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How to Replant a Raised Bed Garden after the Season is Over

fourcowfarm posted the article • 0 comments • 94 views • 2017-09-23 03:30 • came from similar tags

 

 
You will discover the specific techniques John uses to remove plants, move plants, and keep plants in the same raised bed garden to grow more vegetables for the next season. First, You will learn some of the annual vegetables that grew best, as well as the ones that need to be removed, also perennial vegetables that survived the light frost. Next, you will discover how John removes old plants and moving plants from the raised bed vegetable garden to save them for next season. You will then discover the specific amendments including compost that John adds to add fertility to the raised bed garden and why he likes to include amendments such as rock dust, worm castings as well as other organic fertilizers in some cases. John will teach you how to not bury existing perennial plants that would be covered in the soil when topping off the soil level in a raised bed vegetable garden. Next, John will share how he prepares the raised bed that was just filled with compost for planting. You will then learn how to supercharge your plant roots by using Foundation, a Mycorrhizae root drench that can help to colonize the root zone so the plant can be more efficient at taking in nutrients. John will then show you his methodology for transplanting lettuce into a raised bed garden using the square foot gardening spacing and how he uses a template stick to speed up his busy work. Finally, John will show you the completed raised bed and share with you the final step of transplanting the newly planted raised bed garden that will survive the frost with winter vegetables.
 
subtitle:

Alright this is John Kohler of GrowingYourGreens.com today we have another exciting episode for you here at Houston. Here it’s basically the end of the year, and we’re helping out Lauren’s parents with their backyard garden that kind of grew amazingly. If you wanna knew what grew the best, be sure to check the past episode. I'll put a link down below if I remember for all the plants that did amazing here, even through this hot Houston summer. Now that it's turn colder here and they got kind of lite a live frost. You know some of the plants that didn't quite make it, and some of the annual plants finished up to the season such as the shiso that just got harvest in the seeds from. And Lauren has actually harvest in like a copious amount of seeds on the red stem Egyptian spinach with round seed pods. If you guys want some of those, and some of the plants that did the best here in this garden, be sure to check the link down below it's growingyourgreens.ecwid.com we will be making these seeds available for you guys so that you guys can you plant in your garden and have tons of delicious summer edible leafy greens to eat. In the case in this episode because we are doing garden cleanup today. some things are still left from the summer some things are not and basically just cleaning it up. And then we're gonna go ahead and get planting some of the winter crops here. We're gonna show you guys actually the technique I use after the first season or even after every season. Basically I re-enrich the beds with more compost and other amendments and then basically just plant. I mean it's really not that hard what to do after your season ends. So actually let's go over to the raised bed and show you guys what we're working with. Alright so here's what we got working on in this raised bed. You guys can see a lot of loads in this raised bed. As you guys can see, we got all of these flowers on this side and these plants did amazing. And they're basically just some ornamental flowers they put in just so it look nice. But they end up actually, by the end of the season, they took over probably like a quarter of the bed. And you know as much as ornamental flowers are nice, I don't think they below necessarily in a raised bed. You know there's many other places in the yard, you know, along the borders of the trees, the shrubs, and the yard that some ornamentals can be placed. It can then overtake your raised bed and basically they're going to crowd out food crop that you could be growing and eating, to which in my opinion, could be much more valuable than just some pretty flowers. With that being said if you want to plant some flowers, you can plant some edible flowers some things like violas, marigolds, nasturtiums are some common edible flowers you can plant alone in your bed. Nasturtiums can get kind of wild and take over, but the other ones tends to be relatively small. So I'm glad I could actually go ahead to basically take the clippers and just clip these guys out. So we're clipping all the stuff off and then we'll composing all the top growth, and then I'm going to just put that back in a little round base and keep the plant alive. Then I'm gonna basically pluck up the whole root ball, and then i'm gonna go ahead and transplant the root ball in another area of the yard so that I have this raised bed space for growing some edibles. Another thing that you can refine at the end of the season is you're gonna have a lot of dried up plants. I think this is like some basil, and right here is the bamboo stick that came with it. We're gonna go ahead and reuse that for later. But what you want to do after every season is you want to clear up the bed. You know you wanna clear up all these leaves that are down the ground. It could be harboring bugs and bacteria so I basically have to scratch all this stuff back and will take it and will throw it in the bucket here. Everything in the bucket will end up in the compost bin and get basically turned back into soil for next season. Now all these plants here that are all dried up, I think thanks to my little clippers here and I come down to the base. You know I come down to the base right to the soil level and then I snip. I just basically put this whole thing out, and then I'll cut it into small pieces, and it will go on to the bucket, and all the bucket contents will go to the compost. In this way i'm actually leaving the root material under the ground. This is very important when you do this you're going to basically be creating more organic matter or the bacteria, microbes, and more importantly the earthworms and other you know living creatures in the soil. They're going to digest these, the roots and turned it into new nutrients for the plants that are gonna come up for the next season. Another thing that I'm doing is i'm coming up to the ground, and they got all these weeds in here. They haven't done a good job in pulling up all the weed in here. Basically I come in, and basically I pull up all the weeds by the roots and get the roots as much as I can. This way these will not go through into the next season. Let's see here. Oh the other thing I do is actually we're going to also top of the bed once we got this all cleared. We're gonna go ahead and fill up compost almost the top of this bed. As you guys can see, this bed this year sunk down probably like 6 inches or so. They didn't fill it up to top, but as over the season it's settled down, what not. So we're going to add new compost on top with other amendments to bring the level up higher, and then we're just going to go ahead and plant it into a new soil. Let's see what other things I gotta do here, you know. I mean living crops, we got corrupt longevity spinach right here still growing and I'll probably try to trim that back and keep it contained in the one side of the bed so that I can have a nice section for the winter crops. Oh, another thing I want to mention here. They originally put this nails like every foot in the top of the bed to kind of like make a string and make like nice little square foot so that like plants for a square foot garden. But the string overtime has actually created the compost to down and so I got the crowbar. I basically use the crowbar and puller and we're gonna pull out the little nails. You know the nails made it kind of difficult to sit on the raised bed, cause you know it can bump into you. Also they can be, you know, a hazard when you're working in the bed. They might be sharp and you might cut yourself. So we're just gonna go ahead and carefully pull these guys up. Each one of them and once all of these are pulled out, they're gonna build a little frame on the top. Maybe it's going to be 2x6 make a nice overhang, so you really sit on the bed and work it. That's definitely a good idea. Now the tip I give them when they build up the top is try not to have too much overhang on the inside. If you create an overhang in the inside, underneath that's a place where slugs and snails and other bugs may live. And they're going to hide in there in the day in their nice environment and then at night they're gonna come out and eat your plants. So you know I recommend keeping a minimal overhang on the inside then try to keep those overhang on the outside if possible. They do have a little overhang, you know. If you do have an overhang, I do recommend packing soil underneath under the ledge so that you know bugs cannot get in there and hang out. Of course over the season the soil's gonna go down, it's gonna be a constant battle, packing in soil underneath the ledge just so that the bugs can't get in there. And if they do get in there, you know you wanna every once in a while, you know take a look and see what's going on underneath there so you can get any pest out. So the next thing I want to do is I'm going ahead to clear out this bed and we're going to come back at you. Once I get it cleared out and we're gonna go ahead and top it of with compost. Show you guys how easy that is and then we're going to go ahead and plant the new winter crops. All right so you guys can see what I've done is basically just cleared it all out I pulled any little small seedlings that are coming up, weeds, or otherwise clear the ground out I got those flowering whatever those flower plants Ornamental's back like it's a little stubs right here and here, and then basically I got half of the bed on the other half is just kind of still wild we're going to work on. It's getting dark so I won't be actually to finish up this video and actually get this stuff planted out. We got some lettuce and some celery to plant on in this bed. What I want to talk about next is actually, you know, when you're flipping your bed to the next season right. You have a few options like pull everything out, you know compost it and leave the roots under the ground to compost like I talk about earlier. Sometimes you might have a plant you want to keep. If it's a perennial plant for example, you know sometimes all you dig up perennial plants and put them in a greenhouse. You know they don't have a greenhouse that dig up some other plants and put them into so what they may do is they may just build some kind of structure like a pvc tubing over the top with some remade fabric over the top, or some kind of plastic over the top to kinda keep it warmer. You know on those cold night where it will frost. Sometimes you may just want to save plants and you know so if your plants that's living and it's just maybe no longer productive or it is not where I wanted to be I mean move it so that's what we're doing with this little flowering plants here that were planted. They grew massively and now we're gonna move them so it's just gonna be basically a little shovel here. I like smaller little shovels like they're kind of narrow, they're easier to kind of get in into a raised bed than the wide full sized shovels. We're just gonna basically dig up as much as the rootballs can and we're gonna transplant it into a container over yonder. I'm not going to show you guys this process but I want to talk to you guys about this in case you want to save plants right. There's many options and here's the thing like if I pull this up and I planted over there and it doesn't make it, what do I lost? Nothing, because otherwise I would just cut this plant out to the ground anyways, but at least if it survives and makes it which it probably should and it put a lot of growth on there and as long as you're going to get enough of the root ball, they're gonna have some nice beautiful flowers growing over there, which is s a much better space to grow them than here in the raised bed. If you catch your peppers early enough, some so the guys might want to pull up, you now, your pepper plants that you are producing well before it gets too cold because once it goes cold they kind of go on the shock and then they're never quite the same. Then you gotta nurse them back to health which takes a long time. You can dig those or dig whatever you know and move them around and feel free to do that, if a plant in it's place is not actually serving you. Sooner I'm going to get ahead and doing this. We're gonna come back after I've got this dog out and we're ready for the next step. So if you guys can see I've got that bed or this half the bed pretty much cleared out. It's down of the dirt, as you guys can see I lowered down 6-7 inches from the top where was at the beginning of the season. Yeah looking at this soil to me, I mean it looks a fair bit sandy, you know like little more organic matter in there. So that's what I'm going to be adding today today what we're going to add is we got the Farm Dirt Compost. So you guys saw a couple episodes ago, I visited there place, visited their composting food scraps and wood chips to make some really high-quality compost. It's best to buy it in bulk you guys can get it in bulk and if you wan, you know, you can go even further and I think it's Nature's Way resources its another good place here in the Houston area. I think there in Conroe I had the video of them and also I put it down below if I remember the link. So that's where my girlfriend's dad got this original soil. I don't remember which blend he got but I don't know that I'll get this one again. I mean things go pretty well, but after looking at it, it looks very bit sandy. I probably tend to want to make my own customized mix from there raw ingredients that they have. I know that in a lot of my videos I thought about adding rock dust, adding worm casting and adding a lot a whole bunch of other things that I like to add personally. You know here in Texas I actually don't have all those resources available so I'm going to say I should go so and the couple episodes agod. They basically just grow in the dirt that's in his backyard without adding pretty much of anything. I mean here's a thing, the thing is you could guard them without anything, absolutely. You could grow a dirt in your yard it may or may not work. It may work really well, It may work really poorly right. It just depends on the soil and your specific area. What I like to do by adding the worm castings, by adding the rock dust, by adding all the things I like to add that I've shown in other videos is you know provide my plants the best conditions to grow with everything they could possibly need and let them figured out. You know in this day and age you know there are nutrient deficiencies this is readily apparent in people when they're eating food and their bodies are not being nourished. I mean you may think that eating a lot of food but you might not be the getting vitamins, the minerals and more importantly phytochemicals that you need to fully thrive. So I wanna fill my body with as many different varieties of food that I possibly can and that's what I simply tried to do to my plants. And some people would argue, John all that stuff is already in the soil. I would definitely bet you money unless you're getting some of that best soil and different kinds of soil. It's just one soil. You're not going to have that what wide range of spectrum of soil life, soil microbes that I'm going to have in addition you're not going to have the spectrum of minerals. Yes, you would have minerals, you would have some bacteria and fungi and all these things, but you're not they're going to have the spectrum. I mean, I want to provide the biggest spectrum, so hopefully in my plants can you know be better because of it. Anyways, today all we got is the compost so that's minimally what I'd recommend and I recommend a good quality compost. As I've shown in previous videos not all compost is created equal. You got a big box stores and big bag of compost. 2 cubic feet for 3 bucks, guess what you guys are getting what you paid for. I wouldn't even grow in some of this stuff they call compost of the big box store. I mean that stuff to me is more like a mulch, it's not a compost. I'm glad I'm using some good high-quality compost here. I mean look at this stuff this stuff is nice rich and black. You guys see that when you guys go to the big-box store and buy some stuff. Here's the stuff that's in the bed right now, it's kind of like grayish and here's the stuff that I'm adding to it. You might be saying, John should I add it and stir it all off and mix it. Well one of the things I don't want to do is to really disturb the existing soil micro-life and microbes. I dont really want to til it. So i'm going ahead to add this stuff on top and overtime all the nutrients will kinda sift down in the old soil. So yeah I mean this is not rocket science to top of your bed and this is how I add fertility for the next season. I'm not adding, you know, chemical fertilizers. I'm just adding more organic mother and the organic matter is basedly time-released fertility for the plants, because as the organic matter sits in the bed and soil microbes break it down and make it water soluble for the plants to uptake and that's how it should work in nature so so that's what I'm simply doing. All right that's one bag. I think I got about 8 more to go. So now I'm going to show you guys a challenge you guys might have if you guys are toughened up your beds and you're leaving plants in your beds like a am. As you guys can see we're getting close to the top it's a couple inches away but we got this plant which is I believe some society garlic which are edible. The flowers as well as the greens you can eat just like onions or garlic. But the problem is this planted at the at the original height of the raised bed which is up to here and after the season it actually sunk down. So now if you feel the dirt up to the level that we're going to fill up the rest of the soil here, the compost. We're going to bury it like 1/10th of the plant. This stem is actually going to be under the ground. In some cases this may not matter and actually the society garlic may just survive barbarian stem. Some hardly perennials that you can actually grew in water those ones generally are used to having their stems buried by a landslide for example. You know this is just a landslide when were filing plants the soil of up on, you know, the stems of the plants. With that being said to be safe if you're not sure if the plant could handle it or not what I like to do is what I like to call let's jack up the plant. So literally you gotta jack up your car to get it to work or basically gonna go ahead around. This is just kinda like we are pulling up the transplant and we're not actually going to pull it out totally. We're just going to kind of get underneath there. Then we'll use the big guns here. And then we're just gonna literally, jack up, get the plants a little bit higher to the level kind of we wanted. Then we're going to go ahead and take some of that compost and under fill it. So i'm just basically sticking the compost and the hole i've created and we're going to fill the compost in the bottom of the root ball so then when i'm done this guy will be up in this level. Carefully move this around and we're going to under fill it right here again. I've left a sufficient amount of, you know, roots alive for these onions and onions are fairly hardy plants anyways. So these guys in my opinion should totally make it. Once we got all the soil in there, then we're just gonna put out our little shovel there and now we've raised up our plant to the level that we're going to have the soil and I could continue filling the soil. So if you guys can see we've got the compost build up. Maybe within a half inch to the top that's just where I like it. We got it all nice and levelled up pretty well, got the society garlic happy and I think we're basically ready to go to the next step which is once you got all the compost in, you know normally I would just go ahead and plant the plants. But I don't want to plant the plants yet. I want to basically wet down this compost so we're going to go ahead and wet the stuff down with the little hose and just carefully like water in. We don't wanna water log the soil but we gonna get it like nice and damp so the plants will be ready and the roots will have a nice cozy habitat to sink into literally. So we're just about done watering this in here and the next thing you do is you don't wanna plant your plants. We don't just wanna water the plants immediately after watering it. You want to let the water kinda soak in for a little bit. It's getting kinda dark tonight, so I think I'm going to go ahead and stop. I'm going to come back at you tomorrow when I'll be planting all these lettuces out. All right as you guys can see, it's a nice and bright sunny day here in Houston area and what we're going to do today is actually plant out the plant starch. Normally people might take just like the plant starch and pop them and pop them in the ground. And what I like to do instead, normally if i'm at home is I'll put a mixture of different items on the root zones. Such as the Mycorrhizae, benefical bacteria, even some seaweed pattern, some aminos, soil aminos or fish aminos for nutrient in addition in each planting hole up. You know put some additional nutrients and fertilizers in there. Today I'm not going to do any of that cause I don't have anything except this stuff right here. I'm glad I got this stuff. This is known as the foundation, this is the soluble mycorrhizae. So the mycorrhizae is basically a fungal inoculant that basically lives on the roots zone and they make the roots more efficient. You know, bring in nutrients for the plant so normally you have a none soluble mycorrhizae which is little granules that I actually sprinkle on the roots before I plant each plant. This one happened to be a soluble one so because I have soluble mycorrhizae today i'm going to do a root drench. Super simple, super easy. We're going to start out here with basically 10x20 tray with no holes in the bottom. And let's see it says you could use about 1 tablespoon or 2 tablespoons per gallon of water. I'll probably just maybe measure out that much, which may be a tablespoon or so. Then we're just going to go ahead and mix it up with some water here. All right we got the tray filled up about halfway full and now we're just gonna go ahead and bottom water or plant starch. We're gonna go ahead and set them in here. We're gonna go ahead and leave them in here for a while. This will basically allow the roots to get nice and wet, absorb the water, but also you get contact with the mycorrhizae and it'll also start to colonize on the root zone. From my experience this will give you better growth. I mean this is product commonly used in hydroponics to increase the growth and in my opinion, it totally works. So we can only do like one flat at a time. We're going to come back and then swap these out, and soak the rest of them in about 10 minutes, cause I got another project i'm kind of working on, concurrently. All right so as you guys can see, I've got into planting. I planted out already 3 rows, I planted out my fourth row right now. I thought I'll show you guys actually how i'm planting it. So what I like to do is I like to use the square foot gardening method. And I mean you're going to pack plants in a little bit closer than they normally would, for instance on a seed packet. For example for the lettuce, I like to space them approximately 6 inches apart. This will give it enough space to grow especially because we have some nice and rich soil. But more importantly you're going to be able to fit more plants in less space. Also because they are so close, you know, once they start touching each other that's your indicator to let you guys know that it's time to harvest some of the leaves that are touching. So you can go around and harvest like one leaf of every plant that's touching, so that they're not touching and then that will be enough leaves for you guys to make a salad. Unlike, you know, when you go to the store and buy a lettuce. To maximize our harvest we want to simply go around each plant and harvest, you know, the biggest outer leaf of each plant, and you know harvest one leaf of every plant. If you do that you'll have 50 leaves of lettuce with a nice size that will easily make a salad for you. Instead of just cutting the whole plant down then your lettuce is pretty much gone and done and finished. If you just harvest one leaf, it's gonna continue to grow for you until the weather warms up, and until it goes through its complete life cycle. So yeah. So I've spaced it out. So what I've done is every 6 inches I made a little template things. So this is just a piece of the Egyptian spinach stem that I cut down. I also use bamboo sticks and I cut them to 6 inches at home. I'll even like, ride on their 6 inch spacing, so I can just use this to space in between the plant. I've also used some standard twigs that have been laying around to demarcate where the plant holes are going to be. Or where the plants are going to be and then I've actually going to offset the rows so they're not all like uniform. They're offset so that it will provide a little bit nicer look and also provide and allow me to get like one extra plant in. You know per every other row, alright. And planting this guys out since I don't have anything special nothing fancy I got some gloves on cause I don't like getting dirt in my fingernails. We're going to go ahead and take out the little placeholder to let me know where to place the plant. Take two fingers in the nice and fluffy soil. Move that back just enough and just deep enough so that I can get in one of these little transplants. I'd take the transplants in the six packs and squeeze it on the end, and kind of wiggle it out, and gently bring it all out. As you guys can see their roots are just kind of like, it's like my girlfriend's hair when she wakes up. Sometimes it's kind of just like over the place, and that's good you don't want to wrapped up really nice and tight. This means this plant is ready to go right in the ground so we're going to go ahead and take this and carefully put it right in the ground. We're going to get the soil level as it comes out of the six pack to match up the soil level on the ground. So you wanna make sure you dig up deep enough hole, but not too deep. You want to bury too much the stem, cause otherwise you may get this stem rot. Then we're just going to go ahead and carefully pack in some compost around the top, so we have a nice plant that's all planted in the garden. I mean gardening this is not rocket science man. You guys don't even need a high-school diploma to be planting stuff. This is a lot easier than math in my opinion. The stuff's grows. Anyways I got to get to finishing all this stuff up and we're going to come back at you. When I got it all done. Alright as you guys can see, I've had a successful day. I've got all 66 plants in this bed and a few in another container here. I got all lettuces in the front and I got some celeries in the back. These plants will do have no problems with any kind of minor freezes that may occur here in the Houston area. Now most important thing that after you get your plants in. Then just walk away an pat yourself on the back for doing a good job. You got the water them in. Very important. So you know I tried not to get the leaves, I try to usually just generally like water it around the base of the plant on the ground. And I like, you know, nozzle this one kind of sprays like pretty hard actually. This is on shower but it's spraying really hard so I'd rather have like a nozzle that kind of sprays a little bit lighter like drops of water out, more like the rain. But you know this is what we got today so this is what we're using. I think i'm going to just gonna go ahead and water these guys in. Then we're going to call it a day. I'm glad i'm able to help my girlfriend's parents get their garden growing. They got a lots of good stuff and a lot of good food to eat in the upcoming months, aside from other perennial vegetables that are still growing. All right so if you guys enjoyed this format, this episode hey please be sure that you thumbs up. I'll be sure to do more episodes in the future. When I come back with updates of a garden here. Also, be sure to click the subscribe button right down below to be notified of my new and upcoming episode that's coming out about every 3 to 4 days. You never know where I'll show up, or what you will be learning from my YouTube channel. Finally be sure to check my past episodes. I have over 1200 episodes now showing you guys all aspects on how you guys can grow your own food at home . Whether replanting beds or visiting new farms or all kinds of stuff, I've probably got an episode of it man. So yeah, anyways with that