also this is a really cool plant because it’s biannual, so it’ll go up the second year, make seeds, drop seeds in the bed, and in California, the seeds dropped and I collected a lot of them to offer to people and share, but a lot of them are just in the ground and they sprouted up, so now I have ashitaba microgreens that I didn’t have to plant. This is the kind of garden that I want to have, with healing plants in my opinion in the world that’s actually quite rare. So that’s the perennial bed, and these are all annual beds. I have more perennial beds over on that side. As you can see, my green tree collards which are the tallest ones over there. We’ll go over there and take a look but that’s like 12+ feet tall. That’s another perennial, collard or kale-type leaves 365 days a year so I’ll never really run out of greens. I like to grow a lot of the green crops, like the lettuce in the winter/early spring and late fall, but in the middle of the summer you can’t really grow greens so I’ve adapted to different kinds of greens that’ll do well in our climate here because so me of our standard greens won’t do well. And you’ll learn about some of those guys today. So now this bed here has broccoli growing, and so this broccoli, everybody could maybe pinch off a piece if you want, but this broccoli, that’s a second cutting from this broccoli. I have broccoli, cabbage, and up this back panel, it’s supposed to be some sugar snap peas that didn’t do so well, probably because it didn’t get enough water because the Aquajet wasn’t able to hit the edge. And this bed will probably be turned over after I do the lettuce bed and you can see the broccoli makes that little broccoli head that we’re used to, but then if it gets a little older, like the ones over there, they start making flowers and they start to separate. I mean it’s still edible in any form but it’s much better when it’s a tight head, so I’ve been using that and dipping it in guacamole. You can also juice it or do whatever with it, but once again I’ve planted probably every 11 inches in here, fairly tightly to try and keep the sun off the ground. That’s a lot of food. A lot of the cabbage is going to get turned into sauerkraut so even if I don’t make the nice cabbage head, you could just take the leaves or shred them up or what I started to do lately, I have a video coming up on it soon, I just ferment the whole cabbage head or whole leaves. So now you could take the whole leaves and use it as a wrapper for some other thing. And also when you don’t cut them all up, you don’t create as much bacterial surface area so then you get a more mild ferment, which is kind of cool. So this is the irrigation system that I’m using on this whole side. It’s called the Aquajet subsoil irrigation system, and this is basically buried four inches under the soil level and this one originally was in the bed behind you with one single going down the middle, so right in this position, and it wasn’t able to spray out like two feet on both sides approximately and the plants on the edge, the extreme edges, they didn’t make it. So then I installed, that was the experimental bed. Every other bed actually has two so it has maybe one at this point and one over at this point so it only has to reach maybe a foot in either direction and then we get crossover in the middle. If I had to do it again, I might put a little more towards the edges because there’s so much crossover in the middle. But how this works is this comes full pressure, unlike a drip system, if you look closely, every 12 inches there’s a small hole. I haven’t had any problems with it clogging or plugging yet, which I’m kind of wondering if that will happen due to hard water, but it sprays out for only a minute, so it only has to go for a minute per cycle, and that seems to do a pretty good job watering the bed. So at present time I think I have, because it has been a little warmer lately, I have it on twice a day for a minute. And a minute in some cases is too long, so I need to get a different water irrigation timer that controls by the second, because most of them only do by the minute, so that’s been a challenge for me to find. Because then now I want to have 45 second cycles, which may be more appropriate, and do that more often than just two times a day, one minute each. The other thing that’s really cool about the Aquajet system that’s unlike any other kind of traditional drip system or irrigation system is when the system comes on, you can hear it sputtering for the first 15 seconds and what’s happening is out of the holes it’s getting pushed the air that are in the pipes. And so for those of you guys that know, we need air to breathe of course, and so do the plant roots need air. There’s a technique of growing called aquaponics where they use growing in air. Also, more important than the plant roots needing the air, the microbes in the air also need the air to fully thrive. They need good, uncompacted soil that has nice air space in between there, but then we pump it full of air to invigorate them so they can grow faster because the microbes in the soil is an integral part of my gardening system. You might think it’s just me back here gardening, but actually it’s me and about a trillion other of my friends, all the microbes in the soil, that are breaking down the compost that I’m putting in there, breaking down the trace minerals, a form of rock dust, and they’re making the nutrients in the soil bioavailable for the plants. So this is not like using Miracle Crap fertilizer that’s water-soluble that could run off your lawn down into the sewer and it could go into the Gulf and pollute everything. All these nutrients are here because it’s in non water-soluble format. It doesn’t run off. The bacteria break it down and make it available for the plants. So that’s why I like the Aquajet system here. It allows me to save water and aerates the root zone and I’ve seen, provided it’s installed properly, works great. So this bed here is a bed that I actually had some Napa cabbage. You can see the Napa cabbage here, nice large leaves, and it’s actually going to flower so it makes nice flowers and it’s going to make the seeds. I’ve harvested a bunch of it here. Some of it’s empty and I made a video fermenting it. I need to get in and harvest the rest of it. And this stuff’s probably going to get chopped into sections and then fermented. And then I have mixed in lettuce, and in addition I like to plant some flowers, which you can kind of see a few, for beauty, for insects, pollinators. Also those are all edible flowers, so those are violas, pansies, and marigolds are commonly edible flowers. You can put them on top of a salad, add some fruit to look nice and take pictures, and then I also planted arugula. Arugula’s a really easy crop to grow if you haven’t grown it before. It grows really fast and it makes these cool flowers, so I want everybody to pick an arugula flower off here and let me know what you guys think of it, because most people have tasted arugula, but they haven’t tasted the delicate flower. No you could plant it yeah. To me, that kind of tastes like a barbecue sauce. It’s just really interesting and most people haven’t gotten to try that. So you get to look forward to this when your plant’s not making many leaves anymore and in California I’ve been experimenting. There’s this variety called wasabi arugula, so it’s as hot as wasabi sauce, but it’s an arugula and it’s so trippy, so I was able to get that in California. I don’t have any seeds now because the plants here didn’t go to seed but the ones in California. So these are the seed pods on the arugula forming. You get to see them right there, so if I let these grow longer, these seed pods will dry out. They’ll look like little beans and that’ll have the seeds so you can collect and save your seeds after every season. Some of the plants in my garden I let go to seed if I have the space. Sometimes the space is more valuable than trying to collect the seeds. I’m going to have a stock of seeds I already have from previous years or I could just get new seeds. So the next thing I’m going to talk about that’s super important especially for the desert or wherever you live is the soil that you’re growing in. Because if I tried to grow in the soil here like John, why don’t you grow in the soil here man? I don’t wish that on anybody. I mean it could probably work and people do that and you can enrich it and all that stuff, but that’s another reason I built the raised beds, so I could control the soil because simply the quality of the food that you’re eating is based on the soil that you’re growing in. If you have crappy soil, just the existing soil, which actually has a lot of minerals but not a whole lot of organic matter, it’s going to be an issue. So you need to have balanced soil. So I found the best source of compost here in bulk at this time in Las Vegas is a placed called Vera Grow in north Las Vegas, and I’m using the Tomato Lady Mix. I got two years of Tomato Lady Mix, and I mixed it in with about one yard of my amendments, and I’m not going to go into all of those in this video, but I do have an episode where I go into that specifically and show you guys how I did that. Then I got it delivered and put it all back into these beds and that’s pretty much what I’m growing in. But the two main things, no matter where you get your soil, you want to add these two things in your soil no matter where you live. This is called the Azamite, and it’s known as a kind of rock dust. I have other kinds of rock dust. There’s another one back here known as the Spanish River carbonite. This is Volcanic Mineral Plus. That’s from Canada so it’s not available in our location here, but there’s also other ones like Elemite and Cascade Minerals, which I have bags of. The Azamite is available at the feed store in town fro like $16 a bag which is cheaper than anywhere else I’ve been to, so we’ve been really lucky here. The feed store is IFC Farm Store. And this is the granulated one, so that’s easy because it doesn’t have any dust, if you want to use that for micronized, to mix things. It’s more bioavailable for the plants, but I still recommend using the trace minerals to it. The trace minerals add very important minerals that standard agriculture leaves out. This has like 90 different minerals. It’s like if you go to a buffet in Las Vegas, we have a whole selection of things you can choose from to eat, instead of if you go to In and Out Burger, they have hamburgers, cheeseburgers, and French fries. Or maybe shakes. I think that’s it, so you only have five things. The bacteria in my plants, everything, is like going to a buffet in Vegas and they get to pick and choose what they want. You can’t burn with these trace minerals, so I just want to let them figure it out instead of me trying to play God and giving them only three nutrients that you would be giving them if you used a standard boxed fertilizer out of the store for the most part. Now the other thing besides the trace minerals that’s super important to me is the Worm Gold Plus worm castings. So worm castings are very critical and very important for my style of farming. And I want to let you guys know that as much as I like worm castings, not all worm castings are created equal. Trace minerals are pretty easy because it’s a mined product, but worm castings are literally worm poop and the worm poop or the worm castings is only as good as what the worm is being fed. We’re only as healthy as what we’re eating. If we’re eating a plant-strong diet, we’re going to be healthy and our shit ain’t going to stink that much. Well anyways with the worms, it’s very unfortunate that most worm castings are derived from manure, so it’s an excellent way to basically get rid of manure fast. The worms eat the manure, poop out castings, and now you buy castings that are generated from cattle manure and other manure crops. And the cattle may be being fed GMO corn, GMO soy, antibiotics and who knows what else that the worms are now digesting and putting into the worm poop. So the Worm Gold Plus, they’re fed a plant-based diet with grains and high chitin and cardboard and whatnot so they make a really good casting. In addition they also add some kelp and some rock dust in here, which is really good, but the main thing about the Worm Gold Plus, I had an interview with the guy who invented it or figured out how to make the best worm casting, and basically in the Worm Gold Plus it has special things called chitin degraders and cellulose degraders. And cellulose is what’s in wood fiber. It’s in any kind of fiber, and this is when we make compost, it’s all fiber-based so the degraders in here basically munch on all that and turn it into nutrients for your plants. This is so important. I do use a compost tea called Boogie Brew Compost Tea that uses a lot of the Worm Gold Plus to multiply the different bacteria and biologics in the worm castings. And that’s another part. Besides the minerals, we need the biologics. The biologics are what’s in the soil, my free workforce that’s turning the nutrients into soil and making them available for the plants. And that’s the whole cycle that I’m trying to emulate here in my backyard. Another thing you’re going to notice is this wall, because this is like my fence line, all the way down I have this trellis material and I’m growing some zucchini squash here that are almost starting to flower pretty soon. And I got a whole bunch of cucumber plants. My favorite cucumber for the desert is Armenian cucumber, just the standard Armenian and also the striped Armenian, which I prefer a bit more than the standard Armenian. And those guys can take the heat and still produce very well even in the middle of summer. I also have lemon cucumbers, which is one of my personal favorites, although for me personally it hasn’t grown too well, but that would be my second pick for a commonly available cucumber in the desert. Star Nursery currently has both these varieties and although I’m not a big fan of them because I like other nurseries in California better, they’re my favorite nursery in the valley at this point. I wish there was something better because they still gotta get their act together. Alright, so this is a new greenhouse that I just got at Lowe’s. It’s normally $200, for clearance it was like $75. And so I think it’s imperative to have a greenhouse and as you can see this is actually underneath the shade structure and on concrete slab. So mainly this is used in the wintertime so I can keep more sensitive plants alive. I did get these other greenhouses here at Big Lots on clearance at the end of the season for like $17.50 marked down from $70 or something crazy, which I think is a ripoff for that thing, but it’s held up decent enough for me and allows me to grow things that I normally couldn’t grow. I don’t even keep this greenhouse. You can see I have pineapples in there, some ashitaba, and some other sensitive crops. My maringa, I don’t think made it, and I also have baby tree collards. Let’s see, I moved a lot of my gynarakokums, Okinawan spinach in there from my garden to keep it alive because it doesn’t like to get too cold. That’s what I’m going to be doing in here. You can see I have some starter plants out of the full sun, just kind of growing. I pulled up some of my sugarcane that I grew year round that stayed alive in my beds, but it takes a long growing season. When I harvested it last year it wasn’t sweet at all because it didn’t mature. So if you want to grow something like sugarcane, you can grow sorghum, which would do well here in our climate, and that’s a shorter season for a cane-type grass you can harvest and juice and boil it down to whatever. Sorghum syrup or you can just drink the juice for a little sweetener. But yeah, greenhouses to me are important in the summer. I don’t use them too much because it gets far too hot but at least in the shade, it’s a little bit cooler, and I like this one because I can open up those sides. My goal, on that side I have another one of these. I’m going to assemble one on that side and so does anybody here need a greenhouse that looks like this one? Here it is. And you can have it for free. No assembly instructions included, but I have a video on it. I took that down and I put it in a box and then I was like what am I going to do with that? So yeah, greenhouse is super important. Now we’re going to walk through here. It’s a little bit tight, so be careful. So this is a standard round circular 48 inch raised bed that I got for $10. They’ve held up fairly well. You can see one back there that kind of broke when a buddy was over here helping me. They leaned on it too hard so they do get brittle and you can see some of them got leaned on and broke and I kind of painted up and stuff. But overall for ten bucks I really can’t complain, because they’ve allowed me to grow food. You can see on this side instead of subsoil irrigation, which I prefer, the top drip system in a circular fashion to try to get all the areas watered in these beds. Every different raised bed, I try to have something a little different growing. In addition, in the middle of the raised bed, to maximize my use of space, I put a little pot to grow something else. So this one is dandelions and down I have some dandelions and celery growing. Every bed’s a little different. This one’s an area I’m currently working on. That one, that one, this one, and that one. Hopefully, my goal was to have it done by today, but maybe tomorrow, I’m going to harvest all this stuff because two nights ago I harvested all the lettuce in here, that’s why it looks pretty dismal. And this one had lettuce and flowering or ornamental kale and cabbage. Cut all that down. This had broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage, cut it all down, and I like to clean out the bed first and then I’ll pull the roots, or pull the plants out and end up composting them. And top my beds off with new soil mixture including compost that I made, I’m currently using Dr. Earth’s bagged fertilizer, bagged soil, which is some of the best soil you can get in a bag, and that’s at Plant World, now also known as Moon Valley, because they took it over on Charleston. And then top it off, and I’m going to replant cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers in these four beds. This is the bed that did really well and I like it a lot. I got spinach down below. Spinach lasts a little bit longer than say lettuce, which goes out sooner, and up these trellis panels I have the sugar snap peas growing. And sugar snap pears are like my springtime fruit because they are so sweet, especially when they’re grown in good soil. And then we have this plant in the middle that’s kind of getting crowded out, and I’ve been plucking leaves off because I don’t want it to grow too much because it’s crowding out the other things. It’s the Japanese burdock or gobo. So that does amazing. That’s a better specimen. It’s been shading out my broccoli and my rutabagas that I’ve grown out over there. It’s grown really well. I planted it like last year this time, and it grew all summer and basically shaded out the whole bed, which is not a good thing, but it’s pretty ornamental so I was thinking of trying to do it in my front yard. It grows well, it’s stayed alive during the winter. I lost all the top growth but the roots stayed alive and as soon as it warmed up it came right back. Gobo, or Japanese burdock. And that makes a long thing like a carrot but it’s a really long carrot that’s really thin. That was an experiment and an experiment gone awry. It takes too much space. It would’ve been far better to put it in a planter thing off to the side, which actually might be a good idea to dig it up, but I should’ve done that before it started regrowing for the new season. But yeah, this side I just have bagged soil from Home Depot for the most part, and this is more a meld mix, where I did one third peat moss, one third vermiculite, and one third compost. I probably went a little shy on the vermiculite and the peat moss and did more compost then added the rock dust. I wasn’t actually able to add the Worm Gold worm castings, so because of the inferior quality soil or whatever, this area’s actually a bit drier because it’s a run from my drip system, things don’t grow quite as well. I like the wildness of this side compared to the more cleanness of that side because there’s all kinds of things growing. These are the tree collards, the green tree collards. I have green tree collards and purple tree collards, and the green ones are more resilient here. I have lost several purple tree collards over the years. I think I only have like two or three plants left, so I’ve been propagating them but the green ones work far better. The ones that you literally just walked in underneath it’s like 12 feet tall and the main thing for those is you gotta stake them really well because they get tall and you can see the girth on the trunk there. It’s huge and it makes edible kale. If you look closely, this side has a few more bugs than the other side. I have to spray that with Dr. Bronner’s soap and Neem oil. That was on the list for this morning but I didn’t get to do that to control my pests. So my goal is to not have to spray anything because I don’t like to spray anything, even organic crude controls like Neem oil and Dr. Bronner’s soap, which is pretty harmless in my opinion. Yeah you mix them together. So I do two tablespoons of the Dr. Bronner to two tablespoons of the Neem oil and I tried to get the Dr. Bronner’s Castile soap which is the one for the laundry because it’s more sudsy. You could of course just use the regular one to one gallon of water and then I put that in a sprayer and spray my plants down with it. And that takes care of all the bugs for the most part, and even some kinds of powdery mildews. It just suffocates them out. But my goal is to not have to spray anything. On the other side it has far less problems with the pests and I believe that’s because of the higher quality soil. The healthier your soil, the healthier plants, and the more resistant they’ll be to any kind of stressor, whether that’s the weather, whether that’s not getting enough water, or whether that’s disease and pests. So I’m glad that has less and it’s really telling to me that if you do have good soil you’ll have less pests. This is some of the lettuce planted on this side that was planted around the same time over on that side, once again, just a full bed of lettuce with very little space. The green lettuce grows a lot faster than the red lettuce is one thing I’ve learned and the green lettuce makes more abundance than the red. Some of these, I have onions, so this is just standard onions. I had onions that I grew last year. They had the bulbs and the bulbs started sprouting up. If anybody would like sprouting onion bulbs to plant in the garden, I have plenty I’ll be giving away because I need to get rid of them, and this is what happens when you plant them. So this was planted early and then I planted that whole section later and I think this gets a little bit better sun than that one. So of course on here, all the different onions coming up, any different kinds of leaves, these are all edibles, like onion greens. And also because I planted them as the whole bulb, I don’t know if I’m going to get new bulbs underneath. I kind of suspect that I will, but some people will say you’re not. Another cool thing that people haven’t tried are the onion flowers. You guys are lucky. Here’s some that’s opening. So pick off onion flowers that are there to eat and it’s much like the arugula flowers. If you don’t grow a garden you’re rarely ever going to find arugula flowers, even at farmers’ markets, which we don’t have too many farmers’ markets here in the valley. They don’t even sell those, and they’re such a delicate. So if you’re a gourmet froufrou chef, you can just top your soup with some onion flowers. I like to incorporate it into the body of the soup and have a little flavor explosion that’s onion but it’s a little bit sweet at the same time. And also allows me to eat more flowers, and flowers are an excellent thing to eat because a few reasons. Number one, the pigments. The pigments are very important, to eat our foods in color, to eat the rainbow. So I try to grow, besides green lettuce, still trying to grow red lettuce and red chard and other colorful things, but the flowers come in many different pigments and the other thing about the flowers that are really cool is if you look at those flowers that you just ate, there’s a little bit of the pollen, the white pollen. So pollen is very good for us. Many people buy bee pollen, but why let the bees collect it and form it together with their bee spit or whatever when you could just collect the flowers and eat it to get the pollen, because it’s really rich in protein. Another cool, we could try it on the way out, is sage, my purple sage is flowering so you get to try some sage flowers, which you know sage is a pretty strong herb, but when you eat the flowers it’s much more light and delicate flavor. Let’s see, what else do I have. So one of the crops you must grow if you live in Las Vegas is this one right here. It’s dinosaur kale, Tuscan kale, black kale, lacinato kale, however you want to call it. And this is probably my number one leafy green annual crop that grows really well here. Literally I plant this once, this one right here was actually planted last year this time. It grew all year and now it’s going to flower and seed. So all these plants here, I’ll have dinosaur kale for the next year now just from this one bed whereas if I plant this lettuce, same amount of space, in about 90 days I have lettuce and then I have to pull it out and start all over again. So if you just plant a couple beds of dinosaur kale, you’re guaranteed to have that. Another one that’s flowering behind you, that was planted over a year ago also, is the Swiss chard and I let some chard go to seed once and it dropped the seed and they came up as weeds in my garden, so chard’s another one that’s super important. Another one I would encourage you to grow are the tree collards, this is the green one and then I have a purple one. And these ones you plant once and they grow year round without having to replant it every year like the dinosaur kale or like the chard, so that makes the most sense to me. That being said, these guys if you eat them now, they’re pretty decent. We can send some around here, maybe send a couple leaves around. They kind of taste decent. This is more known as animal fodder, which means it’s not desirable for people because it’s pretty strong-tasting but the purple ones are sweeter but right now it actually tastes decent to me but if we eat these in the summertime when we’re having 110 degree days and it’s really going to taste really, really strong and not super desirable. I let these guys milk out and get through the summer and keep them alive and look forward to the fall, winter, and spring when I mainly eat these guys. And then this is an example of an annual bed on this side, because it’s the lettuce that I’m going to be harvesting really soon and then this is an example of a perennial bed that I haven’t really taken a lot of care of. My soil level has been compacted down and I like everything to be fully topped off because my opinion is that the more soil you have, the bigger of a home you have for your plants. Because I’m not topped off, I’m missing a lot of soil and nutrients and bacteria that could be in here to grow these plants and nourish them better. I probably have neglected this bed for at least a year now without topping it off because it’s kind of a lot of things growing in there and to get in there and top it off is a little tough. I still need to do that, but I have some mint growing in these pods, kind of segregates them so the roots won’t come out. Kind of worked but it kind of didn’t because the mint still spread out everywhere. I have some stuff called Chinese chives, also known as ha, which is growing alright, but I would like to have w hole bed of them because they’re a really mild chive that tastes almost like a leafy green instead of a hard garlic or chive or onion chive. These guys right here are the goji berries, so they do amazing, just in a spot where it’s probably getting enough water. I’ll probably get a few berries, even in this shady spot. Some mint, and I’ve also been coming back in this bed, recurring is the perilla, or the shiso, which is another really good herb to grow. Perilla, shiso, stevia, and basil are the top herbs to grow in the summertime. They do amazing in our climate. They love it dry and hot and I’ve grown like, this bed actually had basil last year and it was probably up to here by the time it flowered. And it had like 12 different kinds. I try not to waste a lot of space so you can see on this side I have my irrigation from my drip. I have four-valve timer there so if I just have one line to water this whole area, by the time the water pressure got to the end of the line, it wouldn’t get watered too much, so then I split it up into four different segments so that each one comes on at different times so each one gets more pressure to emit the water out of the drippers. Also what I mentioned on the other side with the Aquajet, I have four valves, so you can’t put all that on one valve because the pressure drop is too much and you won’t get good water pressure. Another thing I want to recommend is a water filter. So I’m using the Boogie Blue water filter. We all drink filtered water, because we know that we don’t want to get contaminants in what we’re drinking. Many people in Vegas unfortunately buy filtered water. I filter my own water that I drink, but we should also be filtering our water for our plants. The main thing that’s bad, not necessarily for the plants but more importantly for the microbes in the soil, is the chlorine that they’re adding. And so I want to remove the chlorine because the chlorine is put in the water to disinfect the water so that we don’t get cholera outbreak or whatever those diseases are. But it’s not good for the bacteria because it will reduce their populations. It won’t wipe them completely out so if you’ve been watering with unfiltered water it’s not the end of the world but to take things up to the next level, to be a little bit better, to have more microbial growth in my opinion, it’s best to have a water filter. That’s what I’ve been trying to do, to take all the gardening practices and try to take it up the notch, always try to improve a little bit because if you improve a little bit here, the overall result will be a lot in the end. So anyways, aside from that — oh yeah, Boogiebrew.com/GYG. QUESTION: How often do you have to change it? JOHN: About once a year. And it depends on how often you use it. I have one for my hose, one for my drip system. The other thing I really want to talk about is down this alley, which looks like a mess pretty much, but down this alley is something that I believe everybody should be doing in Las Vegas or wherever you live. And if you’re going to notice I have about 11 composters and a whole bunch of compost and other source materials that are going to go into my compost eventually. And most of it’s finished compost in different stages. I sift it out to get the fine stuff and I throw out the bigger particles in the bins. So I’ve been experimenting with different bins. I built a new bin yesterday I actually got from Costco that I like a lot, so if you’re looking for the low end budget composter, Costco has one now for about $150, which is really good. It’s a Lifetime tumbling composter, which I will have a video on soon. You can’t really see it because it’s at the far end, but it’s two 50-gallon barrels, so it gives you 100 gallons total composting space and it’s pretty solid. It’s my second best favorite composter. My first best are my metal composters, the Joraform composter from Sweden. They have insulation in there to keep them warmer. But the composters are very important to my compost. All my food scraps, my garden clippings go into the composter. My garden clippings, the things from the beds that you saw were emptied down go into my composters there and you have to mix the carbon with the nitrogens, the greens and the browns. So in general I put one five-gallon bucket of food scraps and I put in the bottom of the bucket this much of pine pellets, which is used for horse bedding, available at the feed store in town, and that adds my carbon. And the nitrogen is all the food scraps. And I turn that like once a day and it breaks down over time. So in the Joraforms that are insulated, I can get a batch of compost in about I want to say six weeks from start to finish, which is pretty quick and so one of the things I have tried is tried to have a compost pile, like many people around the country may have, which work in many places like California. I did do that and it worked fine, but here because of the arid climate, it’s so dry. You have to end up using your hose water to keep your pile at the right moisture level. So that’s why I like the enclosed tumblers because it keeps the moisture level in there right so that you don’t have to add excess water. And so that’s important to me. I experimented with all different kinds. You could often tumblers, composting tumblers, inexpensive on Craigslist if I don’t get it first. That’s how I got most of these guys because people will see the one at Costco, oh yeah composting’s a good idea. They’ll buy it and then they’ll use it very little, like oh we never use that thing, it’s easier to throw it out, and then they’ll sell it on Craigslist the next season. So the good ones they have now at Costco, look for them soon on Craigslist next year. The other thing I noticed Costco does is Costco will sell the composter because it’s spring season, and if you wait a couple months, or maybe a couple more months, by the time they’re clearing out their gardening stuff because it’s getting into later, they’re going to mark it down and drop it like 50 bucks, so pay attention and see. Some Costcos will sell them faster than others, and so my original Lifetime composters, I got them when it was on sale, like $50 off at Costco, which is the first, second, fourth, fifth one down. So they’re all in different stages of compost and all I can say is that the metal Joraform composters break things down faster and I cycle them faster. The Lifetimes work next good and some of the other ones just take way more time. I mean some composters is better than nothing but I just want to try to keep with the best to keep the process flowing and keep things moving in and out because I got a lot of produce waste always and clippings from my garden. They get that stuff out and put it in the soil instead of sitting in the composter not composting and taking forever. The other thing I’ve done that’s really cool is this thing right there. I put a little planter, because this tends to drip sometimes. It’s actually dripping now. And so I don’t want to waste the water so I have a bed here with, I think it’s like gotukola, but it really likes a wet climate and not too much sun so I just put it in there, it drips, and it stays alive, so I always have this to eat when I want it. It’s like gotukola, but it’s not. I forget the exact name. I was told it was gotukola, but it’s not. I don’t know what it is. It’s some kind of Asian green. That’s a rare one. Don’t know what I’m growing, but it’s edible, I do know that. So those are all the main areas I want to cover, the composting, the different soil, the different raised beds. You guys can see an example of how it works. If I was to do it again, I would surely do what I did on the other side, it’s a bit cleaner, and I’d kind of fit more, but I like this side more. The space of it’s more wasted, because it has more walkway space, but I like that each bed is differentiated. I don’t know, I guess at this point I’ll take any questions that you guys may have. QUESTION: What is your water bill? JOHN: My water bill last month was like $35. In the summer it may go up to like $50, but it’s insane that water is so cheap in Nevada. This is why people might want to move to Nevada, because California’s way more expensive and it shouldn’t be that cheap. And even using these water-saving methods, and I have water-conserving fixtures and showerheads and everything, it’s everywhere in my house, it’s really cheap. It doesn’t take as much water as you think to grow a garden, and I may in some cases be overwatering. If you look over here it’s a little bit wet, so I need to get a control on here to dial that down a little bit. And some of the ones in the back aren’t getting enough water or try to increase that. So it’s a constant fight with my drip irrigation system to get it right because the pressure balancing and all this stuff, whereas the other side is a lot easier with the subsoil irrigation. QUESTION: Do you recommend the Aquajet subsoil irrigation system, because I saw in one of your videos you do not recommend it. JOHN: So yeah, the title of the video was “Why I do not recommend the Aquajet irrigation system,” and that went into some specific defects they had with the Aquajet that I can’t necessarily recommend it, but that’s what I use, and tell people to put in, provided they take heed and do the steps that I outline in the video so that they have a successful experience. And mainly because I want the manufacturer to correct the defect before I fully recommend it to the public, although I can’t say here in Vegas, if I were installing another garden, that’s what I would use, not this. QUESTION: John, you said you cut the bamboo stake. So what’s the measurement between the plants you’re using? Is that why you have the stake? JOHN: Right, so I have bamboo stakes that I stake plants up with, and then I take these small non-usable bamboo sticks, I don’t know if I have any around, but they’re really thin, and I cut them to like 11 inches or 12 inches, whatever I determine my plant spacing to be, so that I can easily space out quickly. I could use a ruler and measure out 11 inches on a ruler, but if I just have a stake, I just plant the stem, do the stake, to the next one and plant another one there. And actually I do the bamboo stakes, I stake exactly where the plants go, dig those up, and put a hole right there. So I’m pretty methodical on how I plant things so I can get full coverage because I’ve seen a lot of gardeners, and there’s nothing wrong with this, it’s just haphazardly plant this here, plant that there. And I mean that’s cool if you don’t want to be in production and stuff, but I really try to go for production and maximum yields. So it’s called square foot gardening method, and Mel Bartholomew wrote a book, and that’d be a good book to introduce you to the concepts of that. Basically it’s a whole concept, a whole book of how to garden and make a system out of gardening. I actually use a lot of concepts from that book in my garden, although I’ve adapted and do my own things as well. In general I try to refer to their plant spacing guidelines because it works fairly well and sometimes I make things a little bit closer than what he recommends just due to my size of my raised bed constraints and I want to fit one extra row of stuff in and maximize my plants and we live in the desert and the sun’s beating down on stuff and I want things to grow pretty tight. QUESTION: Do you, because on this side is above the soil, do you have problems with the freezing by that time? In the wintertime you don’t use the drip irrigation? JOHN: So this winter, I didn’t have any issues. Last winter the water didn’t freeze in the irrigation system. One of the things that I thought about was hooking this up to a mixture of hot and cold water to keep it warmer, to keep it going. Another thing I really want to do is have pipes in my beds circulating my warm water from my water heater to keep them warm, but I don’t know if I’ll ever get to do that. But I can say that, not this year, the previous year, it was so cold that because I was watering and it was watering, for the most part, the soil froze because it did have a high water content. And then when that happens, it’s not good for the plants. So I lost a lot of plants that year and I haven’t had a full cold year with that side yet, but I think that side’s going to fare a little better because the water in that side is lower in the ground than being higher up and it’s not going to want to freeze as quickly. QUESTION: When your bed’s over there, do you lay something underneath the ground, on top of the ground, before you put the soil in? JOHN: Good question. So the question is do I add something on the top of my ground before I put the soil in? So that side, I had all cleared out of weeds and it looks like dirt, what you’re standing on right now, so I didn’t add anything on. If I had something like grass there, I would do something called cardboard sheet mulching. So I would get some cardboard, some clean cardboard, take off all the tape, and lay it down on the ground like a couple of layers high and pile the soil on top of that. If I did have moles or bulls or any other gophers, I would lay down some fabric hardware cloth first before filling it up, but I didn’t lay anything down there. The only thing I did lay was I was chip chopping some of the trees up and I laid down logs and pieces of trees to try to fill some mass, then I had some nasty compost from a place called A1 Organic. I think they’re out of business now, which I don’t recommend, and I had to layer that on the bottom to get rid of it because it stank and it was nasty. So it’s on the bottom inch or two that will at some point end up breaking down but for the most part it’s hidden underneath there and a cheap filler and organic waste. I don’t recommend getting topsoil or fill soil because you don’t know what kind of contamination or the quality of that soil. I recommend just getting the bulk soil and filling it up with the good stuff as much as you can. Yes. QUESTION: Where did you get all that soil you have in the back? JOHN: So the bagged soil is known as the Dr. Earth soil, and they have that available at the Plant World Nursery, which is now Moon Valley. So that’s the best by far bagged soil that you could find anywhere, not that I necessarily recommend bagged soil because I always want to encourage people to get bulk soil whenever they can, but I got a bunch of bulk soil and I wanted to do a trial of the bulk soil from the ViraGrow in North Vegas and this stuff. So that is commencing this year when I’m planting similar crops in different soils to see what kind of differences I’ll get. JOHN: Am I growing mulberries? So mulberries, they are technically supposed to be legal because of the pollen or something. Only the boy plants, so I’m not really growing mulberries. Mostly what I focus on is I actually have all vegetables, except for apricots and I might have a few random jackfruit trees if they survived in my greenhouse, but otherwise I’ve been really focusing on greens because if you have a lot of acreage and space with a front yard in an HOH like I do, I would plant trees out there because I can’t plant vegetables but I think by far it would be far better for people to plant vegetables than fruits because fruits in best case, they might produce two times a year for you. And worst case, it’s going to produce once a year for you. It’s going to take a large amount of space and make a nice canopy and shade things out, which could also benefit, whereas the vegetables, you could grow vegetables in other smaller fruit crops, tomatoes and peppers and eggplants, and have those every day. So if I have more acreage, and I will have a farm one day, and I’m going to have fruit trees in the front yard, I don’t want to waste and shade things out too much. I mean in the back, where I have total shade between this overhang and the fence, there were a few junk trees that I didn’t manage and I’m going to cut those down and plant fruit trees in their place because that’s a good space that I could use for growing. I couldn’t grow vegetables, but I could grow fruit trees in here. I do have mulberries in California growing. JOHN: Alright, so here’s the end of the episode, and everybody that came over for the tour today is getting to take home four heads of lettuce from my garden. Alright, so the video kind of cut off because the battery ran out because I kind of talk long and the tour’s only supposed to be an hour long; I think it lasted a couple hours, but I’m confident that many people got a lot of good information out of the tour live and in person. Hopefully you guys also benefited from the tour also. I also answered other questions that people had so you guys didn’t get to hear that, and of course at the end of the tour, besides getting all the information, they got to take home some of the best-grown lettuce here in Las Vegas out of my garden. Everybody that came got to harvest four heads out of my lettuce beds that they could take home some of the freshest and best greens. Hopefully after tasting the greens it’ll motivate them to start to grow their own high quality greens. I want to encourage all the gardeners out there watching this to take your gardening skills to the next level. If you haven’t used the rock dust, if you haven’t used the Worm Gold Plus worm castings, if you haven’t used the compost tea, I would encourage you guys to try it this season to see what kind of difference it can make. It’s my belief that if everybody in the culture and in the world just improved what they were doing a little bit, I really value people like Elon Musk that’s basically taking space travel to the next level, taking electric cars to the next level, boosting the technology of the world to make it that better. And this is simply what I try to do with gardens, is to get them to the next level so that they can have higher quality foods, so that they can have more bug- and disease-resistant plants, have higher quality food, and have food that can even tolerate the stresses of the crazy climactic conditions we’re having these days. If you like this video please give me a thumbs up and I also want to let you guys know that I do not regularly have any tours. I do have some on rare occasion for the local area when I feel like it, but once again my garden’s set up for me to eat out of. It’s my personal farm and not a place for the public or for any kind of tours, so I want to encourage you guys to like this video if you liked it. And I will film future tour videos and put them up for you so you guys can watch free of charge. Also be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel to be updated of future tours and other videos when I travel around and share all the information I’ve learned by traveling around and actually by getting my hands dirty in gardening every day. Finally, be sure to check out my past episodes. I have over 1,000 episodes now. I do give annual summer and winter garden tours so you can actually see what I’m growing in my garden with just me, not with a big crowd and me giving a whole spiel or anything like that. Be sure to pass this video along to your friends and family who you may also think it may assist them to get them motivated to start growing their own food, to grow higher quality food so you can help me fulfill my mission of changing the planet one person at a time and being the change I want to see in life as Mahatma Gandhi once said. So once again my name’s John Kohler wit view all
 