my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com We'll see you next time and until then remember: Keep on growing! of grew amazingly. If you wanna knew what grew the best, be sure to check the past episode. I'll put a link down below if I remember for all the plants that did amazing here, even through this hot Houston summer. Now that it's turn colder here and they got kind of like a live frost. You know some of the plants that didn't quite make it, and some of the annual plants finished up to the season such as the shiso that just got harvest in the seeds from. And Lauren has actually harvest in like a copious amount of seeds on the red stem Egyptian spinach with round seed pots. If you guys want some of those, and some of the plants that did the best here in this garden, be sure to check the link down below it's growingyourgreens.ecwid.com we will be making these seeds available for you guys so that you guys can you plant in your garden and have tons of delicious summer edible leafy greens to eat. In the case in this episode because we are doing garden cleanup today. some things are still left from the summer some things are not and basically just cleaning it up. And then we're gonna go ahead and get planting some of the winter crops here. We're gonna show you guys actually the technique I use after the first season or even after every season. Basically I re-enrich the beds with more compost and other amendments and then basically just plant. I mean it's really not that hard what to do after your season ends. So actually let's go over to the raised bed and show you guys what we're working with. Alright so here's what we got working on in this raised bed. You guys can see a lot of loads in this raised bed. As you guys can see, we got all of these flowers on this side and these plants did amazing. And they're basically just some ornamental flowers they put in just so it look nice. But they end up actually, by the end of the season, they took over probably like a quarter of the bed. And you know as much as ornamental flowers are nice, I don't think they below necessarily in a raised bed. You know there's many other places in the yard, you know, along the borders of the trees, the shrubs, and the yard that some ornamentals can be placed. It can then overtake your raised bed and basically they're going to crowd out food crop that you could be growing and eating, to which in my opinion, could be much more valuable than just some pretty flowers. With that being said if you want to plant some flowers, you can plant some edible flowers some things like violas, marigolds, nasturtiums are some common edible flowers you can plant alone in your bed. Nasturtiums can get kind of wild and take over, but the other ones tends to be relatively small. So I'm glad I could actually go ahead to basically take the clippers and just clip these guys out. So we're clipping all the stuff off and then we'll composing all the top growth, and then I'm going to just put that back in a little round base and keep the plant alive. Then I'm gonna basically pluck up the whole root ball, and then i'm gonna go ahead and transplant the root ball in another area of the yard so that I have this raised bed space for growing some edibles. Another thing that you can refine at the end of the season is you're gonna have a lot of dried up plants. I think this is like some basil, and right here is the bamboo stick that came with it. We're gonna go ahead and reuse that for later. But what you want to do after every season is you want to clear up the bed. You know you wanna clear up all these leaves that are down the ground. It could be harboring bugs and bacteria so I basically have to scratch all this stuff back and will take it and will throw it in the bucket here. Everything in the bucket will end up in the compost bin and get basically turned back into soil for next season. Now all these plants here that are all dried up, I think thanks to my little clippers here and I come down to the base. You know I come down to the base right to the soil level and then I snip. I just basically put this whole thing out, and then I'll cut it into small pieces, and it will go on to the bucket, and all the bucket contents will go to the compost. In this way i'm actually leaving the root material under the ground. This is very important when you do this you're going to basically be creating more organic matter or the bacteria, microbes, and more importantly the earthworms and other you know living creatures in the soil. They're going to digest these, the roots and turned it into new nutrients for the plants that are gonna come up for the next season. Another thing that I'm doing is i'm coming up to the ground, and they got all these weeds in here. They haven't done a good job in pulling up all the weed in here. Basically I come in, and basically I pull up all the weeds by the roots and get the roots as much as I can. This way these will not go through into the next season. Let's see here. Oh the other thing I do is actually we're going to also top of the bed once we got this all cleared. We're gonna go ahead and fill up compost almost the top of this bed. As you guys can see, this bed this year sunk down probably like 6 inches or so. They didn't fill it up to top, but as over the season it's settled down, what not. So we're going to add new compost on top with other amendments to bring the level up higher, and then we're just going to go ahead and plant it into a new soil. Let's see what other things I gotta do here, you know. I mean living crops, we got corrupt longevity spinach right here still growing and I'll probably try to trim that back and keep it contained in the one side of the bed so that I can have a nice section for the winter crops. Oh, another thing I want to mention here. They originally put this nails like every foot in the top of the bed to kind of like make a string and make like nice little square foot so that like plants for a square foot garden. But the string overtime has actually created the compost to down and so I got the crowbar. I basically use the crowbar and puller and we're gonna pull out the little nails. You know the nails made it kind of difficult to sit on the raised bed, cause you know it can bump into you. Also they can be, you know, a hazard when you're working in the bed. They might be sharp and you might cut yourself. So we're just gonna go ahead and carefully pull these guys up. Each one of them and once all of these are pulled out, they're gonna build a little frame on the top. Maybe it's going to be 2x6 make a nice overhang, so you really sit on the bed and work it. That's definitely a good idea. Now the tip I give them when they build up the top is try not to have too much overhang on the inside. If you create an overhang in the inside, underneath that's a place where slugs and snails and other bugs may live. And they're going to hide in there in the day in their nice environment and then at night they're gonna come out and eat your plants. So you know I recommend keeping a minimal overhang on the inside then try to keep those overhang on the outside if possible. They do have a little overhang, you know. If you do have an overhang, I do recommend packing soil underneath under the ledge so that you know bugs cannot get in there and hang out. Of course over the season the soil's gonna go down, it's gonna be a constant battle, packing in soil underneath the ledge just so that the bugs can't get in there. And if they do get in there, you know you wanna every once in a while, you know take a look and see what's going on underneath there so you can get any pest out. So the next thing I want to do is I'm going ahead to clear out this bed and we're going to come back at you. Once I get it cleared out and we're gonna go ahead and top it of with compost. Show you guys how easy that is and then we're going to go ahead and plant the new winter crops. All right so you guys can see what I've done is basically just cleared it all out I pulled any little small seedlings that are coming up, weeds, or otherwise clear the ground out I got those flowering whatever those flower plants Ornamental's back like it's a little stubs right here and here, and then basically I got half of the bed on the other half is just kind of still wild we're going to work on. It's getting dark so I won't be actually to finish up this video and actually get this stuff planted out. We got some lettuce and some celery to plant on in this bed. What I want to talk about next is actually, you know, when you're flipping your bed to the next season right. You have a few options like pull everything out, you know compose it and leave the roots under the ground to compost like I talk about earlier. Sometimes you might have a plant you want to keep. If it's a perennial plant for example, you know sometimes all you dig up perennial plants and put them in a greenhouse. You know they don't have a greenhouse that dig up some other plants and put them into so what they may do is they may just build some kind of structure like a pvc tubing over the top with some remade fabric over the top, or some kind of plastic over the top to kinda keep it warmer. You know on those cold night where it will frost. Sometimes you may just want to save plants and you know so if your plants that's living and it's just maybe no longer productive or it is not where I wanted to be I mean move it so that's what we're doing with this little flowering plants here that were planted. They grew massively and now we're gonna move them so it's just gonna be basically a little shovel here. I like smaller little shovels like they're kind of narrow, they're easier to kind of get in into a raised bed than the wide full sized shovels. We're just gonna basically dig up as much as the rootballs can and we're gonna transplant it into a container over yonder. I'm not going to show you guys this process but I want to talk to you guys about this in case you want to save plants right. There's many options and here's the thing like if I pull this up and I planted over there and it doesn't make it, what do I lost? Nothing, because otherwise I would just cut this plant out to the ground anyways, but at least if it survives and makes it which it probably should and it put a lot of growth on there and as long as you're going to get enough of the root ball, they're gonna have some nice beautiful flowers growing over there, which is s a much better space to grow them than here in the raised bed. If you catch your peppers early enough, some so the guys might want to pull up, you now, your pepper plants that you are producing well before it gets too cold because once it goes cold they kind of go on the shock and then they're never quite the same. Then you gotta nurse them back to health which takes a long time. You can dig those or dig whatever you know and move them around and feel free to do that, if a plant in it's place is not actually serving you. Sooner I'm going to get ahead and doing this. We're gonna come back after I've got this dog out and we're ready for the next step. So if you guys can see I've got that bed or this half the bed pretty much cleared out. It's down of the dirt, as you guys can see I lowered down 6-7 inches from the top where was at the beginning of the season. Yeah looking at this soil to me, I mean it looks a fair bit sandy, you know like little more organic matter in there. So that's what I'm going to be adding today today what we're going to add is we got the Farm Dirt Compost. So you guys saw a couple episodes ago, I visited there place, visited their composting food scraps and wood chips to make some really high-quality compost. It's best to buy it in bulk you guys can get it in bulk and if you wan, you know, you can go even further and I think it's Nature's Way resources its another good place here in the Houston area. I think there in Conroe I had the video of them and also I put it down below if I remember the link. So that's where my girlfriend's dad got this original soil. I don't remember which blend he got but I don't know that I'll get this one again. I mean things go pretty well, but after looking at it, it looks very bit sandy. I probably tend to want to make my own customized mix from there raw ingredients that they have. I know that in a lot of my videos I thought about adding rock dust, adding worm casting and adding a lot a whole bunch of other things that I like to add personally. You know here in Texas I actually don't have all those resources available so I'm going to say I should go so and the couple episodes agod. They basically just grow in the dirt that's in his backyard without adding pretty much of anything. I mean here's a thing, the thing is you could guard them without anything, absolutely. You could grow a dirt in your yard it may or may not work. It may work really well, It may work really poorly right. It just depends on the soil and your specific area. What I like to do by adding the worm castings, by adding the rock dust, by adding all the things I like to add that I've shown in other videos is you know provide my plants the best conditions to grow with everything they could possibly need and let them figured out. You know in this day and age you know there are nutrient deficiencies this is readily apparent in people when they're eating food and their bodies are not being nourished. I mean you may think that eating a lot of food but you might not be the getting vitamins, the minerals and more importantly phytochemicals that you need to fully thrive. So I wanna fill my body with as many different varieties of food that I possibly can and that's what I simply tried to do to my plants. And some people would argue, John all that stuff is already in the soil. I would definitely bet you money unless you're getting some of that best soil and different kinds of soil. It's just one soil. You're not going to have that what wide range of spectrum of soil life, soil microbes that I'm going to have in addition you're not going to have the spectrum of minerals. Yes, you would have minerals, you would have some bacteria and fungi and all these things, but you're not they're going to have the spectrum. I mean, I want to provide the biggest spectrum, so hopefully in my plants can you know be better because of it. Anyways, today all we got is the compost so that's minimally what I'd recommend and I recommend a good quality compost. As I've shown in previous videos not all compost is created equal. You got a big box stores and big bag of compost. 2 cubic feet for 3 bucks, guess what you guys are getting what you paid for. I wouldn't even grow in some of this stuff they call compost of the big box store. I mean that stuff to me is more like a mulch, it's not a compost. I'm glad I'm using some good high-quality compost here. I mean look at this stuff this stuff is nice rich and black. You guys see that when you guys go to the big-box store and buy some stuff. Here's the stuff that's in the bed right now, it's kind of like grayish and here's the stuff that I'm adding to it. You might be saying, John should I add it and stir it all off and mix it. Well one of the things I don't want to do is to really disturb the existing soil micro-life and microbes. I dont really want to til it. So i'm going ahead to add this stuff on top and overtime all the nutrients will kinda sift down in the old soil. So yeah I mean this is not rocket science to top of your bed and this is how I add fertility for the next season. I'm not adding, you know, chemical fertilizers. I'm just adding more organic mother and the organic matter is basedly time-released fertility for the plants, because as the organic matter sits in the bed and soil microbes break it down and make it water soluble for the plants to uptake and that's how it should work in nature so so that's what I'm simply doing. All right that's one bag. I think I got about 8 more to go. So now I'm going to show you guys a challenge you guys might have if you guys are toughened up your beds and you're leaving plants in your beds like a am. As you guys can see we're getting close to the top it's a couple inches away but we got this plant which is I believe some society garlic which are edible. The flowers as well as the greens you can eat just like onions or garlic. But the problem is this planted at the at the original height of the raised bed which is up to here and after the season it actually sunk down. So now if you feel the dirt up to the level that we're going to fill up the rest of the soil here, the compost. We're going to bury it like 1/10th of the plant. This stem is actually going to be under the ground. In some cases this may not matter and actually the society garlic may just survive barbarian stem. Some hardly perennials that you can actually grew in water those ones generally are used to having their stems buried by a landslide for example. You know this is just a landslide when were filing plants the soil of up on, you know, the stems of the plants. With that being said to be safe if you're not sure if the plant could handle it or not what I like to do is what I like to call let's jack up the plant. So literally you gotta jack up your car to get it to work or basically gonna go ahead around. This is just kinda like we are pulling up the transplant and we're not actually going to pull it out totally. We're just going to kind of get underneath there. Then we'll use the big guns here. And then we're just gonna literally, jack up, get the plants a little bit higher to the level kind of we wanted. Then we're going to go ahead and take some of that compost and under fill it. So i'm just basically sticking the compost and the hole i've created and we're going to fill the compost in the bottom of the root ball so then when i'm done this guy will be up in this level. Carefully move this around and we're going to under fill it right here again. I've left a sufficient amount of, you know, roots alive for these onions and onions are fairly hardy plants anyways. So these guys in my opinion should totally make it. Once we got all the soil in there, then we're just gonna put out our little shovel there and now we've raised up our plant to the level that we're going to have the soil and I could continue filling the soil. So if you guys can see we've got the compost build up. Maybe within a half inch to the top that's just where I like it. We got it all nice and levelled up pretty well, got the society garlic happy and I think we're basically ready to go to the next step which is once you got all the compost in, you know normally I would just go ahead and plant the plants. But I don't want to plant the plants yet. I want to basically wet down this compost so we're going to go ahead and wet the stuff down with the little hose and just carefully like water in. We don't wanna water log the soil but we gonna get it like nice and damp so the plants will be ready and the roots will have a nice cozy habitat to sink into literally. So we're just about done watering this in here and the next thing you do is you don't wanna plant your plants. We don't just wanna water the plants immediately after watering it. You want to let the water kinda soak in for a little bit. It's getting kinda dark tonight, so I think I'm going to go ahead and stop. I'm going to come back at you tomorrow when I'll be planting all these lettuces out. All right as you guys can see, it's a nice and bright sunny day here in Houston area and what we're going to do today is actually plant out the plant starch. Normally people might take just like the plant starch and pop them and pop them in the ground. And what I like to do instead, normally if i'm at home is I'll put a mixture of different items on the root zones. Such as the Mycorrhizae, benefical bacteria, even some seaweed pattern, some aminos, soil aminos or fish aminos for nutrient in addition in each planting hole up. You know put some additional nutrients and fertilizers in there. Today I'm not going to do any of that cause I don't have anything except this stuff right here. I'm glad I got this stuff. This is known as the foundation, this is the soluble mycorrhizae. So the mycorrhizae is basically a fungal inoculant that basically lives on the roots zone and they make the roots more efficient. You know, brain in nutrients for the plant so normally you have a none soluble mycorrhizae which is little granules that I actually sprinkle on the roots before I plant each plant. This one happened to be a soluble one so because I have soluble mycorrhizae today i'm going to do a root drench. Super simple, super easy. We're going to start out here with basically 10x20 tray with no holes in the bottom. And let's see it says you could use about 1 tablespoon or 2 tablespoons per gallon of water. I'll probably just maybe measure out that much, which may be a tablespoon or so. Then we're just going to go ahead and mix it up with some water here. All right we got the tray filled up about halfway full and now we're just gonna go ahead and bottom water or plant starch. We're gonna go ahead and set them in here. We're gonna go ahead and leave them in here for a while. This will basically allow the roots to get nice and wet, absorb the water, but also you get contact with the mycorrhizae and it'll also start to colonize on the root zone. From my experience this will give you better growth. I mean this is product Hemel used in hydroponics to increase the growth and in my opinion, it totally works. So we can only do like one flat at a time. We're going to come back and then swap these out, and soak the rest of them in about 10 minutes, cause I got another project i'm kind of working on, concurrently. All right so as you guys can see, I've got into planting. I planted out already 3 rows, I planted out my fourth row right now. I thought I'll show you guys actually how i'm planting it. So what I like to do is I like to use the square foot gardening method. And I mean you're going to pack plants in a little bit closer than they normally would, for instance on a seed packet. For example for the lettuce, I like to space them approximately 6 inches apart. This will give it enough space to grow especially because we have some nice and rich soil. But more importantly you're going to be able to fit more plants in less space. Also because they are so close, you know, once they start touching each other that's your indicator to let you guys know that it's time to harvest some of the leaves that are touching. So you can go around and harvest like one leaf of every plant that's touching, so that they're not touching and then that will be enough leaves for you guys to make a salad. Unlike, you know, when you go to the store and buy a lettuce. To maximize our harvest we want to simply go around each plant and harvest, you know, the biggest outer leaf of each plant, and you know harvest one leaf of every plant. If you do that you'll have 50 leaves of lettuce with a nice size that will easily make a salad for you. Instead of just cutting the whole plant down then your lettuce is pretty much gone and done and finished. If you just harvest one leaf, it's gonna continue to grow for you until the weather warms up, and until it goes through its complete life cycle. So yeah. So I've spaced it out. So what I've done is every 6 inches I made a little template things. So this is just a piece of the Egyptian spinach stem that I cut down. I also use bamboo sticks and I cut them to 6 inches at home. I'll even like, ride on their 6 inch spacing, so I can just use this to space in between the plant. I've also used some standard twigs that have been laying around to demarcate where the plant holes are going to be. Or where the plants are going to be and then I've actually going to offset the rows so they're not all like uniform. They're offset so that it will provide a little bit nicer look and also provide and allow me to get like one extra plant in. You know per every other row, alright. And planting this guys out since I don't have anything special nothing fancy I got some gloves on cause I don't like getting dirt in my fingernails. We're going to go ahead and take out the little placeholder to let me know where to place the plant. Take two fingers in the nice and fluffy soil. Move that back just enough and just deep enough so that I can get in one of these little transplants. I'd take the transplants in the six packs and squeeze it on the end, and kind of wiggle it out, and gently bring it all out. As you guys can see their roots are just kind of like, it's like my girlfriend's hair when she wakes up. Sometimes it's kind of just like over the place, and that's good you don't want to wrapped up really nice and tight. This means this plant is ready to go right in the ground so we're going to go ahead and take this and carefully put it right in the ground. We're going to get the soil level as it comes out of the six pack to match up the soil level on the ground. So you wanna make sure you dig up deep enough hole, but not too deep. You want to bury too much the stem, cause otherwise you may get this stem right. Then we're just going to go ahead and carefully pack in some compost around the top, so we have a nice plant that's all planted in the garden. I mean gardening this is not rocket science man. You guys don't even need a high-school diploma to be planting stuff. This is a lot easier than math in my opinion. The stuff's gross. Anyways I got to get to finishing all this stuff up and we're going to come back at you. When I got it all done. Alright as you guys can see, I've had a successful day. I've got all 66 plants in this bed and a few in another container here. I got all lettuces in the front and I got some celeries in the back. These plants will do have no problems with any kind of minor freezes that may occur here in the Houston area. Now most important thing that after you get your plants in. Then just walk away an pat yourself on the back for doing a good job. You got the water them in. Very important. So you know I tried not to get the leaves, I try to usually just generally like water it around the base of the plant on the ground. And I like, you know, nozzle this one kind of sprays like pretty hard actually. This is on shower but it's spraying really hard so I'd rather have like a nozzle that kind of sprays a little bit lighter like drops of water out, more like the rain. But you know this is what we got today so this is what we're using. I think i'm going to just gonna go ahead and water these guys in. Then we're going to call it a day. I'm glad i'm able to help my girlfriend's parents get their garden growing. They got a lots of good stuff and a lot of good food to eat in the upcoming months, aside from other perennial vegetables that are still growing. All right so if you guys enjoyed this format, this episode hey please be sure that you thumbs up. I'll be sure to do more episodes in the future. When I come back with updates of a garden here. Also, be sure to click the subscribe button right down below to be notified of my new and upcoming episode that's coming out about every 3 to 4 days. You never know where I'll show up, or what you will be learning from my YouTube channel. Finally be sure to check my past episodes. I have over 1200 episodes now showing you guys all aspects on how you guys can grow your own food at home . Whether replanting beds or visiting new farms or all kinds of stuff, I've probably got an episode of it man. So yeah, anyways with that my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com We'll see you next time and until then remember: Keep on growing! view all
 