 
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JOHN: Alright this is John Kohler with Growingyourgreens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you and this one is a very special one for you guys out there that actually wasn’t able to be here today, because what I’m going to do today in just a few minutes, a bunch of people are coming over. I’m actually having a local garden tour for the first time ever. I’ve rarely ever opened up my home for people to come and give a tour. My place is not set up to give tours. I mean I don’t give tours. I share with you guys what I do online, but I really want to have a tour to show local people what is possible and how you can grow food here in the Las Vegas desert, because it really isn’t that hard if you set it up and do it properly. And besides from the people at the tour, who got personal attention, who got to see my garden in person, I also want to film it for you guys. All you guys across the whole world that may live in similar climates. Even if you don’t, a lot of the techniques that I share with you guys in this video will be applicable wherever you live. So anyways, stay tuned for upcoming episode that I’m going to go into next. This is probably one of my best episodes, because it’s just me off the cuff talking and sharing information and attempting to get people to grow their own food and eat a healthier diet. And I believe by doing this, I will be changing the world one person at a time. So anyways, without further ado, let’s go ahead and get into my tour video today. JOHN: Alright, welcome everybody. Today I’m going to give you a tour of my backyard garden. I do want to let you guys know that my backyard garden, or I guess you can call it a farm, it’s my farm, and for me and for me growing my food. And my sole intention is to grow the highest quality food so please be forewarned. This is not designed for giving tours. It’s really tight, constricted spaces. There’s hoses in places. I tried to pick up a little bit this morning but there’s things around that you could trip over, so be careful where you walk and there’s bushes and trees into the walkways, so push them aside. If you’ve got to break a branch, do it. I don’t want you guys getting hurt or falling or anything like that. And I think in this day and age, it’s really important to have the highest quality food because we are what we eat. And I think the majority of Americans in this day and age are just eating poor quality food, especially fast food and junk food and things with high fructose corn syrup and GMO foods. Those are the lowest foods that I don’t even recommend people eat. I mean at least if you’re eating fresh fruits and fresh vegetables, whole foods, plant-based foods, that’s some of the best foods, but take it to the next level. You could eat more fruits and vegetables and even organic fruits and vegetables, which I would recommend. There’s some standard out there that I don’t necessarily agree with because there are some standard practices that might not be necessarily good and organics tell you what you can’t do. It doesn’t tell you what you should do, or should be doing, so I try to grow in an organic fashion so I’m abiding by organic rules, but then I do things as you guys will learn today that organic farmers simply are not doing. Here in Las Vegas, people may think it’s difficult to grow a garden and if you look at my neighbors on both sides, you could see they just, this neighbor just has weeds, and not using any water, which is great. And the other neighbor just has a rocked in yard, which is low maintenance. And you know that’s cool, but I think we all need to eat and especially with the drought in California, many people have heard about that, but luckily we’re not really in that much of a drought although we have been in water conservation mode. What people in the news media neglect to say in many cases is that the majority of California water is not being consumed for residential uses. Does anybody know what it’s being consumed by? Agriculture. So agriculture, to grow food and more specifically, animals. So animals take way more water to grow an animal out, to get them, because they also excrete waste, which is wasted water. And also wasted manure and whatnot. It’s very intensive, so I think people should eat far less animals, they should raise less animals and raise more fruits and vegetables and that’s what people should eat for the water crisis, instead of trying to have people conserve water. Which is important. People should change their diet, which is a more important thing to do, to a more plant-based diet. So then taking it from that point that our diets have to waste a lot of water, even better than having a farm in California use the water where they’re overhead watering and wasting water in many cases, because they can’t do drip irrigation on a whole farm in most cases because it’s just a lot of infrastructure. It’d be far better, and once it’s grown in California and ship it here with all the petroleum fuel products, it’s just better to grow it here as best as you can. So I started growing back in California over 10 years ago now, and northern California, and I had a wonderful time growing there because it’s just so easy. Everything I seemed to plant and the compost and the resources I had there seem to do very well. And when I moved to Vegas, at first things didn’t go so well because I didn’t have the exact same resources. I didn’t have the same compost material, the weather’s similar but a lot different, and I was planting things that I would plant back in California and it wouldn’t work. And I moved here, it was like a big learning curve, so I had to learn and I had videos on YouTube setting up my garden. It was like an hour-long video setting up four circular beds that you’ll see, the original four, but you’ll also see another 16 more that I filled up that side, and last year I started this new side which is doing significantly better because I’ve learned from my mistakes and if you guys are gardeners or haven’t gardened yet and are going to embark on this journey, I encourage you guys to always learn from your mistakes because that’s how we learn and grow as people. If you think oh I’m going to mess up, it’s not cool, I’m not going to do it, I’m not even going to try, messing up is good. You learn successfully what does not work, then you can try something a little bit different. That’s kind of what I’ve done. I was like oh wait, I’ll use the bagged stuff from Home Depot. Stuff grows, but not that well compared to California so let’s try to switch up the soil mix, do something different, let’s do different irrigation systems and see how this works. So now I’m happy to say once you go in my garden you’ll see one side looks more vibrant and abundant in my opinion than the other side and that’s the side where I have the new subsoil irrigation system, better soil mixture, and basically it’s the same plants. I planted lettuce on this side, which I’ll show you later and the lettuce placed on the other side, but with the drip system, different soil. It’s just working better on this side, so if you haven’t set up a system yet, I would recommend emulating this side until I find something better. I’m still tweaking. I’ve unfortunately run out of room because it’s tight back there, but maybe I’ll get to, if my neighbor, expand, get all caught up. Gardening does not have to be a lot of work. It’s as much time as you want to put into it, and the more time you put into it the better of a garden you’re going to have. Like for me personally, I like to be in the garden half the way. I’m working half the day and then I’m in the garden the rest of the half the day. Sometimes I’m there more than a half a day, and there’s always things to do. The most important thing that I want to let you guys know is that the most important thing when you’re gardening is to set up infrastructure and set it up properly because if you don’t set it up properly, it’s going to make more work for you in the long run and if you set it up properly, you could almost have hands off. One point I would just visit here once a month and check on my garden, and most things were self-sufficient and work on their own with the automatic watering system. My yields weren’t as good as if I were here all the time, like I am now. There’s always a way to garden. Anyways, let’s go ahead and head back. We’re going to go to a few different spots where I’ll stop and I’ll talk about different aspects and if you do have any questions, please hold your questions to the end and I’ll answer for you. Let’s have everybody come in, maybe if everybody single file against this side. Once again my place is not made for garden tours with a dozen people here. So this is two different sides of my garden. This is the later side, where I used concrete blocks that I have an episode on if you guys want to learn how to make it. I had a guy come in and help me level it all out and it works very well. A couple of places I stepped on and they fell over, but even with no mortar they’re holding pretty good. Right there there’s a spot you can kind of see it’s popping out and that’s because of the plants there. You have the roots that are popping them out. Those are called akira or edible canna, which are beautiful. They’re banana-like plants. They have edible, starchy roots that they make arrowhead root or something out of, and they can be cooked or they can also be eaten raw. So one of the things I do is I try to grow things for the most part, except I’m going to start growing some potatoes for fun, I like to grow things that can be consumed in their raw and natural state without any heating or cooking because if you do it in the raw state you get a lot more and higher food values. And so a lot of things that you’ll see I juice. I juice, blend, and eat things whole. So here’s a whole bed of lettuce which you guys are each going to get to take home four heads from today, any four heads you’d like. And what I’ve been doing, since I have so much lettuce, I’ve just been juicing this as my juice and also I’ve been making cream of lettuce soup. So I juice one cucumber, a whole bunch of lettuce, and have like 32 ounces of liquid, and I take some of the lettuce, the nice tender hearts, and chop it up, put it into the soup with some seaweed and some spices and herbs and some chunks of avocado, and it’s totally delicious. Having a garden and having over 100 heads of lettuce in one bed that you can harvest, I’ve been harvesting over there and I still got the other side, you have the flexibility to include these healthy things because who can afford going a whole paycheck and buy heads of lettuce for a couple bucks, especially when they just don’t look that healthy or that fresh. They’re just the center hearts because they cull all the outside leaves because they’ve gone bad. And one of the other things that’s really cool is if you have your own garden, you don’t need a refrigerator, because this is my refrigerator. I’m not eating it until I’m picking it. I pick it, I take it inside and eat it. I don’t harvest everything and put it in my fridge, although later if I have a lot of lettuce left over and I can’t eat it and I want to change out the bed, I might do some of that because some of the crops that I grow, like the lettuce, will store easily for two weeks when you put it in the fridge. And that’s why a lot of the foods we have sold in the grocery store, the cold-tolerant crops are the winter crops, like the lettuce, the brassica family, that I have the majority of planted, and I’m starting to plant out my summer stuff. As you can see here a whole bed peppers, and I’ve got a bit of fencing on it because my little dog likes to jump in here and go poop and I don’t like for him to do that in my beds. So those are all started out and just planted out and I’m pretty methodical with how I plant my things out. I get bamboo stake and I cut it to size and I space it 11 inches and I space it and every 11 inches I plant one. It’s pretty symmetrical and between every plant is like 11 inches so we can fit the maximum amount of plants in there and I do this for a few reasons. Number one, to maximize my space because my lot is about 5200 square feet. A lot of it is the front yard and my house and I have just a bit in the backyard, so I try to plant as much as I can and also, the other thing that’s very important to me is you could notice I’m not using any kind of mulch or wood chips or hay or straw or anything on the top of the soil and there’s pros and cons to every method in gardening you may learn. I’m not necessarily against mulch; I just don’t personally like to use mulch because the wood chips get mixed in with the soil and the wood chips could suck nutrients out of your soil. What instead I like to use for mulch is fresh compost. So every year I top off my beds with compost and that acts as a kind of mulch on top and the other thing that I do because I plant so close, these plants will grow out and they will spread out and as you guys can see, if you see this when it was planted out, every lettuce was planted and then a pretty big space. Maybe like eight inches in between the lettuces, and now you can see you can’t see the ground because the lettuces are filled out. That’s the goal with the peppers. So instead of having mulch on the ground that the sun still hits, my goal is to not have mulch and then have plants so tight and close together that the sun’s hitting all the leaves and not the ground. In addition this entire side has the whole subsoil irrigation system that I’ll show you guys in a second and an example of what it looks like. So that means I water under the ground and optimally that system should be set about four inches under the ground and so I don’t get a lot of evaporation loss. You can see some of the top is a little bit wet. That’s because the water will capillate up a little, it goes up a little bit and then falls down to the root zone, where the plants need it. So that’s been working really well for me aside from a few small issues I have had, which I recommend checking my videos for a complete story on that. So let’s go ahead and come in the back. And the other thing you’ll notice is that, if you notice, I’ve pretty much focused on vegetable plants. I just started some fruit trees that I got on clearance in Home Depot and the goal for my front yard since I have HOA and I can’t plant a garden like this in the front yard, I’m just going to plant all edible fruit trees. And the other thing I want to go over real quick is I just cut down some trees right there and this bed used to get half shade, so I cut those down so this would get full sun because some plants like full sun, some like shade, but still this first bed is a bit more of a shady bed so I planted more perennial, long-lasting plants that I literally just plant once. There’s a difference between annuals, such as the lettuce or the peppers here that you have to plant every season and pull up and you gotta replant. Then with the perennials you literally plant once and they grow yearround, year after year, day after day. My favorite plant in my garden is the ashitaba. If you look at the stem, you can see it’s kind of bleeding a yellow sap and those are known as chalcones. Right here, the tall one. The one next to it. So I clipped off a leaf and now it just bleeds this yellow sap which is rich in antioxidants and it’s cancer-fighting and all this stuff. So you can eat the stalks and you can also eat the leaf. Everybody take a piece of the leaf and pass it around. Taste it a little. And you’ll see the stem will start to bleed this yellow color. So this is from Japan and it’s a plant from Japan that grows excellent in Vegas. This is the first year I’m giving them more sun. I have grown them in pots under the overhang, getting some direct sun, but they’ve done fine, so this is a new planting. They start out growing slowly, very slowly, and then they once they get to this size they grow pretty fast. You could juice it. Once again, this is not a lettuce. Think of it like a kale. It has a different flavor. To me it tastes something like gotu kola and maybe if you eat the stalk, that kind of tastes celeryish to me. And also if you notice the ones I’m growing in California are a little bit sweeter than the ones here. Maybe it’s due to the climate, due to soil, due to the watering. I don’t exactly know what. And also this is a really cool plant because it’s biannual, so it’ll go up the second year, make seeds, drop seeds in the bed, and in California, the seeds dropped and I collected a lot of them to offer to people and share, but a lot of them are just in the ground and they sprouted up, so now I have ashitaba microgreens that I didn’t have to plant. This is the kind of garden that I want to have, with healing plants in my opinion in the world that’s actually quite rare. So that’s the perennial bed, and these are all annual beds. I have more perennial beds over on that side. As you can see, my green tree collards which are the tallest ones over there. We’ll go over there and take a look but that’s like 12+ feet tall. That’s another perennial, collard or kale-type leaves 365 days a year so I’ll never really run out of greens. I like to grow a lot of the green crops, like the lettuce in the winter/early spring and late fall, but in the middle of the summer you can’t really grow greens so I’ve adapted to different kinds of greens that’ll do well in our climate here because so me of our standard greens won’t do well. And you’ll learn about some of those guys today. So now this bed here has broccoli growing, and so this broccoli, everybody could maybe pinch off a piece if you want, but this broccoli, that’s a second cutting from this broccoli. I have broccoli, cabbage, and up this back panel, it’s supposed to be some sugar snap peas that didn’t do so well, probably because it didn’t get enough water because the Aquajet wasn’t able to hit the edge. And this bed will probably be turned over after I do the lettuce bed and you can see the broccoli makes that little broccoli head that we’re used to, but then if it gets a little older, like the ones over there, they start making flowers and they start to separate. I mean it’s still edible in any form but it’s much better when it’s a tight head, so I’ve been using that and dipping it in guacamole. You can also juice it or do whatever with it, but once again I’ve planted probably every 11 inches in here, fairly tightly to try and keep the sun off the ground. That’s a lot of food. A lot of the cabbage is going to get turned into sauerkraut so even if I don’t make the nice cabbage head, you could just take the leaves or shred them up or what I started to do lately, I have a video coming up on it soon, I just ferment the whole cabbage head or whole leaves. So now you could take the whole leaves and use it as a wrapper for some other thing. And also when you don’t cut them all up, you don’t create as much bacterial surface area so then you get a more mild ferment, which is kind of cool. So this is the irrigation system that I’m using on this whole side. It’s called the Aquajet subsoil irrigation system, and this is basically buried four inches under the soil level and this one originally was in the bed behind you with one single going down the middle, so right in this position, and it wasn’t able to spray out like two feet on both sides approximately and the plants on the edge, the extreme edges, they didn’t make it. So then I installed, that was the experimental bed. Every other bed actually has two so it has maybe one at this point and one over at this point so it only has to reach maybe a foot in either direction and then we get crossover in the middle. If I had to do it again, I might put a little more towards the edges because there’s so much crossover in the middle. But how this works is this comes full pressure, unlike a drip system, if you look closely, every 12 inches there’s a small hole. I haven’t had any problems with it clogging or plugging yet, which I’m kind of wondering if that will happen due to hard water, but it sprays out for only a minute, so it only has to go for a minute per cycle, and that seems to do a pretty good job watering the bed. So at present time I think I have, because it has been a little warmer lately, I have it on twice a day for a minute. And a minute in some cases is too long, so I need to get a different water irrigation timer that controls by the second, because most of them only do by the minute, so that’s been a challenge for me to find. Because then now I want to have 45 second cycles, which may be more appropriate, and do that more often than just two times a day, one minute each. The other thing that’s really cool about the Aquajet system that’s unlike any other kind of traditional drip system or irrigation system is when the system comes on, you can hear it sputtering for the first 15 seconds and what’s happening is out of the holes it’s getting pushed the air that are in the pipes. And so for those of you guys that know, we need air to breathe of course, and so do the plant roots need air. There’s a technique of growing called aquaponics where they use growing in air. Also, more important than the plant roots needing the air, the microbes in the air also need the air to fully thrive. They need good, uncompacted soil that has nice air space in between there, but then we pump it full of air to invigorate them so they can grow faster because the microbes in the soil is an integral part of my gardening system. You might think it’s just me back here gardening, but actually it’s me and about a trillion other of my friends, all the microbes in the soil, that are breaking down the compost that I’m putting in there, breaking down the trace minerals, a form of rock dust, and they’re making the nutrients in the soil bioavailable for the plants. So this is not like using Miracle Crap fertilizer that’s water-soluble that could run off your lawn down into the sewer and it could go into the Gulf and pollute everything. All these nutrients are here because it’s in non water-soluble format. It doesn’t run off. The bacteria break it down and make it available for the plants. So that’s why I like the Aquajet system here. It allows me to save water and aerates the root zone and I’ve seen, provided it’s installed properly, works great. So this bed here is a bed that I actually had some Napa cabbage. You can see the Napa cabbage here, nice large leaves, and it’s actually going to flower so it makes nice flowers and it’s going to make the seeds. I’ve harvested a bunch of it here. Some of it’s empty and I made a video fermenting it. I need to get in and harvest the rest of it. And this stuff’s probably going to get chopped into sections and then fermented. And then I have mixed in lettuce, and in addition I like to plant some flowers, which you can kind of see a few, for beauty, for insects, pollinators. Also those are all edible flowers, so those are violas, pansies, and marigolds are commonly edible flowers. You can put them on top of a salad, add some fruit to look nice and take pictures, and then I also planted arugula. Arugula’s a really easy crop to grow if you haven’t grown it before. It grows really fast and it makes these cool flowers, so I want everybody to pick an arugula flower off here and let me know what you guys think of it, because most people have tasted arugula, but they haven’t tasted the delicate flower. No you could plant it yeah. To me, that kind of tastes like a barbecue sauce. It’s just really interesting and most people haven’t gotten to try that. So you get to look forward to this when your plant’s not making many leaves anymore and in California I’ve been experimenting. There’s this variety called wasabi arugula, so it’s as hot as wasabi sauce, but it’s an arugula and it’s so trippy, so I was able to get that in California. I don’t have any seeds now because the plants here didn’t go to seed but the ones in California. So these are the seed pods on the arugula forming. You get to see them right there, so if I let these grow longer, these seed pods will dry out. They’ll look like little beans and that’ll have the seeds so you can collect and save your seeds after every season. Some of the plants in my garden I let go to seed if I have the space. Sometimes the space is more valuable than trying to collect the seeds. I’m going to have a stock of seeds I already have from previous years or I could just get new seeds. So the next thing I’m going to talk about that’s super important especially for the desert or wherever you live is the soil that you’re growing in. Because if I tried to grow in the soil here like John, why don’t you grow in the soil here man? I don’t wish that on anybody. I mean it could probably work and people do that and you can enrich it and all that stuff, but that’s another reason I built the raised beds, so I could control the soil because simply the quality of the food that you’re eating is based on the soil that you’re growing in. If you have crappy soil, just the existing soil, which actually has a lot of minerals but not a whole lot of organic matter, it’s going to be an issue. So you need to have balanced soil. So I found the best source of compost here in bulk at this time in Las Vegas is a placed called Vera Grow in north Las Vegas, and I’m using the Tomato Lady Mix. I got two years of Tomato Lady Mix, and I mixed it in with about one yard of my amendments, and I’m not going to go into all of those in this video, but I do have an episode where I go into that specifically and show you guys how I did that. Then I got it delivered and put it all back into these beds and that’s pretty much what I’m growing in. But the two main things, no matter where you get your soil, you want to add these two things in your soil no matter where you live. This is called the Azamite, and it’s known as a kind of rock dust. I have other kinds of rock dust. There’s another one back here known as the Spanish River carbonite. This is Volcanic Mineral Plus. That’s from Canada so it’s not available in our location here, but there’s also other ones like Elemite and Cascade Minerals, which I have bags of. The Azamite is available at the feed store in town fro like $16 a bag which is cheaper than anywhere else I’ve been to, so we’ve been really lucky here. The feed store is IFC Farm Store. And this is the granulated one, so that’s easy because it doesn’t have any dust, if you want to use that for micronized, to mix things. It’s more bioavailable for the plants, but I still recommend using the trace minerals to it. The trace minerals add very important minerals that standard agriculture leaves out. This has like 90 different minerals. It’s like if you go to a buffet in Las Vegas, we have a whole selection of things you can choose from to eat, instead of if you go to In and Out Burger, they have hamburgers, cheeseburgers, and French fries. Or maybe shakes. I think that’s it, so you only have five things. The bacteria in my plants, everything, is like going to a buffet in Vegas and they get to pick and choose what they want. You can’t burn with these trace minerals, so I just want to let them figure it out instead of me trying to play God and giving them only three nutrients that you would be giving them if you used a standard boxed fertilizer out of the store for the most part. Now the other thing besides the trace minerals that’s super important to me is the Worm Gold Plus worm castings. So worm castings are very critical and very important for my style of farming. And I want to let you guys know that as much as I like worm castings, not all worm castings are created equal. Trace minerals are pretty easy because it’s a mined product, but worm castings are literally worm poop and the worm poop or the worm castings is only as good as what the worm is being fed. We’re only as healthy as what we’re eating. If we’re eating a plant-strong diet, we’re going to be healthy and our shit ain’t going to stink that much. Well anyways with the worms, it’s very unfortunate that most worm castings are derived from manure, so it’s an excellent way to basically get rid of manure fast. The worms eat the manure, poop out castings, and now you buy castings that are generated from cattle manure and other manure crops. And the cattle may be being fed GMO corn, GMO soy, antibiotics and who knows what else that the worms are now digesting and putting into the worm poop. So the Worm Gold Plus, they’re fed a plant-based diet with grains and high chitin and cardboard and whatnot so they make a really good casting. In addition they also add some kelp and some rock dust in here, which is really good, but the main thing about the Worm Gold Plus, I had an interview with the guy who invented it or figured out how to make the best worm casting, and basically in the Worm Gold Plus it has special things called chitin degraders and cellulose degraders. And cellulose is what’s in wood fiber. It’s in any kind of fiber, and this is when we make compost, it’s all fiber-based so the degraders in here basically munch on all that and turn it into nutrients for your plants. This is so important. I do use a compost tea called Boogie Brew Compost Tea that uses a lot of the Worm Gold Plus to multiply the different bacteria and biologics in the worm castings. And that’s another part. Besides the minerals, we need the biologics. The biologics are what’s in the soil, my free workforce that’s turning the nutrients into soil and making them available for the plants. And that’s the whole cycle that I’m trying to emulate here in my backyard. Another thing you’re going to notice is this wall, because this is like my fence line, all the way down I have this trellis material and I’m growing some zucchini squash here that are almost starting to flower pretty soon. And I got a whole bunch of cucumber plants. My favorite cucumber for the desert is Armenian cucumber, just the standard Armenian and also the striped Armenian, which I prefer a bit more than the standard Armenian. And those guys can take the heat and still produce very well even in the middle of summer. I also have lemon cucumbers, which is one of my personal favorites, although for me personally it hasn’t grown too well, but that would be my second pick for a commonly available cucumber in the desert. Star Nursery currently has both these varieties and although I’m not a big fan of them because I like other nurseries in California better, they’re my favorite nursery in the valley at this point. I wish there was something better because they still gotta get their act together. Alright, so this is a new greenhouse that I just got at Lowe’s. It’s normally $200, for clearance it was like $75. And so I think it’s imperative to have a greenhouse and as you can see this is actually underneath the shade structure and on concrete slab. So mainly this is used in the wintertime so I can keep more sensitive plants alive. I did get these other greenhouses here at Big Lots on clearance at the end of the season for like $17.50 marked down from $70 or something crazy, which I think is a ripoff for that thing, but it’s held up decent enough for me and allows me to grow things that I normally couldn’t grow. I don’t even keep this greenhouse. You can see I have pineapples in there, some ashitaba, and some other sensitive crops. My maringa, I don’t think made it, and I also have baby tree collards. Let’s see, I moved a lot of my gynarakokums, Okinawan spinach in there from my garden to keep it alive because it doesn’t like to get too cold. That’s what I’m going to be doing in here. You can see I have some starter plants out of the full sun, just kind of growing. I pulled up some of my sugarcane that I grew year round that stayed alive in my beds, but it takes a long growing season. When I harvested it last year it wasn’t sweet at all because it didn’t mature. So if you want to grow something like sugarcane, you can grow sorghum, which would do well here in our climate, and that’s a shorter season for a cane-type grass you can harvest and juice and boil it down to whatever. Sorghum syrup or you can just drink the juice for a little sweetener. But yeah, greenhouses to me are important in the summer. I don’t use them too much because it gets far too hot but at least in the shade, it’s a little bit cooler, and I like this one because I can open up those sides. My goal, on that side I have another one of these. I’m going to assemble one on that side and so does anybody here need a greenhouse that looks like this one? Here it is. And you can have it for free. No assembly instructions included, but I have a video on it. I took that down and I put it in a box and then I was like what am I going to do with that? So yeah, greenhouse is super important. Now we’re going to walk through here. It’s a little bit tight, so be careful. So this is a standard round circular 48 inch raised bed that I got for $10. They’ve held up fairly well. You can see one back there that kind of broke when a buddy was over here helping me. They leaned on it too hard so they do get brittle and you can see some of them got leaned on and broke and I kind of painted up and stuff. But overall for ten bucks I really can’t complain, because they’ve allowed me to grow food. You can see on this side instead of subsoil irrigation, which I prefer, the top drip system in a circular fashion to try to get all the areas watered in these beds. Every different raised bed, I try to have something a little different growing. In addition, in the middle of the raised bed, to maximize my use of space, I put a little pot to grow something else. So this one is dandelions and down I have some dandelions and celery growing. Every bed’s a little different. This one’s an area I’m currently working on. That one, that one, this one, and that one. Hopefully, my goal was to have it done by today, but maybe tomorrow, I’m going to harvest all this stuff because two nights ago I harvested all the lettuce in here, that’s why it looks pretty dismal. And this one had lettuce and flowering or ornamental kale and cabbage. Cut all that down. This had broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage, cut it all down, and I like to clean out the bed first and then I’ll pull the roots, or pull the plants out and end up composting them. And top my beds off with new soil mixture including compost that I made, I’m currently using Dr. Earth’s bagged fertilizer, bagged soil, which is some of the best soil you can get in a bag, and that’s at Plant World, now also known as Moon Valley, because they took it over on Charleston. And then top it off, and I’m going to replant cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers in these four beds. This is the bed that did really well and I like it a lot. I got spinach down below. Spinach lasts a little bit longer than say lettuce, which goes out sooner, and up these trellis panels I have the sugar snap peas growing. And sugar snap pears are like my springtime fruit because they are so sweet, especially when they’re grown in good soil. And then we have this plant in the middle that’s kind of getting crowded out, and I’ve been plucking leaves off because I don’t want it to grow too much because it’s crowding out the other things. It’s the Japanese burdock or gobo. So that does amazing. That’s a better specimen. It’s been shading out my broccoli and my rutabagas that I’ve grown out over there. It’s grown really well. I planted it like last year this time, and it grew all summer and basically shaded out the whole bed, which is not a good thing, but it’s pretty ornamental so I was thinking of trying to do it in my front yard. It grows well, it’s stayed alive during the winter. I lost all the top growth but the roots stayed alive and as soon as it warmed up it came right back. Gobo, or Japanese burdock. And that makes a long thing like a carrot but it’s a really long carrot that’s really thin. That was an experiment and an experiment gone awry. It takes too much space. It would’ve been far better to put it in a planter thing off to the side, which actually might be a good idea to dig it up, but I should’ve done that before it started regrowing for the new season. But yeah, this side I just have bagged soil from Home Depot for the most part, and this is more a meld mix, where I did one third peat moss, one third vermiculite, and one third compost. I probably went a little shy on the vermiculite and the peat moss and did more compost then added the rock dust. I wasn’t actually able to add the Worm Gold worm castings, so because of the inferior quality soil or whatever, this area’s actually a bit drier because it’s a run from my drip system, things don’t grow quite as well. I like the wildness of this side compared to the more cleanness of that side because there’s all kinds of things growing. These are the tree collards, the green tree collards. I have green tree collards and purple tree collards, and the green ones are more resilient here. I have lost several purple tree collards over the years. I think I only have like two or three plants left, so I’ve been propagating them but the green ones work far better. The ones that you literally just walked in underneath it’s like 12 feet tall and the main thing for those is you gotta stake them really well because they get tall and you can see the girth on the trunk there. It’s huge and it makes edible kale. If you look closely, this side has a few more bugs than the other side. I have to spray that with Dr. Bronner’s soap and Neem oil. That was on the list for this morning but I didn’t get to do that to control my pests. So my goal is to not have to spray anything because I don’t like to spray anything, even organic crude controls like Neem oil and Dr. Bronner’s soap, which is pretty harmless in my opinion. Yeah you mix them together. So I do two tablespoons of the Dr. Bronner to two tablespoons of the Neem oil and I tried to get the Dr. Bronner’s Castile soap which is the one for the laundry because it’s more sudsy. You could of course just use the regular one to one gallon of water and then I put that in a sprayer and spray my plants down with it. And that takes care of all the bugs for the most part, and even some kinds of powdery mildews. It just suffocates them out. But my goal is to not have to spray anything. On the other side it has far less problems with the pests and I believe that’s because of the higher quality soil. The healthier your soil, the healthier plants, and the more resistant they’ll be to any kind of stressor, whether that’s the weather, whether that’s not getting enough water, or whether that’s disease and pests. So I’m glad that has less and it’s really telling to me that if you do have good soil you’ll have less pests. This is some of the lettuce planted on this side that was planted around the same time over on that side, once again, just a full bed of lettuce with very little space. The green lettuce grows a lot faster than the red lettuce is one thing I’ve learned and the green lettuce makes more abundance than the red. Some of these, I have onions, so this is just standard onions. I had onions that I grew last year. They had the bulbs and the bulbs started sprouting up. If anybody would like sprouting onion bulbs to plant in the garden, I have plenty I’ll be giving away because I need to get rid of them, and this is what happens when you plant them. So this was planted early and then I planted that whole section later and I think this gets a little bit better sun than that one. So of course on here, all the different onions coming up, any different kinds of leaves, these are all edibles, like onion greens. And also because I planted them as the whole bulb, I don’t know if I’m going to get new bulbs underneath. I kind of suspect that I will, but some people will say you’re not. Another cool thing that people haven’t tried are the onion flowers. You guys are lucky. Here’s some that’s opening. So pick off onion flowers that are there to eat and it’s much like the arugula flowers. If you don’t grow a garden you’re rarely ever going to find arugula flowers, even at farmers’ markets, which we don’t have too many farmers’ markets here in the valley. They don’t even sell those, and they’re such a delicate. So if you’re a gourmet froufrou chef, you can just top your soup with some onion flowers. I like to incorporate it into the body of the soup and have a little flavor explosion that’s onion but it’s a little bit sweet at the same time. And also allows me to eat more flowers, and flowers are an excellent thing to eat because a few reasons. Number one, the pigments. The pigments are very important, to eat our foods in color, to eat the rainbow. So I try to grow, besides green lettuce, still trying to grow red lettuce and red chard and other colorful things, but the flowers come in many different pigments and the other thing about the flowers that are really cool is if you look at those flowers that you just ate, there’s a little bit of the pollen, the white pollen. So pollen is very good for us. Many people buy bee pollen, but why let the bees collect it and form it together with their bee spit or whatever when you could just collect the flowers and eat it to get the pollen, because it’s really rich in protein. Another cool, we could try it on the way out, is sage, my purple sage is flowering so you get to try some sage flowers, which you know sage is a pretty strong herb, but when you eat the flowers it’s much more light and delicate flavor. Let’s see, what else do I have. So one of the crops you must grow if you live in Las Vegas is this one right here. It’s dinosaur kale, Tuscan kale, black kale, lacinato kale, however you want to call it. And this is probably my number one leafy green annual crop that grows really well here. Literally I plant this once, this one right here was actually planted last year this time. It grew all year and now it’s going to flower and seed. So all these plants here, I’ll have dinosaur kale for the next year now just from this one bed whereas if I plant this lettuce, same amount of space, in about 90 days I have lettuce and then I have to pull it out and start all over again. So if you just plant a couple beds of dinosaur kale, you’re guaranteed to have that. Another one that’s flowering behind you, that was planted over a year ago also, is the Swiss chard and I let some chard go to seed once and it dropped the seed and they came up as weeds in my garden, so chard’s another one that’s super important. Another one I would encourage you to grow are the tree collards, this is the green one and then I have a purple one. And these ones you plant once and they grow year round without having to replant it every year like the dinosaur kale or like the chard, so that makes the most sense to me. That being said, these guys if you eat them now, they’re pretty decent. We can send some around here, maybe send a couple leaves around. They kind of taste decent. This is more known as animal fodder, which means it’s not desirable for people because it’s pretty strong-tasting but the purple ones are sweeter but right now it actually tastes decent to me but if we eat these in the summertime when we’re having 110 degree days and it’s really going to taste really, really strong and not super desirable. I let these guys milk out and get through the summer and keep them alive and look forward to the fall, winter, and spring when I mainly eat these guys. And then this is an example of an annual bed on this side, because it’s the lettuce that I’m going to be harvesting really soon and then this is an example of a perennial bed that I haven’t really taken a lot of care of. My soil level has been compacted down and I like everything to be fully topped off because my opinion is that the more soil you have, the bigger of a home you have for your plants. Because I’m not topped off, I’m missing a lot of soil and nutrients and bacteria that could be in here to grow these plants and nourish them better. I probably have neglected this bed for at least a year now without topping it off because it’s kind of a lot of things growing in there and to get in there and top it off is a little tough. I still need to do that, but I have some mint growing in these pods, kind of segregates them so the roots won’t come out. Kind of worked but it kind of didn’t because the mint still spread out everywhere. I have some stuff called Chinese chives, also known as ha, which is growing alright, but I would like to have w hole bed of them because they’re a really mild chive that tastes almost like a leafy green instead of a hard garlic or chive or onion chive. These guys right here are the goji berries, so they do amazing, just in a spot where it’s probably getting enough water. I’ll probably get a few berries, even in this shady spot. Some mint, and I’ve also been coming back in this bed, recurring is the perilla, or the shiso, which is another really good herb to grow. Perilla, shiso, stevia, and basil are the top herbs to grow in the summertime. They do amazing in our climate. They love it dry and hot and I’ve grown like, this bed actually had basil last year and it was probably up to here by the time it flowered. And it had like 12 different kinds. I try not to waste a lot of space so you can see on this side I have my irrigation from my drip. I have four-valve timer there so if I just have one line to water this whole area, by the time the water pressure got to the end of the line, it wouldn’t get watered too much, so then I split it up into four different segments so that each one comes on at different times so each one gets more pressure to emit the water out of the drippers. Also what I mentioned on the other side with the Aquajet, I have four valves, so you can’t put all that on one valve because the pressure drop is too much and you won’t get good water pressure. Another thing I want to recommend is a water filter. So I’m using the Boogie Blue water filter. We all drink filtered water, because we know that we don’t want to get contaminants in what we’re drinking. Many people in Vegas unfortunately buy filtered water. I filter my own water that I drink, but we should also be filtering our water for our plants. The main thing that’s bad, not necessarily for the plants but more importantly for the microbes in the soil, is the chlorine that they’re adding. And so I want to remove the chlorine because the chlorine is put in the water to disinfect the water so that we don’t get cholera outbreak or whatever those diseases are. But it’s not good for the bacteria because it will reduce their populations. It won’t wipe them completely out so if you’ve been watering with unfiltered water it’s not the end of the world but to take things up to the next level, to be a little bit better, to have more microbial growth in my opinion, it’s best to have a water filter. That’s what I’ve been trying to do, to take all the gardening practices and try to take it up the notch, always try to improve a little bit because if you improve a little bit here, the overall result will be a lot in the end. So anyways, aside from that — oh yeah, Boogiebrew.com/GYG. QUESTION: How often do you have to change it? JOHN: About once a year. And it depends on how often you use it. I have one for my hose, one for my drip system. The other thing I really want to talk about is down this alley, which looks like a mess pretty much, but down this alley is something that I believe everybody should be doing in Las Vegas or wherever you live. And if you’re going to notice I have about 11 composters and a whole bunch of compost and other source materials that are going to go into my compost eventually. And most of it’s finished compost in different stages. I sift it out to get the fine stuff and I throw out the bigger particles in the bins. So I’ve been experimenting with different bins. I built a new bin yesterday I actually got from Costco that I like a lot, so if you’re looking for the low end budget composter, Costco has one now for about $150, which is really good. It’s a Lifetime tumbling composter, which I will have a video on soon. You can’t really see it because it’s at the far end, but it’s two 50-gallon barrels, so it gives you 100 gallons total composting space and it’s pretty solid. It’s my second best favorite composter. My first best are my metal composters, the Joraform composter from Sweden. They have insulation in there to keep them warmer. But the composters are very important to my compost. All my food scraps, my garden clippings go into the composter. My garden clippings, the things from the beds that you saw were emptied down go into my composters there and you have to mix the carbon with the nitrogens, the greens and the browns. So in general I put one five-gallon bucket of food scraps and I put in the bottom of the bucket this much of pine pellets, which is used for horse bedding, available at the feed store in town, and that adds my carbon. And the nitrogen is all the food scraps. And I turn that like once a day and it breaks down over time. So in the Joraforms that are insulated, I can get a batch of compost in about I want to say six weeks from start to finish, which is pretty quick and so one of the things I have tried is tried to have a compost pile, like many people around the country may have, which work in many places like California. I did do that and it worked fine, but here because of the arid climate, it’s so dry. You have to end up using your hose water to keep your pile at the right moisture level. So that’s why I like the enclosed tumblers because it keeps the moisture level in there right so that you don’t have to add excess water. And so that’s important to me. I experimented with all different kinds. You could often tumblers, composting tumblers, inexpensive on Craigslist if I don’t get it first. That’s how I got most of these guys because people will see the one at Costco, oh yeah composting’s a good idea. They’ll buy it and then they’ll use it very little, like oh we never use that thing, it’s easier to throw it out, and then they’ll sell it on Craigslist the next season. So the good ones they have now at Costco, look for them soon on Craigslist next year. The other thing I noticed Costco does is Costco will sell the composter because it’s spring season, and if you wait a couple months, or maybe a couple more months, by the time they’re clearing out their gardening stuff because it’s getting into later, they’re going to mark it down and drop it like 50 bucks, so pay attention and see. Some Costcos will sell them faster than others, and so my original Lifetime composters, I got them when it was on sale, like $50 off at Costco, which is the first, second, fourth, fifth one down. So they’re all in different stages of compost and all I can say is that the metal Joraform composters break things down faster and I cycle them faster. The Lifetimes work next good and some of the other ones just take way more time. I mean some composters is better than nothing but I just want to try to keep with the best to keep the process flowing and keep things moving in and out because I got a lot of produce waste always and clippings from my garden. They get that stuff out and put it in the soil instead of sitting in the composter not composting and taking forever. The other thing I’ve done that’s really cool is this thing right there. I put a little planter, because this tends to drip sometimes. It’s actually dripping now. And so I don’t want to waste the water so I have a bed here with, I think it’s like gotukola, but it really likes a wet climate and not too much sun so I just put it in there, it drips, and it stays alive, so I always have this to eat when I want it. It’s like gotukola, but it’s not. I forget the exact name. I was told it was gotukola, but it’s not. I don’t know what it is. It’s some kind of Asian green. That’s a rare one. Don’t know what I’m growing, but it’s edible, I do know that. So those are all the main areas I want to cover, the composting, the different soil, the different raised beds. You guys can see an example of how it works. If I was to do it again, I would surely do what I did on the other side, it’s a bit cleaner, and I’d kind of fit more, but I like this side more. The space of it’s more wasted, because it has more walkway space, but I like that each bed is differentiated. I don’t know, I guess at this point I’ll take any questions that you guys may have. QUESTION: What is your water bill? JOHN: My water bill last month was like $35. In the summer it may go up to like $50, but it’s insane that water is so cheap in Nevada. This is why people might want to move to Nevada, because California’s way more expensive and it shouldn’t be that cheap. And even using these water-saving methods, and I have water-conserving fixtures and showerheads and everything, it’s everywhere in my house, it’s really cheap. It doesn’t take as much water as you think to grow a garden, and I may in some cases be overwatering. If you look over here it’s a little bit wet, so I need to get a control on here to dial that down a little bit. And some of the ones in the back aren’t getting enough water or try to increase that. So it’s a constant fight with my drip irrigation system to get it right because the pressure balancing and all this stuff, whereas the other side is a lot easier with the subsoil irrigation. QUESTION: Do you recommend the Aquajet subsoil irrigation system, because I saw in one of your videos you do not recommend it. JOHN: So yeah, the title of the video was “Why I do not recommend the Aquajet irrigation system,” and that went into some specific defects they had with the Aquajet that I can’t necessarily recommend it, but that’s what I use, and tell people to put in, provided they take heed and do the steps that I outline in the video so that they have a successful experience. And mainly because I want the manufacturer to correct the defect before I fully recommend it to the public, although I can’t say here in Vegas, if I were installing another garden, that’s what I would use, not this. QUESTION: John, you said you cut the bamboo stake. So what’s the measurement between the plants you’re using? Is that why you have the stake? JOHN: Right, so I have bamboo stakes that I stake plants up with, and then I take these small non-usable bamboo sticks, I don’t know if I have any around, but they’re really thin, and I cut them to like 11 inches or 12 inches, whatever I determine my plant spacing to be, so that I can easily space out quickly. I could use a ruler and measure out 11 inches on a ruler, but if I just have a stake, I just plant the stem, do the stake, to the next one and plant another one there. And actually I do the bamboo stakes, I stake exactly where the plants go, dig those up, and put a hole right there. So I’m pretty methodical on how I plant things so I can get full coverage because I’ve seen a lot of gardeners, and there’s nothing wrong with this, it’s just haphazardly plant this here, plant that there. And I mean that’s cool if you don’t want to be in production and stuff, but I really try to go for production and maximum yields. So it’s called square foot gardening method, and Mel Bartholomew wrote a book, and that’d be a good book to introduce you to the concepts of that. Basically it’s a whole concept, a whole book of how to garden and make a system out of gardening. I actually use a lot of concepts from that book in my garden, although I’ve adapted and do my own things as well. In general I try to refer to their plant spacing guidelines because it works fairly well and sometimes I make things a little bit closer than what he recommends just due to my size of my raised bed constraints and I want to fit one extra row of stuff in and maximize my plants and we live in the desert and the sun’s beating down on stuff and I want things to grow pretty tight. QUESTION: Do you, because on this side is above the soil, do you have problems with the freezing by that time? In the wintertime you don’t use the drip irrigation? JOHN: So this winter, I didn’t have any issues. Last winter the water didn’t freeze in the irrigation system. One of the things that I thought about was hooking this up to a mixture of hot and cold water to keep it warmer, to keep it going. Another thing I really want to do is have pipes in my beds circulating my warm water from my water heater to keep them warm, but I don’t know if I’ll ever get to do that. But I can say that, not this year, the previous year, it was so cold that because I was watering and it was watering, for the most part, the soil froze because it did have a high water content. And then when that happens, it’s not good for the plants. So I lost a lot of plants that year and I haven’t had a full cold year with that side yet, but I think that side’s going to fare a little better because the water in that side is lower in the ground than being higher up and it’s not going to want to freeze as quickly. QUESTION: When your bed’s over there, do you lay something underneath the ground, on top of the ground, before you put the soil in? JOHN: Good question. So the question is do I add something on the top of my ground before I put the soil in? So that side, I had all cleared out of weeds and it looks like dirt, what you’re standing on right now, so I didn’t add anything on. If I had something like grass there, I would do something called cardboard sheet mulching. So I would get some cardboard, some clean cardboard, take off all the tape, and lay it down on the ground like a couple of layers high and pile the soil on top of that. If I did have moles or bulls or any other gophers, I would lay down some fabric hardware cloth first before filling it up, but I didn’t lay anything down there. The only thing I did lay was I was chip chopping some of the trees up and I laid down logs and pieces of trees to try to fill some mass, then I had some nasty compost from a place called A1 Organic. I think they’re out of business now, which I don’t recommend, and I had to layer that on the bottom to get rid of it because it stank and it was nasty. So it’s on the bottom inch or two that will at some point end up breaking down but for the most part it’s hidden underneath there and a cheap filler and organic waste. I don’t recommend getting topsoil or fill soil because you don’t know what kind of contamination or the quality of that soil. I recommend just getting the bulk soil and filling it up with the good stuff as much as you can. Yes. QUESTION: Where did you get all that soil you have in the back? JOHN: So the bagged soil is known as the Dr. Earth soil, and they have that available at the Plant World Nursery, which is now Moon Valley. So that’s the best by far bagged soil that you could find anywhere, not that I necessarily recommend bagged soil because I always want to encourage people to get bulk soil whenever they can, but I got a bunch of bulk soil and I wanted to do a trial of the bulk soil from the ViraGrow in North Vegas and this stuff. So that is commencing this year when I’m planting similar crops in different soils to see what kind of differences I’ll get. JOHN: Am I growing mulberries? So mulberries, they are technically supposed to be legal because of the pollen or something. Only the boy plants, so I’m not really growing mulberries. Mostly what I focus on is I actually have all vegetables, except for apricots and I might have a few random jackfruit trees if they survived in my greenhouse, but otherwise I’ve been really focusing on greens because if you have a lot of acreage and space with a front yard in an HOH like I do, I would plant trees out there because I can’t plant vegetables but I think by far it would be far better for people to plant vegetables than fruits because fruits in best case, they might produce two times a year for you. And worst case, it’s going to produce once a year for you. It’s going to take a large amount of space and make a nice canopy and shade things out, which could also benefit, whereas the vegetables, you could grow vegetables in other smaller fruit crops, tomatoes and peppers and eggplants, and have those every day. So if I have more acreage, and I will have a farm one day, and I’m going to have fruit trees in the front yard, I don’t want to waste and shade things out too much. I mean in the back, where I have total shade between this overhang and the fence, there were a few junk trees that I didn’t manage and I’m going to cut those down and plant fruit trees in their place because that’s a good space that I could use for growing. I couldn’t grow vegetables, but I could grow fruit trees in here. I do have mulberries in California growing. JOHN: Alright, so here’s the end of the episode, and everybody that came over for the tour today is getting to take home four heads of lettuce from my garden. Alright, so the video kind of cut off because the battery ran out because I kind of talk long and the tour’s only supposed to be an hour long; I think it lasted a couple hours, but I’m confident that many people got a lot of good information out of the tour live and in person. Hopefully you guys also benefited from the tour also. I also answered other questions that people had so you guys didn’t get to hear that, and of course at the end of the tour, besides getting all the information, they got to take home some of the best-grown lettuce here in Las Vegas out of my garden. Everybody that came got to harvest four heads out of my lettuce beds that they could take home some of the freshest and best greens. Hopefully after tasting the greens it’ll motivate them to start to grow their own high quality greens. I want to encourage all the gardeners out there watching this to take your gardening skills to the next level. If you haven’t used the rock dust, if you haven’t used the Worm Gold Plus worm castings, if you haven’t used the compost tea, I would encourage you guys to try it this season to see what kind of difference it can make. It’s my belief that if everybody in the culture and in the world just improved what they were doing a little bit, I really value people like Elon Musk that’s basically taking space travel to the next level, taking electric cars to the next level, boosting the technology of the world to make it that better. And this is simply what I try to do with gardens, is to get them to the next level so that they can have higher quality foods, so that they can have more bug- and disease-resistant plants, have higher quality food, and have food that can even tolerate the stresses of the crazy climactic conditions we’re having these days. If you like this video please give me a thumbs up and I also want to let you guys know that I do not regularly have any tours. I do have some on rare occasion for the local area when I feel like it, but once again my garden’s set up for me to eat out of. It’s my personal farm and not a place for the public or for any kind of tours, so I want to encourage you guys to like this video if you liked it. And I will film future tour videos and put them up for you so you guys can watch free of charge. Also be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel to be updated of future tours and other videos when I travel around and share all the information I’ve learned by traveling around and actually by getting my hands dirty in gardening every day. Finally, be sure to check out my past episodes. I have over 1,000 episodes now. I do give annual summer and winter garden tours so you can actually see what I’m growing in my garden with just me, not with a big crowd and me giving a whole spiel or anything like that. Be sure to pass this video along to your friends and family who you may also think it may assist them to get them motivated to start growing their own food, to grow higher quality food so you can help me fulfill my mission of changing the planet one person at a time and being the change I want to see in life as Mahatma Gandhi once said. So once again my name’s John Kohler wit
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WPT University Place: How to Avoid Mistakes in a Tall Spindle Orchard