 
You will discover the specific techniques John uses to remove plants, move plants, and keep plants in the same raised bed garden to grow more vegetables for the next season. First, You will learn some of the annual vegetables that grew best, as well as the ones that need to be removed, also perennial vegetables that survived the light frost. Next, you will discover how John removes old plants and moving plants from the raised bed vegetable garden to save them for next season. You will then discover the specific amendments including compost that John adds to add fertility to the raised bed garden and why he likes to include amendments such as rock dust, worm castings as well as other organic fertilizers in some cases. John will teach you how to not bury existing perennial plants that would be covered in the soil when topping off the soil level in a raised bed vegetable garden. Next, John will share how he prepares the raised bed that was just filled with compost for planting. You will then learn how to supercharge your plant roots by using Foundation, a Mycorrhizae root drench that can help to colonize the root zone so the plant can be more efficient at taking in nutrients. John will then show you his methodology for transplanting lettuce into a raised bed garden using the square foot gardening spacing and how he uses a template stick to speed up his busy work. Finally, John will show you the completed raised bed and share with you the final step of transplanting the newly planted raised bed garden that will survive the frost with winter vegetables.
 
subtitle:

Alright this is John Kohler of GrowingYourGreens.com today we have another exciting episode for you here at Houston. Here it’s basically the end of the year, and we’re helping out Lauren’s parents with their backyard garden that kind of grew amazingly. If you wanna knew what grew the best, be sure to check the past episode. I'll put a link down below if I remember for all the plants that did amazing here, even through this hot Houston summer. Now that it's turn colder here and they got kind of lite a live frost. You know some of the plants that didn't quite make it, and some of the annual plants finished up to the season such as the shiso that just got harvest in the seeds from. And Lauren has actually harvest in like a copious amount of seeds on the red stem Egyptian spinach with round seed pods. If you guys want some of those, and some of the plants that did the best here in this garden, be sure to check the link down below it's growingyourgreens.ecwid.com we will be making these seeds available for you guys so that you guys can you plant in your garden and have tons of delicious summer edible leafy greens to eat. In the case in this episode because we are doing garden cleanup today. some things are still left from the summer some things are not and basically just cleaning it up. And then we're gonna go ahead and get planting some of the winter crops here. We're gonna show you guys actually the technique I use after the first season or even after every season. Basically I re-enrich the beds with more compost and other amendments and then basically just plant. I mean it's really not that hard what to do after your season ends. So actually let's go over to the raised bed and show you guys what we're working with. Alright so here's what we got working on in this raised bed. You guys can see a lot of loads in this raised bed. As you guys can see, we got all of these flowers on this side and these plants did amazing. And they're basically just some ornamental flowers they put in just so it look nice. But they end up actually, by the end of the season, they took over probably like a quarter of the bed. And you know as much as ornamental flowers are nice, I don't think they below necessarily in a raised bed. You know there's many other places in the yard, you know, along the borders of the trees, the shrubs, and the yard that some ornamentals can be placed. It can then overtake your raised bed and basically they're going to crowd out food crop that you could be growing and eating, to which in my opinion, could be much more valuable than just some pretty flowers. With that being said if you want to plant some flowers, you can plant some edible flowers some things like violas, marigolds, nasturtiums are some common edible flowers you can plant alone in your bed. Nasturtiums can get kind of wild and take over, but the other ones tends to be relatively small. So I'm glad I could actually go ahead to basically take the clippers and just clip these guys out. So we're clipping all the stuff off and then we'll composing all the top growth, and then I'm going to just put that back in a little round base and keep the plant alive. Then I'm gonna basically pluck up the whole root ball, and then i'm gonna go ahead and transplant the root ball in another area of the yard so that I have this raised bed space for growing some edibles. Another thing that you can refine at the end of the season is you're gonna have a lot of dried up plants. I think this is like some basil, and right here is the bamboo stick that came with it. We're gonna go ahead and reuse that for later. But what you want to do after every season is you want to clear up the bed. You know you wanna clear up all these leaves that are down the ground. It could be harboring bugs and bacteria so I basically have to scratch all this stuff back and will take it and will throw it in the bucket here. Everything in the bucket will end up in the compost bin and get basically turned back into soil for next season. Now all these plants here that are all dried up, I think thanks to my little clippers here and I come down to the base. You know I come down to the base right to the soil level and then I snip. I just basically put this whole thing out, and then I'll cut it into small pieces, and it will go on to the bucket, and all the bucket contents will go to the compost. In this way i'm actually leaving the root material under the ground. This is very important when you do this you're going to basically be creating more organic matter or the bacteria, microbes, and more importantly the earthworms and other you know living creatures in the soil. They're going to digest these, the roots and turned it into new nutrients for the plants that are gonna come up for the next season. Another thing that I'm doing is i'm coming up to the ground, and they got all these weeds in here. They haven't done a good job in pulling up all the weed in here. Basically I come in, and basically I pull up all the weeds by the roots and get the roots as much as I can. This way these will not go through into the next season. Let's see here. Oh the other thing I do is actually we're going to also top of the bed once we got this all cleared. We're gonna go ahead and fill up compost almost the top of this bed. As you guys can see, this bed this year sunk down probably like 6 inches or so. They didn't fill it up to top, but as over the season it's settled down, what not. So we're going to add new compost on top with other amendments to bring the level up higher, and then we're just going to go ahead and plant it into a new soil. Let's see what other things I gotta do here, you know. I mean living crops, we got corrupt longevity spinach right here still growing and I'll probably try to trim that back and keep it contained in the one side of the bed so that I can have a nice section for the winter crops. Oh, another thing I want to mention here. They originally put this nails like every foot in the top of the bed to kind of like make a string and make like nice little square foot so that like plants for a square foot garden. But the string overtime has actually created the compost to down and so I got the crowbar. I basically use the crowbar and puller and we're gonna pull out the little nails. You know the nails made it kind of difficult to sit on the raised bed, cause you know it can bump into you. Also they can be, you know, a hazard when you're working in the bed. They might be sharp and you might cut yourself. So we're just gonna go ahead and carefully pull these guys up. Each one of them and once all of these are pulled out, they're gonna build a little frame on the top. Maybe it's going to be 2x6 make a nice overhang, so you really sit on the bed and work it. That's definitely a good idea. Now the tip I give them when they build up the top is try not to have too much overhang on the inside. If you create an overhang in the inside, underneath that's a place where slugs and snails and other bugs may live. And they're going to hide in there in the day in their nice environment and then at night they're gonna come out and eat your plants. So you know I recommend keeping a minimal overhang on the inside then try to keep those overhang on the outside if possible. They do have a little overhang, you know. If you do have an overhang, I do recommend packing soil underneath under the ledge so that you know bugs cannot get in there and hang out. Of course over the season the soil's gonna go down, it's gonna be a constant battle, packing in soil underneath the ledge just so that the bugs can't get in there. And if they do get in there, you know you wanna every once in a while, you know take a look and see what's going on underneath there so you can get any pest out. So the next thing I want to do is I'm going ahead to clear out this bed and we're going to come back at you. Once I get it cleared out and we're gonna go ahead and top it of with compost. Show you guys how easy that is and then we're going to go ahead and plant the new winter crops. All right so you guys can see what I've done is basically just cleared it all out I pulled any little small seedlings that are coming up, weeds, or otherwise clear the ground out I got those flowering whatever those flower plants Ornamental's back like it's a little stubs right here and here, and then basically I got half of the bed on the other half is just kind of still wild we're going to work on. It's getting dark so I won't be actually to finish up this video and actually get this stuff planted out. We got some lettuce and some celery to plant on in this bed. What I want to talk about next is actually, you know, when you're flipping your bed to the next season right. You have a few options like pull everything out, you know compost it and leave the roots under the ground to compost like I talk about earlier. Sometimes you might have a plant you want to keep. If it's a perennial plant for example, you know sometimes all you dig up perennial plants and put them in a greenhouse. You know they don't have a greenhouse that dig up some other plants and put them into so what they may do is they may just build some kind of structure like a pvc tubing over the top with some remade fabric over the top, or some kind of plastic over the top to kinda keep it warmer. You know on those cold night where it will frost. Sometimes you may just want to save plants and you know so if your plants that's living and it's just maybe no longer productive or it is not where I wanted to be I mean move it so that's what we're doing with this little flowering plants here that were planted. They grew massively and now we're gonna move them so it's just gonna be basically a little shovel here. I like smaller little shovels like they're kind of narrow, they're easier to kind of get in into a raised bed than the wide full sized shovels. We're just gonna basically dig up as much as the rootballs can and we're gonna transplant it into a container over yonder. I'm not going to show you guys this process but I want to talk to you guys about this in case you want to save plants right. There's many options and here's the thing like if I pull this up and I planted over there and it doesn't make it, what do I lost? Nothing, because otherwise I would just cut this plant out to the ground anyways, but at least if it survives and makes it which it probably should and it put a lot of growth on there and as long as you're going to get enough of the root ball, they're gonna have some nice beautiful flowers growing over there, which is s a much better space to grow them than here in the raised bed. If you catch your peppers early enough, some so the guys might want to pull up, you now, your pepper plants that you are producing well before it gets too cold because once it goes cold they kind of go on the shock and then they're never quite the same. Then you gotta nurse them back to health which takes a long time. You can dig those or dig whatever you know and move them around and feel free to do that, if a plant in it's place is not actually serving you. Sooner I'm going to get ahead and doing this. We're gonna come back after I've got this dog out and we're ready for the next step. So if you guys can see I've got that bed or this half the bed pretty much cleared out. It's down of the dirt, as you guys can see I lowered down 6-7 inches from the top where was at the beginning of the season. Yeah looking at this soil to me, I mean it looks a fair bit sandy, you know like little more organic matter in there. So that's what I'm going to be adding today today what we're going to add is we got the Farm Dirt Compost. So you guys saw a couple episodes ago, I visited there place, visited their composting food scraps and wood chips to make some really high-quality compost. It's best to buy it in bulk you guys can get it in bulk and if you wan, you know, you can go even further and I think it's Nature's Way resources its another good place here in the Houston area. I think there in Conroe I had the video of them and also I put it down below if I remember the link. So that's where my girlfriend's dad got this original soil. I don't remember which blend he got but I don't know that I'll get this one again. I mean things go pretty well, but after looking at it, it looks very bit sandy. I probably tend to want to make my own customized mix from there raw ingredients that they have. I know that in a lot of my videos I thought about adding rock dust, adding worm casting and adding a lot a whole bunch of other things that I like to add personally. You know here in Texas I actually don't have all those resources available so I'm going to say I should go so and the couple episodes agod. They basically just grow in the dirt that's in his backyard without adding pretty much of anything. I mean here's a thing, the thing is you could guard them without anything, absolutely. You could grow a dirt in your yard it may or may not work. It may work really well, It may work really poorly right. It just depends on the soil and your specific area. What I like to do by adding the worm castings, by adding the rock dust, by adding all the things I like to add that I've shown in other videos is you know provide my plants the best conditions to grow with everything they could possibly need and let them figured out. You know in this day and age you know there are nutrient deficiencies this is readily apparent in people when they're eating food and their bodies are not being nourished. I mean you may think that eating a lot of food but you might not be the getting vitamins, the minerals and more importantly phytochemicals that you need to fully thrive. So I wanna fill my body with as many different varieties of food that I possibly can and that's what I simply tried to do to my plants. And some people would argue, John all that stuff is already in the soil. I would definitely bet you money unless you're getting some of that best soil and different kinds of soil. It's just one soil. You're not going to have that what wide range of spectrum of soil life, soil microbes that I'm going to have in addition you're not going to have the spectrum of minerals. Yes, you would have minerals, you would have some bacteria and fungi and all these things, but you're not they're going to have the spectrum. I mean, I want to provide the biggest spectrum, so hopefully in my plants can you know be better because of it. Anyways, today all we got is the compost so that's minimally what I'd recommend and I recommend a good quality compost. As I've shown in previous videos not all compost is created equal. You got a big box stores and big bag of compost. 2 cubic feet for 3 bucks, guess what you guys are getting what you paid for. I wouldn't even grow in some of this stuff they call compost of the big box store. I mean that stuff to me is more like a mulch, it's not a compost. I'm glad I'm using some good high-quality compost here. I mean look at this stuff this stuff is nice rich and black. You guys see that when you guys go to the big-box store and buy some stuff. Here's the stuff that's in the bed right now, it's kind of like grayish and here's the stuff that I'm adding to it. You might be saying, John should I add it and stir it all off and mix it. Well one of the things I don't want to do is to really disturb the existing soil micro-life and microbes. I dont really want to til it. So i'm going ahead to add this stuff on top and overtime all the nutrients will kinda sift down in the old soil. So yeah I mean this is not rocket science to top of your bed and this is how I add fertility for the next season. I'm not adding, you know, chemical fertilizers. I'm just adding more organic mother and the organic matter is basedly time-released fertility for the plants, because as the organic matter sits in the bed and soil microbes break it down and make it water soluble for the plants to uptake and that's how it should work in nature so so that's what I'm simply doing. All right that's one bag. I think I got about 8 more to go. So now I'm going to show you guys a challenge you guys might have if you guys are toughened up your beds and you're leaving plants in your beds like a am. As you guys can see we're getting close to the top it's a couple inches away but we got this plant which is I believe some society garlic which are edible. The flowers as well as the greens you can eat just like onions or garlic. But the problem is this planted at the at the original height of the raised bed which is up to here and after the season it actually sunk down. So now if you feel the dirt up to the level that we're going to fill up the rest of the soil here, the compost. We're going to bury it like 1/10th of the plant. This stem is actually going to be under the ground. In some cases this may not matter and actually the society garlic may just survive barbarian stem. Some hardly perennials that you can actually grew in water those ones generally are used to having their stems buried by a landslide for example. You know this is just a landslide when were filing plants the soil of up on, you know, the stems of the plants. With that being said to be safe if you're not sure if the plant could handle it or not what I like to do is what I like to call let's jack up the plant. So literally you gotta jack up your car to get it to work or basically gonna go ahead around. This is just kinda like we are pulling up the transplant and we're not actually going to pull it out totally. We're just going to kind of get underneath there. Then we'll use the big guns here. And then we're just gonna literally, jack up, get the plants a little bit higher to the level kind of we wanted. Then we're going to go ahead and take some of that compost and under fill it. So i'm just basically sticking the compost and the hole i've created and we're going to fill the compost in the bottom of the root ball so then when i'm done this guy will be up in this level. Carefully move this around and we're going to under fill it right here again. I've left a sufficient amount of, you know, roots alive for these onions and onions are fairly hardy plants anyways. So these guys in my opinion should totally make it. Once we got all the soil in there, then we're just gonna put out our little shovel there and now we've raised up our plant to the level that we're going to have the soil and I could continue filling the soil. So if you guys can see we've got the compost build up. Maybe within a half inch to the top that's just where I like it. We got it all nice and levelled up pretty well, got the society garlic happy and I think we're basically ready to go to the next step which is once you got all the compost in, you know normally I would just go ahead and plant the plants. But I don't want to plant the plants yet. I want to basically wet down this compost so we're going to go ahead and wet the stuff down with the little hose and just carefully like water in. We don't wanna water log the soil but we gonna get it like nice and damp so the plants will be ready and the roots will have a nice cozy habitat to sink into literally. So we're just about done watering this in here and the next thing you do is you don't wanna plant your plants. We don't just wanna water the plants immediately after watering it. You want to let the water kinda soak in for a little bit. It's getting kinda dark tonight, so I think I'm going to go ahead and stop. I'm going to come back at you tomorrow when I'll be planting all these lettuces out. All right as you guys can see, it's a nice and bright sunny day here in Houston area and what we're going to do today is actually plant out the plant starch. Normally people might take just like the plant starch and pop them and pop them in the ground. And what I like to do instead, normally if i'm at home is I'll put a mixture of different items on the root zones. Such as the Mycorrhizae, benefical bacteria, even some seaweed pattern, some aminos, soil aminos or fish aminos for nutrient in addition in each planting hole up. You know put some additional nutrients and fertilizers in there. Today I'm not going to do any of that cause I don't have anything except this stuff right here. I'm glad I got this stuff. This is known as the foundation, this is the soluble mycorrhizae. So the mycorrhizae is basically a fungal inoculant that basically lives on the roots zone and they make the roots more efficient. You know, bring in nutrients for the plant so normally you have a none soluble mycorrhizae which is little granules that I actually sprinkle on the roots before I plant each plant. This one happened to be a soluble one so because I have soluble mycorrhizae today i'm going to do a root drench. Super simple, super easy. We're going to start out here with basically 10x20 tray with no holes in the bottom. And let's see it says you could use about 1 tablespoon or 2 tablespoons per gallon of water. I'll probably just maybe measure out that much, which may be a tablespoon or so. Then we're just going to go ahead and mix it up with some water here. All right we got the tray filled up about halfway full and now we're just gonna go ahead and bottom water or plant starch. We're gonna go ahead and set them in here. We're gonna go ahead and leave them in here for a while. This will basically allow the roots to get nice and wet, absorb the water, but also you get contact with the mycorrhizae and it'll also start to colonize on the root zone. From my experience this will give you better growth. I mean this is product commonly used in hydroponics to increase the growth and in my opinion, it totally works. So we can only do like one flat at a time. We're going to come back and then swap these out, and soak the rest of them in about 10 minutes, cause I got another project i'm kind of working on, concurrently. All right so as you guys can see, I've got into planting. I planted out already 3 rows, I planted out my fourth row right now. I thought I'll show you guys actually how i'm planting it. So what I like to do is I like to use the square foot gardening method. And I mean you're going to pack plants in a little bit closer than they normally would, for instance on a seed packet. For example for the lettuce, I like to space them approximately 6 inches apart. This will give it enough space to grow especially because we have some nice and rich soil. But more importantly you're going to be able to fit more plants in less space. Also because they are so close, you know, once they start touching each other that's your indicator to let you guys know that it's time to harvest some of the leaves that are touching. So you can go around and harvest like one leaf of every plant that's touching, so that they're not touching and then that will be enough leaves for you guys to make a salad. Unlike, you know, when you go to the store and buy a lettuce. To maximize our harvest we want to simply go around each plant and harvest, you know, the biggest outer leaf of each plant, and you know harvest one leaf of every plant. If you do that you'll have 50 leaves of lettuce with a nice size that will easily make a salad for you. Instead of just cutting the whole plant down then your lettuce is pretty much gone and done and finished. If you just harvest one leaf, it's gonna continue to grow for you until the weather warms up, and until it goes through its complete life cycle. So yeah. So I've spaced it out. So what I've done is every 6 inches I made a little template things. So this is just a piece of the Egyptian spinach stem that I cut down. I also use bamboo sticks and I cut them to 6 inches at home. I'll even like, ride on their 6 inch spacing, so I can just use this to space in between the plant. I've also used some standard twigs that have been laying around to demarcate where the plant holes are going to be. Or where the plants are going to be and then I've actually going to offset the rows so they're not all like uniform. They're offset so that it will provide a little bit nicer look and also provide and allow me to get like one extra plant in. You know per every other row, alright. And planting this guys out since I don't have anything special nothing fancy I got some gloves on cause I don't like getting dirt in my fingernails. We're going to go ahead and take out the little placeholder to let me know where to place the plant. Take two fingers in the nice and fluffy soil. Move that back just enough and just deep enough so that I can get in one of these little transplants. I'd take the transplants in the six packs and squeeze it on the end, and kind of wiggle it out, and gently bring it all out. As you guys can see their roots are just kind of like, it's like my girlfriend's hair when she wakes up. Sometimes it's kind of just like over the place, and that's good you don't want to wrapped up really nice and tight. This means this plant is ready to go right in the ground so we're going to go ahead and take this and carefully put it right in the ground. We're going to get the soil level as it comes out of the six pack to match up the soil level on the ground. So you wanna make sure you dig up deep enough hole, but not too deep. You want to bury too much the stem, cause otherwise you may get this stem rot. Then we're just going to go ahead and carefully pack in some compost around the top, so we have a nice plant that's all planted in the garden. I mean gardening this is not rocket science man. You guys don't even need a high-school diploma to be planting stuff. This is a lot easier than math in my opinion. The stuff's grows. Anyways I got to get to finishing all this stuff up and we're going to come back at you. When I got it all done. Alright as you guys can see, I've had a successful day. I've got all 66 plants in this bed and a few in another container here. I got all lettuces in the front and I got some celeries in the back. These plants will do have no problems with any kind of minor freezes that may occur here in the Houston area. Now most important thing that after you get your plants in. Then just walk away an pat yourself on the back for doing a good job. You got the water them in. Very important. So you know I tried not to get the leaves, I try to usually just generally like water it around the base of the plant on the ground. And I like, you know, nozzle this one kind of sprays like pretty hard actually. This is on shower but it's spraying really hard so I'd rather have like a nozzle that kind of sprays a little bit lighter like drops of water out, more like the rain. But you know this is what we got today so this is what we're using. I think i'm going to just gonna go ahead and water these guys in. Then we're going to call it a day. I'm glad i'm able to help my girlfriend's parents get their garden growing. They got a lots of good stuff and a lot of good food to eat in the upcoming