fourcowfarm posted the article • 0 comments • 230 views • 2017-09-23 03:30 • came from similar tags

 

Mario Miranda Sazo, Extension Associate at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Lake Ontario Fruit Program, explains the tall spindle system for planting apple trees. Sazo discusses how to set up the supports for the young trees and the correct way to prune.
subtitle:

- We have Mario Miranda Sazo. Again, he's the fruit extension specialist at Cornell Cooperative Extension in the Lake Ontario Fruit Program. And he's talking about how to avoid mistakes when establishing and training a tall spindle orchard. - Okay, so I'm going to... I see, so... Kinda' few guys were not able to hear me very well. So I'm gonna, make a major step just by doing this, it's a big difference. Okay, so hopefully... Do we have more people coming? I don't know, If somebody could sit down that could be great. I just want to give an intro about this just to kind of show you a typical nursery tree. It's a typical nursery tree it's a beautiful nursery tree that perhaps only thing that we're gonna remove pruning that we call corrective pruning is gonna be that feather that is there. That feather shouldn't be there. Because the crutch angle is too narrow. And sometimes it's difficult to make that decision because you are buying a tree and sometimes you want to keep everything but sometimes you can help the tree to grow better by just doing some very smart kind of cut after pruning. After planting. So in this case perhaps the only tree, the only feather that I'm gonna remove is that one. Those are long, long feathers. Okay? Like those feathers that we had five, six years ago. Today we are looking for short feathers. No more than 16 to 18 inches. Okay, very well detailed with a very wide crotch angle hopefully more than 60 degrees. Sign rooster, you're gonna start seeing some of the rooster are gonna start seeing you or giving you more opening with those feathers and because those feathers are more well-open those one are gonna be induced early on. And it's gonna be a more natural cropping. So in your list we're having like I say in the morning we're having planting at different density, we have been using whips and with them we know how to grow those whips we can really fill this page very quickly. So that's kind of my method. Most of the time we have been pushing a lot a lot just to start with highly-feathered trees but sometimes you can do a good job with also with whips. And we're gonna see the case how we do it with whips. Here is a grower that perhaps doesn't use irrigation. This is a grower who grows his own nursery tree. He growing 60, 70, 80,000 trees for a tall spindle system. Very successful planting. Again another shot of this this is a very high planting density two by eleven with two wires and a wire stabilizer that we call, that is gonna be supporting those trees. But this is a mistake. I think so. (laughs) Sometimes, this is a big mistake. You can try to avoid this situation. The guy that did this is an extreme picture that sometimes I want to put this kind of situation because in our industry don't forget 40% of our industry in Wayne county is still 40% processing blocks, okay? Because we have MOTS they are in Wayne county in Williamson next to Lake Ontario. So those growers are still growing kind of big trees and we are still kind of moving to a more modern semi-process, semi-high density planting. But still we are seeing this situation. So it's very kind of still confusing for those kind of growers who are kind of transitioning to semi or high density plantings to see or they are so used to kill the wood permanent wood and we are just trying to renew that wood and make those trees more productive. So it kinda helps picture just to say I want to put this picture, it's a sol axe system. This system is a very complicated, very beautiful perhaps the more kind of amazing way to grow an apple tree and make a system very efficient. Able to produce, originated from France by Lespinasse, and it's a lot of philosophy behind this system but we use today many of the concepts that are here, Lespinasse is also the person who developed the diverticulaxe. And today I have there that's a typical solaxe where you keep the long, long fingers and you do a lot of the spur extinction. So everything that you see at the base will remove through the years all those feathers that you need to leave there were removed so they need the first long finger or long branch with several fingers is gonna start the meter, and very long and you have different fruiting unit it's called centrifugal pruning, you have expert extinction you have a tree that is gonna be something like that hanging over and we use many of these concepts. We really manage crop log branch by branch. So we have rulered that we use in Europe there is a green ruler that I saw there in the trade show that we use branch by branch just to regulate the crop log that we need in each of those branches, okay? For a planting system like tall spindle we just measure the trunk above the ground one time. Just to measure the crop log. So we have that kind of system but this is another you know way to do it, you know? It's a two-dimensional way to grow an apple tree. Just the height and just the length. And we manipulate everything with seven wires in the case of five-wire, six-wire, or seven-wire. And if we start moving the angle we are gonna start seeing the kind of v-trellis that there's another level of precision that is the cool way of how things are moving in Washington. Just to see like it's the same idea like you manipulate everything to the perfection like in this picture like I showed you in the morning. This is Honeycrisp. Okay, but tall spindle that is the concept that we have been introducing in the last perhaps 10, 12 years. It's a combination of the slender spindle that you need to leave the ground in Holland and in Belgium. Okay? What's that shorter tree, to start keeping some permanent wood at the lower tier. And they start doing some kind of renewal in the upper section of those trees. And at the same time, if the combination the tall spindle combination of the slender spindle with the super spindle who that was developed in Germany. So you start seeing these kind of systems and you start seeing diverticulaxe and you start seeing solaxe, and from all these systems like amalgam-H and the we call that is the result of what we are seeing today for that kind of more simple tall spindle. The tall spindle is a tree, dimensional tree, where you have height, you have depth, and you have the length. Also manipulated like in a two-dimensional system like I showed you before. That was a two-dimensional planner. Oh with an angle that you start moving that vertical element, or vertical trunk whatever direction you want. One of the important things it is that I mentioned that those are bi-axis trees that is something kind of I don't know why I put that picture there together with you I just want to talk about this you start seeing this bending of feathers but I don't know if from behind of the room you can see wires. You can see those wires. It's a lot of work that was in Italy done in this tree just to bend down all those original feathers with wire. So we use the wire against the wire of that feather against another feather or the wire against the trunk or the wire against, or loop against one of the wires that you have in your trailings. And we're gonna see that then I'm gonna show you a bunch of different ways how we do that. So that is gonna give you some kind of how you start kind of edging later. These are a more mature planting of tall spindle that we have in Walcott that hopefully in the future if extension want to organize a trip it's an area that we always have trips with growers for educational study that could be great too, in the future. If you want to see something like this in the future. This picture of a kind of traditional gala, tall spindle, very tall you can see the person you have one tier, second tier, and a third tier. These trees are not pruned yet. We are gonna prune this tree by the end of February, but the picture doesn't really show the amount of renewal that we had conducted already in those three years before. Okay so, this is the result of pruning, just by pruning we ended up producing all these kind of highly productive branches. Fruiting, shoot up three or four years old. Okay, this is very important. (laughs) This is very, very important and here I put a bunch of pictures, a kind of promblemic, still this kind of concept. The traditional way to kind of bevel cut or the Dutch cut perhaps is gonna be that one. Okay, but sometimes when you are asking your employees to do the perfect bevel cut or Dutch cut, it's the same issue that I mentioned in the morning. Sometimes they're very afraid to make the wrong cut. And by doing that sometimes they ended up doing a very short cut. Or even removing or without even leaving any stuff. At all. Sometimes not all the time. Most of the times some growers do that sometimes you ended up without any stub there and you start losing the wood. But it's very tricky. So, in some cases this is an extreme situation because gala really shoots like crazy. Okay but in more weight cultivars like Honeycrisp for example, mainly Honeycrisp we're gonna show you I was thinking with sweet tango I was thinking about New York one is now dragon. If you just give to that staff the option to be a little longer I'm not saying they have to be so long like this. Of course you have to choose any bud that is coming underneath. That's the best physics for the fruit weight that is gonna be there. Okay that's the best can be on a limbification that is gonna happen. In that kind of part. But also here it's already coming one or two shoots that are gonna be coming above and perhaps the only thing that I want to stress here is that by giving bigger amount of wood but you're gonna increase your probability to get the response that we want. And later, your crew or yourselves you're gonna remove what you really want to remove. But at least you increase the probability to get the renewal that you need, okay? You can cut that later, you're gonna get the shoot growing there later you can cut but this is an extreme situation. I just want to emphasize that, I'm not saying that all the cuts should be done. With gala, you can go very short and you're gonna get a good response. You have good soil fertility, good light penetration, a good rooster that is gonna, should respond. For the weight cultivar is gonna be more difficult. For this kind of presentation that there's no roosters, there's no troubled management and no precision chemical thinning, nutrition irrigation perhaps one of the important things is the management of the branch management zone. The way how we manage the feathers. Or how another very important topic is the way how we grow the tree and how we support the tree. And another one is the correct pruning zone. That area that is gonna happen in some cases after planting for whatever plant material you got. And you're gonna start moving that as the tree starts growing. As the tree starts growing, you can let the tree grow magically and it's gonna start producing those short shoots that you want. But in some cases you need to do some things just to correct the growth of that shoot. So you sometimes you have to use more correction pruning. So this is a drawing that I have Just to kind of show you if in case you start with a whip. Like in that case, many growers are gonna start with a whip. We prefer to apply Max Cel. And we apply Max Cel after bud break. And we try to delay the application of Max Cel. But we don't recommend you to head the feather. Don't do the heading please because that was a big, big fight in our industry. I just think that in the last two or three years no more growers are doing this step at least in New York. Instead, of heading we ask you to put an application of Max Cel. A late application of Max Cel to start branching hopefully. You need to have some kind of material, green material there to get that kind of response that we want. The other one is just the typical start with a tree, and that tree is gonna grow at the end of the first growing season. Okay I put this picture because I am talking or trying to talk about corrective pruning. And in this case, the response of the angle the crutch angle that I had there that is very important to have a good crotch angle to help early spearing and fruits. It's gonna be highly related to the rooster that you use. So most of the Geneva material. Most of the Geneva material, gela and G-41, G-95 is gonna give you some of those traits. But G-95 is one of my favorites. That is gonna give, it's very obvious how the science developed that kind of it's kind of wide open. Regardless of the cultivar. Even a very narrow scion is gonna be affected by the rooster in that case. This is kind of an ideal tree it had two long feathers in that case this is an old planting. But beautiful trees I cannot say there are no beautiful trees. Those are one of the few orchards that we have in New York that we produce in the way how the trees are produced in Europe is the "knip-baum" technology. Okay we don't produce that kind of tree, nobody's producing or asking to grow those trees with that kind of nursery technology. So we just grow or bud the trees at the end of the Summer. And the following season when that shoot starts growing or we start the shooting if somebody here is a nursery man we start the shooting. We get until around 28, 29, 30 inches above the ground. And that is the moment when we start using Max Cel or pinching the terminal. Just to get the branching that we want, okay? But we don't do pinching anymore. If you have a nursery with 800,000 or 1 million trees today because a good guy just to pinch cannot do more than 7,000 or 8,000 trees per day in a nursery manually. A good guy. So you need to really do chemical branching. And that work, we have done a lot of that work with Max Cel. Max Cel is kind of tricky. You can use Max Cel if you are growing your own nursery tree perhaps you're gonna leave that whip to grow and there have been a whip. But you can pinch, you can do chemical branching with Max Cel or combine, and you have to be kind of careful in the way if you use a Streptomycin also. That is another thing perhaps. We have a lot of information I'm more than happy to share all that. So a cultivar like this, which I blocked here the tag because I don't want to say anything about this cultivar. But it's a cultivar there with a more narrow crotch angle. And if you have a tree like this one, already that is feathered even though it's a nice feather, it's coming to you but it's perhaps a little out of balance, it's telling you that it's a little out of balance need to be removed. Okay so don't hesitate to do that kind of decisions. Because if you walk the post between posts you have 20 trees, you're gonna have two or three trees that require some kind of pruning. Not all the trees but some correction you need to do and you're gonna, by walking those rows you're gonna start seeing get used to what are those feathers that you should start kinda removing. Sometimes you have to remove something that is too crowded. It's just there and it's just knowing the right place because you're gonna bother that feather that is in a better angle. You have to remove that from the get-go. So in the nursery sometimes we produce too much. In the nursery here in the US they are not doing pruning. Pruning of those trees in the nursery, can you imagine? They're not doing that stuff. In other countries in Europe they prune at the nursery level. So what they give you is the perfect tree. But here we have to prune those trees because they're coming with whatever they can produce. So we have to be a little more to work with a little more precision. This is another kind of shot I just got this one when I was working when I knew that I had a little more time. I found this picture. From a planting in Nova Scotia. And I don't know if you can see something like that. It's totally obvious that I need to go out everything below 24 inches I recommend the grower gone. Everything below 24 inches we remove, flush. We don't keep that wood there. Doesn't make any sense. About five, six years ago our recommendation was to leave feathers 20 inches above the ground but we started learning that we have to start removing that later. Because the way that the fruit and the equipment and every side doesn't make a lot of sense. So you have to start leaving 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, today we are leaving feathers starting at 27, 28 inches above the ground but our recommendation is around 24, 25. So all of that should be removed. Don't leave that step because that is taking energy also from the tree from the main lead that you want to grow. You have to single your leader, you have to remove the stuff, those are start there but you need just to grow the short shoots. Okay here I'm going to make a little bit. This is another direction, okay? We are not even close with our orchards to this kind of technology. But I just want to mention this. Because it's very important that you pay attention to why we are talking today about this. With a Fuji culture, that is going to be the best example. If you try to grow a Fuji in one single stem. And you put Fuji in a very big root stock. And on top of that you plant a Fuji with a rigorous root stock in a very highly soiled fertility, and you start doing a lot of soil fertility, what is gonna happen? It's gonna fire up, it's gonna grow a lot you know? Because Fuji tends to grow very vigorously. The same with Macoun. Macoun and Fuji they tend to grow that, as soon as you diffuse the bigger with two stems by-axis, or be-bound as it's called in Italy, you're gonna (blows) let the tree to be a little more mellow. And that is the way how you can control bigger with more highly bigger cultivars. It's as soon as you start producing that those short shoots, you start producing almost a more instant wall. Fruiting wall, okay? Our more short shoots, more imbalanced, not so out of balance when you are trying to grow a very bigger cultivar like any McIntosh in general. Any McIntosh here, we put McIntosh are different. Difficult for us, for us have been very difficult to grow. Macintosh in a tall spindle system. Because this kind of system were grown in Europe. They can have any McIntosh growing there and we are the guys that have been dealing with that kind of situation. So that here is a three-stem or a four-stem situation or two-stem situation where what you can really see is just very fine fruiting wood. And that is what we want. Okay, we can do it with one single stem like I have been saying all day today just through pruning. Okay, we can do that. But with two-stem or three-stem or four-stem it's more natural. So again I come back to the single-stem situation just to kind of explain this the way how the tree grows imagine if you didn't bend the feathers by the end of the first year or by the end of the third year you're gonna start seeing this tree that oh my God I cannot control the growth. And you start getting you know, worried. You say oh my God what should I do? It's too close, and all the feathers are growing and gala is going, going, going and they're growing. Okay in some moment, because they have been spearing, they're gonna start producing apples. And by the weight of those apples, hopefully I don't know your soil fertility here, okay and the bigger those apples start to settle down. It's a bunch of things, crop load management also. Sometimes cultivars cannot be cropped right away. Or some trees we had to crop early on. It's based on the way we manage different cultivars. But at the end, the typical tree that we shoot and draft should be something like this if we have already fruit on the trees and we start doing the renewal. In this situation we have been already doing renewal pruning. This is another interpretation. We just recommend the bending down of the feathers at least in New York just in the lower tier for the initial feathers for Fuji, especially for Fuji, but in Italy they continue doing the bending down of those feathers in the second, even in the third tier of the tree. They have even more bigger in some situations, in some blocks. So this is another drawing that I want to share with you. So this is a block, a typical block, a typical, mature block that went through very aggressive pruning. We had to make that decision in some moments was overdue, it's a bunch of stubbing backs, sorry a bunch of stubs that are there to be able to come out with that kind of canopy. That you can see there. It's the result of a lot of pruning. And here we haven't pruned yet but it's the result this is a mature tree, a mature Gela with a lot of spurs that we are going kind of remove the main, expensive side wood that we had there in those trees. Sometimes like I will mention in the morning sometimes we have so much wood that we have to start the process and we have to remove you know more than two or three long branches in some cases we had to sacrifice the tree that is too small. We shouldn't be doing perhaps that too early. That kind of pruning but in some moments we had to balance the tree. And we cannot let the tree to go too much with those long feathers or too thick. So we have to start doing the pruning sometimes we start doing this kind of pruning in Honeycrisp even though are producing feathers because we want short feathers. Sometimes we have long, long, long, long branches that need to be pruned from the base. Not just start doing things or shedding back or doing things, need to be removed to be able to start producing more jam wood in that tree. Or even in this case, this is a ginger gall, that we have been manipulating the feathers. In some cases like there we start already pruning to columnarize those feathers. That is another concept that we use for tall spindle that we start removing all those shoots. That are above those kind of feathers. Okay so here it's just to enforce this concept of a tree like Macoun where I bend down the feathers and that winter I am counting the spurs. So for each spurs I am putting a tennis ball. But here, in this Macoun tree I didn't bend feathers. And after I count the spurs those are the apple potential apple that I have there. So what I am trying to say that we are able to increase the potential, fruiting potential of any cultivar by doing these kind of techniques. And on top of that we have to start removing renewing the wood too early. We shouldn't be doing this in three or four, with that kind of, never we should be with that kind of wood too early. So here I put something I had a little more time. 3:45 okay so here I have some time because I thought it was at 2:15 but I was able to put this together. We are moving I want to share this with you we are moving from a kind of three-dimensional tree to a two-dimensional canopy. So it's less depth. We are doing that through mechanical edging in this orchard that are transitioning fruiting walls by edging them, by forming this box this box in the dormant. During the dormant pruning season. So we go there, assuming that we had been able to renew the wood that shouldn't be there. We kind surgery and we remove the wood before doing mechanical pruning. We set the box and later from that box in the during the growing season we had the shoots growing from that structure from that permanent kind of permanent structure. And we run again, the edger. So here I have a tree a gala tree just to show you the dormant cut that is there. From the main trunk. And I want to show you the length of that shaft we made the decision to run the edger around 18, 20 inches from the trunk in a case of a super spindle we are doing this situation at 12 inches from the trunk. But this is a tall spindle so we decided to do it between 18 to 20 from the trunk. Here what I am trying to show you is that is the dormant cut. That with the shoot that was growing during the season, that shoot was growing during the season, and was cut upside from the main cut during the Summer four to six inches. With the Summer cut so we have in this case those branches that are good branches they are not too thick, 18 to 20 inches we let those shoot to grow, to develop, and in some moment in the Summer that we should see when we can do that here in Wisconsin but a least for us it's at the end of July and early August, we'll run with the edger and we do the Summer cut four to six inches and we start seeing this kind of situation. So by doing that you have a dormant cut, you have Summer cut, a Summer cut but behind, many times you're not gonna have a regrowth. You're not gonna get that regrowth. What is gonna happen many times, you're gonna get a floral bud that is gonna stay there and is gonna be induced. That is the Summer cut there, that's the floral bud there that's already there. So I ensure that by doing that cut in the Summer, I am able to induce, or start producing little kind of productive units in that wall that is gonna start be filled in the future. So again I had a dormant cut, I had a Summer cut, a Summer cut but behind is the floral bud that has stayed there. Okay that is not gonna be a shoot, that is gonna be a floral but sometimes we get behind those cuts a shoot. You're gonna be a shoot a long shoot but we want a floral bud and that happened most of the time. Again in that picture, another situation with a kind of more sure shoot in the Summer and with the floral bud. So that is a picture what you can see during the Summer. Another super spindle situation this is at 12 inches from the main trunk where we did the dormant cut and in the interior of the canopy in the dormant pruning system, we are doing a dormant hand-pruning cut just to start working with the wood. So those are cuts that we don't do with the edger. We go out there with people to make those kind of cuts. Okay don't this is another, another situation this is a more tight, narrow canopy. This kind of tree that I am showing you now are not,don't be confused here. This is a canopy of 12 inches. 12 inches from the trunk where we are doing the dormant cut. Here I cannot show you yet what is gonna happen but in the interior, of that canopy we are also doing manual pruning. And it's for extinction also. To try to control the crop load that we want with those trees. Again the dormant cut at 12 inches and there I just want to show a dormant hand-pruning cut. We can be this kind of very dirty, pruning. We call this short pruning in a super spindle when these trees are 2 by 11. This is short pruning, don't be confused with long pruning that the kind of pruning that we apply to a tall spindle tree with more longer fruiting branches. Okay two totally different things. And the same thing with the spear extinction there. Renewal cut and a dormant cut in a spindle tree. Why we do this? The only reason that we are doing this stuff is because we are moving the orchard to full mechanization now. So we want to run the machines very close, very close to those canopies. This is Honeycrisp to be able to have the light that we want inside of that canopy and be very efficient. And to have those bins next to the workers. So if we talk about mistakes, perhaps those are the mindset mistakes. Okay perhaps, I don't know if those are valid or not in the Wisconsin fruit industry still. I seen some these were the mistakes that when I came here there in New York and they were saying Mario this idea is too crazy. It's too much wire, it's too much work, it doesn't make any sense. This is not for me, they were saying. Okay, it's, you don't want to try what I told you in the morning let your grandchildren try. But the agriculture management mistakes are gonna be several of these ones. And I don't know if I'm gonna have more time. Little or no advanced planning before planting the spindle orchard. That is a mistake. Inadequate soil and poor drainage preparation, late planting, growing your own nursery trees without much care, producing a whip, planting whips and heading them, planting the tree with a few and long feathers, planting trees with many but long feathers, planting a spindle orchard with short posts. We can talk about training and addressing that concept. Installing the tree support system too late and getting minimum leader growth, planting a high-density orchard without irrigation, deer fencing, little amount of time invested and none effort to manage feathers of a young and vigorous apple tree. So those are kind of from my point of view one of the most important there are many, many more little details. So let me, I can continue but I want to at some moment stop because one kind of the decision made now on the method that you're gonna use are gonna influence the success of your orchard okay? And what we are learning is that engineer of the tree and of the training system. And the trellis support. So it's so important that you really list these critical steps had to be very clear. Or you need to be exposed to those critical steps way in advance because it's too much money that is gonna be invested in this new planting. Okay this is what I was telling somebody in the morning to Honeycrisp, why maximum leader growth is so critical in a modern apple system? You know Honeycrisp is a weak growing cultivar. So for us, it kind of challenges to get to the top of that wire very soon. And it's a lot easier with gala or Fuji or with McIntosh to do it by the end of the third season. So you really with this kind of weak growing cultivars growers need to intensively manage the trees. So you have to babysit the trees. Intensively manage the trees. The first three years to achieve the desired growth. You have to do it. You have to spend and be on top of what you are trying to achieve. So I have this figure just for some of the Cornell root stalks and this is important try to pay attention because I know many of you perhaps have been working for a long time already with the M.9 clones. If you analyze the main clones, the M.9 clones M.9 you're gonna have a low vigor that is gonna be the 337. You're gonna have another one that is gonna be a little more poochy and is gonna be the Nic 29 and you're gonna have the Pajam 2 that is gonna get you more bigger. After that you're gonna have the M.26. Just if you start working with G.11, G.41, and G.94 G.11 is gonna be in the low vigor. Okay, G.11 is a little depending on the situation of the soil fertility, but it's gonna give you a little less push than G.41. And G.41 in some situations is gonna work for Honeycrisp. But for Honeycrisp, a more weight cultivar we definitely are gonna recommend G.95. G.95 is gonna give you the push of M.26, it's gonna give you the push of G.30 like years ago like many growers still love G.30. Many growers. Even though it's brittle, it's this and that, and still the Geneva is serious. It has a bunch of problems in the nursery still but we are still trying to figure out how we're gonna grow these trees in the nursery. Okay we are doing a bunch and here I want to disclose we know that exactly what is happening with the Geneva but you cannot compare the Geneva with the M.9's. It's like trying to compare apples with oranges, okay? Not what worked for an M.9 in a nursery is gonna work for what we do with a Geneva in the nursery. So we are adopting different technology even the grafting technology that we are using and all the trials that we are doing perhaps are gonna be changed in the future. You have to stake all the Geneva material. All those trees in the nursery have to be staked. All those trees. Okay that is mandatory. If you are not staking and you are growing your own nursery trees and you think that you don't have to stake those trees are brittle. They can break. Okay and we are seeing that so that is an important thing to say. But 95 is a monster. It's gonna give you a huge production and we are finding today that in order of our Genevas coming in the future not still available is 890. 890 is working very well in our trials in Washington and in New York also. So we are gonna have more things. 355? Okay, so, one important thing is that we can select the leader. When we're growing the tree. And for many years we have been saying hey remove the buds. Remove bud number two, three and four below the main leader when it's growing. But to be honest with you when I came here, it's not real data telling me that by doing that you're gonna get two or three or four more inches of growth compared with untreated. Okay so as soon as you do it, so as soon as you do it, the better. Whatever the labor that you have. But as soon as you can cut that with clippers it's also good. Most of the growers if they cannot remove the buds, you can do that stuff by clipping those shoots and selecting the main leader by selecting the main leader and pushing that leader to grow and fill the space. But the other important thing is that leader that shoot had to be well-supported. If that shoot is not well-supported, you're losing, you're losing. Okay you're not gonna get the 18, 19, or 24 inches or in some cases 30 inches of shoot growth that we should get per season. I don't know how much your shoots grow here in this area but you start, you can you should get that stuff. The other one is irrigation, okay? Many growers they don't irrigate. And it's very, very important. The tall spindle planting, planting is gonna need at least 500 gallons of water for irrigation per day per acre. Okay and later when they get to maturity they're gonna use more or less between 4 to 5,000 gallons per day per acre. So you have to irrigate. You have to babysit those roots are very shallow, okay? I don't know your precipitation here but if you see the weather pattern for the last ten years, every of those ten years two or three years are dry Summers. I don't know how was your Summer in 2011, I don't know how was your Summer in 2012, but those were very dry Summers, okay? And you are establishing a very highly demanding cultivar you need to put the irrigation, okay? So that is very important to have irrigation available there. So you have to babysit your trees all growing season right away. So important those trees taking care of them as much as you can. You have to apply calcium, calcium nitrate. We recommend one quarter per pound around the tree and about three or four weeks after we apply again and we start seeing by magic that it was just a whip. But the tree start to respond and start producing those shoots. Another one is the wire, the support, the one-wire or two-wire or three-wire but you have to support that tree all the way. So we have the four-wire, we have the five wires the three wires plus the stabilizer that could be bamboo a piece of bamboo I kind of we have been doing a lot with the wire stabilizer but it's a lot better to do it perhaps with a piece of bamboo, this is still very popular one wire with a conduct you can grow a nice tree anyway. But this is I think so the key. If you put those wires, don't let those wires be no more than 25 or 28 inches between space. Because every time that you ask that shoot that is trying to grow to go beyond that distance you're not gonna be able to reach that wire. That growing season and you're not gonna be able to support that tree where it should be. So don't do it more than 25 inches, 25, 25, 25, 25. And as the tree starts growing vertically, de fruit that section. The last section. Just de fruit in those weak trees, especially in a weak tree like Honeycrisp. De fruit that section. Make sure that you don't expose that tree to have any additional weight. Okay de fruit that tree until it's able to get to the next wire. Support that tree there until it starts to lignify. And produce wood. But don't ask, never ask to that shoot to crop. That is the biggest mistake, you're gonna break that shoot there. You need to at least give the opportunity. This grower that put four wires okay and he figured out oh my God this is Honeycrisp. He went a bunch of growers from Wayne county went to China and got this stuff they brought this fiberglass stakes and they put in those ones just to support with that machine that they showed you in the morning. There's a machine that is above the two rows. Just to put those fiberglass just to support the terminal because those trees were moving back and forth and you get the growth. Okay so, branch management. I think so you need to invest the necessary time and especially for Fuji. Especially with Macoun you have to use the wire you have to use the Avis-strip that I know you have that one here. So you can use the wire, you can use the Avis-strip, the Avis-strip is very nice you can do whatever you want to do with that. Move it one direction and another one. You can attach to the main trunk and start bending down all those feathers initially with that angle below the result. That is the key, it's a very ugly angle below the result. Okay you start using rubber bands that is another thing it's more difficult especially if we have the lip but you can start this rubber band six-month-life with 880. And we start doing and we ended up with a very ugly tree, okay? But definitely are below our result. That is why we want with the rubber band. Okay don't do that don't get the feather just look around with the wire against the trunk. Whatever you want to do don't do other stuff just turn it around and you're gonna end up with that kind of feather. So final thoughts to avoid unnecessary mistake. I seriously say everything with higher density planting, the impact of a mistake on your part or the lack of not doing the important thing is higher than with lower planting density. Okay that is saying a lot. And everything had to be done early, early. Good support is critical. Early, good irrigation, and a bunch of things. It's a lot of reading there I don't wanna really-- I wanna have time for questions. Fencing I think I mentioned something in the morning. It's very important we can really justify a job by the amount of planting that we have there with the losses that we had 25% more by deer fencing. We really can justify the deer fence in our industry with more than kind of 600 acres planted in 2013 and 14. We were able to justify 70 miles of deer fence. So we are really convinced that the deer fence is a very important thing that had to be included in the budget from the beginning. And with that I am done. Okay thank you so much. (applause) view all
 


Mario Miranda Sazo, Extension Associate at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Lake Ontario Fruit Program, explains the tall spindle system for planting apple trees. Sazo discusses how to set up the supports for the young trees and the correct way to prune.
subtitle:

- We have Mario Miranda Sazo. Again, he's the fruit extension specialist at Cornell Cooperative Extension in the Lake Ontario Fruit Program. And he's talking about how to avoid mistakes when establishing and training a tall spindle orchard. - Okay, so I'm going to... I see, so... Kinda' few guys were not able to hear me very well. So I'm gonna, make a major step just by doing this, it's a big difference. Okay, so hopefully... Do we have more people coming? I don't know, If somebody could sit down that could be great. I just want to give an intro about this just to kind of show you a typical nursery tree. It's a typical nursery tree it's a beautiful nursery tree that perhaps only thing that we're gonna remove pruning that we call corrective pruning is gonna be that feather that is there. That feather shouldn't be there. Because the crutch angle is too narrow. And sometimes it's difficult to make that decision because you are buying a tree and sometimes you want to keep everything but sometimes you can help the tree to grow better by just doing some very smart kind of cut after pruning. After planting. So in this case perhaps the only tree, the only feather that I'm gonna remove is that one. Those are long, long feathers. Okay? Like those feathers that we had five, six years ago. Today we are looking for short feathers. No more than 16 to 18 inches. Okay, very well detailed with a very wide crotch angle hopefully more than 60 degrees. Sign rooster, you're gonna start seeing some of the rooster are gonna start seeing you or giving you more opening with those feathers and because those feathers are more well-open those one are gonna be induced early on. And it's gonna be a more natural cropping. So in your list we're having like I say in the morning we're having planting at different density, we have been using whips and with them we know how to grow those whips we can really fill this page very quickly. So that's kind of my method. Most of the time we have been pushing a lot a lot just to start with highly-feathered trees but sometimes you can do a good job with also with whips. And we're gonna see the case how we do it with whips. Here is a grower that perhaps doesn't use irrigation. This is a grower who grows his own nursery tree. He growing 60, 70, 80,000 trees for a tall spindle system. Very successful planting. Again another shot of this this is a very high planting density two by eleven with two wires and a wire stabilizer that we call, that is gonna be supporting those trees. But this is a mistake. I think so. (laughs) Sometimes, this is a big mistake. You can try to avoid this situation. The guy that did this is an extreme picture that sometimes I want to put this kind of situation because in our industry don't forget 40% of our industry in Wayne county is still 40% processing blocks, okay? Because we have MOTS they are in Wayne county in Williamson next to Lake Ontario. So those growers are still growing kind of big trees and we are still kind of moving to a more modern semi-process, semi-high density planting. But still we are seeing this situation. So it's very kind of still confusing for those kind of growers who are kind of transitioning to semi or high density plantings to see or they are so used to kill the wood permanent wood and we are just trying to renew that wood and make those trees more productive. So it kinda helps picture just to say I want to put this picture, it's a sol axe system. This system is a very complicated, very beautiful perhaps the more kind of amazing way to grow an apple tree and make a system very efficient. Able to produce, originated from France by Lespinasse, and it's a lot of philosophy behind this system but we use today many of the concepts that are here, Lespinasse is also the person who developed the diverticulaxe. And today I have there that's a typical solaxe where you keep the long, long fingers and you do a lot of the spur extinction. So everything that you see at the base will remove through the years all those feathers that you need to leave there were removed so they need the first long finger or long branch with several fingers is gonna start the meter, and very long and you have different fruiting unit it's called centrifugal pruning, you have expert extinction you have a tree that is gonna be something like that hanging over and we use many of these concepts. We really manage crop log branch by branch. So we have rulered that we use in Europe there is a green ruler that I saw there in the trade show that we use branch by branch just to regulate the crop log that we need in each of those branches, okay? For a planting system like tall spindle we just measure the trunk above the ground one time. Just to measure the crop log. So we have that kind of system but this is another you know way to do it, you know? It's a two-dimensional way to grow an apple tree. Just the height and just the length. And we manipulate everything with seven wires in the case of five-wire, six-wire, or seven-wire. And if we start moving the angle we are gonna start seeing the kind of v-trellis that there's another level of precision that is the cool way of how things are moving in Washington. Just to see like it's the same idea like you manipulate everything to the perfection like in this picture like I showed you in the morning. This is Honeycrisp. Okay, but tall spindle that is the concept that we have been introducing in the last perhaps 10, 12 years. It's a combination of the slender spindle that you need to leave the ground in Holland and in Belgium. Okay? What's that shorter tree, to start keeping some permanent wood at the lower tier. And they start doing some kind of renewal in the upper section of those trees. And at the same time, if the combination the tall spindle combination of the slender spindle with the super spindle who that was developed in Germany. So you start seeing these kind of systems and you start seeing diverticulaxe and you start seeing solaxe, and from all these systems like amalgam-H and the we call that is the result of what we are seeing today for that kind of more simple tall spindle. The tall spindle is a tree, dimensional tree, where you have height, you have depth, and you have the length. Also manipulated like in a two-dimensional system like I showed you before. That was a two-dimensional planner. Oh with an angle that you start moving that vertical element, or vertical trunk whatever direction you want. One of the important things it is that I mentioned that those are bi-axis trees that is something kind of I don't know why I put that picture there together with you I just want to talk about this you start seeing this bending of feathers but I don't know if from behind of the room you can see wires. You can see those wires. It's a lot of work that was in Italy done in this tree just to bend down all those original feathers with wire. So we use the wire against the wire of that feather against another feather or the wire against the trunk or the wire against, or loop against one of the wires that you have in your trailings. And we're gonna see that then I'm gonna show you a bunch of different ways how we do that. So that is gonna give you some kind of how you start kind of edging later. These are a more mature planting of tall spindle that we have in Walcott that hopefully in the future if extension want to organize a trip it's an area that we always have trips with growers for educational study that could be great too, in the future. If you want to see something like this in the future. This picture of a kind of traditional gala, tall spindle, very tall you can see the person you have one tier, second tier, and a third tier. These trees are not pruned yet. We are gonna prune this tree by the end of February, but the picture doesn't really show the amount of renewal that we had conducted already in those three years before. Okay so, this is the result of pruning, just by pruning we ended up producing all these kind of highly productive branches. Fruiting, shoot up three or four years old. Okay, this is very important. (laughs) This is very, very important and here I put a bunch of pictures, a kind of promblemic, still this kind of concept. The traditional way to kind of bevel cut or the Dutch cut perhaps is gonna be that one. Okay, but sometimes when you are asking your employees to do the perfect bevel cut or Dutch cut, it's the same issue that I mentioned in the morning. Sometimes they're very afraid to make the wrong cut. And by doing that sometimes they ended up doing a very short cut. Or even removing or without even leaving any stuff. At all. Sometimes not all the time. Most of the times some growers do that sometimes you ended up without any stub there and you start losing the wood. But it's very tricky. So, in some cases this is an extreme situation because gala really shoots like crazy. Okay but in more weight cultivars like Honeycrisp for example, mainly Honeycrisp we're gonna show you I was thinking with sweet tango I was thinking about New York one is now dragon. If you just give to that staff the option to be a little longer I'm not saying they have to be so long like this. Of course you have to choose any bud that is coming underneath. That's the best physics for the fruit weight that is gonna be there. Okay that's the best can be on a limbification that is gonna happen. In that kind of part. But also here it's already coming one or two shoots that are gonna be coming above and perhaps the only thing that I want to stress here is that by giving bigger amount of wood but you're gonna increase your probability to get the response that we want. And later, your crew or yourselves you're gonna remove what you really want to remove. But at least you increase the probability to get the renewal that you need, okay? You can cut that later, you're gonna get the shoot growing there later you can cut but this is an extreme situation. I just want to emphasize that, I'm not saying that all the cuts should be done. With gala, you can go very short and you're gonna get a good response. You have good soil fertility, good light penetration, a good rooster that is gonna, should respond. For the weight cultivar is gonna be more difficult. For this kind of presentation that there's no roosters, there's no troubled management and no precision chemical thinning, nutrition irrigation perhaps one of the important things is the management of the branch management zone. The way how we manage the feathers. Or how another very important topic is the way how we grow the tree and how we support the tree. And another one is the correct pruning zone. That area that is gonna happen in some cases after planting for whatever plant material you got. And you're gonna start moving that as the tree starts growing. As the tree starts growing, you can let the tree grow magically and it's gonna start producing those short shoots that you want. But in some cases you need to do some things just to correct the growth of that shoot. So you sometimes you have to use more correction pruning. So this is a drawing that I have Just to kind of show you if in case you start with a whip. Like in that case, many growers are gonna start with a whip. We prefer to apply Max Cel. And we apply Max Cel after bud break. And we try to delay the application of Max Cel. But we don't recommend you to head the feather. Don't do the heading please because that was a big, big fight in our industry. I just think that in the last two or three years no more growers are doing this step at least in New York. Instead, of heading we ask you to put an application of Max Cel. A late application of Max Cel to start branching hopefully. You need to have some kind of material, green material there to get that kind of response that we want. The other one is just the typical start with a tree, and that tree is gonna grow at the end of the first growing season. Okay I put this picture because I am talking or trying to talk about corrective pruning. And in this case, the response of the angle the crutch angle that I had there that is very important to have a good crotch angle to help early spearing and fruits. It's gonna be highly related to the rooster that you use. So most of the Geneva material. Most of the Geneva material, gela and G-41, G-95 is gonna give you some of those traits. But G-95 is one of my favorites. That is gonna give, it's very obvious how the science developed that kind of it's kind of wide open. Regardless of the cultivar. Even a very narrow scion is gonna be affected by the rooster in that case. This is kind of an ideal tree it had two long feathers in that case this is an old planting. But beautiful trees I cannot say there are no beautiful trees. Those are one of the few orchards that we have in New York that we produce in the way how the trees are produced in Europe is the "knip-baum" technology. Okay we don't produce that kind of tree, nobody's producing or asking to grow those trees with that kind of nursery technology. So we just grow or bud the trees at the end of the Summer. And the following season when that shoot starts growing or we start the shooting if somebody here is a nursery man we start the shooting. We get until around 28, 29, 30 inches above the ground. And that is the moment when we start using Max Cel or pinching the terminal. Just to get the branching that we want, okay? But we don't do pinching anymore. If you have a nursery with 800,000 or 1 million trees today because a good guy just to pinch cannot do more than 7,000 or 8,000 trees per day in a nursery manually. A good guy. So you need to really do chemical branching. And that work, we have done a lot of that work with Max Cel. Max Cel is kind of tricky. You can use Max Cel if you are growing your own nursery tree perhaps you're gonna leave that whip to grow and there have been a whip. But you can pinch, you can do chemical branching with Max Cel or combine, and you have to be kind of careful in the way if you use a Streptomycin also. That is another thing perhaps. We have a lot of information I'm more than happy to share all that. So a cultivar like this, which I blocked here the tag because I don't want to say anything about this cultivar. But it's a cultivar there with a more narrow crotch angle. And if you have a tree like this one, already that is feathered even though it's a nice feather, it's coming to you but it's perhaps a little out of balance, it's telling you that it's a little out of balance need to be removed. Okay so don't hesitate to do that kind of decisions. Because if you walk the post between posts you have 20 trees, you're gonna have two or three trees that require some kind of pruning. Not all the trees but some correction you need to do and you're gonna, by walking those rows you're gonna start seeing get used to what are those feathers that you should start kinda removing. Sometimes you have to remove something that is too crowded. It's just there and it's just knowing the right place because you're gonna bother that feather that is in a better angle. You have to remove that from the get-go. So in the nursery sometimes we produce too much. In the nursery here in the US they are not doing pruning. Pruning of those trees in the nursery, can you imagine? They're not doing that stuff. In other countries in Europe they prune at the nursery level. So what they give you is the perfect tree. But here we have to prune those trees because they're coming with whatever they can produce. So we have to be a little more to work with a little more precision. This is another kind of shot I just got this one when I was working when I knew that I had a little more time. I found this picture. From a planting in Nova Scotia. And I don't know if you can see something like that. It's totally obvious that I need to go out everything below 24 inches I recommend the grower gone. Everything below 24 inches we remove, flush. We don't keep that wood there. Doesn't make any sense. About five, six years ago our recommendation was to leave feathers 20 inches above the ground but we started learning that we have to start removing that later. Because the way that the fruit and the equipment and every side doesn't make a lot of sense. So you have to start leaving 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, today we are leaving feathers starting at 27, 28 inches above the ground but our recommendation is around 24, 25. So all of that should be removed. Don't leave that step because that is taking energy also from the tree from the main lead that you want to grow. You have to single your leader, you have to remove the stuff, those are start there but you need just to grow the short shoots. Okay here I'm going to make a little bit. This is another direction, okay? We are not even close with our orchards to this kind of technology. But I just want to mention this. Because it's very important that you pay attention to why we are talking today about this. With a Fuji culture, that is going to be the best example. If you try to grow a Fuji in one single stem. And you put Fuji in a very big root stock. And on top of that you plant a Fuji with a rigorous root stock in a very highly soiled fertility, and you start doing a lot of soil fertility, what is gonna happen? It's gonna fire up, it's gonna grow a lot you know? Because Fuji tends to grow very vigorously. The same with Macoun. Macoun and Fuji they tend to grow that, as soon as you diffuse the bigger with two stems by-axis, or be-bound as it's called in Italy, you're gonna (blows) let the tree to be a little more mellow. And that is the way how you can control bigger with more highly bigger cultivars. It's as soon as you start producing that those short shoots, you start producing almost a more instant wall. Fruiting wall, okay? Our more short shoots, more imbalanced, not so out of balance when you are trying to grow a very bigger cultivar like any McIntosh in general. Any McIntosh here, we put McIntosh are different. Difficult for us, for us have been very difficult to grow. Macintosh in a tall spindle system. Because this kind of system were grown in Europe. They can have any McIntosh growing there and we are the guys that have been dealing with that kind of situation. So that here is a three-stem or a four-stem situation or two-stem situation where what you can really see is just very fine fruiting wood. And that is what we want. Okay, we can do it with one single stem like I have been saying all day today just through pruning. Okay, we can do that. But with two-stem or three-stem or four-stem it's more natural. So again I come back to the single-stem situation just to kind of explain this the way how the tree grows imagine if you didn't bend the feathers by the end of the first year or by the end of the third year you're gonna start seeing this tree that oh my God I cannot control the growth. And you start getting you know, worried. You say oh my God what should I do? It's too close, and all the feathers are growing and gala is going, going, going and they're growing. Okay in some moment, because they have been spearing, they're gonna start producing apples. And by the weight of those apples, hopefully I don't know your soil fertility here, okay and the bigger those apples start to settle down. It's a bunch of things, crop load management also. Sometimes cultivars cannot be cropped right away. Or some trees we had to crop early on. It's based on the way we manage different cultivars. But at the end, the typical tree that we shoot and draft should be something like this if we have already fruit on the trees and we start doing the renewal. In this situation we have been already doing renewal pruning. This is another interpretation. We just recommend the bending down of the feathers at least in New York just in the lower tier for the initial feathers for Fuji, especially for Fuji, but in Italy they continue doing the bending down of those feathers in the second, even in the third tier of the tree. They have even more bigger in some situations, in some blocks. So this is another drawing that I want to share with you. So this is a block, a typical block, a typical, mature block that went through very aggressive pruning. We had to make that decision in some moments was overdue, it's a bunch of stubbing backs, sorry a bunch of stubs that are there to be able to come out with that kind of canopy. That you can see there. It's the result of a lot of pruning. And here we haven't pruned yet but it's the result this is a mature tree, a mature Gela with a lot of spurs that we are going kind of remove the main, expensive side wood that we had there in those trees. Sometimes like I will mention in the morning sometimes we have so much wood that we have to start the process and we have to remove you know more than two or three long branches in some cases we had to sacrifice the tree that is too small. We shouldn't be doing perhaps that too early. That kind of pruning but in some moments we had to balance the tree. And we cannot let the tree to go too much with those long feathers or too thick. So we have to start doing the pruning sometimes we start doing this kind of pruning in Honeycrisp even though are producing feathers because we want short feathers. Sometimes we have long, long, long, long branches that need to be pruned from the base. Not just start doing things or shedding back or doing things, need to be removed to be able to start producing more jam wood in that tree. Or even in this case, this is a ginger gall, that we have been manipulating the feathers. In some cases like there we start already pruning to columnarize those feathers. That is another concept that we use for tall spindle that we start removing all those shoots. That are above those kind of feathers. Okay so here it's just to enforce this concept of a tree like Macoun where I bend down the feathers and that winter I am counting the spurs. So for each spurs I am putting a tennis ball. But here, in this Macoun tree I didn't bend feathers. And after I count the spurs those are the apple potential apple that I have there. So what I am trying to say that we are able to increase the potential, fruiting potential of any cultivar by doing these kind of techniques. And on top of that we have to start removing renewing the wood too early. We shouldn't be doing this in three or four, with that kind of, never we should be with that kind of wood too early. So here I put something I had a little more time. 3:45 okay so here I have some time because I thought it was at 2:15 but I was able to put this together. We are moving I want to share this with you we are moving from a kind of three-dimensional tree to a two-dimensional canopy. So it's less depth. We are doing that through mechanical edging in this orchard that are transitioning fruiting walls by edging them, by forming this box this box in the dormant. During the dormant pruning season. So we go there, assuming that we had been able to renew the wood that shouldn't be there. We kind surgery and we remove the wood before doing mechanical pruning. We set the box and later from that box in the during the growing season we had the shoots growing from that structure from that permanent kind of permanent structure. And we run again, the edger. So here I have a tree a gala tree just to show you the dormant cut that is there. From the main trunk. And I want to show you the length of that shaft we made the decision to run the edger around 18, 20 inches from the trunk in a case of a super spindle we are doing this situation at 12 inches from the trunk. But this is a tall spindle so we decided to do it between 18 to 20 from the trunk. Here what I am trying to show you is that is the dormant cut. That with the shoot that was growing during the season, that shoot was growing during the season, and was cut upside from the main cut during the Summer four to six inches. With the Summer cut so we have in this case those branches that are good branches they are not too thick, 18 to 20 inches we let those shoot to grow, to develop, and in some moment in the Summer that we should see when we can do that here in Wisconsin but a least for us it's at the end of July and early August, we'll run with the edger and we do the Summer cut four to six inches and we start seeing this kind of situation. So by doing that you have a dormant cut, you have Summer cut, a Summer cut but behind, many times you're not gonna have a regrowth. You're not gonna get that regrowth. What is gonna happen many times, you're gonna get a floral bud that is gonna stay there and is gonna be induced. That is the Summer cut there, that's the floral bud there that's already there. So I ensure that by doing that cut in the Summer, I am able to induce, or start producing little kind of productive units in that wall that is gonna start be filled in the future. So again I had a dormant cut, I had a Summer cut, a Summer cut but behind is the floral bud that has stayed there. Okay that is not gonna be a shoot, that is gonna be a floral but sometimes we get behind those cuts a shoot. You're gonna be a shoot a long shoot but we want a floral bud and that happened most of the time. Again in that picture, another situation with a kind of more sure shoot in the Summer and with the floral bud. So that is a picture what you can see during the Summer. Another super spindle situation this is at 12 inches from the main trunk where we did the dormant cut and in the interior of the canopy in the dormant pruning system, we are doing a dormant hand-pruning cut just to start working with the wood. So those are cuts that we don't do with the edger. We go out there with people to make those kind of cuts. Okay don't this is another, another situation this is a more tight, narrow canopy. This kind of tree that I am showing you now are not,don't be confused here. This is a canopy of 12 inches. 12 inches from the trunk where we are doing the dormant cut. Here I cannot show you yet what is gonna happen but in the interior, of that canopy we are also doing manual pruning. And it's for extinction also. To try to control the crop load that we want with those trees. Again the dormant cut at 12 inches and there I just want to show a dormant hand-pruning cut. We can be this kind of very dirty, pruning. We call this short pruning in a super spindle when these trees are 2 by 11. This is short pruning, don't be confused with long pruning that the kind of pruning that we apply to a tall spindle tree with more longer fruiting branches. Okay two totally different things. And the same thing with the spear extinction there. Renewal cut and a dormant cut in a spindle tree. Why we do this? The only reason that we are doing this stuff is because we are moving the orchard to full mechanization now. So we want to run the machines very close, very close to those canopies. This is Honeycrisp to be able to have the light that we want inside of that canopy and be very efficient. And to have those bins next to the workers. So if we talk about mistakes, perhaps those are the mindset mistakes. Okay perhaps, I don't know if those are valid or not in the Wisconsin fruit industry still. I seen some these were the mistakes that when I came here there in New York and they were saying Mario this idea is too crazy. It's too much wire, it's too much work, it doesn't make any sense. This is not for me, they were saying. Okay, it's, you don't want to try what I told you in the morning let your grandchildren try. But the agriculture management mistakes are gonna be several of these ones. And I don't know if I'm gonna have more time. Little or no advanced planning before planting the spindle orchard. That is a mistake. Inadequate soil and poor drainage preparation, late planting, growing your own nursery trees without much care, producing a whip, planting whips and heading them, planting the tree with a few and long feathers, planting trees with many but long feathers, planting a spindle orchard with short posts. We can talk about training and addressing that concept. Installing the tree support system too late and getting minimum leader growth, planting a high-density orchard without irrigation, deer fencing, little amount of time invested and none effort to manage feathers of a young and vigorous apple tree. So those are kind of from my point of view one of the most important there are many, many more little details. So let me, I can continue but I want to at some moment stop because one kind of the decision made now on the method that you're gonna use are gonna influence the success of your orchard okay? And what we are learning is that engineer of the tree and of the training system. And the trellis support. So it's so important that you really list these critical steps had to be very clear. Or you need to be exposed to those critical steps way in advance because it's too much money that is gonna be invested in this new planting. Okay this is what I was telling somebody in the morning to Honeycrisp, why maximum leader growth is so critical in a modern apple system? You know Honeycrisp is a weak growing cultivar. So for us, it kind of challenges to get to the top of that wire very soon. And it's a lot easier with gala or Fuji or with McIntosh to do it by the end of the third season. So you really with this kind of weak growing cultivars growers need to intensively manage the trees. So you have to babysit the trees. Intensively manage the trees. The first three years to achieve the desired growth. You have to do it. You have to spend and be on top of what you are trying to achieve. So I have this figure just for some of the Cornell root stalks and this is important try to pay attention because I know many of you perhaps have been working for a long time already with the M.9 clones. If you analyze the main clones, the M.9 clones M.9 you're gonna have a low vigor that is gonna be the 337. You're gonna have another one that is gonna be a little more poochy and is gonna be the Nic 29 and you're gonna have the Pajam 2 that is gonna get you more bigger. After that you're gonna have the M.26. Just if you start working with G.11, G.41, and G.94 G.11 is gonna be in the low vigor. Okay, G.11 is a little depending on the situation of the soil fertility, but it's gonna give you a little less push than G.41. And G.41 in some situations is gonna work for Honeycrisp. But for Honeycrisp, a more weight cultivar we definitely are gonna recommend G.95. G.95 is gonna give you the push of M.26, it's gonna give you the push of G.30 like years ago like many growers still love G.30. Many growers. Even though it's brittle, it's this and that, and still the Geneva is serious. It has a bunch of problems in the nursery still but we are still trying to figure out how we're gonna grow these trees in the nursery. Okay we are doing a bunch and here I want to disclose we know that exactly what is happening with the Geneva but you cannot compare the Geneva with the M.9's. It's like trying to compare apples with oranges, okay? Not what worked for an M.9 in a nursery is gonna work for what we do with a Geneva in the nursery. So we are adopting different technology even the grafting technology that we are using and all the trials that we are doing perhaps are gonna be changed in the future. You have to stake all the Geneva material. All those trees in the nursery have to be staked. All those trees. Okay that is mandatory. If you are not staking and you are growing your own nursery trees and you think that you don't have to stake those trees are brittle. They can break. Okay and we are seeing that so that is an important thing to say. But 95 is a monster. It's gonna give you a huge production and we are finding today that in order of our Genevas coming in the future not still available is 890. 890 is working very well in our trials in Washington and in New York also. So we are gonna have more things. 355? Okay, so, one important thing is that we can select the leader. When we're growing the tree. And for many years we have been saying hey remove the buds. Remove bud number two, three and four below the main leader when it's growing. But to be honest with you when I came here, it's not real data telling me that by doing that you're gonna get two or three or four more inches of growth compared with untreated. Okay so as soon as you do it, so as soon as you do it, the better. Whatever the labor that you have. But as soon as you can cut that with clippers it's also good. Most of the growers if they cannot remove the buds, you can do that stuff by clipping those shoots and selecting the main leader by selecting the main leader and pushing that leader to grow and fill the space. But the other important thing is that leader that shoot had to be well-supported. If that shoot is not well-supported, you're losing, you're losing. Okay you're not gonna get the 18, 19, or 24 inches or in some cases 30 inches of shoot growth that we should get per season. I don't know how much your shoots grow here in this area but you start, you can you should get that stuff. The other one is irrigation, okay? Many growers they don't irrigate. And it's very, very important. The tall spindle planting, planting is gonna need at least 500 gallons of water for irrigation per day per acre. Okay and later when they get to maturity they're gonna use more or less between 4 to 5,000 gallons per day per acre. So you have to irrigate. You have to babysit those roots are very shallow, okay? I don't know your precipitation here but if you see the weather pattern for the last ten years, every of those ten years two or three years are dry Summers. I don't know how was your Summer in 2011, I don't know how was your Summer in 2012, but those were very dry Summers, okay? And you are establishing a very highly demanding cultivar you need to put the irrigation, okay? So that is very important to have irrigation available there. So you have to babysit your trees all growing season right away. So important those trees taking care of them as much as you can. You have to apply calcium, calcium nitrate. We recommend one quarter per pound around the tree and about three or four weeks after we apply again and we start seeing by magic that it was just a whip. But the tree start to respond and start producing those shoots. Another one is the wire, the support, the one-wire or two-wire or three-wire but you have to support that tree all the way. So we have the four-wire, we have the five wires the three wires plus the stabilizer that could be bamboo a piece of bamboo I kind of we have been doing a lot with the wire stabilizer but it's a lot better to do it perhaps with a piece of bamboo, this is still very popular one wire with a conduct you can grow a nice tree anyway. But this is I think so the key. If you put those wires, don't let those wires be no more than 25 or 28 inches between space. Because every time that you ask that shoot that is trying to grow to go beyond that distance you're not gonna be able to reach that wire. That growing season and you're not gonna be able to support that tree where it should be. So don't do it more than 25 inches, 25, 25, 25, 25. And as the tree starts growing vertically, de fruit that section. The last section. Just de fruit in those weak trees, especially in a weak tree like Honeycrisp. De fruit that section. Make sure that you don't expose that tree to have any additional weight. Okay de fruit that tree until it's able to get to the next wire. Support that tree there until it starts to lignify. And produce wood. But don't ask, never ask to that shoot to crop. That is the biggest mistake, you're gonna break that shoot there. You need to at least give the opportunity. This grower that put four wires okay and he figured out oh my God this is Honeycrisp. He went a bunch of growers from Wayne county went to China and got this stuff they brought this fiberglass stakes and they put in those ones just to support with that machine that they showed you in the morning. There's a machine that is above the two rows. Just to put those fiberglass just to support the terminal because those trees were moving back and forth and you get the growth. Okay so, branch management. I think so you need to invest the necessary time and especially for Fuji. Especially with Macoun you have to use the wire you have to use the Avis-strip that I know you have that one here. So you can use the wire, you can use the Avis-strip, the Avis-strip is very nice you can do whatever you want to do with that. Move it one direction and another one. You can attach to the main trunk and start bending down all those feathers initially with that angle below the result. That is the key, it's a very ugly angle below the result. Okay you start using rubber bands that is another thing it's more difficult especially if we have the lip but you can start this rubber band six-month-life with 880. And we start doing and we ended up with a very ugly tree, okay? But definitely are below our result. That is why we want with the rubber band. Okay don't do that don't get the feather just look around with the wire against the trunk. Whatever you want to do don't do other stuff just turn it around and you're gonna end up with that kind of feather. So final thoughts to avoid unnecessary mistake. I seriously say everything with higher density planting, the impact of a mistake on your part or the lack of not doing the important thing is higher than with lower planting density. Okay that is saying a lot. And everything had to be done early, early. Good support is critical. Early, good irrigation, and a bunch of things. It's a lot of reading there I don't wanna really-- I wanna have time for questions. Fencing I think I mentioned something in the morning. It's very important we can really justify a job by the amount of planting that we have there with the losses that we had 25% more by deer fencing. We really can justify the deer fence in our industry with more than kind of 600 acres planted in 2013 and 14. We were able to justify 70 miles of deer fence. So we are really convinced that the deer fence is a very important thing that had to be included in the budget from the beginning. And with that I am done. Okay thank you so much. (applause)

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How to Prepare Your Raised Bed Garden for the Winter Season

fourcowfarm posted the article • 1 comments • 109 views • 2017-09-23 03:30 • came from similar tags

 

 
subtitle:

Alright, this is John Kohler with growngyourgreens.com here with another exciting episode. And where I am today in the world is Salt Lake City, Utah here, I’m here downtown Salt Lake City. I was actually driving by this community garden right here actually. And I was like, man, that place looks familiar. And actually for those of you guys that are long term viewers, you guys will know, that actually I was at this community garden, I don’t know how many years ago… maybe it was like… 2000 and… I don’t know. But maybe it was a long time ago and I remember the sculptures and stuff. And I actually visited this. So, for those of you guys that have been watching me since then, and remember seeing this episode- hey, thumbs up to you guys! That’s great! I want to thank you guys, all my viewers for your guys support and all this kind of stuff. Anyways, todays episode I thought, you know, I just love coming back to community gardens I’ve been to to kinda see how things are growing… seeing what’s up. I’ll post a link down below to that original video I made back here many years ago. I can’t remember how many years ago now. But it seemed like it was pretty new at the time, you know, because I don’t get to Salt Lake City much. Anyways, what I thought I’d do with this episode is actually share with you guys what’s growing on, or not growing on actually at this point. Pretty much Salt Lake City had their first frost already, maybe a light frost. And you know, the farmers markets here have already ended here for the season. They’re getting into the winter markets here. And so, pretty much it’s the end of the season. So I’m going to show you guys actually in the garden...umm… the community garden here, what grew the best! So if you live in Salt Lake City, these are maybe some of the things you’ll want to grow for next season that’ll do really well, perform well. And even perform after the traditional summer growing season ends. In addition, at the tail end of this video what I thought I’d do, because I know a lot of you guys are in this same predicament now, where it’s the end of your season. You want to know- “John, what do I do with my raised beds?” So I’m going to share with you guys my opinions on maybe what people should do in the community garden to get their beds ready for next year, or keep, to basically overwinter their beds, if they’re not going to be growing. So anyways, let’s go ahead and head into the community garden and check it out. So this is the Wasatch community garden. It’s the peoples portable garden, established in 2009. It would be interesting see when I was actually here, I think it was close to that time actually. And you know, I’m glad that this is an open community garden. Many places that I go to in the country like, I go to a community garden and check it out, the gates are locked man, you can’t get in unless you know somebody that’s you know, farming on the inside, or somebody happens to be there. So I’m glad that this is open for people. But at the same time I hope that people would respect other peoples gardens. OPG- other peoples gardens! And not like, pick stuff! And see they have signs… “Please respect the garden” you know, and “don’t take anything from the garden”, “the garden is closed from dusk till dawn”, “keep this area organic and pest free”. So those are some of the rules. In addition, they’ve got this little produce crate here, strapped to the fence, which I think is a nice idea. And inside what am I finding? I’m finding some tomatoes. Errr, could be riper. These could be good for fired tomatoes or something. I dunno, if you’re starving maybe it’s be good. I think that’s great you know, to have a area to donate people… or donate food to people, in the area that may need it! And, coz there’s always extra abundance in the garden. Especially when you’re planting, you know, so much. So anyways, let’s head into this community garden and show you guys what’s growing on today. So what you guys are looking at behind me here, is one of the many community garden plots here. I think they’re maybe 4 foot, by I don't’ know, maybe looks like 16, 20 feet wide. So you would rent these out I guess for the season. And everybody has something a little bit different growing in each one. And this is probable pretty much, at this time, near the end of the season… umm… one of the beds looks like the tomatoes have kind of gone the way of the west. Some of them are, you know, messed up. And over on this side we’ve got squash that is probably pretty much no longer making it. Some of them actually have powdery mildew. And a lot of plants and debris in here are brown and probably need to be pulled out and then composted, right? And that’s just pretty much what’s happening here for most plants. But there’s some plants that are the stars. So I want you guys to always pick out the stars in your garden. You know, basically the plants that perform well over the entire season. And focus a good percentage of what you grow, you know, the stars. The ones that produce reliably for ya. And that’s what I’m going to do in this episode is point out some of the stars here in Salt Lake City and the plants that did some of the best. Which actually are not a big surprise to me, some of the ones that do the best for be aswell, and they’ll probably do good for you to grow also. Alright, so where I’ve taken you guys first is plot number 21! So if your name’s Joey, you’re featured on my video man! So this is Joey’s plot. I like that they have a little sign on every plot, who it’s rented by. This is Joey’s plot and actually on this side of the garden he’s planted some crops that have done really well over the season. So basil. No surprise to me that the basil has done quite well here. Now this has gone to full flower and seed. So when that happens you know that the production goes down, so it would be good to, you know... ahh… clip it back. Clip all the flowers at this point because it’s probably going to frost any day now. It’s probably not worthwhile to do that. But you could at least get another harvest of all the leaves and, you know, the little flowers off it. And just the plain leaves. And so that would be good to preserve. One of the best ways to preserve your basil in the winter is, you know, freeze it in ice cubes! Coz, basil especially when you dry it loses some of the aromatics. Not too good. But if you freeze it in ice cubes… also you can basically cure it in salt so, like, harvest your basil, get a big bowl, and line the bottom with some salt, and then put some leaves of basil on there. Like a whole layer of leaves of basil. And line it with more salt and then keep layering the basil and the salt on top of each other and fill the whole bowl. That’s another way to, you know, ensure you guys can have some basil through the winter when you’re not growing it. Of course you could also take cuttings of your basil and grow them inside in the winter. But yeah, basil really did well here in the garden in Salt Lake. Another one next door that doesn’t surprise me either. The rosemary. Rosemary is another herb that does really well here. And you know, there’s a few other herbs that maybe I’m not going to show you in this episode that did really well. Like, let’s see, the mints look like they did pretty well and some of the sages that I saw round did pretty well also. And I always want to encourage you guys to grow herbs. They’re not only nutrition. You know, power-packed nutrition for you guys with high anti-oxidants, but they make you food taste good without the salt. Another vegetable behind, I don’t know if you guys can see that back there, done pretty good. I think maybe he’s the only guy that grew okra in this whole garden that I saw. The okra man, it’s still performing! I mean like, some of the stuff he should have harvested and used the pods. But right now he could use some of the seeds. And there’s even new, small, little baby okras starting to grow. Once again like the basil you want to try and keep all your okra pods clipped of so that it keeps producing. You know, the new pods for you guys to eat. Yeah and this looks like it did pretty well, and it’s still growing. The other thing that’s pretty much apparent, you know, walking and checking out this community garden to me (and this is just my opinion because I don’t really know what's going on here) is that, and this happens a lot in gardening you know, people get really excited about the spring and they plant a community garden plot, they’re really into it, they keep coming back and all this stuff. And then near the end of the season, like, the interest fizzles out. And I want you guys to keep your interest high the full season long. Especially if your garden isn’t right in your backyard like I is… like mine is… you know. I mean, it can get hard. We all get busy in life, you know, but… and especially during the hot summer you might not want to go to the community garden. But if you plant the right things, like some of the things that I’m talking about in this episode, you could have food from your community garden. So I mean, I know you guys go to the grocery store regularly. So especially at a community garden plot that’s like, not near you. Go to your community garden plot to shop first, right! It’s apparent to me that by walking around, I’m seeing a lot of unharvested food. And if somebody’s not harvesting the food at the community garden, that means they’re buying it at the grocery store. And I’d much rather have you guys eat the food out of your community garden plot. Or your plot, or your garden in your backyard or your front yard, wherever you have it, instead of the grocery store. Coz this will allow you to buy less food! To save more money! To have a higher quality food! To have food that tastes better! To have food that’s more nutritious! Right So, yeah, I don’t know how to motivate people to go to their community garden plots more that just that. And hope that people retain the interest more, right? So anyways, let’s go ahead and take a look at a few more vegetables that have grown really well this season. So I was walking past this bed on the way to some vegetables and I just had to stop for you guys because here’s some more herbs, right? And these herbs are also growing really well here and includes oregano. That’s actually going to flower in mass quantities. So if you don’t want them to flower, you know, clip them back and they’ll keep growing for ya. In the middle here we have a big ball of sage. A huge ball of sage! It probably takes up a quarter of the raised bed! Kind of insane. And to me it doesn’t really look like they’re using it a lot, right? And on the other side of the sage, you guys can’t see, they’ve got the thyme. You got the money honey, I got the thyme. Actually, I’m growing thyme and they’re growing thyme too. Once again you know, I want to encourage you guys to grow some herbs. But also, especially if you have a small raised bed and that’s all your gardening space, right? I would encourage you guys to use your space wisely. As much as I would like to dedicate a small portion to the herbs, you know in this bed it looks like it’s mostly herbs. And that’d be great if you were using it and doing something with your herbs, but it looks to me like they’re not really using the herbs so much. And that makes me sad. So I dunno, make herb potpourri and put it in all the rooms of your house. Hang sprigs of sage in your house to make smell nice and stuff. Put some dried sage, uh, you know, uh, and branches of oregano in your drawers with your clothes so you’re gonna smell like a hippie! Ha ha ha. But use it man! Use it before you lose it! Because with the frost man, this stuff is going to be flattened. So the first vegetable I want to share with you guys today is actually these guys right here. And these are beans that are still producing, despite the looming frost. You know, in this garden I’ve seen other kinds of beans and peas growing, but some of them maybe have powdery mildew and some of them maybe look like they’re not doing so well. But this plant is a fighter. Coz it’s a native, more wild, heirloom crop that’s been growing here in North America since before the white man came, right? These are Native American runner beans. And check this out. I don’t know if you guys can see this here, I’ll try to like, bring it over. But this plant is still, basically producing flowers right now and producing little baby pods. So you know, it’s this kind of plant that, you know, may produce for a long season. Of course it depends also, it likes a more mild temperature, so like, you know, errr, in 100 plus degree weather on a regular basis, it may not perform in the heat of the summer. But once it cools down it will start performing again. But if you live in a place that’s like mostly in the 80’s, maybe in the 90’s, might tip into the 100’s sometimes, but it’s not consistent. Then it’ll produce all season long for you guys like it has for me. And these little small baby beans can be eaten like the snap peas that are quite delicious. And when the pods get much more mature, like maybe some of these guys, they’re going to dry out and then you can harvest and save the seeds. And you could eat the beans or the seeds inside or you could also share them with friends. The other cool thing about the Native American runner beans that I found out, you know, depending on your climate if you cut them back at the end of the season, you mulch it heavily, keep the root zone warm, right? It might just come back for you next season and be a perennial-style crop. So my plants have come back for many years and at some point usually I lose them, but you know, they are long-lasting crops. So I do like that because it makes it a lot less work for me to grow them. And if you’re looking to get this plant, I might still have seeds available, depending on when you’re seeing this. So you want to visit my website, growingyourgreens.wedc.com. That’s the seed store that my girlfriend is taking care of all the fulfillment and stuff because I don’t have the time to do that. So I’m glad she’s doing that because she still doesn’t really quite have a job and kinda needs money. So, when she sells the seeds, that’s money she gets to pay all here insurance and car payments and all her bills and all this kind of stuff. So, that’s for you guys support, for helping my girlfriend out. And also for me to be able to spread out the seeds to you guys. Anyways, let’s go ahead and take a look at a few more crops that are doing good here in Salt Lake City. So the next two crops that I want you guys to grow, whether you grow here in Salt Lake City or most places, that pretty much do well wherever you live, are these two guys here. Number one, of course, these guys here. This is the dinosaur kale. Or black kale, Tuscan kale, so many different words for it. But basically, as you guys can see, this thing is huge! Look at that! I mean, this is like a little kale tree right there. And you know kale is all the rage right now. It’s one of the most nutritious of vegetables. Kale is actually anti-cancerous. And it makes me sad when I come to a community garden and I see this much kale still hanging out on the plant. Now this might be a good thing, because this gardener might know that this kale will survive some light frost. And actually when the frosts come, the kale gets sweeter! So typically I don’t like to eat kale in the middle of the summer. The flavor gets kind of more intense and strong. And you know, I don’t like that so much. I’ll eat my summer greens, that do really well in the summer, that really love the heat and are more mild. But come the winter once it starts to get cold, right? The sugars… the plant puts more sugars into the leaves to help it, to prevent itself from getting frost or freezing right? And then when you eat it, it’s more sweet and delicious. Of course you can make things like kale salads. You can mis, you know, half kale, half lettuce. You could cook up the kale. But my favorite way to use the kale is by juicing it. Blending it into a smoothie. So, a little bit of kale, some frozen bananas, some coconut water. Amazing smoothie. Add more bananas if the kale taste is too strong. And of course, my other favorite way to use the kale is to make the kale chips! You know, that can get quite expensive if you buy them at the store. A two once bag at a health food store is going to run you maybe 5 bucks! But especially if you have unlimited kale man, you should turn them all into kale chips! And I guarantee, you’ll eat them! Remember to check all my past episodes and if I remember, I’ll put a link down below to an episode I did making kale chips myself. So you guys can see how I do it. Let’s see another leafy green that’s done really well. And I want you guys to eat your leafy greens man! My goal everyday is to eat two pounds of leafy greens. A bit more challenging when I’m traveling. But the swiss chard leaves here also looks like something that’s done really well. And has done well in most places that I visit. So I think there’s an Elton John song that goes “I’m still standing”… I don’t know the rest of the melody but… Anyway, you can see the corn here, I mean, it’s still standing, but it’s all dried up, not doing so good. But right here in front of me as you can see there’s a nice huge bunch of the green onions. And it looks like the green onions has done well. Looks like it’s gone to flower and seed. They’ve cut some of it back. And it’s still producing, you know, lots of green onions. Now, green onions, you might not eat a lot of them. You might eat more kale. You might eat more tomatoes than kale. Or green onions… but I want to encourage you guys to just clip back a couple of sprigs of green onions everyday and include them as a flavoring agent in your dinners, right? I want you guys to eat green onions everyday. The main reason for this is it’s an anti-cancerous plant. Much like other plants in the allium family which includes the onion and the garlic. And actually the onion greens are actually more nutritious for you that the whole onion bulb that is normally bought. So I like to just take a couple of sprigs and just chop it up really fine. Throw it in my salad, throw it my soup for flavoring. Plus, I’m getting the anti-cancer boost. As you know to buy green onions could cost you a bunch… could cost you a dollar a bunch in the store. And having it… if you just plant one plant, you’ll have it probably for the whole summer season. And of course, at the end of the season before it goes bad you clip it all back, chop it into little pieces, dehydrate it and have dehydrated onions, you know, to use in the winter when you don’t have your fresh plants. Of course green onions are another really easy thing to grow in your kitchen in the winter time. So the last vegetable that I want to show you guys that did better than some of the other ones here are actually the tomatoes. And I know that tomatoes are the number one home vegetable crop that people love to plant. Everybody always thinks- grow your own tomatoes! And I definitely agree that tomatoes that you home grow taste way better than the ones from the store. But even within that there are some varieties that will do better or worse in your area. And you’re going to have to figure that out for yourselves. But in general, my general recommendation for tomatoes (and it looks like the whole tree right here also) is to grow the smaller cherry tomatoes, right? Here are some cherry tomatoes. I don’t know exactly what variety. But you guys can see that even in the impending frost, they’re still ripening up. And they’re going to be good, you know, they do have also other tomatoes… I don’t know if you can see these guys are nice and huge. And these green tomatoes will never fully ripen up properly before the frost because it’s going to take a while. But these small ones they grow faster, they ripen and they mature quicker. So you’re going to have, you know, more tomatoes over your full season. And I’m good with cherry tomatoes. One of my favorite varieties is the black cherie tomato. And even though some of their plants are, you know, turning… some cucumbers, are getting some diseases and stuff here… these tomatoes here are quite doing well. Another tip I want to share with you guys before the first frost (don’t let the first frost happen and then do this coz then it’s not going to work) but if you do this before the first frost you may be able to salvage some of your tomatoes. So even some of the tomatoes that are still green, before the first frost, you know, just harvest them with the stems and all and keep them in, you know, like, a box. In a cool, you know, dry place. Not in the rain, maybe like, inside your house somewhere. You know and these guys, if they’re at a certain stage of ripeness, uh, you know, will turn, turn red for ya. Not that they’re going to taste good because you picked them early and they’re still ripening. They’re never going to have the full flavor, but they’ll still be edible. And of course many people still use their green tomatoes for eating. I personally wouldn’t do that myself. And of course, uh, all the ripe ones, you know, enjoy them now or… I encourage you guys to dehydrate them and save them for the winter. So after walking the community garden a few times and sharing with you guys the vegetables that did the best, I think I pretty much covered them all. If you have vegetables that do really well, hey, please post them down below to let other people know so that people can try those varieties as well. You know, I want to encourage you guys, wherever you live, to always increase the varieties and increase the genetic diversity you grow. Because this is the way we can learn and grow. You’ll plant different varieties of this or that, or some leafy green that you’ve never heard of from one of the seed catalogs. You know one of the good sources of seeds here is MV Seeds (that’s Mountain Valley Seeds). Most of those seeds are high altitude seeds that are going to do really well here in the short season. So yeah, that’s very important. But uh, other that that, I mean that’s pretty much the end of this video. But before I go, I want to share with you guys, what many of you guys are already going through for this year is… at the end of the season, and you’ve got all the plants kind of looking messed up, they’ve got white powdery mildew and they’re drying out and they’re just not looking too good. What do you do? Right? What I like to do is simply this, you know, number one I’ll cut all the plants down. And actually what I’m doing these days is I’m cutting them down at the base. So I’m leaving all the root matter in the soil. I’m not pulling up the root matter, unless they’re getting in the way of the crop that, you know, uh, I’m going to plant next, uh, go around in that raised bed. Why am I doing this? Right? I’m doing this so that I can adhere more to the no-till gardening and disturb the soil less. And also so that I can feed the microbes, the earthworms, any other creatures in the beds. So I’m just cutting off the root zone, leaving it in there. It’s going to compost in-place. And this is especially true if you live in a place, you know, where you’re not growing in the winter time. So once you clear you space of all the top growth, you leave the roots under the ground. Then the next thing I would do to prepare for the next growing season, or in this case the dormant growing season, is… uh, you know… This raised bed here, most raised beds the level of the soil will sink down, you know, over the season. So this raised bed looks like it’s sunk down at least 6 inches. So what I would like to do is (minimum) put 3 inches of good amended compost on top of this raised bed, before doing anything else. So I’d add things like the rock dust. Add things like the worm castings. Maybe some the different fertilizers, things like the soil humates… Maybe like also, you know, uh, grass… You know, uh, just a nice rich mixture of different, you know, compost mixed with other nutrients to just basically put over the top. This way the biologic activity of the soil can start breaking this stuff down and getting it ready for the next growing season, whenever that may be. And in my case, I top up my beds and I plant in it for the next growing season because I grow year-round. And growing year-round is simply the best thing that you guys could do. Now in a place like Salt Lake City here, I’m looking up in the mountains and I’m already seeing snow up there right? Umm, you know, probably to grow all year round would be a lot more challenging. But it can be done, you know, building some kind of hoop house over this would probably keep it warm enough to grow some crops that are frost tolerant. Such as, you know, uhh, maybe some collared greens or some kale right? Some of the kale crops are, uh, quite frost tolerant and will deal with frost. Of course other things like the allium or onion family, many of them, will do well also. So you guys can still be growing food in the winter with a covering over it, some plastic on there to keep it warmer on the inside. And that’s my first recommendation is to always keep something growing in your soil, right? Now second-best if you’re not going to grow edibles in your soil, maybe spread out some seeds to grow some cover crops over the winter if your climate allows you to do that. I know some places will just have snow on the ground. You’re not really going to do too many cover crops with snow on the ground if it’s there consistently. The final thing I would do if you guys aren’t doing to do those first two choices is cover the soil at a bare minimum! So don’t leave your beds as like bare soil that you can look at. It’s like us walking outside, you know, with no clothes on! And unless you are a naturalist or a hippie, you’re probably not going to that. We’re all going to put clothes on before we go outside because we don’t want to be bare, right? And, uh, our soils don’t want to be bare either. And so I would encourage you guys to cover your soils in the winter. Like they’re doing here, like, they put, you know, just some straw here to cover the soil. I’d probably put a much deeper layer of straw here. And whether you’re going to use some kind of straw, whether you’re going to use some kind of leaves, whether you’re going to use some kind of wood chips, I don’t really care. Or even if you don’t have all those organic matters, which is what I would prefer, cover it with a tarp or a piece of plastic. I mean, that’s the last resort but cover the damn soil man! That’s very important in my opinion to, you know, keep all the biological activity. Keep all the microbes and fungi and earthworms active because, you know, they don’t like the bare exposed soil that, you know, exposes it to the elements especially in the winter time. Um, then you’re basically going to let that stuff decompose and protect the soil over the winter. It’s going to decompose, break down a little bit depending on your climate and what-not. And then when you;re ready to plant out the next growing season, you’re going to basically scratch back all the stuff that didn’t degrade down. You may be able to top off your bed with some more compost, make sure you get some fungal dominated compost in there. Very important. If you don’t know what that is, fungal dominated compost, check my other videos for it. Put as much of that stuff as you can in your garden coz it’s actually quite rare. And in my opinion, most gardens don’t have enough fungal based compost or fungal activity to grow optimally well, from my observations. But yeah, you’re going to scratch back all the stuff that’s left over, compost that out, and then you’re just going to go ahead and replant for your next season. So that’s how I would prepare, you know, my raised bed for the winter. That’s what I would do. Of course, you know, post your links down below or your ideas down below on what you guys do, you know, it would be interesting to hear. But I want to encourage you guys to cover your soil, keep your soil protected, you know, try to disturb your soil the least amount as possible because this will raise the fertility of your soil. And overall increase the way that you’re able to grow and increase the quality of the produce, increase the quantity of the produce, and make the produce more bug and disease resistant, and build a nice healthy microbiome in your soil. And this something that conventional farming and even organic farmers that still use tractors are simply not doing. And this is, you know, this is how nature works you know. So this is nothing new, this is to kinda try to use nature to our advantage instead of try to work against it. To think that man is more intelligent than nature because we able to invent rotor tillers and we were able invent, you know, tractors and we were able to invent all these chemical fertilizers right? That’s not the way. And I know a lot of you guys are really into your tilling and all this stuff, but hey if you have a lot of beds that normally you would till up, you know hey, try one or two the method that I’m recommending to you guys. And see what happens. Do an experiment. You know, “I’m just going to try that crazy step that John says and see what works”. See what happens, see if my growing is better or worse in those beds than the ones that you tilled in. You know, I bet dollars to donuts that in time you’ll see that no-till beds will perform better. And that’s just the feedback I’ve gotten in my own garden and the feedback I’ve gotten from so many farmers that are doing the no-till method. So anyways, I’ve come to the end of my time here at the community garden in Salt Lake City. If you guys have enjoyed this episode and want me to come back here and want me to do more videos here in Salt Lake, hey, give me a thumbs up! I might get up here again. Also be sure to click that subscribe button right down below. I have new videos every three to four days and if you subscribe you’ll get notified of new and upcoming videos. It’s really one of the best ways for you guys to, you know, stay excited about gardening! I always try and excite you guys about gardening in some aspect but also try and teach you guys something at the same time. Keep you motivated and keep you guys growing because it’s really important to me. And finally be sure and check my past episodes. My past episodes are a wealth of knowledge especially in the winter time when you can’t get out and garden. At least you can see me, hear me, and you know, learn from me, from all the different gardens and places I’ve visited over the years. And I’ll still of course be gardening year-round and I want to encourage you guys to do that also if you’re able to do that in your area. But minimum, grow some sprouts and micro-greens that you can grow inside your home in the winter. So, once again my name is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com, we’’l see you next time. And until then remember, keep on growing. view all
 


 
subtitle:

Alright, this is John Kohler with growngyourgreens.com here with another exciting episode. And where I am today in the world is Salt Lake City, Utah here, I’m here downtown Salt Lake City. I was actually driving by this community garden right here actually. And I was like, man, that place looks familiar. And actually for those of you guys that are long term viewers, you guys will know, that actually I was at this community garden, I don’t know how many years ago… maybe it was like… 2000 and… I don’t know. But maybe it was a long time ago and I remember the sculptures and stuff. And I actually visited this. So, for those of you guys that have been watching me since then, and remember seeing this episode- hey, thumbs up to you guys! That’s great! I want to thank you guys, all my viewers for your guys support and all this kind of stuff. Anyways, todays episode I thought, you know, I just love coming back to community gardens I’ve been to to kinda see how things are growing… seeing what’s up. I’ll post a link down below to that original video I made back here many years ago. I can’t remember how many years ago now. But it seemed like it was pretty new at the time, you know, because I don’t get to Salt Lake City much. Anyways, what I thought I’d do with this episode is actually share with you guys what’s growing on, or not growing on actually at this point. Pretty much Salt Lake City had their first frost already, maybe a light frost. And you know, the farmers markets here have already ended here for the season. They’re getting into the winter markets here. And so, pretty much it’s the end of the season. So I’m going to show you guys actually in the garden...umm… the community garden here, what grew the best! So if you live in Salt Lake City, these are maybe some of the things you’ll want to grow for next season that’ll do really well, perform well. And even perform after the traditional summer growing season ends. In addition, at the tail end of this video what I thought I’d do, because I know a lot of you guys are in this same predicament now, where it’s the end of your season. You want to know- “John, what do I do with my raised beds?” So I’m going to share with you guys my opinions on maybe what people should do in the community garden to get their beds ready for next year, or keep, to basically overwinter their beds, if they’re not going to be growing. So anyways, let’s go ahead and head into the community garden and check it out. So this is the Wasatch community garden. It’s the peoples portable garden, established in 2009. It would be interesting see when I was actually here, I think it was close to that time actually. And you know, I’m glad that this is an open community garden. Many places that I go to in the country like, I go to a community garden and check it out, the gates are locked man, you can’t get in unless you know somebody that’s you know, farming on the inside, or somebody happens to be there. So I’m glad that this is open for people. But at the same time I hope that people would respect other peoples gardens. OPG- other peoples gardens! And not like, pick stuff! And see they have signs… “Please respect the garden” you know, and “don’t take anything from the garden”, “the garden is closed from dusk till dawn”, “keep this area organic and pest free”. So those are some of the rules. In addition, they’ve got this little produce crate here, strapped to the fence, which I think is a nice idea. And inside what am I finding? I’m finding some tomatoes. Errr, could be riper. These could be good for fired tomatoes or something. I dunno, if you’re starving maybe it’s be good. I think that’s great you know, to have a area to donate people… or donate food to people, in the area that may need it! And, coz there’s always extra abundance in the garden. Especially when you’re planting, you know, so much. So anyways, let’s head into this community garden and show you guys what’s growing on today. So what you guys are looking at behind me here, is one of the many community garden plots here. I think they’re maybe 4 foot, by I don't’ know, maybe looks like 16, 20 feet wide. So you would rent these out I guess for the season. And everybody has something a little bit different growing in each one. And this is probable pretty much, at this time, near the end of the season… umm… one of the beds looks like the tomatoes have kind of gone the way of the west. Some of them are, you know, messed up. And over on this side we’ve got squash that is probably pretty much no longer making it. Some of them actually have powdery mildew. And a lot of plants and debris in here are brown and probably need to be pulled out and then composted, right? And that’s just pretty much what’s happening here for most plants. But there’s some plants that are the stars. So I want you guys to always pick out the stars in your garden. You know, basically the plants that perform well over the entire season. And focus a good percentage of what you grow, you know, the stars. The ones that produce reliably for ya. And that’s what I’m going to do in this episode is point out some of the stars here in Salt Lake City and the plants that did some of the best. Which actually are not a big surprise to me, some of the ones that do the best for be aswell, and they’ll probably do good for you to grow also. Alright, so where I’ve taken you guys first is plot number 21! So if your name’s Joey, you’re featured on my video man! So this is Joey’s plot. I like that they have a little sign on every plot, who it’s rented by. This is Joey’s plot and actually on this side of the garden he’s planted some crops that have done really well over the season. So basil. No surprise to me that the basil has done quite well here. Now this has gone to full flower and seed. So when that happens you know that the production goes down, so it would be good to, you know... ahh… clip it back. Clip all the flowers at this point because it’s probably going to frost any day now. It’s probably not worthwhile to do that. But you could at least get another harvest of all the leaves and, you know, the little flowers off it. And just the plain leaves. And so that would be good to preserve. One of the best ways to preserve your basil in the winter is, you know, freeze it in ice cubes! Coz, basil especially when you dry it loses some of the aromatics. Not too good. But if you freeze it in ice cubes… also you can basically cure it in salt so, like, harvest your basil, get a big bowl, and line the bottom with some salt, and then put some leaves of basil on there. Like a whole layer of leaves of basil. And line it with more salt and then keep layering the basil and the salt on top of each other and fill the whole bowl. That’s another way to, you know, ensure you guys can have some basil through the winter when you’re not growing it. Of course you could also take cuttings of your basil and grow them inside in the winter. But yeah, basil really did well here in the garden in Salt Lake. Another one next door that doesn’t surprise me either. The rosemary. Rosemary is another herb that does really well here. And you know, there’s a few other herbs that maybe I’m not going to show you in this episode that did really well. Like, let’s see, the mints look like they did pretty well and some of the sages that I saw round did pretty well also. And I always want to encourage you guys to grow herbs. They’re not only nutrition. You know, power-packed nutrition for you guys with high anti-oxidants, but they make you food taste good without the salt. Another vegetable behind, I don’t know if you guys can see that back there, done pretty good. I think maybe he’s the only guy that grew okra in this whole garden that I saw. The okra man, it’s still performing! I mean like, some of the stuff he should have harvested and used the pods. But right now he could use some of the seeds. And there’s even new, small, little baby okras starting to grow. Once again like the basil you want to try and keep all your okra pods clipped of so that it keeps producing. You know, the new pods for you guys to eat. Yeah and this looks like it did pretty well, and it’s still growing. The other thing that’s pretty much apparent, you know, walking and checking out this community garden to me (and this is just my opinion because I don’t really know what's going on here) is that, and this happens a lot in gardening you know, people get really excited about the spring and they plant a community garden plot, they’re really into it, they keep coming back and all this stuff. And then near the end of the season, like, the interest fizzles out. And I want you guys to keep your interest high the full season long. Especially if your garden isn’t right in your backyard like I is… like mine is… you know. I mean, it can get hard. We all get busy in life, you know, but… and especially during the hot summer you might not want to go to the community garden. But if you plant the right things, like some of the things that I’m talking about in this episode, you could have food from your community garden. So I mean, I know you guys go to the grocery store regularly. So especially at a community garden plot that’s like, not near you. Go to your community garden plot to shop first, right! It’s apparent to me that by walking around, I’m seeing a lot of unharvested food. And if somebody’s not harvesting the food at the community garden, that means they’re buying it at the grocery store. And I’d much rather have you guys eat the food out of your community garden plot. Or your plot, or your garden in your backyard or your front yard, wherever you have it, instead of the grocery store. Coz this will allow you to buy less food! To save more money! To have a higher quality food! To have food that tastes better! To have food that’s more nutritious! Right So, yeah, I don’t know how to motivate people to go to their community garden plots more that just that. And hope that people retain the interest more, right? So anyways, let’s go ahead and take a look at a few more vegetables that have grown really well this season. So I was walking past this bed on the way to some vegetables and I just had to stop for you guys because here’s some more herbs, right? And these herbs are also growing really well here and includes oregano. That’s actually going to flower in mass quantities. So if you don’t want them to flower, you know, clip them back and they’ll keep growing for ya. In the middle here we have a big ball of sage. A huge ball of sage! It probably takes up a quarter of the raised bed! Kind of insane. And to me it doesn’t really look like they’re using it a lot, right? And on the other side of the sage, you guys can’t see, they’ve got the thyme. You got the money honey, I got the thyme. Actually, I’m growing thyme and they’re growing thyme too. Once again you know, I want to encourage you guys to grow some herbs. But also, especially if you have a small raised bed and that’s all your gardening space, right? I would encourage you guys to use your space wisely. As much as I would like to dedicate a small portion to the herbs, you know in this bed it looks like it’s mostly herbs. And that’d be great if you were using it and doing something with your herbs, but it looks to me like they’re not really using the herbs so much. And that makes me sad. So I dunno, make herb potpourri and put it in all the rooms of your house. Hang sprigs of sage in your house to make smell nice and stuff. Put some dried sage, uh, you know, uh, and branches of oregano in your drawers with your clothes so you’re gonna smell like a hippie! Ha ha ha. But use it man! Use it before you lose it! Because with the frost man, this stuff is going to be flattened. So the first vegetable I want to share with you guys today is actually these guys right here. And these are beans that are still producing, despite the looming frost. You know, in this garden I’ve seen other kinds of beans and peas growing, but some of them maybe have powdery mildew and some of them maybe look like they’re not doing so well. But this plant is a fighter. Coz it’s a native, more wild, heirloom crop that’s been growing here in North America since before the white man came, right? These are Native American runner beans. And check this out. I don’t know if you guys can see this here, I’ll try to like, bring it over. But this plant is still, basically producing flowers right now and producing little baby pods. So you know, it’s this kind of plant that, you know, may produce for a long season. Of course it depends also, it likes a more mild temperature, so like, you know, errr, in 100 plus degree weather on a regular basis, it may not perform in the heat of the summer. But once it cools down it will start performing again. But if you live in a place that’s like mostly in the 80’s, maybe in the 90’s, might tip into the 100’s sometimes, but it’s not consistent. Then it’ll produce all season long for you guys like it has for me. And these little small baby beans can be eaten like the snap peas that are quite delicious. And when the pods get much more mature, like maybe some of these guys, they’re going to dry out and then you can harvest and save the seeds. And you could eat the beans or the seeds inside or you could also share them with friends. The other cool thing about the Native American runner beans that I found out, you know, depending on your climate if you cut them back at the end of the season, you mulch it heavily, keep the root zone warm, right? It might just come back for you next season and be a perennial-style crop. So my plants have come back for many years and at some point usually I lose them, but you know, they are long-lasting crops. So I do like that because it makes it a lot less work for me to grow them. And if you’re looking to get this plant, I might still have seeds available, depending on when you’re seeing this. So you want to visit my website, growingyourgreens.wedc.com. That’s the seed store that my girlfriend is taking care of all the fulfillment and stuff because I don’t have the time to do that. So I’m glad she’s doing that because she still doesn’t really quite have a job and kinda needs money. So, when she sells the seeds, that’s money she gets to pay all here insurance and car payments and all her bills and all this kind of stuff. So, that’s for you guys support, for helping my girlfriend out. And also for me to be able to spread out the seeds to you guys. Anyways, let’s go ahead and take a look at a few more crops that are doing good here in Salt Lake City. So the next two crops that I want you guys to grow, whether you grow here in Salt Lake City or most places, that pretty much do well wherever you live, are these two guys here. Number one, of course, these guys here. This is the dinosaur kale. Or black kale, Tuscan kale, so many different words for it. But basically, as you guys can see, this thing is huge! Look at that! I mean, this is like a little kale tree right there. And you know kale is all the rage right now. It’s one of the most nutritious of vegetables. Kale is actually anti-cancerous. And it makes me sad when I come to a community garden and I see this much kale still hanging out on the plant. Now this might be a good thing, because this gardener might know that this kale will survive some light frost. And actually when the frosts come, the kale gets sweeter! So typically I don’t like to eat kale in the middle of the summer. The flavor gets kind of more intense and strong. And you know, I don’t like that so much. I’ll eat my summer greens, that do really well in the summer, that really love the heat and are more mild. But come the winter once it starts to get cold, right? The sugars… the plant puts more sugars into the leaves to help it, to prevent itself from getting frost or freezing right? And then when you eat it, it’s more sweet and delicious. Of course you can make things like kale salads. You can mis, you know, half kale, half lettuce. You could cook up the kale. But my favorite way to use the kale is by juicing it. Blending it into a smoothie. So, a little bit of kale, some frozen bananas, some coconut water. Amazing smoothie. Add more bananas if the kale taste is too strong. And of course, my other favorite way to use the kale is to make the kale chips! You know, that can get quite expensive if you buy them at the store. A two once bag at a health food store is going to run you maybe 5 bucks! But especially if you have unlimited kale man, you should turn them all into kale chips! And I guarantee, you’ll eat them! Remember to check all my past episodes and if I remember, I’ll put a link down below to an episode I did making kale chips myself. So you guys can see how I do it. Let’s see another leafy green that’s done really well. And I want you guys to eat your leafy greens man! My goal everyday is to eat two pounds of leafy greens. A bit more challenging when I’m traveling. But the swiss chard leaves here also looks like something that’s done really well. And has done well in most places that I visit. So I think there’s an Elton John song that goes “I’m still standing”… I don’t know the rest of the melody but… Anyway, you can see the corn here, I mean, it’s still standing, but it’s all dried up, not doing so good. But right here in front of me as you can see there’s a nice huge bunch of the green onions. And it looks like the green onions has done well. Looks like it’s gone to flower and seed. They’ve cut some of it back. And it’s still producing, you know, lots of green onions. Now, green onions, you might not eat a lot of them. You might eat more kale. You might eat more tomatoes than kale. Or green onions… but I want to encourage you guys to just clip back a couple of sprigs of green onions everyday and include them as a flavoring agent in your dinners, right? I want you guys to eat green onions everyday. The main reason for this is it’s an anti-cancerous plant. Much like other plants in the allium family which includes the onion and the garlic. And actually the onion greens are actually more nutritious for you that the whole onion bulb that is normally bought. So I like to just take a couple of sprigs and just chop it up really fine. Throw it in my salad, throw it my soup for flavoring. Plus, I’m getting the anti-cancer boost. As you know to buy green onions could cost you a bunch… could cost you a dollar a bunch in the store. And having it… if you just plant one plant, you’ll have it probably for the whole summer season. And of course, at the end of the season before it goes bad you clip it all back, chop it into little pieces, dehydrate it and have dehydrated onions, you know, to use in the winter when you don’t have your fresh plants. Of course green onions are another really easy thing to grow in your kitchen in the winter time. So the last vegetable that I want to show you guys that did better than some of the other ones here are actually the tomatoes. And I know that tomatoes are the number one home vegetable crop that people love to plant. Everybody always thinks- grow your own tomatoes! And I definitely agree that tomatoes that you home grow taste way better than the ones from the store. But even within that there are some varieties that will do better or worse in your area. And you’re going to have to figure that out for yourselves. But in general, my general recommendation for tomatoes (and it looks like the whole tree right here also) is to grow the smaller cherry tomatoes, right? Here are some cherry tomatoes. I don’t know exactly what variety. But you guys can see that even in the impending frost, they’re still ripening up. And they’re going to be good, you know, they do have also other tomatoes… I don’t know if you can see these guys are nice and huge. And these green tomatoes will never fully ripen up properly before the frost because it’s going to take a while. But these small ones they grow faster, they ripen and they mature quicker. So you’re going to have, you know, more tomatoes over your full season. And I’m good with cherry tomatoes. One of my favorite varieties is the black cherie tomato. And even though some of their plants are, you know, turning… some cucumbers, are getting some diseases and stuff here… these tomatoes here are quite doing well. Another tip I want to share with you guys before the first frost (don’t let the first frost happen and then do this coz then it’s not going to work) but if you do this before the first frost you may be able to salvage some of your tomatoes. So even some of the tomatoes that are still green, before the first frost, you know, just harvest them with the stems and all and keep them in, you know, like, a box. In a cool, you know, dry place. Not in the rain, maybe like, inside your house somewhere. You know and these guys, if they’re at a certain stage of ripeness, uh, you know, will turn, turn red for ya. Not that they’re going to taste good because you picked them early and they’re still ripening. They’re never going to have the full flavor, but they’ll still be edible. And of course many people still use their green tomatoes for eating. I personally wouldn’t do that myself. And of course, uh, all the ripe ones, you know, enjoy them now or… I encourage you guys to dehydrate them and save them for the winter. So after walking the community garden a few times and sharing with you guys the vegetables that did the best, I think I pretty much covered them all. If you have vegetables that do really well, hey, please post them down below to let other people know so that people can try those varieties as well. You know, I want to encourage you guys, wherever you live, to always increase the varieties and increase the genetic diversity you grow. Because this is the way we can learn and grow. You’ll plant different varieties of this or that, or some leafy green that you’ve never heard of from one of the seed catalogs. You know one of the good sources of seeds here is MV Seeds (that’s Mountain Valley Seeds). Most of those seeds are high altitude seeds that are going to do really well here in the short season. So yeah, that’s very important. But uh, other that that, I mean that’s pretty much the end of this video. But before I go, I want to share with you guys, what many of you guys are already going through for this year is… at the end of the season, and you’ve got all the plants kind of looking messed up, they’ve got white powdery mildew and they’re drying out and they’re just not looking too good. What do you do? Right? What I like to do is simply this, you know, number one I’ll cut all the plants down. And actually what I’m doing these days is I’m cutting them down at the base. So I’m leaving all the root matter in the soil. I’m not pulling up the root matter, unless they’re getting in the way of the crop that, you know, uh, I’m going to plant next, uh, go around in that raised bed. Why am I doing this? Right? I’m doing this so that I can adhere more to the no-till gardening and disturb the soil less. And also so that I can feed the microbes, the earthworms, any other creatures in the beds. So I’m just cutting off the root zone, leaving it in there. It’s going to compost in-place. And this is especially true if you live in a place, you know, where you’re not growing in the winter time. So once you clear you space of all the top growth, you leave the roots under the ground. Then the next thing I would do to prepare for the next growing season, or in this case the dormant growing season, is… uh, you know… This raised bed here, most raised beds the level of the soil will sink down, you know, over the season. So this raised bed looks like it’s sunk down at least 6 inches. So what I would like to do is (minimum) put 3 inches of good amended compost on top of this raised bed, before doing anything else. So I’d add things like the rock dust. Add things like the worm castings. Maybe some the different fertilizers, things like the soil humates… Maybe like also, you know, uh, grass… You know, uh, just a nice rich mixture of different, you know, compost mixed with other nutrients to just basically put over the top. This way the biologic activity of the soil can start breaking this stuff down and getting it ready for the next growing season, whenever that may be. And in my case, I top up my beds and I plant in it for the next growing season because I grow year-round. And growing year-round is simply the best thing that you guys could do. Now in a place like Salt Lake City here, I’m looking up in the mountains and I’m already seeing snow up there right? Umm, you know, probably to grow all year round would be a lot more challenging. But it can be done, you know, building some kind of hoop house over this would probably keep it warm enough to grow some crops that are frost tolerant. Such as, you know, uhh, maybe some collared greens or some kale right? Some of the kale crops are, uh, quite frost tolerant and will deal with frost. Of course other things like the allium or onion family, many of them, will do well also. So you guys can still be growing food in the winter with a covering over it, some plastic on there to keep it warmer on the inside. And that’s my first recommendation is to always keep something growing in your soil, right? Now second-best if you’re not going to grow edibles in your soil, maybe spread out some seeds to grow some cover crops over the winter if your climate allows you to do that. I know some places will just have snow on the ground. You’re not really going to do too many cover crops with snow on the ground if it’s there consistently. The final thing I would do if you guys aren’t doing to do those first two choices is cover the soil at a bare minimum! So don’t leave your beds as like bare soil that you can look at. It’s like us walking outside, you know, with no clothes on! And unless you are a naturalist or a hippie, you’re probably not going to that. We’re all going to put clothes on before we go outside because we don’t want to be bare, right? And, uh, our soils don’t want to be bare either. And so I would encourage you guys to cover your soils in the winter. Like they’re doing here, like, they put, you know, just some straw here to cover the soil. I’d probably put a much deeper layer of straw here. And whether you’re going to use some kind of straw, whether you’re going to use some kind of leaves, whether you’re going to use some kind of wood chips, I don’t really care. Or even if you don’t have all those organic matters, which is what I would prefer, cover it with a tarp or a piece of plastic. I mean, that’s the last resort but cover the damn soil man! That’s very important in my opinion to, you know, keep all the biological activity. Keep all the microbes and fungi and earthworms active because, you know, they don’t like the bare exposed soil that, you know, exposes it to the elements especially in the winter time. Um, then you’re basically going to let that stuff decompose and protect the soil over the winter. It’s going to decompose, break down a little bit depending on your climate and what-not. And then when you;re ready to plant out the next growing season, you’re going to basically scratch back all the stuff that didn’t degrade down. You may be able to top off your bed with some more compost, make sure you get some fungal dominated compost in there. Very important. If you don’t know what that is, fungal dominated compost, check my other videos for it. Put as much of that stuff as you can in your garden coz it’s actually quite rare. And in my opinion, most gardens don’t have enough fungal based compost or fungal activity to grow optimally well, from my observations. But yeah, you’re going to scratch back all the stuff that’s left over, compost that out, and then you’re just going to go ahead and replant for your next season. So that’s how I would prepare, you know, my raised bed for the winter. That’s what I would do. Of course, you know, post your links down below or your ideas down below on what you guys do, you know, it would be interesting to hear. But I want to encourage you guys to cover your soil, keep your soil protected, you know, try to disturb your soil the least amount as possible because this will raise the fertility of your soil. And overall increase the way that you’re able to grow and increase the quality of the produce, increase the quantity of the produce, and make the produce more bug and disease resistant, and build a nice healthy microbiome in your soil. And this something that conventional farming and even organic farmers that still use tractors are simply not doing. And this is, you know, this is how nature works you know. So this is nothing new, this is to kinda try to use nature to our advantage instead of try to work against it. To think that man is more intelligent than nature because we able to invent rotor tillers and we were able invent, you know, tractors and we were able to invent all these chemical fertilizers right? That’s not the way. And I know a lot of you guys are really into your tilling and all this stuff, but hey if you have a lot of beds that normally you would till up, you know hey, try one or two the method that I’m recommending to you guys. And see what happens. Do an experiment. You know, “I’m just going to try that crazy step that John says and see what works”. See what happens, see if my growing is better or worse in those beds than the ones that you tilled in. You know, I bet dollars to donuts that in time you’ll see that no-till beds will perform better. And that’s just the feedback I’ve gotten in my own garden and the feedback I’ve gotten from so many farmers that are doing the no-till method. So anyways, I’ve come to the end of my time here at the community garden in Salt Lake City. If you guys have enjoyed this episode and want me to come back here and want me to do more videos here in Salt Lake, hey, give me a thumbs up! I might get up here again. Also be sure to click that subscribe button right down below. I have new videos every three to four days and if you subscribe you’ll get notified of new and upcoming videos. It’s really one of the best ways for you guys to, you know, stay excited about gardening! I always try and excite you guys about gardening in some aspect but also try and teach you guys something at the same time. Keep you motivated and keep you guys growing because it’s really important to me. And finally be sure and check my past episodes. My past episodes are a wealth of knowledge especially in the winter time when you can’t get out and garden. At least you can see me, hear me, and you know, learn from me, from all the different gardens and places I’ve visited over the years. And I’ll still of course be gardening year-round and I want to encourage you guys to do that also if you’re able to do that in your area. But minimum, grow some sprouts and micro-greens that you can grow inside your home in the winter. So, once again my name is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com, we’’l see you next time. And until then remember, keep on growing.