months, aside from other perennial vegetables that are still growing. All right so if you guys enjoyed this format, this episode hey please be sure that you thumbs up. I'll be sure to do more episodes in the future. When I come back with updates of a garden here. Also, be sure to click the subscribe button right down below to be notified of my new and upcoming episode that's coming out about every 3 to 4 days. You never know where I'll show up, or what you will be learning from my YouTube channel. Finally be sure to check my past episodes. I have over 1200 episodes now showing you guys all aspects on how you guys can grow your own food at home . Whether replanting beds or visiting new farms or all kinds of stuff, I've probably got an episode of it man. So yeah, anyways with that my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com We'll see you next time and until then remember: Keep on growing! of grew amazingly. If you wanna knew what grew the best, be sure to check the past episode. I'll put a link down below if I remember for all the plants that did amazing here, even through this hot Houston summer. Now that it's turn colder here and they got kind of like a live frost. You know some of the plants that didn't quite make it, and some of the annual plants finished up to the season such as the shiso that just got harvest in the seeds from. And Lauren has actually harvest in like a copious amount of seeds on the red stem Egyptian spinach with round seed pots. If you guys want some of those, and some of the plants that did the best here in this garden, be sure to check the link down below it's growingyourgreens.ecwid.com we will be making these seeds available for you guys so that you guys can you plant in your garden and have tons of delicious summer edible leafy greens to eat. In the case in this episode because we are doing garden cleanup today. some things are still left from the summer some things are not and basically just cleaning it up. And then we're gonna go ahead and get planting some of the winter crops here. We're gonna show you guys actually the technique I use after the first season or even after every season. Basically I re-enrich the beds with more compost and other amendments and then basically just plant. I mean it's really not that hard what to do after your season ends. So actually let's go over to the raised bed and show you guys what we're working with. Alright so here's what we got working on in this raised bed. You guys can see a lot of loads in this raised bed. As you guys can see, we got all of these flowers on this side and these plants did amazing. And they're basically just some ornamental flowers they put in just so it look nice. But they end up actually, by the end of the season, they took over probably like a quarter of the bed. And you know as much as ornamental flowers are nice, I don't think they below necessarily in a raised bed. You know there's many other places in the yard, you know, along the borders of the trees, the shrubs, and the yard that some ornamentals can be placed. It can then overtake your raised bed and basically they're going to crowd out food crop that you could be growing and eating, to which in my opinion, could be much more valuable than just some pretty flowers. With that being said if you want to plant some flowers, you can plant some edible flowers some things like violas, marigolds, nasturtiums are some common edible flowers you can plant alone in your bed. Nasturtiums can get kind of wild and take over, but the other ones tends to be relatively small. So I'm glad I could actually go ahead to basically take the clippers and just clip these guys out. So we're clipping all the stuff off and then we'll composing all the top growth, and then I'm going to just put that back in a little round base and keep the plant alive. Then I'm gonna basically pluck up the whole root ball, and then i'm gonna go ahead and transplant the root ball in another area of the yard so that I have this raised bed space for growing some edibles. Another thing that you can refine at the end of the season is you're gonna have a lot of dried up plants. I think this is like some basil, and right here is the bamboo stick that came with it. We're gonna go ahead and reuse that for later. But what you want to do after every season is you want to clear up the bed. You know you wanna clear up all these leaves that are down the ground. It could be harboring bugs and bacteria so I basically have to scratch all this stuff back and will take it and will throw it in the bucket here. Everything in the bucket will end up in the compost bin and get basically turned back into soil for next season. Now all these plants here that are all dried up, I think thanks to my little clippers here and I come down to the base. You know I come down to the base right to the soil level and then I snip. I just basically put this whole thing out, and then I'll cut it into small pieces, and it will go on to the bucket, and all the bucket contents will go to the compost. In this way i'm actually leaving the root material under the ground. This is very important when you do this you're going to basically be creating more organic matter or the bacteria, microbes, and more importantly the earthworms and other you know living creatures in the soil. They're going to digest these, the roots and turned it into new nutrients for the plants that are gonna come up for the next season. Another thing that I'm doing is i'm coming up to the ground, and they got all these weeds in here. They haven't done a good job in pulling up all the weed in here. Basically I come in, and basically I pull up all the weeds by the roots and get the roots as much as I can. This way these will not go through into the next season. Let's see here. Oh the other thing I do is actually we're going to also top of the bed once we got this all cleared. We're gonna go ahead and fill up compost almost the top of this bed. As you guys can see, this bed this year sunk down probably like 6 inches or so. They didn't fill it up to top, but as over the season it's settled down, what not. So we're going to add new compost on top with other amendments to bring the level up higher, and then we're just going to go ahead and plant it into a new soil. Let's see what other things I gotta do here, you know. I mean living crops, we got corrupt longevity spinach right here still growing and I'll probably try to trim that back and keep it contained in the one side of the bed so that I can have a nice section for the winter crops. Oh, another thing I want to mention here. They originally put this nails like every foot in the top of the bed to kind of like make a string and make like nice little square foot so that like plants for a square foot garden. But the string overtime has actually created the compost to down and so I got the crowbar. I basically use the crowbar and puller and we're gonna pull out the little nails. You know the nails made it kind of difficult to sit on the raised bed, cause you know it can bump into you. Also they can be, you know, a hazard when you're working in the bed. They might be sharp and you might cut yourself. So we're just gonna go ahead and carefully pull these guys up. Each one of them and once all of these are pulled out, they're gonna build a little frame on the top. Maybe it's going to be 2x6 make a nice overhang, so you really sit on the bed and work it. That's definitely a good idea. Now the tip I give them when they build up the top is try not to have too much overhang on the inside. If you create an overhang in the inside, underneath that's a place where slugs and snails and other bugs may live. And they're going to hide in there in the day in their nice environment and then at night they're gonna come out and eat your plants. So you know I recommend keeping a minimal overhang on the inside then try to keep those overhang on the outside if possible. They do have a little overhang, you know. If you do have an overhang, I do recommend packing soil underneath under the ledge so that you know bugs cannot get in there and hang out. Of course over the season the soil's gonna go down, it's gonna be a constant battle, packing in soil underneath the ledge just so that the bugs can't get in there. And if they do get in there, you know you wanna every once in a while, you know take a look and see what's going on underneath there so you can get any pest out. So the next thing I want to do is I'm going ahead to clear out this bed and we're going to come back at you. Once I get it cleared out and we're gonna go ahead and top it of with compost. Show you guys how easy that is and then we're going to go ahead and plant the new winter crops. All right so you guys can see what I've done is basically just cleared it all out I pulled any little small seedlings that are coming up, weeds, or otherwise clear the ground out I got those flowering whatever those flower plants Ornamental's back like it's a little stubs right here and here, and then basically I got half of the bed on the other half is just kind of still wild we're going to work on. It's getting dark so I won't be actually to finish up this video and actually get this stuff planted out. We got some lettuce and some celery to plant on in this bed. What I want to talk about next is actually, you know, when you're flipping your bed to the next season right. You have a few options like pull everything out, you know compose it and leave the roots under the ground to compost like I talk about earlier. Sometimes you might have a plant you want to keep. If it's a perennial plant for example, you know sometimes all you dig up perennial plants and put them in a greenhouse. You know they don't have a greenhouse that dig up some other plants and put them into so what they may do is they may just build some kind of structure like a pvc tubing over the top with some remade fabric over the top, or some kind of plastic over the top to kinda keep it warmer. You know on those cold night where it will frost. Sometimes you may just want to save plants and you know so if your plants that's living and it's just maybe no longer productive or it is not where I wanted to be I mean move it so that's what we're doing with this little flowering plants here that were planted. They grew massively and now we're gonna move them so it's just gonna be basically a little shovel here. I like smaller little shovels like they're kind of narrow, they're easier to kind of get in into a raised bed than the wide full sized shovels. We're just gonna basically dig up as much as the rootballs can and we're gonna transplant it into a container over yonder. I'm not going to show you guys this process but I want to talk to you guys about this in case you want to save plants right. There's many options and here's the thing like if I pull this up and I planted over there and it doesn't make it, what do I lost? Nothing, because otherwise I would just cut this plant out to the ground anyways, but at least if it survives and makes it which it probably should and it put a lot of growth on there and as long as you're going to get enough of the root ball, they're gonna have some nice beautiful flowers growing over there, which is s a much better space to grow them than here in the raised bed. If you catch your peppers early enough, some so the guys might want to pull up, you now, your pepper plants that you are producing well before it gets too cold because once it goes cold they kind of go on the shock and then they're never quite the same. Then you gotta nurse them back to health which takes a long time. You can dig those or dig whatever you know and move them around and feel free to do that, if a plant in it's place is not actually serving you. Sooner I'm going to get ahead and doing this. We're gonna come back after I've got this dog out and we're ready for the next step. So if you guys can see I've got that bed or this half the bed pretty much cleared out. It's down of the dirt, as you guys can see I lowered down 6-7 inches from the top where was at the beginning of the season. Yeah looking at this soil to me, I mean it looks a fair bit sandy, you know like little more organic matter in there. So that's what I'm going to be adding today today what we're going to add is we got the Farm Dirt Compost. So you guys saw a couple episodes ago, I visited there place, visited their composting food scraps and wood chips to make some really high-quality compost. It's best to buy it in bulk you guys can get it in bulk and if you wan, you know, you can go even further and I think it's Nature's Way resources its another good place here in the Houston area. I think there in Conroe I had the video of them and also I put it down below if I remember the link. So that's where my girlfriend's dad got this original soil. I don't remember which blend he got but I don't know that I'll get this one again. I mean things go pretty well, but after looking at it, it looks very bit sandy. I probably tend to want to make my own customized mix from there raw ingredients that they have. I know that in a lot of my videos I thought about adding rock dust, adding worm casting and adding a lot a whole bunch of other things that I like to add personally. You know here in Texas I actually don't have all those resources available so I'm going to say I should go so and the couple episodes agod. They basically just grow in the dirt that's in his backyard without adding pretty much of anything. I mean here's a thing, the thing is you could guard them without anything, absolutely. You could grow a dirt in your yard it may or may not work. It may work really well, It may work really poorly right. It just depends on the soil and your specific area. What I like to do by adding the worm castings, by adding the rock dust, by adding all the things I like to add that I've shown in other videos is you know provide my plants the best conditions to grow with everything they could possibly need and let them figured out. You know in this day and age you know there are nutrient deficiencies this is readily apparent in people when they're eating food and their bodies are not being nourished. I mean you may think that eating a lot of food but you might not be the getting vitamins, the minerals and more importantly phytochemicals that you need to fully thrive. So I wanna fill my body with as many different varieties of food that I possibly can and that's what I simply tried to do to my plants. And some people would argue, John all that stuff is already in the soil. I would definitely bet you money unless you're getting some of that best soil and different kinds of soil. It's just one soil. You're not going to have that what wide range of spectrum of soil life, soil microbes that I'm going to have in addition you're not going to have the spectrum of minerals. Yes, you would have minerals, you would have some bacteria and fungi and all these things, but you're not they're going to have the spectrum. I mean, I want to provide the biggest spectrum, so hopefully in my plants can you know be better because of it. Anyways, today all we got is the compost so that's minimally what I'd recommend and I recommend a good quality compost. As I've shown in previous videos not all compost is created equal. You got a big box stores and big bag of compost. 2 cubic feet for 3 bucks, guess what you guys are getting what you paid for. I wouldn't even grow in some of this stuff they call compost of the big box store. I mean that stuff to me is more like a mulch, it's not a compost. I'm glad I'm using some good high-quality compost here. I mean look at this stuff this stuff is nice rich and black. You guys see that when you guys go to the big-box store and buy some stuff. Here's the stuff that's in the bed right now, it's kind of like grayish and here's the stuff that I'm adding to it. You might be saying, John should I add it and stir it all off and mix it. Well one of the things I don't want to do is to really disturb the existing soil micro-life and microbes. I dont really want to til it. So i'm going ahead to add this stuff on top and overtime all the nutrients will kinda sift down in the old soil. So yeah I mean this is not rocket science to top of your bed and this is how I add fertility for the next season. I'm not adding, you know, chemical fertilizers. I'm just adding more organic mother and the organic matter is basedly time-released fertility for the plants, because as the organic matter sits in the bed and soil microbes break it down and make it water soluble for the plants to uptake and that's how it should work in nature so so that's what I'm simply doing. All right that's one bag. I think I got about 8 more to go. So now I'm going to show you guys a challenge you guys might have if you guys are toughened up your beds and you're leaving plants in your beds like a am. As you guys can see we're getting close to the top it's a couple inches away but we got this plant which is I believe some society garlic which are edible. The flowers as well as the greens you can eat just like onions or garlic. But the problem is this planted at the at the original height of the raised bed which is up to here and after the season it actually sunk down. So now if you feel the dirt up to the level that we're going to fill up the rest of the soil here, the compost. We're going to bury it like 1/10th of the plant. This stem is actually going to be under the ground. In some cases this may not matter and actually the society garlic may just survive barbarian stem. Some hardly perennials that you can actually grew in water those ones generally are used to having their stems buried by a landslide for example. You know this is just a landslide when were filing plants the soil of up on, you know, the stems of the plants. With that being said to be safe if you're not sure if the plant could handle it or not what I like to do is what I like to call let's jack up the plant. So literally you gotta jack up your car to get it to work or basically gonna go ahead around. This is just kinda like we are pulling up the transplant and we're not actually going to pull it out totally. We're just going to kind of get underneath there. Then we'll use the big guns here. And then we're just gonna literally, jack up, get the plants a little bit higher to the level kind of we wanted. Then we're going to go ahead and take some of that compost and under fill it. So i'm just basically sticking the compost and the hole i've created and we're going to fill the compost in the bottom of the root ball so then when i'm done this guy will be up in this level. Carefully move this around and we're going to under fill it right here again. I've left a sufficient amount of, you know, roots alive for these onions and onions are fairly hardy plants anyways. So these guys in my opinion should totally make it. Once we got all the soil in there, then we're just gonna put out our little shovel there and now we've raised up our plant to the level that we're going to have the soil and I could continue filling the soil. So if you guys can see we've got the compost build up. Maybe within a half inch to the top that's just where I like it. We got it all nice and levelled up pretty well, got the society garlic happy and I think we're basically ready to go to the next step which is once you got all the compost in, you know normally I would just go ahead and plant the plants. But I don't want to plant the plants yet. I want to basically wet down this compost so we're going to go ahead and wet the stuff down with the little hose and just carefully like water in. We don't wanna water log the soil but we gonna get it like nice and damp so the plants will be ready and the roots will have a nice cozy habitat to sink into literally. So we're just about done watering this in here and the next thing you do is you don't wanna plant your plants. We don't just wanna water the plants immediately after watering it. You want to let the water kinda soak in for a little bit. It's getting kinda dark tonight, so I think I'm going to go ahead and stop. I'm going to come back at you tomorrow when I'll be planting all these lettuces out. All right as you guys can see, it's a nice and bright sunny day here in Houston area and what we're going to do today is actually plant out the plant starch. Normally people might take just like the plant starch and pop them and pop them in the ground. And what I like to do instead, normally if i'm at home is I'll put a mixture of different items on the root zones. Such as the Mycorrhizae, benefical bacteria, even some seaweed pattern, some aminos, soil aminos or fish aminos for nutrient in addition in each planting hole up. You know put some additional nutrients and fertilizers in there. Today I'm not going to do any of that cause I don't have anything except this stuff right here. I'm glad I got this stuff. This is known as the foundation, this is the soluble mycorrhizae. So the mycorrhizae is basically a fungal inoculant that basically lives on the roots zone and they make the roots more efficient. You know, brain in nutrients for the plant so normally you have a none soluble mycorrhizae which is little granules that I actually sprinkle on the roots before I plant each plant. This one happened to be a soluble one so because I have soluble mycorrhizae today i'm going to do a root drench. Super simple, super easy. We're going to start out here with basically 10x20 tray with no holes in the bottom. And let's see it says you could use about 1 tablespoon or 2 tablespoons per gallon of water. I'll probably just maybe measure out that much, which may be a tablespoon or so. Then we're just going to go ahead and mix it up with some water here. All right we got the tray filled up about halfway full and now we're just gonna go ahead and bottom water or plant starch. We're gonna go ahead and set them in here. We're gonna go ahead and leave them in here for a while. This will basically allow the roots to get nice and wet, absorb the water, but also you get contact with the mycorrhizae and it'll also start to colonize on the root zone. From my experience this will give you better growth. I mean this is product Hemel used in hydroponics to increase the growth and in my opinion, it totally works. So we can only do like one flat at a time. We're going to come back and then swap these out, and soak the rest of them in about 10 minutes, cause I got another project i'm kind of working on, concurrently. All right so as you guys can see, I've got into planting. I planted out already 3 rows, I planted out my fourth row right now. I thought I'll show you guys actually how i'm planting it. So what I like to do is I like to use the square foot gardening method. And I mean you're going to pack plants in a little bit closer than they normally would, for instance on a seed packet. For example for the lettuce, I like to space them approximately 6 inches apart. This will give it enough space to grow especially because we have some nice and rich soil. But more importantly you're going to be able to fit more plants in less space. Also because they are so close, you know, once they start touching each other that's your indicator to let you guys know that it's time to harvest some of the leaves that are touching. So you can go around and harvest like one leaf of every plant that's touching, so that they're not touching and then that will be enough leaves for you guys to make a salad. Unlike, you know, when you go to the store and buy a lettuce. To maximize our harvest we want to simply go around each plant and harvest, you know, the biggest outer leaf of each plant, and you know harvest one leaf of every plant. If you do that you'll have 50 leaves of lettuce with a nice size that will easily make a salad for you. Instead of just cutting the whole plant down then your lettuce is pretty much gone and done and finished. If you just harvest one leaf, it's gonna continue to grow for you until the weather warms up, and until it goes through its complete life cycle. So yeah. So I've spaced it out. So what I've done is every 6 inches I made a little template things. So this is just a piece of the Egyptian spinach stem that I cut down. I also use bamboo sticks and I cut them to 6 inches at home. I'll even like, ride on their 6 inch spacing, so I can just use this to space in between the plant. I've also used some standard twigs that have been laying around to demarcate where the plant holes are going to be. Or where the plants are going to be and then I've actually going to offset the rows so they're not all like uniform. They're offset so that it will provide a little bit nicer look and also provide and allow me to get like one extra plant in. You know per every other row, alright. And planting this guys out since I don't have anything special nothing fancy I got some gloves on cause I don't like getting dirt in my fingernails. We're going to go ahead and take out the little placeholder to let me know where to place the plant. Take two fingers in the nice and fluffy soil. Move that back just enough and just deep enough so that I can get in one of these little transplants. I'd take the transplants in the six packs and squeeze it on the end, and kind of wiggle it out, and gently bring it all out. As you guys can see their roots are just kind of like, it's like my girlfriend's hair when she wakes up. Sometimes it's kind of just like over the place, and that's good you don't want to wrapped up really nice and tight. This means this plant is ready to go right in the ground so we're going to go ahead and take this and carefully put it right in the ground. We're going to get the soil level as it comes out of the six pack to match up the soil level on the ground. So you wanna make sure you dig up deep enough hole, but not too deep. You want to bury too much the stem, cause otherwise you may get this stem right. Then we're just going to go ahead and carefully pack in some compost around the top, so we have a nice plant that's all planted in the garden. I mean gardening this is not rocket science man. You guys don't even need a high-school diploma to be planting stuff. This is a lot easier than math in my opinion. The stuff's gross. Anyways I got to get to finishing all this stuff up and we're going to come back at you. When I got it all done. Alright as you guys can see, I've had a successful day. I've got all 66 plants in this bed and a few in another container here. I got all lettuces in the front and I got some celeries in the back. These plants will do have no problems with any kind of minor freezes that may occur here in the Houston area. Now most important thing that after you get your plants in. Then just walk away an pat yourself on the back for doing a good job. You got the water them in. Very important. So you know I tried not to get the leaves, I try to usually just generally like water it around the base of the plant on the ground. And I like, you know, nozzle this one kind of sprays like pretty hard actually. This is on shower but it's spraying really hard so I'd rather have like a nozzle that kind of sprays a little bit lighter like drops of water out, more like the rain. But you know this is what we got today so this is what we're using. I think i'm going to just gonna go ahead and water these guys in. Then we're going to call it a day. I'm glad i'm able to help my girlfriend's parents get their garden growing. They got a lots of good stuff and a lot of good food to eat in the upcoming months, aside from other perennial vegetables that are still growing. All right so if you guys enjoyed this format, this episode hey please be sure that you thumbs up. I'll be sure to do more episodes in the future. When I come back with updates of a garden here. Also, be sure to click the subscribe button right down below to be notified of my new and upcoming episode that's coming out about every 3 to 4 days. You never know where I'll show up, or what you will be learning from my YouTube channel. Finally be sure to check my past episodes. I have over 1200 episodes now showing you guys all aspects on how you guys can grow your own food at home . Whether replanting beds or visiting new farms or all kinds of stuff, I've probably got an episode of it man. So yeah, anyways with that my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com We'll see you next time and until then remember: Keep on growing!

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How to trace minerals to grow his foods which include rock dust, ocean solids, soil humates and seaweeds.

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 202 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

 
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John: All right, this is John Kohler with  Growingyourgreens.com with another exciting episode for you. and what I'm going to do today is actually I got a special guest on the show. actually just recently I was at the 2016 Naturopathic doctors conference here in Las Vegas, Nevada. I make my way to many different health food and health conferences throughout the year, amongst all the other gardening and heirloom events that I visit to keep up to date with what's going on, with you know, not like traditional medical care, but what's considered nowadays alternative or complementary cure.  So I go to a lot of the different talks at the Naturopathic doctor’s convention and hear a lot of different speakers and learn about a lot of different products and supplements and actually new foods. you know, that they try to say in a package but then I just, you know, decide to grow 'em. And I learn about a lot of new stuff and one of the people who is there, I interviewed. that's going to come on a little bit later in this segment.  But before I get into him, I want to share more about what I'm into and growing in my garden, and why this is one of the fundamental keys to my gardening success and one of the reasons why I personally garden myself. And what it comes down to for me personally, is the trace minerals. You know you guys have heard me talk about it before. Whether you're going to get it from soil humates, rock dust, or even you know ocean solids, you know I want you guys to get the trace minerals into your garden. Because, number one your plants will respond. I have seen in my gardens and many friend’s gardens, when they start adding the trace minerals, their plants just get plain healthier. There's something in them trace minerals, that the plants love. they get healthier, in turn they take up these nutrients, these trace minerals in themselves and when they make their fruit, such as my peppers here or they make the leaves, lettuce or kale or collard greens or Egyptian spinach, whatever I'm growing, when they make their leaves, now they take up the inorganic form of that mineral and basically turn it into an organic mineral. and when it's in the state that is taken up into the plant, it basically changes the polarity or the charge on the mineral so that we can actually accept it easily into us. you know just sucking out a copper penny might get you some copper, but you're not going to have a high level of uptake because it's the wrong charge on it. And that's why I like to get my minerals from food.  Furthermore, I want to go into this, you know because a lot of guys haven't seen this before. it's actually a Senate document. the Senate document is from 1936. Document 264 74th Congress, 2nd session, and it's entitled 'The modern miracle men'. This was presented to Congress, way back then. And Congress and the government and people have known about this since that time. What it basically is, it relates to proper food mineral balances by Dr. Charles Northern, reprinted from Cosmopolitan June 1936. Alright, so basically it starts like this: do you know that most of us today are suffering from certain dangerous dietary deficiencies which cannot be remedied until the depleted stores from which our foods come are brought into proper mineral balance. The alarming fact, is that foods, fruits and vegetables and grains now being raised on millions of acres of land that are no longer contains enough of certain needed minerals are starving us no matter how much of them we eat. this is back in the 1930s. And let me tell you, through actually studies and reports I've seen from the U.S.D.A. minerals in the food, over the years, are just declining and declining and declining. nowadays they're at an all time low. And this is because commercial industry is not putting back all the various amounts of trace minerals back in the soil. They're focused on three main minerals N, P, K.  And then along with the many, conventional, synthetic made fertilizers along with the N P K, they're shoving in, in many cases without telling people, small amounts of minerals.  But these are not the minerals that we want, these are the heavy, heavy metal minerals that actually they're just dumping you know. The answer to pollution is not dilution, or I don't know, something like that. but anyway, they're diluting the heavy metals that toxic- that industry is creating in fertilizers, that then grow to grow food for cattle and also for us. So I want you guys to step out of that system and grow your own mineral rich food.  anyways you guys could look up this Senate document, but I think if I go to the end I could sum it up. I mean, it basically talks a lot about, a lot about a different about a lot of different things and here's one of the points: healthy plants mean healthy people, said he, we can't raise a strong race on weak soil. Why don't you try mending the deficiencies in your farm and growing some more minerals in your crops? So then they go on and basically they planted celery with trace minerals and they found that it had at least I think twice as much minerals as celery not grown with the trace minerals, also it stored longer. And it was healthier to eat, going on further in the book, I mean I want you guys to actually look up this book. I'll put a link down below to this. So you guys could look it up and read the whole thing yourself, to learn about all this stuff, because I mean I was exposed to this, must be like twenty years ago now. It says a famous nutrition authority recently said, one sure way to end the American people susceptibility to infection, is to supply through food based ration or iron, copper and other metals. an organism requirements may so utilize these elements, as to produce immunity from infection quite beyond anything we're able to produce artificially by our present method of immunization. you can't make up that deficiency by using patent medicine. So think about that. What is he really saying there. I mean I kind of feel like my English instructor when he's reading Shakespeare and stuff and I like, really didn't understand what all that stuff was about Shakespeare and all this stuff. but I understand this: basically he's saying, that if we have you know, food that's deficient, we're not getting all their trace minerals. we're going to get higher levels of diseases and you know even the latest medicine, immunizations or whatever, is not going to fix that efficiency. the deficiency isn’t a deficiency from a vaccine, or from a drug, which always have side effects, which are just undesired effects. but the deficiency is because we're not eating the proper foods anymore. And this is what I'm really so passionate about these days. I mean I guess at the end, I'll sum it up, last line of this booklet. it is simpler to cure sick soils, than sick people. which shall we choose? this was back in 1936 man. What do they choose? Well industry, the government, whomever is in charge, chose the path of least resistance, I suppose, which is the path of financial interests, big corporations, companies making a lot of money and you know making chemical fertilizers that could be sold after the World War. and they had all these excess, you know factories making you know bombs, now they could make fertilizer out of them and make money. and so I don't know, things didn't go exactly as, as I would have liked. and trace minerals are really important, and what I want to do next for you is actually turn this into an interview with Dr. Joel Wallach actually. He is the man, who enlightened me originally, about the importance of trace minerals, and how to get them into our bodies. so I see Dr. Wallach pretty much every year, at the Naturopathic Doctor’s Convention and this year I decided to interview him for you guys, to pass on his very important words of wisdom. because he's been doing this even longer than I have. so let's go ahead and get into the interview with Dr. Wallach.   So now I have the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Joel Wallach, and he's the expert on minerals that I've learned about, you know back in what is it, the 1990s. there was a cassette tape, this kind of dates a  little bit, that went around called Dead Doctors Don't Lie. And this is the man that made that tape, and he is the one that basically enlightened me, about the importance of trace minerals in our diets and why you should use them to grow your food, and how they can positively affect to help your health and your plants health. So I want to just get Dr. Wallach today on, to basically share with you guys the importance of using trace minerals in your garden, because if you go down to standard big box store, and you get some fertilizer package or conventional fertilizer, you know synthetic fertilizer has like ten ten ten, but those are three main minerals in there. and you know we need a lot more than that. So I'm not going to take the show away from Dr. Wallach, we want to get his expert opinion here. so Dr. Wallach, why is using just three standard minerals which is what most of conventional and even a lot of organic farming focuses on?   Dr. Wallach: Well John, first of all thank you for asking me to speak with you.  Plants only need three minerals. All vertebrates, including human beings require sixty. That's why we have this discrepancy, and we see other minerals from putting our wood ash from our wood stoves into the garden, and also the spring floods that leaves silt when the floodwater recedes, we plough that in. and that renews the minerals in the soil. but once you get electricity, there's no more wood ashes going into the garden, and because we have hydroelectric plants, there is no more flooding and so there's no more silt left in the spring to plough back in the soil and renews the minerals in the soil. and so in the agricultural industry, and as you know I'm a veterinarian, as well as a naturopathic physician, so in the agricultural industry, we make sure the cheapest, most economical and most efficient way to get the minerals into our dairy cows and our beef cows and our chickens and pigs and things, is to feed it to them, give it to them. The little alfalfa pellets, aren't just alfalfa, it's corn and alfalfa and maybe some wheat and maybe some rice. Certainly there's ninety cents of nutrients, sixty minerals, sixteen vitamins, from amino acids, three fatty acids put in there. And we put them in the animal feed because we don't have insurance for them. and they get this and it increases fertility, it increases longevity, increases live births and eliminates birth defects, increases production- instead of having a cow give you half a quart of milk or they're getting a gallon and a half, instead of chickens laying eggs at three a week, they'll lay three eggs a day and so on. and so by giving the animals the 90 essential nutrients, which include all the trace minerals which are cofactors, enzymes, and hormones working in the body, all vertibrateswhat happens is you're maximizing the genetic potential of that human being, or that animal, has for health, fending off disease, longevity, production. and this is the piece we're missing as humans. and humans, medical doctors will say, oh just eat well. you'll get everything you need. No, because plants might only have three minerals, they don't make minerals. If you put three minerals in the soil to make the plant happy, they'll make good seeds for the next generation, but you're not getting what you need. That's why there's blue zones, according to Dan Buettner, for Natural Geographic. and he called them blue zones, because he's circling with a blue crayon right on the map, very scientific. but these are the longest lived of peoples on earth and by dumb luck they live in places that have more than sixty minerals in their soil and they're still using wood stoves. These are all third world cultures, longest lived  peoples on Earth according to National Geographic. because they still have wood stoves, they are putting the wood ashes in the garden, so that the plant doesn't need more than three minerals but they'll suck them all up. and so then when you eat the plant has been fertilized with the wood ashes, with the plant minerals, right, because wood ashes are only actually the minerals the tree soaks up. and so that's why the longest lived people of the third world cultures, minerals, minerals, minerals. it eliminates all birth defects; all birth defects are caused by nutritional deficiencies in the embryos. there's no birth defects are passed on by genetics, none. That's an overreach of the science of genetics/ Genetics will determine your hair color, your eye color, your skin color, your gender, boy/girl kind of thing, and it will tell your liver cells to make liver cells, was repairing itself, to  John: Wow. Yeah I mean, I went to this talk earlier, I mean, this guy's a wealth of knowledge. I want to this talk earlier on epigenetics, which is basically the expression of your genes. so you have genes and if you have nutrient deficiencies, like especially in the trace minerals, then your, you may be sicker, a lot of different things could happen, because the expression of your genes is different than how they should be if you had all the nutrition in there. Anyways the doctor could talk for hours about this mineral for this and this, but I want to get in some more important information for you guys, like Doctor, you talked about the wood ashes. Right, so if my viewers that are gardening, if they use wood ashes in their garden, you know, I've heard things like, you know too many wood ashes might not be a good thing. but will they get all the minerals they need from wood ashes, or should they not guarantee that they're going to get all the minerals from just using the wood ashes, should they get maybe another product?  Dr. Wallach: because there's no guarantee, because nutritional minerals, John, do not occur in a uniform blank or on the coast here. they occur in veins like chocolate and chunky ice cream, but all swirls and swirls. And these twenty top longevity cultures, they by dumb luck, live in places that have all these minerals. have sixty or more minerals and so.  Rest ones who eat well, they garden organic gardening and they'll die of ruptured aneurysm at age thirty-two. That's because they didn't have the trace minerals in the soil. the only way to guarantee it, is to supplement with it, in your mouth or, supplement your garden with it. Ok. And course, we do have a product,  We 'll talk about that in a little bit Dr. Wallach: Yes, and so we have the ability to do that. And as a result the yield goes up, the health of the crops goes up, the health of the land goes up. And it's just one of those miracles, to increase your yield, time so many fold. For instance, use our program, you can take sweet potatoes, which would normally give you mature sweet potatoes of a quarter of a pound, they will be twelve, fourteen pounds, big as a football. And they're sweeter and more tender than the little ones. and the same was true with all the fruit and berries, strawberries, they're huge and they're bright red all the way through the center, they don't have that white pulp in the middle kind of thing. and tomatoes are three times bigger, same thing is true for animals are fed like soybeans or hay that are fertilized with these minerals. their milk production goes up, the egg production goes up, their weight gain and beef cattle and pigs goes up, fertility goes up, survivability of babies goes up, all their birth defects goes away, all the white muscle disease, things like mulberry heart disease in pigs, all those birth defects, cleft palate, Down syndrome, that all goes away, cerebropalsy, it all goes away by supplementing with these trace minerals. John: yeah, trace minerals are super important. If you guys watch me for any length of time, you guys know I'm really on and into the trace minerals. So Dr., I know there's a lot of people out there, that say, I don't need to add to trace minerals to my garden because my soil is fertile, where I live, and the minerals are already in there.  My plants grow fine. What would you say to them?  Dr. Wallach: Well the reason why the minerals are in the plants, is that the plants will suck them out of the soil, unless you're renewing those minerals by putting the plant minerals aka wood ashes in, or leaving in flood silt, that's coming form places that have the sixty minerals in it. after a period of six, eight, ten years, depending on how intense you grow crops in your garden, there won't be any minerals left in the garden. your garden will die, and you'll have to start adding commercial fertilizer.  OK. You must fertilize the soil, two or three or four times a year depending on what you're growing, to make it optimal for the plant and optimal for the man and animals that are eating those plans. Otherwise you're not going to guarantee, and I'll give you an analogy. I think this is a good place to kind of, end.   Alright.  Dr. Wallach: The analogy goes like this. Let's say you take your car to a mechanic, and he say it's time to change the oil. and you say well, I don't want to spend a lot of money for six quarts of high grade oil. I want the cheapest oil. So I can do better than. Instead of putting six quarts of cheap oil in your car, I’m going to put six quarts of dirt from Texas in your car. never mind there's lots of oil in Texas, there's bound to be some oil in that dirt from Texas. That'll take care of your car. Nobody would do that, even to an old rusted out, dented up car. You say no, I don't believe that one. But people believe when doctors say,  oh just eat well you will get everything  you need. What you want to do is take all ninety essential nutrients, even though you've been putting these nutrients in the garden, you still want to supplement. and then what you're getting from your food is value added. That's one way to look at it. You do not want to not supplement. you do not want to not supplement. and then you supplement the soil.  You will maximize your genetic potential for health and longevity at that point.  John: Yeah I mean, I totally agree. I don't want you guys to become deficient. So Dr., what's the soil product that you recommend us? I have some in my house, there's a liquid and a solid right, I got both of them myself. I've been using them, the blooming' mineral. So how can that actually create fertility and add these very important trace minerals into some of these gardening, and why do you come up with this product? Dr. Wallach: well there's seventy-eight minerals in this product, seventy-eight minerals, including all sixty essential minerals at optimal amounts. It's called Blooming mineral, as you pointed out. we have in forty pound bags of granules. We also have it in quart, and fifty-five gallon drums of the liquid. Depending on how big your operation is, either use a sprayer or a spreader. and so you can full your fees as well as do the granules on the soil. And so we kind of go through this, we have a lot of experience and so we can, actually I’m working on a book, but we do have one book that kind of covers this. it’s called "Rare Earths Forbidden Cures". Which you looked at earlier. And so that one is a very, very good one, tells what minerals are missing when you get certain diseases. How the minerals work. What enzyme system, what hormones require them to function properly.  John: Awesome, awesome and then I apply these minerals to my garden like after every growing season so once a year. You know, I grow two different cropping, so like a summer crop, and a winter crop, all I add the minerals and more compost and create fertility after every season of planting, because I'm pulling nutrients out in my plants and I want to put them back in, and even if I'm adding more than the plant are putting out, that's a good thing. that's like putting money in the bank. versus like taking money out of the bank and being withdrawn and overbalancing, getting like you know them fees right. You don't want to over pull from the soil.  So. actually Dr. Wallach got a call and he had to take off, so I couldn't get to finish my interview with him. So I'm kind of sad, but at least I'm glad I got what I got on tape for you guys. So you guys could hear it. So you guys could learn the importance of the trace minerals, you know, not only do I add trace minerals in for my plants, which some people still you know, fail to realize that plants really need more than just three N.P. K. or maybe fifteen or sixteen minerals. But I mean if nature, God, whomever put all these minerals on the earth, and they should be in the soil. then if they're not there, I mean then, then it's not we're not growing, or going according with nature. So here's the thing, like the soils are getting pulled out, the nutrients, the minerals are not getting put back in. So there's basically two solutions, right. When I learned about Dr. Wallach, I learned that Dead Doctors Don't Lie tape, and he was trying to sell a colloidal mineral supplement, which you know I took at the time.  But I tried to figure out likewise, like John, you could take a supplement, you could buy a supplement for the rest of your life, but what's even better than buying a supplement? Hey, I want to eat foods that are mineralized. and at the time I wasn't actually growing my food. I was getting all my food from the grocery store, from the farmer's market, and even most farmers unfortunately, do not add trace minerals. the majority of people, even home gardeners, don't add trace minerals, except if you're one of my long term viewers and watch me and and trust in what I say, and trust in the experts that I have on for you guys, because I'm just sharing what I've learned over the years, all these years that have been really important to me right. and I don't want to lose my life, you know, from something that I could have prevented. right I don't want to be my mistake right. And I'm just sharing what I know and that's why I make these videos So, anyways I just cited that, you know I could take these colloidal minerals, that's pretty good, but I don't want to be hooked on a supplement for the rest of my life. so I want to like, grow my own high quality food and eat food predominantly out of my garden that has all these trace minerals in there, in amounts that nature would require. So that's why I started gardening and growing my food. I took out my front yard, my front lawn, and started growing. I raised a bed of vegetable gardens, I was, like I think nine years ago now. before that I was growing in the periphery of my yard, and that's really good right? And I know a lot of you guys are growing with the trace minerals, and that's great, also. And there's many different types of the kind, actually Dr. Wallach himself actually has a company. It's actually called the Youngevity, it’s right here, this is one of his products right here. That's the Dr. Wallach right there. and basically this is, this is the blooming minerals product. This is a soil revitalizer and this is a OMRI certified for use in organic farming. This is a small jar full, It's two and a half pounds. It's actually kind of expensive, they have a bigger bag which is a much better deal in my opinion. This is the one that you will want to buy, if you want to revitalize your soil with up to seventy-six different minerals in there. and if we open it, and it has a list of all of them on the back. But this is the one he formulated, he put together and he's recommending. And so if you want to trust the doctor, that's what I would recommend to you guys.  And so I have a link down below, if you want to purchase this product. And I'll just show you guys what it looks like. basically it looks like this, and what this is in my opinion and I don't really know exactly for sure, because I'm not a soil microbiologist or all this stuff, but it looks like soil humates to me, right. And soil humates are commonly available for actually a lot less than what this is being sold for, but those soil humates may not be organic approved and you know they may be of varying quality. So I'm sure he checks each and every batch to ensure he's getting some of the best stuff because you're also paying more for it. So yeah, so besides just this stuff the blooming minerals or soil humates, you could also use things like a rock dust, and not all rock dust is created equal. I'm not really going to get into rock here. Be sure to click some of the links below, where I’ll have a link to my playlists about rock dust, where you can learn more about it. I'm also the ocean solids or ocean minerals and also put links down below, to some of those videos I did. so I do encourage you guys to do the minerals, and then to grow all your food and especially if you guys have pets or animals, grow the food for them using the trace minerals, so that they can be healthier. I mean as Dr. Wallach who's a, you know a veterinary, and went to school for animal husbandry, you know saw that they always would feed animals trace mineral supplements in their feed. Why don't we? From a young age, have trace mineral supplements right? They are worth their weight in something, instead of actually just going in one end and coming out the other.  So that's what I want to talk about next. If you guys aren't up to the point where you guys are actually growing a significant portion of your food, and just want to ensure you get the proper minerals. I want you guys to eat foods that have high levels of trace minerals in there. So aside from my home grown rock dust, you know, soil humates, blooming mineral, ocean solid, enhanced vegetables that I grow. I also take some different products such as seaweed powders, I take seaweed powders almost every day. seaweed have a wide spectrum of minerals, because in the oceans, they have significantly more minerals, than most parts of soil or of land soil.  Depending on less rain maybe, in one of the blue zones, and that's probably one of the reasons why blue zones people live so long. because they actually have the trace minerals.  But there's other reasons as well. But aside from that, I also take some supplementary minerals. and so the ones that I've been taken recently are these guys. so this is also this is the youngevity brand and this is actually Dr. Wallach's product. This is actually called the plant derived minerals. So this is the liquid version, and I like this a lot because actually there's no artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners and let me tell you, tastes like hell. If you're going to drink, you're going to be like whoa. I mean, I suppose it tastes better to me than alcohol, but I don't drink. But has a strong flavor when I drink, some reverse osmosis water after drinking this straight up, which actually I don't recommend for you guys. Actually the water tasted sweet, and that's how bad the minerals taste. So if you're going to get these minerals that are liquid then I do encourage you guys to maybe like mix them in with some juice or something like that, it will taste a lot better. But yeah, this has up to seventy-six different minerals also, that are listed on the back. and basically a thing about these minerals unlike a Centrum tablet or other minerals, these are actually from plant derived minerals. So basically these are plants that basically composted thousands of years ago and basically they put in a bottle. so the minerals are coming from plants. Now if you don't like liquids, like Josh doesn't like sipping liquids in bottles, you guys could actually get the capsules. so liquids or capsules and I've also taken these capsules, these capsules are actually in gelatin caps, so I don't like to take gelatin caps, I don't like to take a lot of processed things like that. So I actually open the capsules up and put in my tongue. I was not and that was another not so great idea that I had recently. It actually fuzzed and bubbled on my tongue and that even tasted worse than liquid. So I don't recommend doing that.  maybe mix the tablets in with a juice, once again I would empty the contents of the capsule, out of the capsule. or if you don't mind taking some gelatin, just swallow the capsule whole, while you're taking it with some juice and the capsule will dissolve and you'll get the minerals in you, and your body will absorb them and get healthier because it. I mean, I think overall Dr. Wallach looks great for his age, you know I'm sure nobody does everything exactly right, and I hope he eats his share of fresh fruits and vegetables grown in rock dust and soil humates enhanced and blooming minerals and all that stuff. and just eats the you know the majority of his food is plant food, because those are the best food and I mean that's why I got into gardening. and the Greens are why I got into gardening, one of the reasons is because the minerals. like I want to get the trace minerals in me, I don't want to have a mineral deficiency. You know there's many different health challenges, that can be caused by a mineral deficiency, according to documented research that I have seen. I will have an upcoming episode, actually on some brand new fertilizers that may help with certain conditions, that are formulated with certain minerals that are known to be deficient in individuals with certain conditions. So I'm really looking forward to that episode but in the meantime, right to keep your health, to have your wealth which is your health, I want you guys to supplement, you know, not only yourselves but also your soils more importantly, with the trace minerals. your plants will be happier and in the end you could be happier and I wish all of industry to simply do this. it would not be that much more expensive to start using rock dust, locally sourced rock dust from different quarries and adding that to the farmlands to increase their fertility, increase the nutrition of America's foods. and if America's not going to do that's great, if you guys are from another country, hey tell your ministry of agriculture and all this stuff, to watch my video. and I want you guys, whatever country you guys are in, to start mineralizing your guys' foods. I mean in some countries, they are actually taking seaweed powders and bacon into bread, and the health of the population is actually increasing, because of this. and I want America to be first in everything, but if there's anyone who could do it, I don't care who does it, because I just want, you know the world need to change. the world needs to start remineralizing the soil, not only for the soil health, not only for the people health but for the planet health as well. So if you guys want to pick up some of these mineral products for the soil or the ones you want to take internally, please check the link down below this video, that will get you to where you guys can order them. also be sure to click the Subscribe button right down below, to be notified by new and upcoming episodes upcoming out about every three to four days, you never know what I'll be talking about, or what you'll be learning about my YouTube gardening channel. also be sure to check my past episodes, my past episodes are a wealth of knowledge. I have over twelve hundred episodes to date, teach you guys all aspects on how to grow your own food at home. and be sure like this video. that'll encourage me to maybe hit up Dr. Wallach next time for another interview and maybe you'll have a- some more good questions for- so well once again, my name is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com. We'll see you next time. And until then, remember keep on growing.   All right. This is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com today with another exciting episode for you. and I'm happy to be at the National heirloom Expo. This is the world's Pure Food Fair. You're going to learn more about them.