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How to grow medicinal vegetables that can help heal disease

fourcowfarm posted the article • 1 comments • 194 views • 2017-09-23 03:30 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
 
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Alright this is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you. We’re well into fall here and I’m still getting my fall garden planted out and growing for the season. Got my lettuce bed. You guys probably can't see it, it’s right next door. You’ll probably see it in an upcoming shot. I’ve got this bed planted out on this side and I got like about 5 other beds on the other side of the yard all planted out but today I’m planted out another huge bed—this bed is approximately 4 feet by about 16 feet long and so this calls for a lot of plans. My lettuce bed actually has I think about 104 plants in the same size bed. This bed, because I am planting a different plant or crop, which is all of the—my leafy greens and Brassica family plants, they're going to require a little bit different spacing like about 12 inch spacing is what square foot gardening calls for. I'm doing actually a diamond pattern instead of a box pattern and I got between 14 inches in one direction and 11 inches in the other direction so I'm fitting 72 plants in this raised bed. I thought I’d share with you guys, you know, some of the special fertilizers that I’m putting in to my bed, into my soil to grow higher quality and the most nutritious crops on the entire planet—but before I do, actually, I want to share with you guys the plants I’ll be planting in this bed. So I got 3 flats here, I'm only going to probably use like 2 flats, I'm going to pick and choose of these plants that I might have duplicates of. But I'm going to go over all the different kinds with you guys really quick. As you guys know, my channel is called GrowingYourGreens and it’s called GrowingYourGreens for a reason because especially in the winter time I want you guys to really focus on the leafy greens. These are the crops that grow really well and they're the most nutritious foods in the entire planet. All these plants here are basically anti-cancer factories, right? They're sitting out here in the sun, they're absorbing the sun rays, right, and they're producing all these plant metabolites. The plant metabolites is actually what the plant produces to keep itself healthy to prevent and defend itself from diseases and pests, the weather and all these kinds of things. But more importantly when you eat the plants you get those benefits and each one of these different kinds of plants produce little bit different, you know, witch’s brew of these helpful compounds. Isothyocyanates is just one of these many compounds. One of the discovered compounds—I'm sure there’s plenty of other undiscovered ones. My goal everyday is to eat 2 pounds of leafy greens and I'm easily able to do that in the winter time with all the greens I'm growing in my garden. So anyways let’s go over the different greens I’ll be growing this year in my garden here. Heirloom kale, red Russian, I love that guy a lot. It’s a really good performer. In some areas it will grow year round. I’ve got 12 of those guys. Over here we got some more leafy greens. This is the heirloom kale lacinato also known as black kale, Tuscan kale, or dino kale. I’ve got a bunch of those guys here. I’ve got like 3 six packs, I don't know if I’ll be planting all those guys in here. And I got one six pack of the Georgia collards. Oh, I did want to mention—the dino kale, that’s also another really good performer. That will grow in the summer here, also the winter here. So if you only had to pick one kale, I’d pick the dinosaur kale. It’s like the most resilient one I found. Going over to collard greens, if you had to pick only one kind of collard greens I’d pick the Georgia collards, they're more heat resistant. Actually, I have some that I think I actually over-summered, because the summers here are quite hot. I’ve had plants go on the entire summer, Georgia collards. I grow all these for the leafy greens although these plants will also go to flower and set seed which are also edible. The next category of plants I'm growing, mostly for the flours but also the greens. The greens on all these guys are all edible. Up next here we got some cheddar cauliflower. I love the cheddar cauliflower a lot. It grows the cauliflower but instead of growing the white head it grows a brilliant, cheddar cheese colored cauliflower. So it’s like, yellow-orangeish color. Really cool. I want to encourage you guys besides just eating phytonutrient rich foods like the leafy greens here, you also want to eat highly pigmented foods. Instead of eating something white, you know, like a white chocolate—that was a bad example, but I really want you guys to focus on foods of color, right? There’s new emerging research that has already come out, has been published, and studies that have yet not to be published and not to come out yet but the phytonutrients are probably in my opinion one of the most important nutrients in the food and especially when you're eating all these refined process foods, white flower, white sugar, white vinegar, right, all these foods have all these beneficial pigments processed out of them, and then much of the beneficial properties of the food goes down the toilet, in my opinion. So that’s why I'm growing some really rich and colorful foods in my garden to do the exact opposite. This is actually long island brussel sprouts. I don’t generally get the brussel sprouts here, the brussel sprouts and the stalks everybody always wants but I don’t really care because those guys actually, I grow for the immature buds. Maybe I grow also in addition, for the leaves. So I don’t care if I don’t get the brussel sprouts, what I'm used to in the store, all the brussel sprout plant produces is leaves, copious amounts of leaves that I just eat like collards or kale or cauliflower leaves or broccoli leaves which all have very similar nutrition for you guys. Of course, next we got some more stuff. We got that cauliflower rainbow mix. So this probably has the white, the cheddar, and the purple cauliflower in there. Like that a lot. Let’s move this guy over here. And then also I got these guys. We got graffiti cauliflower. Look at the picture on there. This is like a nice purple, rich colored cauliflower so once again, you know, I want you guys to eat the foods of color. There’s been some special research regarding purple foods. The research was done with purple carrots. They fed rats purple carrots along with junk food. And then they fed another set of rats, just the junk food alone and the rats eating the purple carrots with the junk food either did not gain weight and/or lost weight, whereas the animals eating the junk food gained the weight. Now, I'm not saying that you know, eat purple high antioxidant rich foods like purple carrots and then eat junk food—why even eat the junk food whatsoever? So ij ust like to eat the deep rich purple pigemented foods such as purple carrots, purple cauliflower, purple broccoli, blueberries, blackberries, without the junk food, right, to get the benefits of those guys because they probably help keep you slim and also help keep you healthy. And over in this bunch we got just the standard purple cauliflower, so I'm not sure if that’s different from the graffiti variety that you guys just saw. Of course we got one last six pack here we’re going to go over really quick. Now I'm also growing the broccoli, right? I think it’s sad how cauliflower and broccoli are grown for the immature flower buds. That’s what they're known for. You go to buy broccoli or cauliflower in the store and you get the immature flower buds that you know are just the flower, that you're going to eat. This is sad because people will not use the leaves of these plants. The leaves of these plants can be eaten just like a kale or collard green. In some instances, in my opinion, they're actually more delicious and sweeter than the kale and collard greens. So as long as these guys are growing, they're producing leaves, I can harvest these leaves to put in juices, add to smoothies, make kale chips or broccoli leaf chips or cauliflower leaf chips or Brussels sprout leaf chips. To me it’s all the same. Like, greens are greens and I want to get as many of these guys into me as possible and I love the winter time because I can do just that and also because it’s so cold out, the plant makes additional sugars and puts them into the leaves so they're actually sweeter. So if you're eating kale out of your summer garden, you're like, man that kale stuff John, that sucks, it tastes bad, I'm not going to eat it. Right? Try it again, give it another chance and grow it in your winter garden when it’s cold because this will make the sugar come out and they're going to taste so much better and I'm going to get you to be a lover of kale, alright. So here we got the broccoli early dividend. Another thing I want to encouraged you guys to do is to plant different varieties of the crops, right? I'm growing not just like all white cauliflower, I got graffiti, I got purple, I got cheddar, I got a rainbow mix and the same with the broccoli. I got the early dividend here, we got another early dividend because I like my cauliflower like I like my women—early. No, wait, that didn’t make sense. I like the early broccoli so I have some broccoli leaves sooner rather than later in the season. I got two six packs of those and I got some English violet broccoli. Never seen this variety before, I'm glad they have this as a start so I was able to buy it. I do want to say that I'm actually quite lucky to have the availability of all these plants and all the unique and different varieties because I know if you only have one nursery or something near you, you go to that nursery, whatever they got, they got and that’s what you get. So I know some of you guys still buying Bonnie plants from Home Depot and Lowe’s and all this stuff, I buy those when I don’t have any other options but I prefer to go to a local nursery where I’ve gotten some of these or the majority of these plants actually came from CPG plant nursery. If I remember, I’ll post a link down below. They're in southern California. I basically buy around 500 plants this last trip and this is the last major bunch that I will be planting out in the garden. I got some stragglers, like two more flats left. But yeah, I'm glad that they really grow a wide variety so you guys can have a nice selection of different plants and see which ones do better, grow better for you and also which ones you like, are tastier for you. This one is actually called the broccolini aspa brock. So I never grew this before, it’s going to be fun to see how it does. And of course, along with my purple cauliflower, I got some purple sprouting broccoli. I really like the foods of color and I want to really encourage you guys to grow like purple colored foods. They're the bomb. Alright. I think the last bunch—yeah I think this is it. I got the broccoli cauliflower romanesco, this is kind of a mixture between the two. so what’s going to happen is, I'm going to go ahead and select, two flats of all these, maybe not take out the doubles. And then I'm going to plant like all these intermixed in this bed here and I’m going to get probably planted out, get a good start on it, plant a bunch out, and then I'm going to come back at you and show you guys how I plant these guys and more importantly, the special fertilizer that I use to already take the high levels of phytonutrients, phytochemicals, vitamins and minerals in these plants they already produce to the next level. So as you guys can see, more than half the bed planted out in this bed. I got basically five rows, one, two, three, four, five, they are all offset, so they're not even, they're making a diamond pattern. Going down this direction between this plant and this plant, there’s 14 inches and then going diagonally between plants, there’s about 11 inches. So I kind of like this spacing, it just kind of allows me to get more plants in the bed with you know, little bit more space between them. Normally you would want to space your Brassica plants every 12 inches or so. I like to kind of put them a little bit closer so I can get more plants in the same space. In addition as you guys can see there’s a lot of extra space in between the plants still. I'm going to go in and either probably seed with some kind of intermediary plant in between while these guys get big so I can easily get—harvest a radish, for example in between the plants and maybe I might do something like carrots even, in between, some nice root vegetables in between, to maximize my space. I could put some kind of leafy green down in the bottom, maybe some kind of minor’s lettuce. Better even, mosh or moshe. I think I’ll do that actually, I love mosh. But anyways, I got that planted out. What I thought I’d do next is actually share with you guys how I'm planting these guys out… as you guys can see, I got all these stakes so you know, the first step of clearing this bed—it had peppers in it so I clear cut them down. I just cut to the stems and left all the root matter underneath and I leave them there. That’s my new practice now, to encourage more soil micro-biome and life in the soil. Unless they get in the way when I'm digging my new planting holes, they stay in the ground and just get to rot in place. Actually, I’ve only ran into a few of them through this process. That’s kind of cool. It saves me work from having to you know, pull them up, shake them out, and compost them in my compost bin. They're just going to go ahead and compost in the bed where they lay. So as you guys can see, I basically put these bamboo stakes and I actually do this elaborate setup of making as tying from each end to the other end and making little sticks to like space out each plant at the appropriate spacing. And you know it does take some time and this is a way I’d like to garden, not saying you guys have to do this. I know a lot of you guys plant haphazardly but I'm really here to produce the most amount of food in the smallest amount of space and by being more methodical it allows me to do just that. So if you want to see actually that process, be sure to check the link down below, if I remember, to a link of me planting this exact bed out of peppers, the same peppers that I’ve clear cut, because I showed you guys from like a roof shot, like how I plant all this out and the whole process I go through. Any case, once we got all the stakes in I basically pull out one stake at a time and I basically take a bulb planter. And yes, I know I'm planting transplants, starts and not bulbs, but I like the bulb planter because it allows me to minimally disturb the soil. Most of you guys might dig a little shovel or trowel and dig a little hole or even your hand but I like that this gets in there because there’s just about the right size hole to plant from my jumbo six packs and everything and I actually even have some electrical tape on here to denote how deep I need to go so don’t go too deep. So just put that in there and spin this baby around, go to my depth, I pull out a nice core fo soil that’s in there and then I go to a bucket and I just tap it out and it’s empty, ready for the next one. Then I got a hole that’s all ready to be planted out. So the next thing that I do is actually stock that hole with more nutrients. The other step that I didn’t mention actually is all this new layer on the top is all new compost mixture so I mix things like two different kinds of worm castings, maybe three different kinds of compost, maybe three different kinds of rock dusts, John and Bob’s soil products, all three different ones that I have, and then also put in like, oh, some biochar, some insect frass, just a mixture of all the different things I have laying around and mixed it all up. Top this whole bed off, got some coconut coyer from the local coconut company, wonder soil. Yeah but anyways, top this all off, and so that’s what adds fertility to my soil. In addition, all the other compost that’s all in there that this bed is filled actually with doctor’s earth bagged soil which is a good high quality product. This product I would recommend if you can't find bulk stuff near you. It may be still available at home depot, I think they might be getting clearance out so it might be good to check your local home depot and see if the stuff is on final clearance when it’s going to be dirt cheap and I'm just going to load up if it is because I think they might be discontinuing it, I'm not sure. But anyways, yeah. Top that off. But even then, you know, I want to add further fertility for my plants, especially my baby transplants as I plant them in so I add a few things. The first thing is, add some of this stuff. This is the Dr. Earth’s life fertilizer and this is an all purpose fertilizer. It’s good for fruits, vegetables, flowering plants, shrubs, ground covers, and even your lawns. And I like that this stuff is actually pelatized. So I have had like the powder Dr. Earth stuff but I find it gets very dusty very fast so I like basically just to stick my hand in here and I just take a bunch out and just sprinkle a few bits into each planting hole. Alright? And that adds lots of different nutrients. This is a 5-5-5 fertilizer and lots of different organic materials to add in but in addition it also contains non plant food ingredients including many different kinds of beneficial bacteria and more importantly mycorrhizae, humic acids, kelp, and all kinds of other nutrients for my baby plants to kind of get them off to the right start. Now besides that stuff I add something else and I actually have decanned another product which I will talk to you about in another minute before I come back in this little bucket here which is actually the original one I got last year and this is a western biotech solutions GTF glucose tolerance factor soil conditioner—that’s what it says on the label but that’s not what’s in here. This is last year’s label. I'm just reusing a container and encourage you guys always to reuse instead of recycle. It’s better. So what I do is I empty some soil conditioners into here and this is what it looks like. It’s basically in saw dust… and I take one scoop of this stuff and I put it in each hole. And the scoop size I'm using is a level scoop size of one teaspoon. Now, why this step is important is because this adds specific amounts of very essential trace materials into the planting hole, into the soil, for the plants to absorb so that then they could hold onto those plants, digest these in organic minerals, turn them into organic form so that when I eat the plants, I could get these very important trace minerals that in my opinion and based on research I’ve read will help keep me healthy and disease free. And that’s very important because most people have no clue about this and I'm going to go into a segment at the end of this, even get more into it, so after I add those two items to the planting hole, I'm ready to plant my plant start. So what we got here is we got some red Russian kale. How I'm doing this actually I'm planting in rows but they're diagonal rows so it’s going to look really cool. I got all red Russian kale in this side, this row, got some English violet broccoli in the next row, got their lacinato or Tuscan kale in the next row, like all the way down so when it’s done it’s going to look really cool or when it’s growing. So what we’re going to do is we’re going to go ahead and take one of these little heirloom red Russian kale plants, pop it out of the cell, got really nice roots in there in the bottom and so what I generally do is I go ahead and take an empty bucket. This is basically the soil I topped off my bed with, I enriched it a little bit more, I’ll put this, I’ll go over here, I’ll just you know, tease out the roots like I’m teasing out the hair, if you're a girl in the ‘80s. And we get them kind of hanging out a little bit and then I put this guys, which is a shaker bottle which is once again also reused. Unscrew it and then I just shake a little bit of this stuff on there while I’m like over my little bucket that has all my—the stuff that I topped of the bed with. Once I shake that on there then I’ll go very carefully to the planting hole, maybe I’ll put a little bit of the stuff in the bucket in the planting hole and then I’ll drop these guys in there carefully. And then I’ll take my fingers and kind of go around and take out the airspace because the jumbo six pack size is a little bit smaller than the bulb planter so we’re kind of making sure all the soil is flushed near the bottom. And then we’re going to finally take like a handful of this stuff on the top and just spread it on the top. Sometimes I’ll find on Brassica plants like these guys, they start to pop out, so they can be planted a little bit deeper and that’s what we did and that’s basically how I planted. Now you're probably wondering, John, what’s in this stuff right here? Let me go ahead and show ya. So this is a mixture of several different items. I think I have like maybe—at least two thirds of this shaker bottle is this stuff right here. It’s actually known as the mycorrhizae granular mycorrhiza. So this has different kinds of endo and ecto mycorrhiza, good for both vegetables and trees and I know what you're thinking right now—John, the Brassica family of plants they don’t like colonizing with the mycorrhiza. Well, that may be true but I'm also going to be growing things in between these plants. Plus I just want them in my soil to hang out for next time. And also the other thing is, as much as this is two thirds of this shaker bottle, I got some other things in there, so the remaining two thirds consist of a few things. Number one, the plant success siable premium mycorrhiza innoculent with beneficial bacteria, seaweed, and humic acids so that also gets the remaining one third in here. I think I like that mainly for the beneficial bacteria. In addition I got the pure protein dry powder. Also part of this. Last two thirds. And of course I got the aqua sap. So I add these additional nutrients to really give the plants boost so that they don’t have as much shell shock or root shock or transplant shock once they're planted back in. iv’e actually already planted all the lettuces and a whole bunch of other stuff with the same mixture that I’ve been using for years and I’ve always been tweaking it over the years, this is my latest mixture and they always do really well. So yeah that’s how I plant them out. I guess next I need to actually plant the rest of these out. Then we’re going to come back at you, and let you guys know why this saw dust stuff here, these trace minerals are probably one of the most important agents of fertility you guys could add to your garden and probably aren’t. So as you guys can see me, behind me, I’ve got this raised bed all planted out, 72 plants, took me several hours, that was like today’s project today, the sun is going down, it’s getting kind of cold. I really dislike when the days get shorter you know, and the sun goes down earlier. So it just encourages me to get up early, get outside and do my gardening earlier before it gets too cold in the afternoon. Anyways, I got my gardening done for today. Last thing I got to do for this bit is put a little fence around it because otherwise my dog gets up in there and digs and leaves footprints and poops, so, I’ll do that after I shoot this video. But I want the come back at you, and let you guys know what was that sawdust like powder fertilizer that I was putting in? And I got my new shipment in of that stuff and what it is, it’s actually called the western biotech soil solutions. It says grow your own mineral supplements, and this is the master gardener pack soul conditioner. This pack right here isn’t for the faint of heart, right. This pack is like if you're serious about your health and growing high quality food. If you're not, turn off this video now because you can continue do your free gardening style, right? I mean I want to tell you guys really quick why I'm so into gardening and growing food and growing not only just any old food but the highest quality most nutritious food I possibly can. And that is basically because when I was in my 20s, I had a life threatening illness known as spinal meningitis. I was hospitalized and my mom stayed by my side the whole time I was hospitalized. I was taken into an intensive care unit, I was passed out, I woke up in intensive care with all these IVs stuck inside me and you know when you're sick in the hospital, you ask the doctor one question, ehy doc, when am I going to g et out of here? And he gave me the answer no one wants to hear, no matter what age you're at. I was just graduated from college. He said, you might not make it out of here. And I thought about it for a second like… I'm like, whoa, this is not a good situation. I might not make it out of here, he’s like you have a viral version of the spinal meningitis and there is no medical treatment for you. And that’s not something anyone wants to hear at any age. You know? And so that like, I was like, wow, this is messed up, this is the last thing I'm going to see potentially, my life is inside this hospital and not get to experience life, not to use my college degree to the benefit of anybody. Or anything, or me, or anything. And so luckily, as you guys know, I made it out of that situation but I could not stay through the medical system. I could only stay through higher powers and that’s what I like to say—I was given a second chance and my second chance is in my opinion, help thy fellow man. Promises, prayed when I was in the hospital that if I make it out of there, I'm going to be a better person in this life and do the best I can. So anyways, I made out of that situation and when I was leaving I said doctor, hey doc, why did I get in this situation in the first place? Like why was I sick and none of my college buddies that I was playing broom ball with get sick? And he says, well you have what’s called compliment immune deficiency which basically—basically, in his words he says you have a chronically weakened immune system because of your genes. So he blamed it on my genes. And so all I knew after I left is that John, you need to do something to make your genes stronger so that you don’t get sick again, you don’t get in the hospital and the doctor is not telling you again in another point, you might not make it out alive, because that’s not a fun place to be, right? The only thing I wanted when the doctor’s told me that is I just wanted my health. I didn’t want a million dollars, I didn’t want a billion dollars, I didn’t want to be president. I didn’t want anything except to have my health because I almost lost it. And I think it’s really sad in this day and age that we all take our health for granted. We all take being healthy for granted. I take being healthy for granted. I walk around without stomachaches, without all these different aches and pains like my brother who is a couple years younger than me, you know? And it’s only in times when I make a video and really think about it that I really appreciate the health that I have. But you know the health that I have did not happen to me haphazardly, right? I’ve been working very judiciously for the last 21 years now on building my health to the next level. What’s in this box in my opinion can take your health to the next level no matter where you're at. So I learned at a young age that your health is your greatest wealth and it’s not about making money in our world. It’s about having your life and not only being healthy and living a long life but living a long, healthy productive life that you know, you're doing something worthy for worthy goals and making the planet a better place. A lot of people are not making the planet a better place and so I want to do my part to make this planet better for the future generations and my kids and their kids and their kids’ kids. So anyways, back to the soil solutions soul conditioner and why I think this is revolutionary in fertilizers. Let’s go ahead and read the bottom—provide your soil with proper bio available minerals needed to increase mineral uptake in the plants. So here’s the thing, as you guys know, you know, I’ve put a lot of different nutrients in my soil, probably more than anybody I know or have ever met. Whether that’s an overkill or I'm overdoing it or I need to put that much stuff in—you know that’s up to debate but once again this is my money, and gardening is my hobby, and I can spend my money however I like. My dad said when I was kid, John you can take all your money and taking pennies and throw it off the golden gate bridge for all I care, because he let us kids do with our money what we want. I believe by doing this, I'm making an investment. Not investment into the US treasury or the Bank of America or anything but investment in my health, which is my greatest wealth and the most—the thing that I have that is most dear and valuable to me! So I would encourage you guys, you know, to make your health first and yeah some of these things that I do may cost a little money but it’s going to grow a higher quality food which means you're going to be a higher quality person and you know, literally, in my opinion I'm buying myself out of getting sick in the future and that is priceless because I don’t want to go through all those pains and all those things that people go through when they're really sick and in the hospital with cancer and cancer is eating their body and I don’t even want to know how painful that can be, right? And so up till now I’ve added things like the rock dust and different kinds of rock dust, 5 different kinds of rock dust and different kinds of rock dust with the trace minerals because I know that trace minerals are super important. I put in soil humates, I had doctor Joel Wallack, I’ll put a link below to that video if I remember, you know, who has done all kinds of research on how important and vital trace minerals are to your health. And unfortunately with top soil degradation, the standard farming practices of today even organic farming practices, they're not replacing the certain trace minerals in the soils like there should be. Furthermore, with soil contamination of certain trace minerals, other trace minerals may not be absorbed properly and things may not work in the system. So I try to bring my soil back into balance and add some of the trace minerals into the soil and that’s what I do with the rock dust. Rock dust is kind of like a shot gun, right. I shot gun all the different minerals and I hope that my plants take the minerals they need to be healthy, plus I get to eat that and be healthy. But still, it’s like playing poker. You're leaving many things up to chance, right? And I don’t want to leave things up to chance as much as I'm—you know I have to. I want to really gamble and pull that slot machine lever when I know I'm going to win. Well how do you know you're going to win? You can rig it. That’s what this stuff is, the soil conditioner you know, you're kind of rigging the system instead of putting in all kinds of rock dust and hoping that certain trace minerals are uptake and when you eat those you're going to get those in you. The soil solution products, what they allow you to do, they allow you to spoon feed the plants certain minerals that then it converts, takes up, and then makes it by all available for us. Furthermore, aside from just the minerals that’s taken up, because a plant may be healthier, it may be producing a different kind of plant metabolites which are nutrients for us. So what I want to do now is actually open up this box and show you guys what’s inside. Alright, in this box here, I’ve got some cool stuff. We’ve got a whole bunch of stuff. We got mainly the soil conditioner pack right here and in this pack there’s basically a couple bags, maybe I think like six bags of this fertilizer stuff. And this is the emotional wellbeing formula soil conditioner. So what this formula is, it’s specifically formulated with certain trace minerals that has been shown in people to be maybe deficient if you maybe don’t feel emotionally well, right? So you can flip this over and there’s a total like list of all the different minerals in there. So there’s like, 36 grams of boron, 225 grams of calcium, 365 grams of magnesium, 360 milligrams of selenium, 3650 milligrams of lithium, 100 grams of sulfur, and the pine shavings. And so here’s the thing. You're thinking, John, I could get like you know, boron from a supplement. Well, number one, the supplement, you know what you could take boron and other trace mineral supplements, the absorption rate is very low and that’s not how we’re supposed to get our minerals. We’re not supposed to be taking these mineral supplements, we’re not supposed to be sucking on copper pennies to get our copper. We want to get copper from the foods we eat and that’s how we were designed to do it. The problem is, especially if things like boron which may be deficient in soils across the world is not in the soils, the food that’s being grown in those soils will not have the boron in it. And so how do we know all these minerals are really important—well, there’s this book that comes along with this pack. It’s actually minerals and the genetic code, even if you're not going to buy this pack, I would encourage you to go on Amazon and pick up this book so you can learn about how important these trace minerals are if you don’t believe me. It says that an exposition an analysis of the doctor standard genetic period chart in the physical, chemical, and biological connection by Charles Walters. But in here, he goes into all the different minerals and how they're important for different conditions and also you know, more importantly, what specific plants take up these minerals. For example, iodine. Iodine in my opinion is a big deficiency these days. Most people get it from eating some iodide salt, but what if you don’t eat iodide salt because it’s that crap table salt that you cut out your diet—oh, I eat sea salt, John. You're not going to get enough iodine from sea salt. Maybe you’re eating sea minerals but other than that you know, things actually in here, it’s actually bladder wrack, it’s really high in iodine, pistachios, you know, it’s significantly lower in iodine than the kelp or bladder wrack. And then even going down from there, soy beans, red seeder shoots, yeah, anyways. It goes over all the different plants rich in iodine which is actually significantly lower than the seaweed so I just recommend seaweed for that. But pistachios could have 51 parts per million so we’re talking like parts per million the kelp has 54 hundred parts per million. And so the thing is this, we know that pistachios can absorb the iodine but the problem is if there’s not iodine in the soils the pistachios ain’t going to have it in there and this can be true for all minerals. So, that’s what this book goes over but let’s get back to this right here. So you know certain plants will take up certain trace minerals so you know they make recommendations on this formula. So for this formula, if you want to really take up boron and get more boron in your diet, you want to grow things like strawberries, lettuce, tomatoes, and cabbage. If you want to get more calcium, the tomatoes, cauliflower, and dill will absorb more of the calcium. If you want to get the magnesium uptake, you want to grow beans, oats, and spinach. If you want to get the selenium, selenium is a very important trace mineral that I believe many people may be deficient in these days. You want to grow things like milk thistle, lemongrass, and pumpkin. If you want to get lithium, lithium is an essential nutrient, we want to grow thyme, beans, and lettuce, and if you want to get sulfur, very important, cabbage and onions as well as the amazing tropical fruit named durian will take up a lot of sulfur. I think also garlic, garlic also rich in sulfur. But anyways, that lets you know what plants to get those trace minerals but then here it has basically the mineral function—boron, calcium, magnesium, selenium, lithium. I could sit here, read all of it. I might read one for maybe the boron. Boron appears to affect calcium and magnesium metabolism and membrane function that is essential for efficient absorption of calcium in the body. It was found by the US Department of Agriculture to significantly reduce the loss of calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus in post-menopausal women. It may also be helpful for ischemic heart disease and other forms of cardiovascular disease. Boron deficiencies sign may be related to the level of vitamin D and possibly other nutrients in the diet. Deficiency systems—osteoporosis and arthritis. So if you are deficient in certain trace minerals you may be more likely to get diseases—they’ve done a lot of different studies regarding that. So anyways this one is for the emotional well being, so if you're having emotional well being issues this is the one to get. Let’s see here. We’ve also got one for the GTF, glucose tolerance factor. This is the one I used last year. If you want to learn significantly more than what I'm talking about, these trace minerals than this episode, be sure to check that link down below where I interviewed Robert Rissingham regarding these products that he came up with and how he came up with it and why he came up with it—his parents actually had cancer, so he had to come up with a way so they could get the very important trace minerals so that they could overcome their cancer. I guess he wasn’t able to get to one of his parents but he was able to save the other one as well as his wife’s parents. But this one is the glucose tolerance factor, I’ve been using this, and this one has chromium, vanadium, molybdenum, zinc, sulfur, and the pine shavings. You guys are like, try to get pregnant, you guys can't, right? Then maybe you want to try this one—fertility and potency formula. Yeah, I want to be potent, man. You know what I mean by potent—does that apply for women too? I think it’s mostly men. Chromium, potassium, iodide, calcium, magnese, selenium, cobalt, sulfur, and pine shavings. Next one, this is the one actually I’ve been using this year now, planting all my lettuce you can see behind me. With this formula, health and immune sstem formula, this is probably the most important one for me because I did have an immune compromise, I want to make sure my immune system is strong and it has the specific trace minerals to build my immune system. This one has boron, potassium iodide, magnesium silver, zinc, tin, and sulfur. Got another one here. This is probably the largest killers of Americans in this day and age and people around the world is heart disease. This is heart, health, and cardiovascular formula. This has calcium, magnesium, selenium, copper, and sulfur. Then I got one left in here. This is an important one for many of you guys maybe getting up there, I think my dad needs to get on this one. This is the memory formula. And this is if you want to enhance your memory, maybe even things like certain diseases that you may lose your memory when you get older—magnesium, sulfur, boron, cobalt, selenium, and yttrium. That’s an interesting one. When have you got your yttrium lately? Anyways, each one of these formulas is specifically designed to support certain conditions so you can actually grow like your own medicine, literally, your foods, your fruits and your vegetables will uptake these trace minerals and you’ll get them when you eat the foods that you harvested. Now you might be thinking, john, why is all this important man and how much is this stuff? Well, I’ll tell you this. With the discount code, GYG, you guys get 30 percent off to buy these guys and these guys ain’t cheap—this whole box, it’ll set you back a pretty penny. It might be a paycheck or even two for some of you guys. But each one of these bags after the discount codes, it’ll be 100 dollars including shipping. But here’s the thing—this one bag of soil conditioner for the heart health and cardiovascular formula is going to treat one cubic yard so the rich man’s way to use this is actually to treat a yard, you know, of soil with this and then put it in your garden and plant in it. Another way if you don’t want to, you know, mix it into a whole yard is you could actually till it into a 10 by 10 raised bed, 3 inches deep. You could also do it that way. The way I do it, the rich man’s way, is spreading it out in your whole garden because you're not planting in every area of your garden unless you're having a forest style garden. The poor man’s way, the way I'm doing it, is actually ij ust take out one teaspoon of this stuff and then put it in each planting hole. That’s why these bags are going to last me for many years to come, and they’ll last. These will not evaporate or go bad or anything like that. But yeah, that’s this stuff. Definitely really important. I want to exactly show why it’s so important and why I like using this and this is going to blow your guys’ mind, so let me go ahead and grab some paperwork. So here’s the thing, fruits and vegetables and things, they’ll absorb these trace minerals if they're in the soil. In my opinion, you know, soils are getting devoid of minerals due to soil degradation due to unsustainable farming practices—yes, even organic farming is in many cases is degrading the soil because they're still tilling the soil. So I like to do the no till method which preserves some nutrients and then they're bringing in compost but the compost is grown on last year’s remnants and whatnot, and if the trace minerals aren’t in there, they're not going to magically appear unless you're getting heavy metal trace minerals from things that are falling out the sky that I won't mention what they are because some of you guys believe in it and some of you guys don’t, but anyways, the foods are deficient inn the minerals and if you're eating a mineral deficient diet, you may come down with health conditions. And that’s not fun. And I want to avoid these things and that’s why I'm doing and adding all these things into my soil. Anyways, here’s a test, right. So this is the health and immune system formula, the one actually I just used for my—the lettuce bed right over there. This is certified lab testing results for boron. So boron may be a mineral you're deficient in. There’s many implications for boron, I could read it on the back of the packages. I’ll send in a website for this company. You can read some of the different minerals, what they do, and how they can enhance their health. The company basically drew in a control bed, just regular soil. They grew vegetables. And then they added in the same soil blend, they added their health formula, and then they drew the same vegetables. So here’s for example… they grew formula grass and if you grew it in the health formula you could eat like one serving a week grass and if you just grew it in the control soil, you’d have to eat one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen servings of wheat grass. So you can have significantly more nutrition in less volume of food. So for broccoli you could get the trace minerals by eating one head you know, if you added the health formula instead of two heads for not doing anything. And beans, it’s one serving of beans instead of 3 servings of beans. So what’s the benefit to this. The benefit to this is actually you could eat lower calories to get the same amount of trace minerals. So calories for the health formula, you could eat 140 calories versus 413 calories. So you could eat significantly less calories and calorie restriction has been the only thing that has been shown—proven to enhance the longevity so now you can eat less calories but still maintain and get your nutrients. This is jus ton the boron, go onto the next page where we talk about zinc. Zinc, another important trace mineral. Many friends of mine, whether they're eating a plant based diet or not are deficient in zinc. That’s because zinc is disappearing from the soils and not being supplemented because standard agriculture is focused on 3 main minerals putting in NPK, and they don’t care about anything else man, and they're growing these big giant heads of lettuce and things that taste like nothing that don’t give you the nutrients that your body really requires to function and don’t get started if you're eating processed foods, man. Processed foods, that’s some of the cheapest stuff you could get and they process a lot of the nutrients out of it. Anyways, for example, zinc… wheat grass was the same whether they added the zinc or not but for example, the lettuce you know, you could eat one serving instead of two servings and the calories was 99 versus 104 so that’s not like a big savings for zinc, you know, with this formula versus the control. The control had good zinc levels in there. But what’s even more fun is when we get into these guys. This is the silver and the tin. So for example, on silver, for lettuce, you could either eat one head if you had this mineral formula added to your soil and actually this is the same one I added to my lettuce bed over there—oh my light came on, it’s getting dark. Or you could eat eight servings of lettuce to get the same amount of the trace minerals by using the health formula. And once again, the calorie difference, 140 versus 377, that’s like almost two and a half, three times difference. So on tin, on the health formula, versus the control you could eat one serving of radishes or you’ll have to eat 52 servings of radishes grown in control. I don't know, that’s a lot of radish to eat, right? My goal these days is to eat the minimum amount of food and get the maximum amount of nutrients. Not only the trace minerals but also the plant phytochemical sand phytonutrients and vitamins and minerals. And so that’s literally what this fertilizer allows me to do, allows me to really maximize the trace minerals so that I don’t have to buy a supplement that maybe isn’t easily absorbed. Of course this is advanced topic, advanced credit only if you're really serious about your health. Maybe you have a condition, maybe you have diabetes or something, right? You might want to try that glucose tolerance factor—try it. Right, it’s 100 bucks, right, you guys are buying insulin or whatever and if it wasn’t covered by insurance, it’d cost well more than 100 bucks. Like drugs, they're really expensive. Invested in some fertilizer. It’s going to last you a long time if you just scoop it out by the teaspoon like I'm doing, right. It’s a good investment. It’s going to last. Maybe you’ll see a difference in your diet. Of course growing high mineral food is not the answer to all the world’s health challenges, but in my opinion, it’s the part of the answer. Trace minerals are definitely indicated in many different disease situations and I have seen diseases get reversed by supplementing with foods rich in trace minerals. It may just be eating more fruits and vegetables. That may do it for you. It may be adding in things like kelp powders and seaweed powders and other kinds of plant available trace minerals into you. It might be adding in some of these vegetables that are grown in the soil solution products to basically up the levels of the certain trace minerals you need to be healthy, to get rid of your disease conditions. Of course, also, going along with that, I always want to encourage you guys to eat a healthy diet that’s focused around plants, right? Eat mostly what you grow in your garden and other plant foods. And if you got to eat other junk foods and processed foods and animal foods, eat those in small quantities, right? I don’t really care what you guys eat but I want you guys to eat a lot of plants, especially the ones you grow in high quality soil and also when you're spending a 100 dollars per bag like, I’ve just put in my garden. You're going to want to eat your food because you don’t want that very nutritious food to go to waste. I’d love to give my food to my family, my parents, my brother, my friends that you know, so they can have some high quality food, right, and maybe they could be healthy because of it. You know, Robert, the owner and CEO of this company, has research that shows there’s higher uptakes in his products you know that he’s grown and the fertilizer products that he’s used to grow food is of higher quality. Now here’s the thing—if you don’t want to invest in a fertilizer which is by far the cheapest way to do this and as time goes on, since he’s a new company hopefully he’s going to get these products into WalMart one of these days and it’s going to be super cheap to do it on mass scale—he does all these batches by hand and stuff, lots of labor, he uses US labor, pays a fair wage up in Wyoming or wherever he’s at. If you don’t want to buy the fertilizer and grow out with it, what he has is these guys—he sent me a couple of samples here. He has his wheatgrass powder. So this is wheatgrass powder grown in the glucose tolerance factory. Basically he took his product, grew wheatgrass with it, he got the wheatgrass and then he powdered it up and put it in a bottle for you so you guys could take it. This is the glucose tolerance factor—I guess he sent me three of those. So this is for people that may have things like diabetes, this may help them with their blood sugar issues to need less insulin or maybe even potentially get off it. He has been getting testimonials from people you know, on just literally changing and adding in some super mineral rich, certain mineral rich enhanced foods to get better. I think this is really where drugs will go in the future, instead of taking a drug to cure your diabetes or unfortunately, most drugs do not cure anything in my opinion. They are a crutch. My dad is on blood pressure lowering medications—it didn’t just fix him, he has to take that for the rest of his life, against my wishes, right? Maybe if he grew in the heart health fertilizer, maybe he’d get off his drugs and not have to keep buying drugs that basically don’t do anything to fix the problem, they’re a band-aid or a temporary crutch and an to a full solution whereas I believe these produces—if every drug store sold food. If you could go to the grocery store and buy food grown in these mineral products, people could have really nutritious food and maybe we wouldn’t have any diseases in our world today! This is, I think, where we really need to go. These fertilizer products need to go out to big industries and people need to start going, especially in the cannabis industry—medicinal cannabis. Could be grown with some of these trace minerals to get higher uptakes so that when the users of the cannabis, hopefully they're juicing it or using it in its raw state, it’s going to get better results because they're also going to get not only the cannabanoids but also higher levels of trace minerals that have been implicated in certain diseases, right? So the future is great, I'm glad to be living in this time now, there’s so much new information, technology, and things going on in the world so that you guys can get healthier one step at a time if you guys want to. And that’s what I simply do. a lot of you guys are going to poopoo this—John that stuff is too expensive! Fine! You can garden on the cheap, growing your own food is still better than the store, right? My goal, because I almost lost my life, is to grow the highest quality food so I don’t end up back at the hospital again and being out of control. I want to control my ultimate destiny and my ultimate health and I believe this is a product that can do it for you guys. So if you guys want to learn more about these products here, you want to visit the website WesternEnvironmentalServices.com, I’ll also put the links down below this video so you guys can check it out. Also be sure to use the discount code GYG. This is going to be for a limited time only and that’s going to get you guys 30 percent off these soil conditioners or even if you don’t want to grow your stuff in the soil conditioners, the cheapest way, this bag, if you're just dolling it out a teaspoon at a time with your transplants or even in your plant starts or when you're moving into pots or if you’re just growing into pots, you can put the teaspoon in the plants or around the seed, that’s going to definitely get some uptake. Another thing I forgot to mention is that once you treat your soil it’s going to last for 4 years so you don’t have to re-add this stuff to your soil for another 4 years but if it’s in the bag it’s probably going to literally last forever. The minerals aren’t going to just evaporate, so, yes, definitely an investment to make. If you don’t want to use this stuff, of course a discount code will also work for the different powders that in my opinion are actually quite expensive. Definitely pays money in this case to buy the fertilizer products, grow your own food, and actually take your food and dehydrate it into your own patterns so you could eat it in the winter and in times when you're not able to eat the healthiest food out of your own garden. That’s pretty much my episode for today. I didn’t eat lunch because I had to work through lunch to get this planted, make this video for you guys so I'm going to go in and eat lunch at dinner time and then I’ll eat dinner later. Anyways if you guys enjoyed this episode, learning about the trace minerals and the importance of them, I also want to encourage you guys to go to the website down below to learn about the trace minerals and why they are so important and also link to a database that talks about mineral deficiencies and what challenges, the health challenges you may see because of that. I mean, this is new, evolving research and I believe every place that has like a health facility retreat center that’s growing food should be using these, especially with people for certain conditions because it’s only going to in my opinion up the level of healing and success for people around the world. So yeah, anyways, if you enjoyed this episode, please give me a thumbs up. I’ll try to get out to Robert’s place and see how he’s growing it, what he’s doing, make a full video there, if I get a thousand thumbs ups. I’ll go out to his place in Wyoming, hopefully in the summertime because I'm going to freeze my butt off in the winter. Also make sure to check the links down below in the description. I have links in the original video I did with Robert, other videos I talked about in this episode, also the link to the place to buy the stuff. Also be sure to click that subscribe button right down below to be notified of my new and upcoming episodes. I have new and upcoming episodes every three to four days on this channel. You never know where I'm going to pop up, what you’ll be learning on my YouTube channel. Finally, be sure to check out my past episodes. My past episodes are a wealth of knowledge. I have over 1200 episodes now at this point teaching you guys all aspects on how to grow the highest quality food on the planet. So once again, my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com. we’ll see you next time. And until then, remember, keep on growing. view all
 