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John: All right, this is John Kohler with  Growingyourgreens.com with another exciting episode for you. and what I'm going to do today is actually I got a special guest on the show. actually just recently I was at the 2016 Naturopathic doctors conference here in Las Vegas, Nevada. I make my way to many different health food and health conferences throughout the year, amongst all the other gardening and heirloom events that I visit to keep up to date with what's going on, with you know, not like traditional medical care, but what's considered nowadays alternative or complementary cure.  So I go to a lot of the different talks at the Naturopathic doctor’s convention and hear a lot of different speakers and learn about a lot of different products and supplements and actually new foods. you know, that they try to say in a package but then I just, you know, decide to grow 'em. And I learn about a lot of new stuff and one of the people who is there, I interviewed. that's going to come on a little bit later in this segment.  But before I get into him, I want to share more about what I'm into and growing in my garden, and why this is one of the fundamental keys to my gardening success and one of the reasons why I personally garden myself. And what it comes down to for me personally, is the trace minerals. You know you guys have heard me talk about it before. Whether you're going to get it from soil humates, rock dust, or even you know ocean solids, you know I want you guys to get the trace minerals into your garden. Because, number one your plants will respond. I have seen in my gardens and many friend’s gardens, when they start adding the trace minerals, their plants just get plain healthier. There's something in them trace minerals, that the plants love. they get healthier, in turn they take up these nutrients, these trace minerals in themselves and when they make their fruit, such as my peppers here or they make the leaves, lettuce or kale or collard greens or Egyptian spinach, whatever I'm growing, when they make their leaves, now they take up the inorganic form of that mineral and basically turn it into an organic mineral. and when it's in the state that is taken up into the plant, it basically changes the polarity or the charge on the mineral so that we can actually accept it easily into us. you know just sucking out a copper penny might get you some copper, but you're not going to have a high level of uptake because it's the wrong charge on it. And that's why I like to get my minerals from food.  Furthermore, I want to go into this, you know because a lot of guys haven't seen this before. it's actually a Senate document. the Senate document is from 1936. Document 264 74th Congress, 2nd session, and it's entitled 'The modern miracle men'. This was presented to Congress, way back then. And Congress and the government and people have known about this since that time. What it basically is, it relates to proper food mineral balances by Dr. Charles Northern, reprinted from Cosmopolitan June 1936. Alright, so basically it starts like this: do you know that most of us today are suffering from certain dangerous dietary deficiencies which cannot be remedied until the depleted stores from which our foods come are brought into proper mineral balance. The alarming fact, is that foods, fruits and vegetables and grains now being raised on millions of acres of land that are no longer contains enough of certain needed minerals are starving us no matter how much of them we eat. this is back in the 1930s. And let me tell you, through actually studies and reports I've seen from the U.S.D.A. minerals in the food, over the years, are just declining and declining and declining. nowadays they're at an all time low. And this is because commercial industry is not putting back all the various amounts of trace minerals back in the soil. They're focused on three main minerals N, P, K.  And then along with the many, conventional, synthetic made fertilizers along with the N P K, they're shoving in, in many cases without telling people, small amounts of minerals.  But these are not the minerals that we want, these are the heavy, heavy metal minerals that actually they're just dumping you know. The answer to pollution is not dilution, or I don't know, something like that. but anyway, they're diluting the heavy metals that toxic- that industry is creating in fertilizers, that then grow to grow food for cattle and also for us. So I want you guys to step out of that system and grow your own mineral rich food.  anyways you guys could look up this Senate document, but I think if I go to the end I could sum it up. I mean, it basically talks a lot about, a lot about a different about a lot of different things and here's one of the points: healthy plants mean healthy people, said he, we can't raise a strong race on weak soil. Why don't you try mending the deficiencies in your farm and growing some more minerals in your crops? So then they go on and basically they planted celery with trace minerals and they found that it had at least I think twice as much minerals as celery not grown with the trace minerals, also it stored longer. And it was healthier to eat, going on further in the book, I mean I want you guys to actually look up this book. I'll put a link down below to this. So you guys could look it up and read the whole thing yourself, to learn about all this stuff, because I mean I was exposed to this, must be like twenty years ago now. It says a famous nutrition authority recently said, one sure way to end the American people susceptibility to infection, is to supply through food based ration or iron, copper and other metals. an organism requirements may so utilize these elements, as to produce immunity from infection quite beyond anything we're able to produce artificially by our present method of immunization. you can't make up that deficiency by using patent medicine. So think about that. What is he really saying there. I mean I kind of feel like my English instructor when he's reading Shakespeare and stuff and I like, really didn't understand what all that stuff was about Shakespeare and all this stuff. but I understand this: basically he's saying, that if we have you know, food that's deficient, we're not getting all their trace minerals. we're going to get higher levels of diseases and you know even the latest medicine, immunizations or whatever, is not going to fix that efficiency. the deficiency isn’t a deficiency from a vaccine, or from a drug, which always have side effects, which are just undesired effects. but the deficiency is because we're not eating the proper foods anymore. And this is what I'm really so passionate about these days. I mean I guess at the end, I'll sum it up, last line of this booklet. it is simpler to cure sick soils, than sick people. which shall we choose? this was back in 1936 man. What do they choose? Well industry, the government, whomever is in charge, chose the path of least resistance, I suppose, which is the path of financial interests, big corporations, companies making a lot of money and you know making chemical fertilizers that could be sold after the World War. and they had all these excess, you know factories making you know bombs, now they could make fertilizer out of them and make money. and so I don't know, things didn't go exactly as, as I would have liked. and trace minerals are really important, and what I want to do next for you is actually turn this into an interview with Dr. Joel Wallach actually. He is the man, who enlightened me originally, about the importance of trace minerals, and how to get them into our bodies. so I see Dr. Wallach pretty much every year, at the Naturopathic Doctor’s Convention and this year I decided to interview him for you guys, to pass on his very important words of wisdom. because he's been doing this even longer than I have. so let's go ahead and get into the interview with Dr. Wallach.   So now I have the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Joel Wallach, and he's the expert on minerals that I've learned about, you know back in what is it, the 1990s. there was a cassette tape, this kind of dates a  little bit, that went around called Dead Doctors Don't Lie. And this is the man that made that tape, and he is the one that basically enlightened me, about the importance of trace minerals in our diets and why you should use them to grow your food, and how they can positively affect to help your health and your plants health. So I want to just get Dr. Wallach today on, to basically share with you guys the importance of using trace minerals in your garden, because if you go down to standard big box store, and you get some fertilizer package or conventional fertilizer, you know synthetic fertilizer has like ten ten ten, but those are three main minerals in there. and you know we need a lot more than that. So I'm not going to take the show away from Dr. Wallach, we want to get his expert opinion here. so Dr. Wallach, why is using just three standard minerals which is what most of conventional and even a lot of organic farming focuses on?   Dr. Wallach: Well John, first of all thank you for asking me to speak with you.  Plants only need three minerals. All vertebrates, including human beings require sixty. That's why we have this discrepancy, and we see other minerals from putting our wood ash from our wood stoves into the garden, and also the spring floods that leaves silt when the floodwater recedes, we plough that in. and that renews the minerals in the soil. but once you get electricity, there's no more wood ashes going into the garden, and because we have hydroelectric plants, there is no more flooding and so there's no more silt left in the spring to plough back in the soil and renews the minerals in the soil. and so in the agricultural industry, and as you know I'm a veterinarian, as well as a naturopathic physician, so in the agricultural industry, we make sure the cheapest, most economical and most efficient way to get the minerals into our dairy cows and our beef cows and our chickens and pigs and things, is to feed it to them, give it to them. The little alfalfa pellets, aren't just alfalfa, it's corn and alfalfa and maybe some wheat and maybe some rice. Certainly there's ninety cents of nutrients, sixty minerals, sixteen vitamins, from amino acids, three fatty acids put in there. And we put them in the animal feed because we don't have insurance for them. and they get this and it increases fertility, it increases longevity, increases live births and eliminates birth defects, increases production- instead of having a cow give you half a quart of milk or they're getting a gallon and a half, instead of chickens laying eggs at three a week, they'll lay three eggs a day and so on. and so by giving the animals the 90 essential nutrients, which include all the trace minerals which are cofactors, enzymes, and hormones working in the body, all vertibrateswhat happens is you're maximizing the genetic potential of that human being, or that animal, has for health, fending off disease, longevity, production. and this is the piece we're missing as humans. and humans, medical doctors will say, oh just eat well. you'll get everything you need. No, because plants might only have three minerals, they don't make minerals. If you put three minerals in the soil to make the plant happy, they'll make good seeds for the next generation, but you're not getting what you need. That's why there's blue zones, according to Dan Buettner, for Natural Geographic. and he called them blue zones, because he's circling with a blue crayon right on the map, very scientific. but these are the longest lived of peoples on earth and by dumb luck they live in places that have more than sixty minerals in their soil and they're still using wood stoves. These are all third world cultures, longest lived  peoples on Earth according to National Geographic. because they still have wood stoves, they are putting the wood ashes in the garden, so that the plant doesn't need more than three minerals but they'll suck them all up. and so then when you eat the plant has been fertilized with the wood ashes, with the plant minerals, right, because wood ashes are only actually the minerals the tree soaks up. and so that's why the longest lived people of the third world cultures, minerals, minerals, minerals. it eliminates all birth defects; all birth defects are caused by nutritional deficiencies in the embryos. there's no birth defects are passed on by genetics, none. That's an overreach of the science of genetics/ Genetics will determine your hair color, your eye color, your skin color, your gender, boy/girl kind of thing, and it will tell your liver cells to make liver cells, was repairing itself, to  John: Wow. Yeah I mean, I went to this talk earlier, I mean, this guy's a wealth of knowledge. I want to this talk earlier on epigenetics, which is basically the expression of your genes. so you have genes and if you have nutrient deficiencies, like especially in the trace minerals, then your, you may be sicker, a lot of different things could happen, because the expression of your genes is different than how they should be if you had all the nutrition in there. Anyways the doctor could talk for hours about this mineral for this and this, but I want to get in some more important information for you guys, like Doctor, you talked about the wood ashes. Right, so if my viewers that are gardening, if they use wood ashes in their garden, you know, I've heard things like, you know too many wood ashes might not be a good thing. but will they get all the minerals they need from wood ashes, or should they not guarantee that they're going to get all the minerals from just using the wood ashes, should they get maybe another product?  Dr. Wallach: because there's no guarantee, because nutritional minerals, John, do not occur in a uniform blank or on the coast here. they occur in veins like chocolate and chunky ice cream, but all swirls and swirls. And these twenty top longevity cultures, they by dumb luck, live in places that have all these minerals. have sixty or more minerals and so.  Rest ones who eat well, they garden organic gardening and they'll die of ruptured aneurysm at age thirty-two. That's because they didn't have the trace minerals in the soil. the only way to guarantee it, is to supplement with it, in your mouth or, supplement your garden with it. Ok. And course, we do have a product,  We 'll talk about that in a little bit Dr. Wallach: Yes, and so we have the ability to do that. And as a result the yield goes up, the health of the crops goes up, the health of the land goes up. And it's just one of those miracles, to increase your yield, time so many fold. For instance, use our program, you can take sweet potatoes, which would normally give you mature sweet potatoes of a quarter of a pound, they will be twelve, fourteen pounds, big as a football. And they're sweeter and more tender than the little ones. and the same was true with all the fruit and berries, strawberries, they're huge and they're bright red all the way through the center, they don't have that white pulp in the middle kind of thing. and tomatoes are three times bigger, same thing is true for animals are fed like soybeans or hay that are fertilized with these minerals. their milk production goes up, the egg production goes up, their weight gain and beef cattle and pigs goes up, fertility goes up, survivability of babies goes up, all their birth defects goes away, all the white muscle disease, things like mulberry heart disease in pigs, all those birth defects, cleft palate, Down syndrome, that all goes away, cerebropalsy, it all goes away by supplementing with these trace minerals. John: yeah, trace minerals are super important. If you guys watch me for any length of time, you guys know I'm really on and into the trace minerals. So Dr., I know there's a lot of people out there, that say, I don't need to add to trace minerals to my garden because my soil is fertile, where I live, and the minerals are already in there.  My plants grow fine. What would you say to them?  Dr. Wallach: Well the reason why the minerals are in the plants, is that the plants will suck them out of the soil, unless you're renewing those minerals by putting the plant minerals aka wood ashes in, or leaving in flood silt, that's coming form places that have the sixty minerals in it. after a period of six, eight, ten years, depending on how intense you grow crops in your garden, there won't be any minerals left in the garden. your garden will die, and you'll have to start adding commercial fertilizer.  OK. You must fertilize the soil, two or three or four times a year depending on what you're growing, to make it optimal for the plant and optimal for the man and animals that are eating those plans. Otherwise you're not going to guarantee, and I'll give you an analogy. I think this is a good place to kind of, end.   Alright.  Dr. Wallach: The analogy goes like this. Let's say you take your car to a mechanic, and he say it's time to change the oil. and you say well, I don't want to spend a lot of money for six quarts of high grade oil. I want the cheapest oil. So I can do better than. Instead of putting six quarts of cheap oil in your car, I’m going to put six quarts of dirt from Texas in your car. never mind there's lots of oil in Texas, there's bound to be some oil in that dirt from Texas. That'll take care of your car. Nobody would do that, even to an old rusted out, dented up car. You say no, I don't believe that one. But people believe when doctors say,  oh just eat well you will get everything  you need. What you want to do is take all ninety essential nutrients, even though you've been putting these nutrients in the garden, you still want to supplement. and then what you're getting from your food is value added. That's one way to look at it. You do not want to not supplement. you do not want to not supplement. and then you supplement the soil.  You will maximize your genetic potential for health and longevity at that point.  John: Yeah I mean, I totally agree. I don't want you guys to become deficient. So Dr., what's the soil product that you recommend us? I have some in my house, there's a liquid and a solid right, I got both of them myself. I've been using them, the blooming' mineral. So how can that actually create fertility and add these very important trace minerals into some of these gardening, and why do you come up with this product? Dr. Wallach: well there's seventy-eight minerals in this product, seventy-eight minerals, including all sixty essential minerals at optimal amounts. It's called Blooming mineral, as you pointed out. we have in forty pound bags of granules. We also have it in quart, and fifty-five gallon drums of the liquid. Depending on how big your operation is, either use a sprayer or a spreader. and so you can full your fees as well as do the granules on the soil. And so we kind of go through this, we have a lot of experience and so we can, actually I’m working on a book, but we do have one book that kind of covers this. it’s called "Rare Earths Forbidden Cures". Which you looked at earlier. And so that one is a very, very good one, tells what minerals are missing when you get certain diseases. How the minerals work. What enzyme system, what hormones require them to function properly.  John: Awesome, awesome and then I apply these minerals to my garden like after every growing season so once a year. You know, I grow two different cropping, so like a summer crop, and a winter crop, all I add the minerals and more compost and create fertility after every season of planting, because I'm pulling nutrients out in my plants and I want to put them back in, and even if I'm adding more than the plant are putting out, that's a good thing. that's like putting money in the bank. versus like taking money out of the bank and being withdrawn and overbalancing, getting like you know them fees right. You don't want to over pull from the soil.  So. actually Dr. Wallach got a call and he had to take off, so I couldn't get to finish my interview with him. So I'm kind of sad, but at least I'm glad I got what I got on tape for you guys. So you guys could hear it. So you guys could learn the importance of the trace minerals, you know, not only do I add trace minerals in for my plants, which some people still you know, fail to realize that plants really need more than just three N.P. K. or maybe fifteen or sixteen minerals. But I mean if nature, God, whomever put all these minerals on the earth, and they should be in the soil. then if they're not there, I mean then, then it's not we're not growing, or going according with nature. So here's the thing, like the soils are getting pulled out, the nutrients, the minerals are not getting put back in. So there's basically two solutions, right. When I learned about Dr. Wallach, I learned that Dead Doctors Don't Lie tape, and he was trying to sell a colloidal mineral supplement, which you know I took at the time.  But I tried to figure out likewise, like John, you could take a supplement, you could buy a supplement for the rest of your life, but what's even better than buying a supplement? Hey, I want to eat foods that are mineralized. and at the time I wasn't actually growing my food. I was getting all my food from the grocery store, from the farmer's market, and even most farmers unfortunately, do not add trace minerals. the majority of people, even home gardeners, don't add trace minerals, except if you're one of my long term viewers and watch me and and trust in what I say, and trust in the experts that I have on for you guys, because I'm just sharing what I've learned over the years, all these years that have been really important to me right. and I don't want to lose my life, you know, from something that I could have prevented. right I don't want to be my mistake right. And I'm just sharing what I know and that's why I make these videos So, anyways I just cited that, you know I could take these colloidal minerals, that's pretty good, but I don't want to be hooked on a supplement for the rest of my life. so I want to like, grow my own high quality food and eat food predominantly out of my garden that has all these trace minerals in there, in amounts that nature would require. So that's why I started gardening and growing my food. I took out my front yard, my front lawn, and started growing. I raised a bed of vegetable gardens, I was, like I think nine years ago now. before that I was growing in the periphery of my yard, and that's really good right? And I know a lot of you guys are growing with the trace minerals, and that's great, also. And there's many different types of the kind, actually Dr. Wallach himself actually has a company. It's actually called the Youngevity, it’s right here, this is one of his products right here. That's the Dr. Wallach right there. and basically this is, this is the blooming minerals product. This is a soil revitalizer and this is a OMRI certified for use in organic farming. This is a small jar full, It's two and a half pounds. It's actually kind of expensive, they have a bigger bag which is a much better deal in my opinion. This is the one that you will want to buy, if you want to revitalize your soil with up to seventy-six different minerals in there. and if we open it, and it has a list of all of them on the back. But this is the one he formulated, he put together and he's recommending. And so if you want to trust the doctor, that's what I would recommend to you guys.  And so I have a link down below, if you want to purchase this product. And I'll just show you guys what it looks like. basically it looks like this, and what this is in my opinion and I don't really know exactly for sure, because I'm not a soil microbiologist or all this stuff, but it looks like soil humates to me, right. And soil humates are commonly available for actually a lot less than what this is being sold for, but those soil humates may not be organic approved and you know they may be of varying quality. So I'm sure he checks each and every batch to ensure he's getting some of the best stuff because you're also paying more for it. So yeah, so besides just this stuff the blooming minerals or soil humates, you could also use things like a rock dust, and not all rock dust is created equal. I'm not really going to get into rock here. Be sure to click some of the links below, where I’ll have a link to my playlists about rock dust, where you can learn more about it. I'm also the ocean solids or ocean minerals and also put links down below, to some of those videos I did. so I do encourage you guys to do the minerals, and then to grow all your food and especially if you guys have pets or animals, grow the food for them using the trace minerals, so that they can be healthier. I mean as Dr. Wallach who's a, you know a veterinary, and went to school for animal husbandry, you know saw that they always would feed animals trace mineral supplements in their feed. Why don't we? From a young age, have trace mineral supplements right? They are worth their weight in something, instead of actually just going in one end and coming out the other.  So that's what I want to talk about next. If you guys aren't up to the point where you guys are actually growing a significant portion of your food, and just want to ensure you get the proper minerals. I want you guys to eat foods that have high levels of trace minerals in there. So aside from my home grown rock dust, you know, soil humates, blooming mineral, ocean solid, enhanced vegetables that I grow. I also take some different products such as seaweed powders, I take seaweed powders almost every day. seaweed have a wide spectrum of minerals, because in the oceans, they have significantly more minerals, than most parts of soil or of land soil.  Depending on less rain maybe, in one of the blue zones, and that's probably one of the reasons why blue zones people live so long. because they actually have the trace minerals.  But there's other reasons as well. But aside from that, I also take some supplementary minerals. and so the ones that I've been taken recently are these guys. so this is also this is the youngevity brand and this is actually Dr. Wallach's product. This is actually called the plant derived minerals. So this is the liquid version, and I like this a lot because actually there's no artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners and let me tell you, tastes like hell. If you're going to drink, you're going to be like whoa. I mean, I suppose it tastes better to me than alcohol, but I don't drink. But has a strong flavor when I drink, some reverse osmosis water after drinking this straight up, which actually I don't recommend for you guys. Actually the water tasted sweet, and that's how bad the minerals taste. So if you're going to get these minerals that are liquid then I do encourage you guys to maybe like mix them in with some juice or something like that, it will taste a lot better. But yeah, this has up to seventy-six different minerals also, that are listed on the back. and basically a thing about these minerals unlike a Centrum tablet or other minerals, these are actually from plant derived minerals. So basically these are plants that basically composted thousands of years ago and basically they put in a bottle. so the minerals are coming from plants. Now if you don't like liquids, like Josh doesn't like sipping liquids in bottles, you guys could actually get the capsules. so liquids or capsules and I've also taken these capsules, these capsules are actually in gelatin caps, so I don't like to take gelatin caps, I don't like to take a lot of processed things like that. So I actually open the capsules up and put in my tongue. I was not and that was another not so great idea that I had recently. It actually fuzzed and bubbled on my tongue and that even tasted worse than liquid. So I don't recommend doing that.  maybe mix the tablets in with a juice, once again I would empty the contents of the capsule, out of the capsule. or if you don't mind taking some gelatin, just swallow the capsule whole, while you're taking it with some juice and the capsule will dissolve and you'll get the minerals in you, and your body will absorb them and get healthier because it. I mean, I think overall Dr. Wallach looks great for his age, you know I'm sure nobody does everything exactly right, and I hope he eats his share of fresh fruits and vegetables grown in rock dust and soil humates enhanced and blooming minerals and all that stuff. and just eats the you know the majority of his food is plant food, because those are the best food and I mean that's why I got into gardening. and the Greens are why I got into gardening, one of the reasons is because the minerals. like I want to get the trace minerals in me, I don't want to have a mineral deficiency. You know there's many different health challenges, that can be caused by a mineral deficiency, according to documented research that I have seen. I will have an upcoming episode, actually on some brand new fertilizers that may help with certain conditions, that are formulated with certain minerals that are known to be deficient in individuals with certain conditions. So I'm really looking forward to that episode but in the meantime, right to keep your health, to have your wealth which is your health, I want you guys to supplement, you know, not only yourselves but also your soils more importantly, with the trace minerals. your plants will be happier and in the end you could be happier and I wish all of industry to simply do this. it would not be that much more expensive to start using rock dust, locally sourced rock dust from different quarries and adding that to the farmlands to increase their fertility, increase the nutrition of America's foods. and if America's not going to do that's great, if you guys are from another country, hey tell your ministry of agriculture and all this stuff, to watch my video. and I want you guys, whatever country you guys are in, to start mineralizing your guys' foods. I mean in some countries, they are actually taking seaweed powders and bacon into bread, and the health of the population is actually increasing, because of this. and I want America to be first in everything, but if there's anyone who could do it, I don't care who does it, because I just want, you know the world need to change. the world needs to start remineralizing the soil, not only for the soil health, not only for the people health but for the planet health as well. So if you guys want to pick up some of these mineral products for the soil or the ones you want to take internally, please check the link down below this video, that will get you to where you guys can order them. also be sure to click the Subscribe button right down below, to be notified by new and upcoming episodes upcoming out about every three to four days, you never know what I'll be talking about, or what you'll be learning about my YouTube gardening channel. also be sure to check my past episodes, my past episodes are a wealth of knowledge. I have over twelve hundred episodes to date, teach you guys all aspects on how to grow your own food at home. and be sure like this video. that'll encourage me to maybe hit up Dr. Wallach next time for another interview and maybe you'll have a- some more good questions for- so well once again, my name is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com. We'll see you next time. And until then, remember keep on growing.   All right. This is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com today with another exciting episode for you. and I'm happy to be at the National heirloom Expo. This is the world's Pure Food Fair. You're going to learn more about them.