 
 
 
 
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Alright this is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you. We’re well into fall here and I’m still getting my fall garden planted out and growing for the season. Got my lettuce bed. You guys probably can't see it, it’s right next door. You’ll probably see it in an upcoming shot. I’ve got this bed planted out on this side and I got like about 5 other beds on the other side of the yard all planted out but today I’m planted out another huge bed—this bed is approximately 4 feet by about 16 feet long and so this calls for a lot of plans. My lettuce bed actually has I think about 104 plants in the same size bed. This bed, because I am planting a different plant or crop, which is all of the—my leafy greens and Brassica family plants, they're going to require a little bit different spacing like about 12 inch spacing is what square foot gardening calls for. I'm doing actually a diamond pattern instead of a box pattern and I got between 14 inches in one direction and 11 inches in the other direction so I'm fitting 72 plants in this raised bed. I thought I’d share with you guys, you know, some of the special fertilizers that I’m putting in to my bed, into my soil to grow higher quality and the most nutritious crops on the entire planet—but before I do, actually, I want to share with you guys the plants I’ll be planting in this bed. So I got 3 flats here, I'm only going to probably use like 2 flats, I'm going to pick and choose of these plants that I might have duplicates of. But I'm going to go over all the different kinds with you guys really quick. As you guys know, my channel is called GrowingYourGreens and it’s called GrowingYourGreens for a reason because especially in the winter time I want you guys to really focus on the leafy greens. These are the crops that grow really well and they're the most nutritious foods in the entire planet. All these plants here are basically anti-cancer factories, right? They're sitting out here in the sun, they're absorbing the sun rays, right, and they're producing all these plant metabolites. The plant metabolites is actually what the plant produces to keep itself healthy to prevent and defend itself from diseases and pests, the weather and all these kinds of things. But more importantly when you eat the plants you get those benefits and each one of these different kinds of plants produce little bit different, you know, witch’s brew of these helpful compounds. Isothyocyanates is just one of these many compounds. One of the discovered compounds—I'm sure there’s plenty of other undiscovered ones. My goal everyday is to eat 2 pounds of leafy greens and I'm easily able to do that in the winter time with all the greens I'm growing in my garden. So anyways let’s go over the different greens I’ll be growing this year in my garden here. Heirloom kale, red Russian, I love that guy a lot. It’s a really good performer. In some areas it will grow year round. I’ve got 12 of those guys. Over here we got some more leafy greens. This is the heirloom kale lacinato also known as black kale, Tuscan kale, or dino kale. I’ve got a bunch of those guys here. I’ve got like 3 six packs, I don't know if I’ll be planting all those guys in here. And I got one six pack of the Georgia collards. Oh, I did want to mention—the dino kale, that’s also another really good performer. That will grow in the summer here, also the winter here. So if you only had to pick one kale, I’d pick the dinosaur kale. It’s like the most resilient one I found. Going over to collard greens, if you had to pick only one kind of collard greens I’d pick the Georgia collards, they're more heat resistant. Actually, I have some that I think I actually over-summered, because the summers here are quite hot. I’ve had plants go on the entire summer, Georgia collards. I grow all these for the leafy greens although these plants will also go to flower and set seed which are also edible. The next category of plants I'm growing, mostly for the flours but also the greens. The greens on all these guys are all edible. Up next here we got some cheddar cauliflower. I love the cheddar cauliflower a lot. It grows the cauliflower but instead of growing the white head it grows a brilliant, cheddar cheese colored cauliflower. So it’s like, yellow-orangeish color. Really cool. I want to encourage you guys besides just eating phytonutrient rich foods like the leafy greens here, you also want to eat highly pigmented foods. Instead of eating something white, you know, like a white chocolate—that was a bad example, but I really want you guys to focus on foods of color, right? There’s new emerging research that has already come out, has been published, and studies that have yet not to be published and not to come out yet but the phytonutrients are probably in my opinion one of the most important nutrients in the food and especially when you're eating all these refined process foods, white flower, white sugar, white vinegar, right, all these foods have all these beneficial pigments processed out of them, and then much of the beneficial properties of the food goes down the toilet, in my opinion. So that’s why I'm growing some really rich and colorful foods in my garden to do the exact opposite. This is actually long island brussel sprouts. I don’t generally get the brussel sprouts here, the brussel sprouts and the stalks everybody always wants but I don’t really care because those guys actually, I grow for the immature buds. Maybe I grow also in addition, for the leaves. So I don’t care if I don’t get the brussel sprouts, what I'm used to in the store, all the brussel sprout plant produces is leaves, copious amounts of leaves that I just eat like collards or kale or cauliflower leaves or broccoli leaves which all have very similar nutrition for you guys. Of course, next we got some more stuff. We got that cauliflower rainbow mix. So this probably has the white, the cheddar, and the purple cauliflower in there. Like that a lot. Let’s move this guy over here. And then also I got these guys. We got graffiti cauliflower. Look at the picture on there. This is like a nice purple, rich colored cauliflower so once again, you know, I want you guys to eat the foods of color. There’s been some special research regarding purple foods. The research was done with purple carrots. They fed rats purple carrots along with junk food. And then they fed another set of rats, just the junk food alone and the rats eating the purple carrots with the junk food either did not gain weight and/or lost weight, whereas the animals eating the junk food gained the weight. Now, I'm not saying that you know, eat purple high antioxidant rich foods like purple carrots and then eat junk food—why even eat the junk food whatsoever? So ij ust like to eat the deep rich purple pigemented foods such as purple carrots, purple cauliflower, purple broccoli, blueberries, blackberries, without the junk food, right, to get the benefits of those guys because they probably help keep you slim and also help keep you healthy. And over in this bunch we got just the standard purple cauliflower, so I'm not sure if that’s different from the graffiti variety that you guys just saw. Of course we got one last six pack here we’re going to go over really quick. Now I'm also growing the broccoli, right? I think it’s sad how cauliflower and broccoli are grown for the immature flower buds. That’s what they're known for. You go to buy broccoli or cauliflower in the store and you get the immature flower buds that you know are just the flower, that you're going to eat. This is sad because people will not use the leaves of these plants. The leaves of these plants can be eaten just like a kale or collard green. In some instances, in my opinion, they're actually more delicious and sweeter than the kale and collard greens. So as long as these guys are growing, they're producing leaves, I can harvest these leaves to put in juices, add to smoothies, make kale chips or broccoli leaf chips or cauliflower leaf chips or Brussels sprout leaf chips. To me it’s all the same. Like, greens are greens and I want to get as many of these guys into me as possible and I love the winter time because I can do just that and also because it’s so cold out, the plant makes additional sugars and puts them into the leaves so they're actually sweeter. So if you're eating kale out of your summer garden, you're like, man that kale stuff John, that sucks, it tastes bad, I'm not going to eat it. Right? Try it again, give it another chance and grow it in your winter garden when it’s cold because this will make the sugar come out and they're going to taste so much better and I'm going to get you to be a lover of kale, alright. So here we got the broccoli early dividend. Another thing I want to encouraged you guys to do is to plant different varieties of the crops, right? I'm growing not just like all white cauliflower, I got graffiti, I got purple, I got cheddar, I got a rainbow mix and the same with the broccoli. I got the early dividend here, we got another early dividend because I like my cauliflower like I like my women—early. No, wait, that didn’t make sense. I like the early broccoli so I have some broccoli leaves sooner rather than later in the season. I got two six packs of those and I got some English violet broccoli. Never seen this variety before, I'm glad they have this as a start so I was able to buy it. I do want to say that I'm actually quite lucky to have the availability of all these plants and all the unique and different varieties because I know if you only have one nursery or something near you, you go to that nursery, whatever they got, they got and that’s what you get. So I know some of you guys still buying Bonnie plants from Home Depot and Lowe’s and all this stuff, I buy those when I don’t have any other options but I prefer to go to a local nursery where I’ve gotten some of these or the majority of these plants actually came from CPG plant nursery. If I remember, I’ll post a link down below. They're in southern California. I basically buy around 500 plants this last trip and this is the last major bunch that I will be planting out in the garden. I got some stragglers, like two more flats left. But yeah, I'm glad that they really grow a wide variety so you guys can have a nice selection of different plants and see which ones do better, grow better for you and also which ones you like, are tastier for you. This one is actually called the broccolini aspa brock. So I never grew this before, it’s going to be fun to see how it does. And of course, along with my purple cauliflower, I got some purple sprouting broccoli. I really like the foods of color and I want to really encourage you guys to grow like purple colored foods. They're the bomb. Alright. I think the last bunch—yeah I think this is it. I got the broccoli cauliflower romanesco, this is kind of a mixture between the two. so what’s going to happen is, I'm going to go ahead and select, two flats of all these, maybe not take out the doubles. And then I'm going to plant like all these intermixed in this bed here and I’m going to get probably planted out, get a good start on it, plant a bunch out, and then I'm going to come back at you and show you guys how I plant these guys and more importantly, the special fertilizer that I use to already take the high levels of phytonutrients, phytochemicals, vitamins and minerals in these plants they already produce to the next level. So as you guys can see, more than half the bed planted out in this bed. I got basically five rows, one, two, three, four, five, they are all offset, so they're not even, they're making a diamond pattern. Going down this direction between this plant and this plant, there’s 14 inches and then going diagonally between plants, there’s about 11 inches. So I kind of like this spacing, it just kind of allows me to get more plants in the bed with you know, little bit more space between them. Normally you would want to space your Brassica plants every 12 inches or so. I like to kind of put them a little bit closer so I can get more plants in the same space. In addition as you guys can see there’s a lot of extra space in between the plants still. I'm going to go in and either probably seed with some kind of intermediary plant in between while these guys get big so I can easily get—harvest a radish, for example in between the plants and maybe I might do something like carrots even, in between, some nice root vegetables in between, to maximize my space. I could put some kind of leafy green down in the bottom, maybe some kind of minor’s lettuce. Better even, mosh or moshe. I think I’ll do that actually, I love mosh. But anyways, I got that planted out. What I thought I’d do next is actually share with you guys how I'm planting these guys out… as you guys can see, I got all these stakes so you know, the first step of clearing this bed—it had peppers in it so I clear cut them down. I just cut to the stems and left all the root matter underneath and I leave them there. That’s my new practice now, to encourage more soil micro-biome and life in the soil. Unless they get in the way when I'm digging my new planting holes, they stay in the ground and just get to rot in place. Actually, I’ve only ran into a few of them through this process. That’s kind of cool. It saves me work from having to you know, pull them up, shake them out, and compost them in my compost bin. They're just going to go ahead and compost in the bed where they lay. So as you guys can see, I basically put these bamboo stakes and I actually do this elaborate setup of making as tying from each end to the other end and making little sticks to like space out each plant at the appropriate spacing. And you know it does take some time and this is a way I’d like to garden, not saying you guys have to do this. I know a lot of you guys plant haphazardly but I'm really here to produce the most amount of food in the smallest amount of space and by being more methodical it allows me to do just that. So if you want to see actually that process, be sure to check the link down below, if I remember, to a link of me planting this exact bed out of peppers, the same peppers that I’ve clear cut, because I showed you guys from like a roof shot, like how I plant all this out and the whole process I go through. Any case, once we got all the stakes in I basically pull out one stake at a time and I basically take a bulb planter. And yes, I know I'm planting transplants, starts and not bulbs, but I like the bulb planter because it allows me to minimally disturb the soil. Most of you guys might dig a little shovel or trowel and dig a little hole or even your hand but I like that this gets in there because there’s just about the right size hole to plant from my jumbo six packs and everything and I actually even have some electrical tape on here to denote how deep I need to go so don’t go too deep. So just put that in there and spin this baby around, go to my depth, I pull out a nice core fo soil that’s in there and then I go to a bucket and I just tap it out and it’s empty, ready for the next one. Then I got a hole that’s all ready to be planted out. So the next thing that I do is actually stock that hole with more nutrients. The other step that I didn’t mention actually is all this new layer on the top is all new compost mixture so I mix things like two different kinds of worm castings, maybe three different kinds of compost, maybe three different kinds of rock dusts, John and Bob’s soil products, all three different ones that I have, and then also put in like, oh, some biochar, some insect frass, just a mixture of all the different things I have laying around and mixed it all up. Top this whole bed off, got some coconut coyer from the local coconut company, wonder soil. Yeah but anyways, top this all off, and so that’s what adds fertility to my soil. In addition, all the other compost that’s all in there that this bed is filled actually with doctor’s earth bagged soil which is a good high quality product. This product I would recommend if you can't find bulk stuff near you. It may be still available at home depot, I think they might be getting clearance out so it might be good to check your local home depot and see if the stuff is on final clearance when it’s going to be dirt cheap and I'm just going to load up if it is because I think they might be discontinuing it, I'm not sure. But anyways, yeah. Top that off. But even then, you know, I want to add further fertility for my plants, especially my baby transplants as I plant them in so I add a few things. The first thing is, add some of this stuff. This is the Dr. Earth’s life fertilizer and this is an all purpose fertilizer. It’s good for fruits, vegetables, flowering plants, shrubs, ground covers, and even your lawns. And I like that this stuff is actually pelatized. So I have had like the powder Dr. Earth stuff but I find it gets very dusty very fast so I like basically just to stick my hand in here and I just take a bunch out and just sprinkle a few bits into each planting hole. Alright? And that adds lots of different nutrients. This is a 5-5-5 fertilizer and lots of different organic materials to add in but in addition it also contains non plant food ingredients including many different kinds of beneficial bacteria and more importantly mycorrhizae, humic acids, kelp, and all kinds of other nutrients for my baby plants to kind of get them off to the right start. Now besides that stuff I add something else and I actually have decanned another product which I will talk to you about in another minute before I come back in this little bucket here which is actually the original one I got last year and this is a western biotech solutions GTF glucose tolerance factor soil conditioner—that’s what it says on the label but that’s not what’s in here. This is last year’s label. I'm just reusing a container and encourage you guys always to reuse instead of recycle. It’s better. So what I do is I empty some soil conditioners into here and this is what it looks like. It’s basically in saw dust… and I take one scoop of this stuff and I put it in each hole. And the scoop size I'm using is a level scoop size of one teaspoon. Now, why this step is important is because this adds specific amounts of very essential trace materials into the planting hole, into the soil, for the plants to absorb so that then they could hold onto those plants, digest these in organic minerals, turn them into organic form so that when I eat the plants, I could get these very important trace minerals that in my opinion and based on research I’ve read will help keep me healthy and disease free. And that’s very important because most people have no clue about this and I'm going to go into a segment at the end of this, even get more into it, so after I add those two items to the planting hole, I'm ready to plant my plant start. So what we got here is we got some red Russian kale. How I'm doing this actually I'm planting in rows but they're diagonal rows so it’s going to look really cool. I got all red Russian kale in this side, this row, got some English violet broccoli in the next row, got their lacinato or Tuscan kale in the next row, like all the way down so when it’s done it’s going to look really cool or when it’s growing. So what we’re going to do is we’re going to go ahead and take one of these little heirloom red Russian kale plants, pop it out of the cell, got really nice roots in there in the bottom and so what I generally do is I go ahead and take an empty bucket. This is basically the soil I topped off my bed with, I enriched it a little bit more, I’ll put this, I’ll go over here, I’ll just you know, tease out the roots like I’m teasing out the hair, if you're a girl in the ‘80s. And we get them kind of hanging out a little bit and then I put this guys, which is a shaker bottle which is once again also reused. Unscrew it and then I just shake a little bit of this stuff on there while I’m like over my little bucket that has all my—the stuff that I topped of the bed with. Once I shake that on there then I’ll go very carefully to the planting hole, maybe I’ll put a little bit of the stuff in the bucket in the planting hole and then I’ll drop these guys in there carefully. And then I’ll take my fingers and kind of go around and take out the airspace because the jumbo six pack size is a little bit smaller than the bulb planter so we’re kind of making sure all the soil is flushed near the bottom. And then we’re going to finally take like a handful of this stuff on the top and just spread it on the top. Sometimes I’ll find on Brassica plants like these guys, they start to pop out, so they can be planted a little bit deeper and that’s what we did and that’s basically how I planted. Now you're probably wondering, John, what’s in this stuff right here? Let me go ahead and show ya. So this is a mixture of several different items. I think I have like maybe—at least two thirds of this shaker bottle is this stuff right here. It’s actually known as the mycorrhizae granular mycorrhiza. So this has different kinds of endo and ecto mycorrhiza, good for both vegetables and trees and I know what you're thinking right now—John, the Brassica family of plants they don’t like colonizing with the mycorrhiza. Well, that may be true but I'm also going to be growing things in between these plants. Plus I just want them in my soil to hang out for next time. And also the other thing is, as much as this is two thirds of this shaker bottle, I got some other things in there, so the remaining two thirds consist of a few things. Number one, the plant success siable premium mycorrhiza innoculent with beneficial bacteria, seaweed, and humic acids so that also gets the remaining one third in here. I think I like that mainly for the beneficial bacteria. In addition I got the pure protein dry powder. Also part of this. Last two thirds. And of course I got the aqua sap. So I add these additional nutrients to really give the plants boost so that they don’t have as much shell shock or root shock or transplant shock once they're planted back in. iv’e actually already planted all the lettuces and a whole bunch of other stuff with the same mixture that I’ve been using for years and I’ve always been tweaking it over the years, this is my latest mixture and they always do really well. So yeah that’s how I plant them out. I guess next I need to actually plant the rest of these out. Then we’re going to come back at you, and let you guys know why this saw dust stuff here, these trace minerals are probably one of the most important agents of fertility you guys could add to your garden and probably aren’t. So as you guys can see me, behind me, I’ve got this raised bed all planted out, 72 plants, took me several hours, that was like today’s project today, the sun is going down, it’s getting kind of cold. I really dislike when the days get shorter you know, and the sun goes down earlier. So it just encourages me to get up early, get outside and do my gardening earlier before it gets too cold in the afternoon. Anyways, I got my gardening done for today. Last thing I got to do for this bit is put a little fence around it because otherwise my dog gets up in there and digs and leaves footprints and poops, so, I’ll do that after I shoot this video. But I want the come back at you, and let you guys know what was that sawdust like powder fertilizer that I was putting in? And I got my new shipment in of that stuff and what it is, it’s actually called the western biotech soil solutions. It says grow your own mineral supplements, and this is the master gardener pack soul conditioner. This pack right here isn’t for the faint of heart, right. This pack is like if you're serious about your health and growing high quality food. If you're not, turn off this video now because you can continue do your free gardening style, right? I mean I want to tell you guys really quick why I'm so into gardening and growing food and growing not only just any old food but the highest quality most nutritious food I possibly can. And that is basically because when I was in my 20s, I had a life threatening illness known as spinal meningitis. I was hospitalized and my mom stayed by my side the whole time I was hospitalized. I was taken into an intensive care unit, I was passed out, I woke up in intensive care with all these IVs stuck inside me and you know when you're sick in the hospital, you ask the doctor one question, ehy doc, when am I going to g et out of here? And he gave me the answer no one wants to hear, no matter what age you're at. I was just graduated from college. He said, you might not make it out of here. And I thought about it for a second like… I'm like, whoa, this is not a good situation. I might not make it out of here, he’s like you have a viral version of the spinal meningitis and there is no medical treatment for you. And that’s not something anyone wants to hear at any age. You know? And so that like, I was like, wow, this is messed up, this is the last thing I'm going to see potentially, my life is inside this hospital and not get to experience life, not to use my college degree to the benefit of anybody. Or anything, or me, or anything. And so luckily, as you guys know, I made it out of that situation but I could not stay through the medical system. I could only stay through higher powers and that’s what I like to say—I was given a second chance and my second chance is in my opinion, help thy fellow man. Promises, prayed when I was in the hospital that if I make it out of there, I'm going to be a better person in this life and do the best I can. So anyways, I made out of that situation and when I was leaving I said doctor, hey doc, why did I get in this situation in the first place? Like why was I sick and none of my college buddies that I was playing broom ball with get sick? And he says, well you have what’s called compliment immune deficiency which basically—basically, in his words he says you have a chronically weakened immune system because of your genes. So he blamed it on my genes. And so all I knew after I left is that John, you need to do something to make your genes stronger so that you don’t get sick again, you don’t get in the hospital and the doctor is not telling you again in another point, you might not make it out alive, because that’s not a fun place to be, right? The only thing I wanted when the doctor’s told me that is I just wanted my health. I didn’t want a million dollars, I didn’t want a billion dollars, I didn’t want to be president. I didn’t want anything except to have my health because I almost lost it. And I think it’s really sad in this day and age that we all take our health for granted. We all take being healthy for granted. I take being healthy for granted. I walk around without stomachaches, without all these different aches and pains like my brother who is a couple years younger than me, you know? And it’s only in times when I make a video and really think about it that I really appreciate the health that I have. But you know the health that I have did not happen to me haphazardly, right? I’ve been working very judiciously for the last 21 years now on building my health to the next level. What’s in this box in my opinion can take your health to the next level no matter where you're at. So I learned at a young age that your health is your greatest wealth and it’s not about making money in our world. It’s about having your life and not only being healthy and living a long life but living a long, healthy productive life that you know, you're doing something worthy for worthy goals and making the planet a better place. A lot of people are not making the planet a better place and so I want to do my part to make this planet better for the future generations and my kids and their kids and their kids’ kids. So anyways, back to the soil solutions soul conditioner and why I think this is revolutionary in fertilizers. Let’s go ahead and read the bottom—provide your soil with proper bio available minerals needed to increase mineral uptake in the plants. So here’s the thing, as you guys know, you know, I’ve put a lot of different nutrients in my soil, probably more than anybody I know or have ever met. Whether that’s an overkill or I'm overdoing it or I need to put that much stuff in—you know that’s up to debate but once again this is my money, and gardening is my hobby, and I can spend my money however I like. My dad said when I was kid, John you can take all your money and taking pennies and throw it off the golden gate bridge for all I care, because he let us kids do with our money what we want. I believe by doing this, I'm making an investment. Not investment into the US treasury or the Bank of America or anything but investment in my health, which is my greatest wealth and the most—the thing that I have that is most dear and valuable to me! So I would encourage you guys, you know, to make your health first and yeah some of these things that I do may cost a little money but it’s going to grow a higher quality food which means you're going to be a higher quality person and you know, literally, in my opinion I'm buying myself out of getting sick in the future and that is priceless because I don’t want to go through all those pains and all those things that people go through when they're really sick and in the hospital with cancer and cancer is eating their body and I don’t even want to know how painful that can be, right? And so up till now I’ve added things like the rock dust and different kinds of rock dust, 5 different kinds of rock dust and different kinds of rock dust with the trace minerals because I know that trace minerals are super important. I put in soil humates, I had doctor Joel Wallack, I’ll put a link below to that video if I remember, you know, who has done all kinds of research on how important and vital trace minerals are to your health. And unfortunately with top soil degradation, the standard farming practices of today even organic farming practices, they're not replacing the certain trace minerals in the soils like there should be. Furthermore, with soil contamination of certain trace minerals, other trace minerals may not be absorbed properly and things may not work in the system. So I try to bring my soil back into balance and add some of the trace minerals into the soil and that’s what I do with the rock dust. Rock dust is kind of like a shot gun, right. I shot gun all the different minerals and I hope that my plants take the minerals they need to be healthy, plus I get to eat that and be healthy. But still, it’s like playing poker. You're leaving many things up to chance, right? And I don’t want to leave things up to chance as much as I'm—you know I have to. I want to really gamble and pull that slot machine lever when I know I'm going to win. Well how do you know you're going to win? You can rig it. That’s what this stuff is, the soil conditioner you know, you're kind of rigging the system instead of putting in all kinds of rock dust and hoping that certain trace minerals are uptake and when you eat those you're going to get those in you. The soil solution products, what they allow you to do, they allow you to spoon feed the plants certain minerals that then it converts, takes up, and then makes it by all available for us. Furthermore, aside from just the minerals that’s taken up, because a plant may be healthier, it may be producing a different kind of plant metabolites which are nutrients for us. So what I want to do now is actually open up this box and show you guys what’s inside. Alright, in this box here, I’ve got some cool stuff. We’ve got a whole bunch of stuff. We got mainly the soil conditioner pack right here and in this pack there’s basically a couple bags, maybe I think like six bags of this fertilizer stuff. And this is the emotional wellbeing formula soil conditioner. So what this formula is, it’s specifically formulated with certain trace minerals that has been shown in people to be maybe deficient if you maybe don’t feel emotionally well, right? So you can flip this over and there’s a total like list of all the different minerals in there. So there’s like, 36 grams of boron, 225 grams of calcium, 365 grams of magnesium, 360 milligrams of selenium, 3650 milligrams of lithium, 100 grams of sulfur, and the pine shavings. And so here’s the thing. You're thinking, John, I could get like you know, boron from a supplement. Well, number one, the supplement, you know what you could take boron and other trace mineral supplements, the absorption rate is very low and that’s not how we’re supposed to get our minerals. We’re not supposed to be taking these mineral supplements, we’re not supposed to be sucking on copper pennies to get our copper. We want to get copper from the foods we eat and that’s how we were designed to do it. The problem is, especially if things like boron which may be deficient in soils across the world is not in the soils, the food that’s being grown in those soils will not have the boron in it. And so how do we know all these minerals are really important—well, there’s this book that comes along with this pack. It’s actually minerals and the genetic code, even if you're not going to buy this pack, I would encourage you to go on Amazon and pick up this book so you can learn about how important these trace minerals are if you don’t believe me. It says that an exposition an analysis of the doctor standard genetic period chart in the physical, chemical, and biological connection by Charles Walters. But in here, he goes into all the different minerals and how they're important for different conditions and also you know, more importantly, what specific plants take up these minerals. For example, iodine. Iodine in my opinion is a big deficiency these days. Most people get it from eating some iodide salt, but what if you don’t eat iodide salt because it’s that crap table salt that you cut out your diet—oh, I eat sea salt, John. You're not going to get enough iodine from sea salt. Maybe you’re eating sea minerals but other than that you know, things actually in here, it’s actually bladder wrack, it’s really high in iodine, pistachios, you know, it’s significantly lower in iodine than the kelp or bladder wrack. And then even going down from there, soy beans, red seeder shoots, yeah, anyways. It goes over all the different plants rich in iodine which is actually significantly lower than the seaweed so I just recommend seaweed for that. But pistachios could have 51 parts per million so we’re talking like parts per million the kelp has 54 hundred parts per million. And so the thing is this, we know that pistachios can absorb the iodine but the problem is if there’s not iodine in the soils the pistachios ain’t going to have it in there and this can be true for all minerals. So, that’s what this book goes over but let’s get back to this right here. So you know certain plants will take up certain trace minerals so you know they make recommendations on this formula. So for this formula, if you want to really take up boron and get more boron in your diet, you want to grow things like strawberries, lettuce, tomatoes, and cabbage. If you want to get more calcium, the tomatoes, cauliflower, and dill will absorb more of the calcium. If you want to get the magnesium uptake, you want to grow beans, oats, and spinach. If you want to get the selenium, selenium is a very important trace mineral that I believe many people may be deficient in these days. You want to grow things like milk thistle, lemongrass, and pumpkin. If you want to get lithium, lithium is an essential nutrient, we want to grow thyme, beans, and lettuce, and if you want to get sulfur, very important, cabbage and onions as well as the amazing tropical fruit named durian will take up a lot of sulfur. I think also garlic, garlic also rich in sulfur. But anyways, that lets you know what plants to get those trace minerals but then here it has basically the mineral function—boron, calcium, magnesium, selenium, lithium. I could sit here, read all of it. I might read one for maybe the boron. Boron appears to affect calcium and magnesium metabolism and membrane function that is essential for efficient absorption of calcium in the body. It was found by the US Department of Agriculture to significantly reduce the loss of calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus in post-menopausal women. It may also be helpful for ischemic heart disease and other forms of cardiovascular disease. Boron deficiencies sign may be related to the level of vitamin D and possibly other nutrients in the diet. Deficiency systems—osteoporosis and arthritis. So if you are deficient in certain trace minerals you may be more likely to get diseases—they’ve done a lot of different studies regarding that. So anyways this one is for the emotional well being, so if you're having emotional well being issues this is the one to get. Let’s see here. We’ve also got one for the GTF, glucose tolerance factor. This is the one I used last year. If you want to learn significantly more than what I'm talking about, these trace minerals than this episode, be sure to check that link down below where I interviewed Robert Rissingham regarding these products that he came up with and how he came up with it and why he came up with it—his parents actually had cancer, so he had to come up with a way so they could get the very important trace minerals so that they could overcome their cancer. I guess he wasn’t able to get to one of his parents but he was able to save the other one as well as his wife’s parents. But this one is the glucose tolerance factor, I’ve been using this, and this one has chromium, vanadium, molybdenum, zinc, sulfur, and the pine shavings. You guys are like, try to get pregnant, you guys can't, right? Then maybe you want to try this one—fertility and potency formula. Yeah, I want to be potent, man. You know what I mean by potent—does that apply for women too? I think it’s mostly men. Chromium, potassium, iodide, calcium, magnese, selenium, cobalt, sulfur, and pine shavings. Next one, this is the one actually I’ve been using this year now, planting all my lettuce you can see behind me. With this formula, health and immune sstem formula, this is probably the most important one for me because I did have an immune compromise, I want to make sure my immune system is strong and it has the specific trace minerals to build my immune system. This one has boron, potassium iodide, magnesium silver, zinc, tin, and sulfur. Got another one here. This is probably the largest killers of Americans in this day and age and people around the world is heart disease. This is heart, health, and cardiovascular formula. This has calcium, magnesium, selenium, copper, and sulfur. Then I got one left in here. This is an important one for many of you guys maybe getting up there, I think my dad needs to get on this one. This is the memory formula. And this is if you want to enhance your memory, maybe even things like certain diseases that you may lose your memory when you get older—magnesium, sulfur, boron, cobalt, selenium, and yttrium. That’s an interesting one. When have you got your yttrium lately? Anyways, each one of these formulas is specifically designed to support certain conditions so you can actually grow like your own medicine, literally, your foods, your fruits and your vegetables will uptake these trace minerals and you’ll get them when you eat the foods that you harvested. Now you might be thinking, john, why is all this important man and how much is this stuff? Well, I’ll tell you this. With the discount code, GYG, you guys get 30 percent off to buy these guys and these guys ain’t cheap—this whole box, it’ll set you back a pretty penny. It might be a paycheck or even two for some of you guys. But each one of these bags after the discount codes, it’ll be 100 dollars including shipping. But here’s the thing—this one bag of soil conditioner for the heart health and cardiovascular formula is going to treat one cubic yard so the rich man’s way to use this is actually to treat a yard, you know, of soil with this and then put it in your garden and plant in it. Another way if you don’t want to, you know, mix it into a whole yard is you could actually till it into a 10 by 10 raised bed, 3 inches deep. You could also do it that way. The way I do it, the rich man’s way, is spreading it out in your whole garden because you're not planting in every area of your garden unless you're having a forest style garden. The poor man’s way, the way I'm doing it, is actually ij ust take out one teaspoon of this stuff and then put it in each planting hole. That’s why these bags are going to last me for many years to come, and they’ll last. These will not evaporate or go bad or anything like that. But yeah, that’s this stuff. Definitely really important. I want to exactly show why it’s so important and why I like using this and this is going to blow your guys’ mind, so let me go ahead and grab some paperwork. So here’s the thing, fruits and vegetables and things, they’ll absorb these trace minerals if they're in the soil. In my opinion, you know, soils are getting devoid of minerals due to soil degradation due to unsustainable farming practices—yes, even organic farming is in many cases is degrading the soil because they're still tilling the soil. So I like to do the no till method which preserves some nutrients and then they're bringing in compost but the compost is grown on last year’s remnants and whatnot, and if the trace minerals aren’t in there, they're not going to magically appear unless you're getting heavy metal trace minerals from things that are falling out the sky that I won't mention what they are because some of you guys believe in it and some of you guys don’t, but anyways, the foods are deficient inn the minerals and if you're eating a mineral deficient diet, you may come down with health conditions. And that’s not fun. And I want to avoid these things and that’s why I'm doing and adding all these things into my soil. Anyways, here’s a test, right. So this is the health and immune system formula, the one actually I just used for my—the lettuce bed right over there. This is certified lab testing results for boron. So boron may be a mineral you're deficient in. There’s many implications for boron, I could read it on the back of the packages. I’ll send in a website for this company. You can read some of the different minerals, what they do, and how they can enhance their health. The company basically drew in a control bed, just regular soil. They grew vegetables. And then they added in the same soil blend, they added their health formula, and then they drew the same vegetables. So here’s for example… they grew formula grass and if you grew it in the health formula you could eat like one serving a week grass and if you just grew it in the control soil, you’d have to eat one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen servings of wheat grass. So you can have significantly more nutrition in less volume of food. So for broccoli you could get the trace minerals by eating one head you know, if you added the health formula instead of two heads for not doing anything. And beans, it’s one serving of beans instead of 3 servings of beans. So what’s the benefit to this. The benefit to this is actually you could eat lower calories to get the same amount of trace minerals. So calories for the health formula, you could eat 140 calories versus 413 calories. So you could eat significantly less calories and calorie restriction has been the only thing that has been shown—proven to enhance the longevity so now you can eat less calories but still maintain and get your nutrients. This is jus ton the boron, go onto the next page where we talk about zinc. Zinc, another important trace mineral. Many friends of mine, whether they're eating a plant based diet or not are deficient in zinc. That’s because zinc is disappearing from the soils and not being supplemented because standard agriculture is focused on 3 main minerals putting in NPK, and they don’t care about anything else man, and they're growing these big giant heads of lettuce and things that taste like nothing that don’t give you the nutrients that your body really requires to function and don’t get started if you're eating processed foods, man. Processed foods, that’s some of the cheapest stuff you could get and they process a lot of the nutrients out of it. Anyways, for example, zinc… wheat grass was the same whether they added the zinc or not but for example, the lettuce you know, you could eat one serving instead of two servings and the calories was 99 versus 104 so that’s not like a big savings for zinc, you know, with this formula versus the control. The control had good zinc levels in there. But what’s even more fun is when we get into these guys. This is the silver and the tin. So for example, on silver, for lettuce, you could either eat one head if you had this mineral formula added to your soil and actually this is the same one I added to my lettuce bed over there—oh my light came on, it’s getting dark. Or you could eat eight servings of lettuce to get the same amount of the trace minerals by using the health formula. And once again, the calorie difference, 140 versus 377, that’s like almost two and a half, three times difference. So on tin, on the health formula, versus the control you could eat one serving of radishes or you’ll have to eat 52 servings of radishes grown in control. I don't know, that’s a lot of radish to eat, right? My goal these days is to eat the minimum amount of food and get the maximum amount of nutrients. Not only the trace minerals but also the plant phytochemical sand phytonutrients and vitamins and minerals. And so that’s literally what this fertilizer allows me to do, allows me to really maximize the trace minerals so that I don’t have to buy a supplement that maybe isn’t easily absorbed. Of course this is advanced topic, advanced credit only if you're really serious about your health. Maybe you have a condition, maybe you have diabetes or something, right? You might want to try that glucose tolerance factor—try it. Right, it’s 100 bucks, right, you guys are buying insulin or whatever and if it wasn’t covered by insurance, it’d cost well more than 100 bucks. Like drugs, they're really expensive. Invested in some fertilizer. It’s going to last you a long time if you just scoop it out by the teaspoon like I'm doing, right. It’s a good investment. It’s going to last. Maybe you’ll see a difference in your diet. Of course growing high mineral food is not the answer to all the world’s health challenges, but in my opinion, it’s the part of the answer. Trace minerals are definitely indicated in many different disease situations and I have seen diseases get reversed by supplementing with foods rich in trace minerals. It may just be eating more fruits and vegetables. That may do it for you. It may be adding in things like kelp powders and seaweed powders and other kinds of plant available trace minerals into you. It might be adding in some of these vegetables that are grown in the soil solution products to basically up the levels of the certain trace minerals you need to be healthy, to get rid of your disease conditions. Of course, also, going along with that, I always want to encourage you guys to eat a healthy diet that’s focused around plants, right? Eat mostly what you grow in your garden and other plant foods. And if you got to eat other junk foods and processed foods and animal foods, eat those in small quantities, right? I don’t really care what you guys eat but I want you guys to eat a lot of plants, especially the ones you grow in high quality soil and also when you're spending a 100 dollars per bag like, I’ve just put in my garden. You're going to want to eat your food because you don’t want that very nutritious food to go to waste. I’d love to give my food to my family, my parents, my brother, my friends that you know, so they can have some high quality food, right, and maybe they could be healthy because of it. You know, Robert, the owner and CEO of this company, has research that shows there’s higher uptakes in his products you know that he’s grown and the fertilizer products that he’s used to grow food is of higher quality. Now here’s the thing—if you don’t want to invest in a fertilizer which is by far the cheapest way to do this and as time goes on, since he’s a new company hopefully he’s going to get these products into WalMart one of these days and it’s going to be super cheap to do it on mass scale—he does all these batches by hand and stuff, lots of labor, he uses US labor, pays a fair wage up in Wyoming or wherever he’s at. If you don’t want to buy the fertilizer and grow out with it, what he has is these guys—he sent me a couple of samples here. He has his wheatgrass powder. So this is wheatgrass powder grown in the glucose tolerance factory. Basically he took his product, grew wheatgrass with it, he got the wheatgrass and then he powdered it up and put it in a bottle for you so you guys could take it. This is the glucose tolerance factor—I guess he sent me three of those. So this is for people that may have things like diabetes, this may help them with their blood sugar issues to need less insulin or maybe even potentially get off it. He has been getting testimonials from people you know, on just literally changing and adding in some super mineral rich, certain mineral rich enhanced foods to get better. I think this is really where drugs will go in the future, instead of taking a drug to cure your diabetes or unfortunately, most drugs do not cure anything in my opinion. They are a crutch. My dad is on blood pressure lowering medications—it didn’t just fix him, he has to take that for the rest of his life, against my wishes, right? Maybe if he grew in the heart health fertilizer, maybe he’d get off his drugs and not have to keep buying drugs that basically don’t do anything to fix the problem, they’re a band-aid or a temporary crutch and an to a full solution whereas I believe these produces—if every drug store sold food. If you could go to the grocery store and buy food grown in these mineral products, people could have really nutritious food and maybe we wouldn’t have any diseases in our world today! This is, I think, where we really need to go. These fertilizer products need to go out to big industries and people need to start going, especially in the cannabis industry—medicinal cannabis. Could be grown with some of these trace minerals to get higher uptakes so that when the users of the cannabis, hopefully they're juicing it or using it in its raw state, it’s going to get better results because they're also going to get not only the cannabanoids but also higher levels of trace minerals that have been implicated in certain diseases, right? So the future is great, I'm glad to be living in this time now, there’s so much new information, technology, and things going on in the world so that you guys can get healthier one step at a time if you guys want to. And that’s what I simply do. a lot of you guys are going to poopoo this—John that stuff is too expensive! Fine! You can garden on the cheap, growing your own food is still better than the store, right? My goal, because I almost lost my life, is to grow the highest quality food so I don’t end up back at the hospital again and being out of control. I want to control my ultimate destiny and my ultimate health and I believe this is a product that can do it for you guys. So if you guys want to learn more about these products here, you want to visit the website WesternEnvironmentalServices.com, I’ll also put the links down below this video so you guys can check it out. Also be sure to use the discount code GYG. This is going to be for a limited time only and that’s going to get you guys 30 percent off these soil conditioners or even if you don’t want to grow your stuff in the soil conditioners, the cheapest way, this bag, if you're just dolling it out a teaspoon at a time with your transplants or even in your plant starts or when you're moving into pots or if you’re just growing into pots, you can put the teaspoon in the plants or around the seed, that’s going to definitely get some uptake. Another thing I forgot to mention is that once you treat your soil it’s going to last for 4 years so you don’t have to re-add this stuff to your soil for another 4 years but if it’s in the bag it’s probably going to literally last forever. The minerals aren’t going to just evaporate, so, yes, definitely an investment to make. If you don’t want to use this stuff, of course a discount code will also work for the different powders that in my opinion are actually quite expensive. Definitely pays money in this case to buy the fertilizer products, grow your own food, and actually take your food and dehydrate it into your own patterns so you could eat it in the winter and in times when you're not able to eat the healthiest food out of your own garden. That’s pretty much my episode for today. I didn’t eat lunch because I had to work through lunch to get this planted, make this video for you guys so I'm going to go in and eat lunch at dinner time and then I’ll eat dinner later. Anyways if you guys enjoyed this episode, learning about the trace minerals and the importance of them, I also want to encourage you guys to go to the website down below to learn about the trace minerals and why they are so important and also link to a database that talks about mineral deficiencies and what challenges, the health challenges you may see because of that. I mean, this is new, evolving research and I believe every place that has like a health facility retreat center that’s growing food should be using these, especially with people for certain conditions because it’s only going to in my opinion up the level of healing and success for people around the world. So yeah, anyways, if you enjoyed this episode, please give me a thumbs up. I’ll try to get out to Robert’s place and see how he’s growing it, what he’s doing, make a full video there, if I get a thousand thumbs ups. I’ll go out to his place in Wyoming, hopefully in the summertime because I'm going to freeze my butt off in the winter. Also make sure to check the links down below in the description. I have links in the original video I did with Robert, other videos I talked about in this episode, also the link to the place to buy the stuff. Also be sure to click that subscribe button right down below to be notified of my new and upcoming episodes. I have new and upcoming episodes every three to four days on this channel. You never know where I'm going to pop up, what you’ll be learning on my YouTube channel. Finally, be sure to check out my past episodes. My past episodes are a wealth of knowledge. I have over 1200 episodes now at this point teaching you guys all aspects on how to grow the highest quality food on the planet. So once again, my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com. we’ll see you next time. And until then, remember, keep on growing.

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How to planting shrubs in Wet Heavy Soils

fourcowfarm posted the article • 0 comments • 170 views • 2017-09-23 03:30 • came from similar tags

 

 
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Welcome to The Family Plot. I'm Chris Cooper. Joining me today is Joellen Diamond. Joellen is a TSU extension agent in Tipton County. And we also have a number of master gardeners from Shelby and Tipton Counties here to help us out today. All right, Joellen. We got our soil tested. Let's see what those readings are. - Yeah. - How about that? - [Joellen] Well, it came back with the soil pH of 7.72, which is a little high. - [Chris] Mmm, it's high. - [Joellen] And everything else seems to be somewhat okay, but obviously we're gonna need to fertilize the plants. - [Chris] Sure, sure. - And we might want to put some acid, some sulfur down at some point to try to change the pH at the very top of the soil. - [Chris] Right, need to lower it a little bit. - A little bit, just to help the plants out. - [Chris] Okay. - But we've got to analyze the site before we could design it, so this was one of the first things we did. - That's right, 'cause we always tell people what? Soil test. - Soil test. Always soil test. - It is that important, folks. - It is that important. And next thing we gotta do is, I've been told it's notoriously wet here. So we've done a percolation test. - [Chris] Yes. - And oh my. - [Chris] Look at that. (laughing) The water's just standing there. - The water's standing, and I guess it's been there for a day or so, just still standing. So we have absolutely, it doesn't look like there's much percolation at all in this soil. - I would say none, how about that? - Yeah. - That looks like it's been there for a little while. - It's been there for awhile. Well, the next thing we know, we've got a lot of mulch here, and a lot of mulch has been piled up onto the trunks of the trees, which we know is not a good thing because that will end up rotting the base of the tree and then the tree will fall over. - [Chris] Okay. - So we really don't want to do that. But just because the soil is so compact here, let's kind of look and see what we can find, what's going on, because it would be nice to amend this soil, but we need to find out what's going on first, so let's get some of this mulch away from the tree. - [Chris] All right. - It's a lot back. Oh, and look here. We're already coming up against feeder roots from this tree which are end up being, they're growing not in the soil, but in this large mulch layer, which also means that they're above the natural grade of this tree than when it was originally planted. The roots are not growing into the soil as much as they are growing on the surface of the soil. - [Chris] And those were actually some nice looking roots, but guess what? We don't see any root flares, either. - No, there's no root flares. There's nothing. Well, this takes us to a different level. If this means that this tree has got a lot of its feeder roots in this mulch layer, we, and the percolation test shows that the soil does not drain, if we actually till this bed and incorporated this mulch into the hardpan soil, we would end up creating a swimming pool for the plants. I don't think we really want to do that. - I don't think the plants would enjoy that, either. - No, so we're going to have to find some, use some plants that can take some wet conditions. - Okay. - And we're going to have to do something that I rarely do, but in this situation, we're going to try to plant a lot above the soil. So we're gonna plant some of the plants in the actual soil and not create a trough and we will build up the bed just around each individual plant. - Wow, okay. So the planting material that we're talking about actually can survive in wet soils, but not really thrive in wet soils? Is that what we're saying? - Correct. - [Chris] Okay. - And also wet soils, this isn't a bog. - [Chris] Right. - But yet the soil is so compact and it stays so wet all the time, that it acts like one. But because it's so dense, it's not really bog soil material because bog soil is loose and this is not. So this is a completely different situation. - Right, compact. (laughing) - [Joellen] Very compact. - [Chris] For sure. - Well, Chris, I've drawn up a plan here for us for the front of this building, and what I've done is given it an evergreen background behind us with using some Illicium floridanum or Florida anise, and some Ilex vomitoria, Shillings Dwarf, or a Dwarf Yaupon Holly. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] And then for some color in the front, and to give some more texture, we've gone with some Spiraea japonica Anthony Waterer, the Anthony Waterer spirea. And then some Stella de Oro daylilies, 'cause daylilies can take water, wet conditions, too. And we've gone with an Acorus gramineus Ogen, the Sweet Flag, and some Plumbagos, some perennials. And of course we've got these wonderful cannas that have lived and done well, and cannas can stand wet feet. So we are going to take those and divide them up and spread them out throughout the landscape. - [Chris] Okay. All right, well I actually know some of those plant materials, so this should be fun, don't you think? - Yeah, this, I'm hoping most homeowners that have trouble like we have here can find these plants very easily, 'cause these are fairly common plants in the landscape at nurseries and out around town in garden centers. - Right. And these are the ones that are of course are recommended for areas like this. - [Joellen] Yes. - [Chris] Okay. - Well, first thing we're going to do is set the plants out according to the plan. And this is built on a 1/8 of an inch scale equals one foot. So I have my ruler that measures out how many feet they are in the plan. And measuring tape to measure out the feet and we are trying to set them out exactly how it is laid out on the plan. The first plant we're gonna plant after we've laid out all of our evergreen background is this Florida anise. - [Chris] Okay. - And the Florida anise likes, can take wet soil, but it also likes shade. And since we have these lovely trees here. - Ah, shade. - And these, the reason why these trees probably survived is the fact that these are Magnolia virginiana, which is a native magnolia, but it's also a common name called swamp magnolia, meaning it can take wet soils. So that's probably why they have lived. - Which these are. - Which is what we have. So what we're going to do is we've laid these out. Now we're gonna plant this one Florida anise. - Okay. - And what we're gonna do is plant the container, the root ball 2/3 in the soil, in the actual soil, and keep the actual soil the same. And then we are going to be amending the top third of the soil and making a mound around it so it'll have some nice well-drained soil to grow in. - [Chris] Okay. - We'll scrape off our mulch to start with. - Which there's a lot of. - Which there is quite a bit of. - [Chris] And there are your roots. - Then we've got roots of the magnolia that we're gonna have to contend with. And by us not tilling this ground, we are also not gonna disturb all of these roots. So that the tree can have as many roots as possible to live in this terrible soil condition. Well, we've come to some major roots for this tree and we don't want to disturb 'em. So we're going to move our plant slightly because the plant will grow and fill in the area. Yeah, you see they fertilized this already, so we don't have to add any fertilizer 'cause they've already done it this season. And the root ball seems to be very nice. We've got a few circling roots here. We might just wanna kind of loosen those up a little bit so it'll stop circling. We will set this down in the hole. And make sure it faces out nice. The nicest part faces out towards the view. And of course the one thing we gotta remember to do is take off the plant tags. It's nice for you to remember, but people forget and leave them on there and it will girdle this branch right here if you continue to leave it on. So we want to take it off. - And I always like to inspect the plant material for diseased leaves or anything that's broken, anything like that. - We might need some soil. Let me put a little bit at the base of this, the existing soil. So we don't want to change that because of the percolation test. There we go, and now we'll add some soil. - Ready for this? - With our amendment. And we'll build up around the plant. Just do one around and then we'll incorporate some of that existing soil in. Then we will continue to add. - [Chris] All right. - All right, let's see if we can put some more soil around there. Just another ring like that and that should be enough. That looks good. Yeah, you have the whole bag and then people want to put the whole bag down, but you really don't need to. You just need as much as you need. So you can use that soil for something else or another plant. But as you see, we're not really burying the plant. It's about at the same soil surface. So we're really not burying the top crown of the plant. We're mixing, incorporating the soil into the existing soil that's here. And we'll put just a little bit on top just to cover it up. Now when you come back and you mulch this, that will seal it up nice. But you'll see that it's several, a few inches above the existing grade so it will drain, and have somewhere nice to be in. - All right, so Joellen, why did we choose this particular plant for this site? - Well, this is a Dwarf Youpan Holly. One way is it will stay short, and is a nice foundation plant. Also, it can take the wet soils that we have and it's a nice evergreen background to what we're gonna have planted in front of it. - Okay. - But it should do very well here. In fact, the Youpan Holly is one of the most favorite landscape plants for foundation plants. They just do well here and in so many different wide varieties of sites including the wet soil like we have. - Okay, okay. I'll move that for you. And we're still gonna plant this the same way? - [Joellen] Same way. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] Yeah, 'cause we want to see, I mean, one shovel and I'm coming into roots. - [Chris] Right. - [Joellen] So that's just what it's gonna be like. - Okay, let me take that over from you, Joellen. - [Joellen] That looks good. - [Chris] Okay. - So what we'll do is take the plant out of the pot, set it down, and see that we're 2/3 in the ground. So that's a good depth. - How does that root system look to you? - Now this root system is a little more compacted, so this is where I would cut them. - Yeah, there you go. Knew you'd need those. - [Joellen] Thank you. Yes, and a lot of times I'll just use these, but I'll just make vertical slits in the root system every few inches and just break up those circling roots so that they'll start growing out instead of circling. Yeah. - [Chris] Oh, you're mad at it. You trimmed it. - I usually, you know, I usually try not to use my clippers simply because they, that dulls the blade, but I always sharpen my blades anyway, so but you can use shovels. - [Chris] That's a good practice. - Some people have different pruning saws. Sometimes they'll use those to score it. Anything to get the circling roots from stopping to circle the plant. - [Chris] Okay. - And we'll plant this. Make sure we have the nice side facing out. Make sure it's level. And we'll backfill the bottom part with the native soil. It's not as porous. And then we'll put some-- - [Chris] Ready for your soil? - Amendment soil, yeah. I'll put a ring around it and incorporate the native soil with it. - [Chris] Need a little more or? - I think that's good enough 'cause again, we don't want to put it over the crown of the plant. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] And we're right up at the top of the plant right here. As you see it's a little raised area right around the plant. So it'll have some good air movement for the roots. - [Chris] That looks good, Joellen. - Chris, the next plant we're gonna plant are these Anthony Waterer spirea. And they like wet feet, too. But they will bloom nice pinkish-red flowers. - [Chris] Nice. - [Joellen] For the majority of the summer, so it'll be a really nice addition with the green background to this landscape. - [Chris] Okay, lovely looking plant, don't you think? - Beautiful plant. The one thing is, they will lose their leaves in the winter, they are deciduous. But that's okay because we've got our green background to take up for it in the winter. Now we can measure. You can measure with a ruler, but if you don't have a ruler, you can always measure with your shovel, and the bottom of our hole is there. The top of it is here. So we've got enough, it's deep enough. So now we'll take it out of the pot and plant it. This must be a little root bound because I've-- - [Chris] Is it tough to get out? - I have to squish it. There we go. And yes, you can see these roots are quite root bound, so we will have to slice them. And we'll show them how to do that with a shovel. - [Chris] Okay. - It's the same principle. Vertical slices. Insides. Especially the ones... - [Chris] Up at the top. - [Joellen] At the top 'cause that's where it's gonna take hold first. - Is that good enough? Do you want the pruners? - I might use the pruners on this top part. It seems to be very tough. That's why sometimes a knife, a garden knife, it's nice to have a garden knife. There's all sorts of tools you can use. Now level off the bottom of the hole. - [Chris] Okay. - Set it in and we'll make sure it's faced correctly. And we'll backfill with the existing soil that's got poor drainage. (Chris laughing) For the bottom of the root ball. And then we'll add some amendments. - [Chris] Okay. - You can use just about any kind of amendment you want to. We're using bags of topsoil for this. Organic humus, your own compost, anything will work. You just have to incorporate it with the existing soil. And of course we want to check and make sure that it doesn't get too far over the existing soil level and smooth it out. And that will give this plant a space to grow. - All right, Joellen, now we have cannas. What are we gonna do with these? - Well, part of them we're gonna leave here. - [Chris] Okay. - And the other half we're gonna move down and fill in the next two sections. - Okay. And it's gonna be better for us to use the back half, do you think? - I think we're gonna use the back half of this 'cause it's kind of under, hanging under this canopy, and they like sun, so we're gonna leave the front half. - [Chris] Okay, good. - I'm using a digging fork. We'll start with that. 'Cause we don't want to disturb the roots too much. - [Chris] Joellen, will this hurt the cannas, digging them up like that? - [Joellen] No, they can be divided. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] It might not be the most ideal time of year to divide them, but they will be fine. - [Chris] All right, okay. - [Joellen] Now the roots that we've exposed, we need to bury again. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] It seems to be just like the tree, growing in the top part of the mulch, so. There we go. We were never here. Now we're gonna go to the next section where we're gonna plant these. - [Chris] Okay. - Okay, now we're gonna have to dig a slight little hole. Not very deep because these roots are not deep at all. Then we've got a lot of roots from this tree here, too. Okay, Chris. - Okay, you ready? - Let's set yours in. - [Chris] How does that look? - [Joellen] It looks good. - [Chris] Okay. - And we don't want to bury the tubers, just the roots. So we don't need to add anything to this extra than what we've already got. And they look nice. - Oh, they look happy, Joellen. - Now we're gonna lay out all of the rest of the one gallon material. There are different shapes and sizes of it, but it's all one gallon material, and we are going to lay it out to make it look nice. We have the number of plants that we have on our plan, but we don't have to measure every space that that goes in because we will just set it out and make it look good in real life. We've got them all set out. Now we're gonna plant the last three different types of plants that we have in this landscape. The first is the Stella de Oro daylily. Daylilies can stand wet feet, so that's why we've picked them. And the Stella de Oro, except from the very heat of the summer, it will probably get two blooms out of it in the season. Earlier in the summer and then maybe later towards fall. - [Chris] Okay. - Then we've got this blue Plumbago, so that'll be a nice blue against the yellow that we have here. This will spread out and act as a groundcover and it also can take some wet feet. - [Chris] Okay. - The last is the Sweet Flag. The yellow. And this is just a groundcover, nice spiky plant into all of the round leaves that we have. And will make a nice yellow statement here year round 'cause this is evergreen. These two, the Plumbago and the Stella de Oro, they will die back in the winter, but the Acorus, the Sweet Flag, that will stay that color all year long. - How about that? That's pretty good. - Now we're gonna plant these just like we did the others. - [Chris] Okay. - We're gonna plant 2/3 in the ground and 1/3 out of the ground, and we'll add a little soil amend around it for them to have a place to grow. - Okay. All right, let's do it. What do you think about the root systems here? - Yeah, we're gonna have to tease these a little bit, try to straighten them up just a little bit. We want to keep that circling pattern. We want to disrupt it so it will stop circling and anchor itself out into the soil. And if you'll just give me some-- - [Chris] Some soil? - Just a little bit of soil there to mix with this that we have. - [Chris] Tell me when. - [Joellen] That's good. And mix this with what we've got. Small raised area. - [Chris] That looks good. - [Joellen] And there's the daylily. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] And this we'll start. - [Chris] Plumbago. - [Joellen] You can scrape the mulch back just a little bit. You don't need to incorporate that in and we can top dress with that. Still lots of good mulch here. - How much does this spread? - [Joellen] Two or three feet. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] It depends on how happy it is. - [Chris] A-ha. Got it? - [Joellen] And those look nice. I'm not gonna disturb those. That's a little low so I'm gonna put some more natural dirt back in. And I don't want air pockets. We need to break that up. And if you'll give me just a little bit of soil just like you did before. That's good. There we go. - [Chris] Be happy. - [Joellen] There's the Plumbago. - [Chris] Okay. - Okay. - What about that one? - Now this one is pretty good. Maybe just tease it a little bit. - [Chris] Okay. - But it's not got that many roots that are circling, and that will ensure that they don't. And of course backfill with the original soil. And you can add some amendment. That's good. There we go, nice mound. - [Chris] Right. - [Joellen] Make sure we stay out of the crown of the plant. There, we've got all three of these planted. Now let's go ahead and plant the rest of all the plants. - All right, let's do it. (upbeat country music) Joellen, this bed looks much better than it did when we first got started today. - Yes, it does. And the yellow Acorus and the Stella de Oro daylilies just really make the landscape pop. - That looks so good. We appreciate you comin' by, designing this for us and you know, picking out the right plant material that we need for this. - I can't wait to see it in the next year. - I can't wait, as well.


 
 
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Welcome to The Family Plot. I'm Chris Cooper. Joining me today is Joellen Diamond. Joellen is a TSU extension agent in Tipton County. And we also have a number of master gardeners from Shelby and Tipton Counties here to help us out today. All right, Joellen. We got our soil tested. Let's see what those readings are. - Yeah. - How about that? - [Joellen] Well, it came back with the soil pH of 7.72, which is a little high. - [Chris] Mmm, it's high. - [Joellen] And everything else seems to be somewhat okay, but obviously we're gonna need to fertilize the plants. - [Chris] Sure, sure. - And we might want to put some acid, some sulfur down at some point to try to change the pH at the very top of the soil. - [Chris] Right, need to lower it a little bit. - A little bit, just to help the plants out. - [Chris] Okay. - But we've got to analyze the site before we could design it, so this was one of the first things we did. - That's right, 'cause we always tell people what? Soil test. - Soil test. Always soil test. - It is that important, folks. - It is that important. And next thing we gotta do is, I've been told it's notoriously wet here. So we've done a percolation test. - [Chris] Yes. - And oh my. - [Chris] Look at that. (laughing) The water's just standing there. - The water's standing, and I guess it's been there for a day or so, just still standing. So we have absolutely, it doesn't look like there's much percolation at all in this soil. - I would say none, how about that? - Yeah. - That looks like it's been there for a little while. - It's been there for awhile. Well, the next thing we know, we've got a lot of mulch here, and a lot of mulch has been piled up onto the trunks of the trees, which we know is not a good thing because that will end up rotting the base of the tree and then the tree will fall over. - [Chris] Okay. - So we really don't want to do that. But just because the soil is so compact here, let's kind of look and see what we can find, what's going on, because it would be nice to amend this soil, but we need to find out what's going on first, so let's get some of this mulch away from the tree. - [Chris] All right. - It's a lot back. Oh, and look here. We're already coming up against feeder roots from this tree which are end up being, they're growing not in the soil, but in this large mulch layer, which also means that they're above the natural grade of this tree than when it was originally planted. The roots are not growing into the soil as much as they are growing on the surface of the soil. - [Chris] And those were actually some nice looking roots, but guess what? We don't see any root flares, either. - No, there's no root flares. There's nothing. Well, this takes us to a different level. If this means that this tree has got a lot of its feeder roots in this mulch layer, we, and the percolation test shows that the soil does not drain, if we actually till this bed and incorporated this mulch into the hardpan soil, we would end up creating a swimming pool for the plants. I don't think we really want to do that. - I don't think the plants would enjoy that, either. - No, so we're going to have to find some, use some plants that can take some wet conditions. - Okay. - And we're going to have to do something that I rarely do, but in this situation, we're going to try to plant a lot above the soil. So we're gonna plant some of the plants in the actual soil and not create a trough and we will build up the bed just around each individual plant. - Wow, okay. So the planting material that we're talking about actually can survive in wet soils, but not really thrive in wet soils? Is that what we're saying? - Correct. - [Chris] Okay. - And also wet soils, this isn't a bog. - [Chris] Right. - But yet the soil is so compact and it stays so wet all the time, that it acts like one. But because it's so dense, it's not really bog soil material because bog soil is loose and this is not. So this is a completely different situation. - Right, compact. (laughing) - [Joellen] Very compact. - [Chris] For sure. - Well, Chris, I've drawn up a plan here for us for the front of this building, and what I've done is given it an evergreen background behind us with using some Illicium floridanum or Florida anise, and some Ilex vomitoria, Shillings Dwarf, or a Dwarf Yaupon Holly. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] And then for some color in the front, and to give some more texture, we've gone with some Spiraea japonica Anthony Waterer, the Anthony Waterer spirea. And then some Stella de Oro daylilies, 'cause daylilies can take water, wet conditions, too. And we've gone with an Acorus gramineus Ogen, the Sweet Flag, and some Plumbagos, some perennials. And of course we've got these wonderful cannas that have lived and done well, and cannas can stand wet feet. So we are going to take those and divide them up and spread them out throughout the landscape. - [Chris] Okay. All right, well I actually know some of those plant materials, so this should be fun, don't you think? - Yeah, this, I'm hoping most homeowners that have trouble like we have here can find these plants very easily, 'cause these are fairly common plants in the landscape at nurseries and out around town in garden centers. - Right. And these are the ones that are of course are recommended for areas like this. - [Joellen] Yes. - [Chris] Okay. - Well, first thing we're going to do is set the plants out according to the plan. And this is built on a 1/8 of an inch scale equals one foot. So I have my ruler that measures out how many feet they are in the plan. And measuring tape to measure out the feet and we are trying to set them out exactly how it is laid out on the plan. The first plant we're gonna plant after we've laid out all of our evergreen background is this Florida anise. - [Chris] Okay. - And the Florida anise likes, can take wet soil, but it also likes shade. And since we have these lovely trees here. - Ah, shade. - And these, the reason why these trees probably survived is the fact that these are Magnolia virginiana, which is a native magnolia, but it's also a common name called swamp magnolia, meaning it can take wet soils. So that's probably why they have lived. - Which these are. - Which is what we have. So what we're going to do is we've laid these out. Now we're gonna plant this one Florida anise. - Okay. - And what we're gonna do is plant the container, the root ball 2/3 in the soil, in the actual soil, and keep the actual soil the same. And then we are going to be amending the top third of the soil and making a mound around it so it'll have some nice well-drained soil to grow in. - [Chris] Okay. - We'll scrape off our mulch to start with. - Which there's a lot of. - Which there is quite a bit of. - [Chris] And there are your roots. - Then we've got roots of the magnolia that we're gonna have to contend with. And by us not tilling this ground, we are also not gonna disturb all of these roots. So that the tree can have as many roots as possible to live in this terrible soil condition. Well, we've come to some major roots for this tree and we don't want to disturb 'em. So we're going to move our plant slightly because the plant will grow and fill in the area. Yeah, you see they fertilized this already, so we don't have to add any fertilizer 'cause they've already done it this season. And the root ball seems to be very nice. We've got a few circling roots here. We might just wanna kind of loosen those up a little bit so it'll stop circling. We will set this down in the hole. And make sure it faces out nice. The nicest part faces out towards the view. And of course the one thing we gotta remember to do is take off the plant tags. It's nice for you to remember, but people forget and leave them on there and it will girdle this branch right here if you continue to leave it on. So we want to take it off. - And I always like to inspect the plant material for diseased leaves or anything that's broken, anything like that. - We might need some soil. Let me put a little bit at the base of this, the existing soil. So we don't want to change that because of the percolation test. There we go, and now we'll add some soil. - Ready for this? - With our amendment. And we'll build up around the plant. Just do one around and then we'll incorporate some of that existing soil in. Then we will continue to add. - [Chris] All right. - All right, let's see if we can put some more soil around there. Just another ring like that and that should be enough. That looks good. Yeah, you have the whole bag and then people want to put the whole bag down, but you really don't need to. You just need as much as you need. So you can use that soil for something else or another plant. But as you see, we're not really burying the plant. It's about at the same soil surface. So we're really not burying the top crown of the plant. We're mixing, incorporating the soil into the existing soil that's here. And we'll put just a little bit on top just to cover it up. Now when you come back and you mulch this, that will seal it up nice. But you'll see that it's several, a few inches above the existing grade so it will drain, and have somewhere nice to be in. - All right, so Joellen, why did we choose this particular plant for this site? - Well, this is a Dwarf Youpan Holly. One way is it will stay short, and is a nice foundation plant. Also, it can take the wet soils that we have and it's a nice evergreen background to what we're gonna have planted in front of it. - Okay. - But it should do very well here. In fact, the Youpan Holly is one of the most favorite landscape plants for foundation plants. They just do well here and in so many different wide varieties of sites including the wet soil like we have. - Okay, okay. I'll move that for you. And we're still gonna plant this the same way? - [Joellen] Same way. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] Yeah, 'cause we want to see, I mean, one shovel and I'm coming into roots. - [Chris] Right. - [Joellen] So that's just what it's gonna be like. - Okay, let me take that over from you, Joellen. - [Joellen] That looks good. - [Chris] Okay. - So what we'll do is take the plant out of the pot, set it down, and see that we're 2/3 in the ground. So that's a good depth. - How does that root system look to you? - Now this root system is a little more compacted, so this is where I would cut them. - Yeah, there you go. Knew you'd need those. - [Joellen] Thank you. Yes, and a lot of times I'll just use these, but I'll just make vertical slits in the root system every few inches and just break up those circling roots so that they'll start growing out instead of circling. Yeah. - [Chris] Oh, you're mad at it. You trimmed it. - I usually, you know, I usually try not to use my clippers simply because they, that dulls the blade, but I always sharpen my blades anyway, so but you can use shovels. - [Chris] That's a good practice. - Some people have different pruning saws. Sometimes they'll use those to score it. Anything to get the circling roots from stopping to circle the plant. - [Chris] Okay. - And we'll plant this. Make sure we have the nice side facing out. Make sure it's level. And we'll backfill the bottom part with the native soil. It's not as porous. And then we'll put some-- - [Chris] Ready for your soil? - Amendment soil, yeah. I'll put a ring around it and incorporate the native soil with it. - [Chris] Need a little more or? - I think that's good enough 'cause again, we don't want to put it over the crown of the plant. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] And we're right up at the top of the plant right here. As you see it's a little raised area right around the plant. So it'll have some good air movement for the roots. - [Chris] That looks good, Joellen. - Chris, the next plant we're gonna plant are these Anthony Waterer spirea. And they like wet feet, too. But they will bloom nice pinkish-red flowers. - [Chris] Nice. - [Joellen] For the majority of the summer, so it'll be a really nice addition with the green background to this landscape. - [Chris] Okay, lovely looking plant, don't you think? - Beautiful plant. The one thing is, they will lose their leaves in the winter, they are deciduous. But that's okay because we've got our green background to take up for it in the winter. Now we can measure. You can measure with a ruler, but if you don't have a ruler, you can always measure with your shovel, and the bottom of our hole is there. The top of it is here. So we've got enough, it's deep enough. So now we'll take it out of the pot and plant it. This must be a little root bound because I've-- - [Chris] Is it tough to get out? - I have to squish it. There we go. And yes, you can see these roots are quite root bound, so we will have to slice them. And we'll show them how to do that with a shovel. - [Chris] Okay. - It's the same principle. Vertical slices. Insides. Especially the ones... - [Chris] Up at the top. - [Joellen] At the top 'cause that's where it's gonna take hold first. - Is that good enough? Do you want the pruners? - I might use the pruners on this top part. It seems to be very tough. That's why sometimes a knife, a garden knife, it's nice to have a garden knife. There's all sorts of tools you can use. Now level off the bottom of the hole. - [Chris] Okay. - Set it in and we'll make sure it's faced correctly. And we'll backfill with the existing soil that's got poor drainage. (Chris laughing) For the bottom of the root ball. And then we'll add some amendments. - [Chris] Okay. - You can use just about any kind of amendment you want to. We're using bags of topsoil for this. Organic humus, your own compost, anything will work. You just have to incorporate it with the existing soil. And of course we want to check and make sure that it doesn't get too far over the existing soil level and smooth it out. And that will give this plant a space to grow. - All right, Joellen, now we have cannas. What are we gonna do with these? - Well, part of them we're gonna leave here. - [Chris] Okay. - And the other half we're gonna move down and fill in the next two sections. - Okay. And it's gonna be better for us to use the back half, do you think? - I think we're gonna use the back half of this 'cause it's kind of under, hanging under this canopy, and they like sun, so we're gonna leave the front half. - [Chris] Okay, good. - I'm using a digging fork. We'll start with that. 'Cause we don't want to disturb the roots too much. - [Chris] Joellen, will this hurt the cannas, digging them up like that? - [Joellen] No, they can be divided. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] It might not be the most ideal time of year to divide them, but they will be fine. - [Chris] All right, okay. - [Joellen] Now the roots that we've exposed, we need to bury again. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] It seems to be just like the tree, growing in the top part of the mulch, so. There we go. We were never here. Now we're gonna go to the next section where we're gonna plant these. - [Chris] Okay. - Okay, now we're gonna have to dig a slight little hole. Not very deep because these roots are not deep at all. Then we've got a lot of roots from this tree here, too. Okay, Chris. - Okay, you ready? - Let's set yours in. - [Chris] How does that look? - [Joellen] It looks good. - [Chris] Okay. - And we don't want to bury the tubers, just the roots. So we don't need to add anything to this extra than what we've already got. And they look nice. - Oh, they look happy, Joellen. - Now we're gonna lay out all of the rest of the one gallon material. There are different shapes and sizes of it, but it's all one gallon material, and we are going to lay it out to make it look nice. We have the number of plants that we have on our plan, but we don't have to measure every space that that goes in because we will just set it out and make it look good in real life. We've got them all set out. Now we're gonna plant the last three different types of plants that we have in this landscape. The first is the Stella de Oro daylily. Daylilies can stand wet feet, so that's why we've picked them. And the Stella de Oro, except from the very heat of the summer, it will probably get two blooms out of it in the season. Earlier in the summer and then maybe later towards fall. - [Chris] Okay. - Then we've got this blue Plumbago, so that'll be a nice blue against the yellow that we have here. This will spread out and act as a groundcover and it also can take some wet feet. - [Chris] Okay. - The last is the Sweet Flag. The yellow. And this is just a groundcover, nice spiky plant into all of the round leaves that we have. And will make a nice yellow statement here year round 'cause this is evergreen. These two, the Plumbago and the Stella de Oro, they will die back in the winter, but the Acorus, the Sweet Flag, that will stay that color all year long. - How about that? That's pretty good. - Now we're gonna plant these just like we did the others. - [Chris] Okay. - We're gonna plant 2/3 in the ground and 1/3 out of the ground, and we'll add a little soil amend around it for them to have a place to grow. - Okay. All right, let's do it. What do you think about the root systems here? - Yeah, we're gonna have to tease these a little bit, try to straighten them up just a little bit. We want to keep that circling pattern. We want to disrupt it so it will stop circling and anchor itself out into the soil. And if you'll just give me some-- - [Chris] Some soil? - Just a little bit of soil there to mix with this that we have. - [Chris] Tell me when. - [Joellen] That's good. And mix this with what we've got. Small raised area. - [Chris] That looks good. - [Joellen] And there's the daylily. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] And this we'll start. - [Chris] Plumbago. - [Joellen] You can scrape the mulch back just a little bit. You don't need to incorporate that in and we can top dress with that. Still lots of good mulch here. - How much does this spread? - [Joellen] Two or three feet. - [Chris] Okay. - [Joellen] It depends on how happy it is. - [Chris] A-ha. Got it? - [Joellen] And those look nice. I'm not gonna disturb those. That's a little low so I'm gonna put some more natural dirt back in. And I don't want air pockets. We need to break that up. And if you'll give me just a little bit of soil just like you did before. That's good. There we go. - [Chris] Be happy. - [Joellen] There's the Plumbago. - [Chris] Okay. - Okay. - What about that one? - Now this one is pretty good. Maybe just tease it a little bit. - [Chris] Okay. - But it's not got that many roots that are circling, and that will ensure that they don't. And of course backfill with the original soil. And you can add some amendment. That's good. There we go, nice mound. - [Chris] Right. - [Joellen] Make sure we stay out of the crown of the plant. There, we've got all three of these planted. Now let's go ahead and plant the rest of all the plants. - All right, let's do it. (upbeat country music) Joellen, this bed looks much better than it did when we first got started today. - Yes, it does. And the yellow Acorus and the Stella de Oro daylilies just really make the landscape pop. - That looks so good. We appreciate you comin' by, designing this for us and you know, picking out the right plant material that we need for this. - I can't wait to see it in the next year. - I can't wait, as well.