 
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How to Make High Quality Compost from Plants for Your Organic Garden

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 150 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

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All right. This is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you once again. I'm traveling and I'm here checking out another cool place and I'm currently here in Houston, Texas. and where I'm at in Houston is actually the Fifth Ward, and for those guys who don't live in Houston the Fifth Ward is maybe not the most upper class neighborhoods, a lower class neighborhood when that maybe has gotten forgotten about. I mean I was just walking down the street there and there's piles of trash kind of sitting in the road. Anyways some people might consider this place trash, from today but I consider it gold. and where I'm at today is actually Farm Dirt Compost and they have a plant based, aerated compost and this is their little label here, 02, and their hours of operation. if you want to come here and buy their compost directly, its nine A.M. to three P.M. Monday through Friday and they also accept vegetative food waste and clean wood waste only. so yeah I mean besides just gardening, one of the most important things for me as a gardener is to have good compost, whether that means you're going to make yourself like many of you guys already do, or you know in some cases I need more compost than I could actually create myself. so I go out to visit places that make compost for you on a much bigger and a grandiose scale. and that's why I'm here today, to share this valuable resource with all you guys that live here, in the Houston area. Even the surrounding cities or even if you don't live near Houston, actually you can now mail order and get shipped directly to you, the farm dirt compost that you are going to learn about today. now we're sitting outside their shipping container and I can say we're going to go inside the shipping container and show you guys what's inside. But you know what, there's a packing shed and not much in there. What we really want to look at is a turn around to the yard here. And we're going to go out there and show you guys how they make the compost here in Houston, using renewable resources that are a waste product for many companies. It's actually - let's go start out by the street and show you guys a really good overview shot of what's going on here. So what we're looking at now, is I'm across the street from Farm Dirt Compost and as you guys can see behind me, you guys basically just see a whole big pile or literally a wall of wood chips happening. And this is one of the primary ingredients they use to make their plant based compost. So their plant based compost is made out of the wood chips and other you know tree leaves that are chipped up by landscape companies. the landscape companies then come here and pay a reduced fee to dump the chips here, instead of taken to the landfill where they basically just rot. And then they're combined with another ingredient to make the plant based compost that they're making here. So anyway let's go ahead into the yard and show you guys up close a delivery of the wood chips they've got and then we'll show you guys the other plant materials that they use as a source to create their awesome compost here. All right so what we're looking at now is one of the primary components of their plant based composts, right. it's right here. its basically as I stand here setting up my camera, a big landscaping truck came in, and they dumped this up. they dump this right here and what it is just shredded up wood chips or trees, with some of the leaves of the trees in there and it's already broken up into a smaller particle size so that can be easily composted. Now the reason why I want to share with this episode with you guys today on this particular company doing this work, is because you know not all compost are created equal and so many times they get gardeners saying, "John, is this a good compost?" because I don't know there's no real legal definition of what a compost is right. Actually some people would call this stuff, mulch what they're doing here. Actually all these piles on the outside are actually mulch piles. But nonetheless I mean there's no really good term on what compost is and so I want you guys to be familiar with actually looking at compost to be able to tell if it's a good compost or not. And I'll show you guys near the end of his video the product they produce here which in my opinion is the good compost by not only looking it, looking at it, feeling it, smelling it but by also asking for you know certain test reports to ensure they're making a good quality product. and unlike many compost that you guys may buy in the store right. They screen it to a nice size, which we'll cover in the episode and they also don't add inexpensive fillers. some of the places I've visited that make compost, they'll add fillers like sand to their compost which you know basically now you're paying a lot of money for sand and so while this compost here may cost a little bit of money at present time. It's like eighty-five dollars a yard. You know it's definitely worth it because it's not like you know; it's cut with sand. so like what, say you buy compost for forty-five dollars a yard, or half the price, but it's 50% percent sand. well that's the same price you're getting now you're buying sand. hope its good washed agriculture sand, not just some cheap sand that they're just using as a filler, or adding other filler products right. and the other thing that I like here, is that this is one hundred percent plant based compost. This is their only use in you know the wood chips and fruit and vegetable scraps that we'll see in a minute, to make the compost and in my opinion right to grow fruits and vegetables and fruit trees. We want to feed the plants what they're made out of, which is fruits and vegetables and trees right. The best food for trees is other trees. the best food for fruits and vegetables are other fruits or vegetables because the fruits and vegetables took up everything it needed. And then when it composted and decayed down, right, there's this nutrition that the plant needs. Of course you know depending on the source of the fruits and vegetables I would also add other trace minerals, which I'll talk about a bit later in this episode. Any case, next let's go over to an area where they're getting the shipments of the fruits and vegetables that they use the compost down. unfortunate because I am here in a Saturday and normally they only take deliveries on Monday through Friday. They don't have any fresh materials to show you. But I'll uncover some buried material. So besides the wood chips that you guys just saw, they get dumped off by the tree trimmers. The other valuable source of plant nutrition they're getting, comes in bins like this among other ways, from the local produce row here which is the wholesale produce market here in Houston. They get about one hundred of these little tote things here filled with you know, rotten fruits and vegetables and pieces of the chopped up fruits and vegetables right. And this is just basically the waste product of the produce industry and instead of going to the landfill which where rots and creates copious amounts of methane gas and other gases, here it is composted properly to create less of the different gases. But more importantly instead of just rotting in a landfill and never to be used again, it gets turned into good nutritious organic compost, that can be added to farms, gardens, your local shrubs and trees and even your lawn, to increase their growth because compost is the original way that nature fertilizes the trees, shrubs, the fruits and the vegetables, the ornamentals, the edibles, all the plants work on compost. And when we start trying to feed these synthetic fertilizers, that we think man is more intelligent than nature with these water soluble nutrients right. We're subverting the whole natural cycle of things and the compost, so I think especially in this day and age it's critical for companies like Farm Dirt to take some of these waste products that would end up in the landfill to make a valuable product out of it, to revive the local community and more important, us gardeners a good quality compost because I visit a lot of places and man, a lot of places they're not making good quality compost like they are here. So once they get, you know these bins from the produce row they combine that with other produce waste products from other sources, so this business actually started when the owner, or one of the owners called the Whole Foods up and said you know hey I see you chop up all the produce and you have rotten produce that you're thrown out every week. Hey can I get some of that produce to compost for my personal garden and Whole Foods like, no you know there's like liability issues and all this kind of stuff, anyways one of the owners has a yard in a landscaping company to like make compost and then he called that Whole Foods you know later, and said hey well I have a facility to take your compost or your food scraps to compost. and then once Whole Foods are, oh you have a facility, then they knew some of the legal issues might be you know diverted and then they're like yeah you get our compost and now, you know that was three years ago when they started this business and oh I do want to say that if you think John that place you're visiting looks real familiar. I saw you're on an episode of the Last Organic outpost in Houston and you visited the same yard. Well right at that time I showed this yard because this is the compost of the last organic outpost uses, but it's a separate entity making compost, you know for next, the next door neighbors and the community at large to purchase and buy and to you know sustainably you know reduce the amount of waste going into the landfill. and I think that's a big challenge in this society that we live in. we live in a disposable society. Right. And I want you guys to be producers instead of consumers right. Produce your own compost instead of come here, but of course if you can't do that you know and produce your own, come here and support them, because they are producing something that would normally you know just went to the landfill and been more of a you know in that whole consumption, mass consumption craziness cycle we have. So yeah they got they get the Whole Foods produce crafts as well as the local school district right. the local school district here wants to be the one of the greenest school districts and they're working with different schools in the school district to take their compost and then compost that here and create an amazing compost. So anyways let's go ahead and show you guys how the process specifically works with composting the wood chips and the food scraps. All right so what you're looking at now, is an active compost pile I'm sitting on it and I could actually feel that it is nice in warm. So what they do is they take proper ratios of the wood chips and the food scraps and they basically pile it up. And normally you know, they pile extra wood chips on the top, to keep all the bugs and the flies down, if they're doing their job properly. Maybe this area, maybe could have a few more wood chips on top and let's go ahead and dig underneath here and see what we could find. All right so what I'm finding is I'm finding a lot of the beer mash, so that the brewery process places that make brews and things they have the waste, kind of smells like oatmeal. and then underneath here we look further we find like big pieces - wow this is actually quite warm - of a watermelon and just the other fruits and vegetables in this mixture here. we're going to go and try to mix that back up for 'em. but basically that's what composting is. right you add some carbons and the right ratios of nitrogen. The carbon in the wood chips, the nitrogen is the food scraps and some of the leaves and what not. And compost happens. So composting is not rocket science right. One of the great sayings is that compost happens even if you don't get the ratio right. Everything will break down over time. That being said, its very important to them here at Farm Dirt to you know, minimize their composting cycle time. because they get shipments in every week. Lots of materials in and they've got to, as fast as they move this material in, they want to be moving it out, otherwise they're going to outgrow their small little space here. So they've done procedures and they're constantly improving their process to make it more efficient. Since I've been here just a couple years ago looks like they're really improving their process a lot. and they've got some upcoming changes that they talked to me about, that is even going to you know take them to the next level. But I might mention you guys later in this episode. Anyways one of the processes is to increase the productivity and decrease the amount of overall processing time is a ration of the piles, that cut off a week from their total processing time, which is from apples as they come in, rotten apples, to the dirt that goes out, its sixty days. So you guys at home should be able to produce a good compost in sixty days. I've been able to do it in the limit over a month, with my 13:17 composters but even on this massive industrial scale where they just have piles and piles of wood chips and food, in under sixty days. You know they have a finished compost product to sell. So yeah let's go ahead over to you know, one of the ways they speed up the composting process. So one of the ways they speed up the composting process, is by active aeration what you see in this little box here, little house and that's not a dog house. It's a blower house. So this house, houses a blower that has electricity plumbed into it. And they say there's blower comes out into this big P.V.C. tubing, then goes down and as you guys can see it just gets distributed down into these big pipes that then have a perforated tubing go underneath the compost piles that you know, are maybe five, six, feet tall and basically that forces air underneath it and forces the air up through the compost. and what this does, this feeds the microbial action in there right. The compost bacteria love air and when they get air, it's like us eating some chocolate cake. Well, I don't recommend chocolate cake, eating some chocolate persimmons and we're so happy and so excited and we're full of energy. we could do a lot of stuff. Well when the bacteria get air, they work overtime and they're so happy. They're working faster so they can shave a week off. their, you know the time that it takes to make the compost, because that's what it's all about here. Improving processes to make the time of the inputs coming in, and going out shorter, so that they could actually start producing more in less time. Now the next thing I want to do is actually take you guys over to another space in the yard and show you guys another tip they'll be soon using to decrease the composting time. So here I am again sitting on a mound of not compost, but activated mulch. this mulch here is not just the standard mulch that you'd buy of wood chips right, even though it looks like nice and dark and brown like some of them things are painted right, your local big box store. This is actually activated mulch. and what this is, is they take their finished compost product, they run it through their sifter that I'll show you guys in a minute and sift out all the quarter inch and below small particles. This is what gets bagged up and sold to you right. A lot of compost places might only sift down a half inch, and then they're leaving a lot of chunks. I don't like a lot of chunks in my compost. So all their chunks go into big piles like this, that they, they then they sell as activated mulch I think its about forty-five dollars a yard. And this is the mulch that you guys want if you guys want to like add nutrition. But also a mulch to your fruit trees and other trees around your property right. The reason why this is activated, is because it's already gone through the composting process, it was in one of those big piles that I saw you, that you guys saw earlier. but it's not the finished product they're selling directly. This is basically, while it does have a lot of little fine particulate compost still in there, this is a larger chunk. But these large chunks have already been inoculated with the bacteria in the fungi that's in there as you look at it. and as I'm looking at it now there's bacteria and fungi working on this stuff breaking it down and breaking up the constituent parts into plant nutrients for your trees and shrubs and things like that right. So if you are going to be using a mulch right, instead of just getting wood chips that are not a knock later even start to break down yet, and you have to go through that process, it be a lot wiser to get something like this it's already has the process. Now why am I telling you this? Because when they start a new pile of compost they take a good percentage of this inoculated mulch stuff, that actually has the activated bacteria and fungi and all the little microorganisms that make the compost. they add this to the wood, the virgin wood chips and the food scraps so that now, it basically kicks starts the process, kind of like using a starter culture, if you're doing fermented foods. and this is another thing that I recommend for you guys as home gardeners, making your own compost right. You could use your, your mulch that you screened off your last batch of compost, but I like to put in a scoop or two of my last batch of compost in my new compost, that'll just make things happen a lot faster. I don’t know if you guys can see this, but as you guys can see there's like compost wall above me. Maybe I should have maybe move the camera back a whole bunch. But there was a big whole compost wall behind me. this stuff is not quite ready, but it's getting ready to get harvested and then sifted out and then sold to one of you guys out there. but basically I want to show you guys this is because you know they got a nice lot of fungal hyphae, that’s all like I don't know if you guys can see, but it's like a white you know, in the compost instead of being dark, black and white. So this is definitely a really good sign. Now the other thing that they're not yet doing that they hope to implement soon once they get a seventy-two-hundred-dollar piece of equipment, is they're going to start to process their incoming food scraps and grind it to a smaller particle size that will create more surface area. and at the same time they're going to pull off some of the excess liquid off the produce. That then they could take and use to inoculate their, you know and make compost teas and inoculate their soil and so the don't have to deal with so much extra liquid in their compost and they could really dial in the amount of wood chips to ground up plant matter, or you know, fruit and vegetable scraps. So this is a really cool and that's going to help them save time, because once again, once things are broken down more for the bacteria, it's going to make it more easy for them to digest it, and you know finish the process of composting. Now you know, I talked to them about this, and they're not going to be basically shredding up their wood chips, they have done you know studies on grinding up their food scraps which worked really well. and they have home food scraps grinders for those guys do home composting to speed up your composting process. but they don't want to grind up the wood chips because they found out when they did this, there wasn't enough airflow in there because the wood chips you know, provide a lot of nooks and crannies in there. and when they grind up the food scraps, the food scraps will now attach to the different pieces of wood chips and compost faster, is what they're thinking and it'll be more efficient in their process and be able to save actually a lot of space and so may be able to move it more, more you know, wood chips in and more importantly, move it out quicker. Alright the next thing I want to do, is actually show you guys some of the finished compost that they produce here, that has not yet been screened. So now I'm sitting on another pile of what, plant based compost. I hate it when I go to places that have like cow bays to manure bays, chicken shit based compost. Because it's a lot smellier than here. Here actually like this finished compost that I'm sitting on, I mean it basically has no smell. Maybe I smell a little bit of wood something but mostly it's no smell and I want to encourage you guys as gardeners out there, you know to feed your plants other plants. So I encourage you guys to use plant based compost in general. it's a lot safer to use then animal manure based compost. Why is this? Well there can be many challenges with animal manure based compost, a lot of the stuff you buy at a big box store is number one, coming from the animal agriculture industry where they're feeding the animals GMO based corn and soy. and feeding them antibiotics and things like that which is not good because all that is going into the compost you guys are buying. and that's going in your food. In addition, they may be feeding you know or spraying on the G.M.O. corn or soy, things like roundup, things like bio solids, things like chemical fertilizers that may have heavy metal contamination. So that stuff gets run through the cow or the pig, the chicken, in the animal and then when you eat the animal then you're getting some that contamination, but it also comes out in their poop. So now when you're spreading the poop on your garden now you may be getting some of that contamination as well. and let's not talk about E. koi or other you know harmful bacteria that may be present in animal based manures, if not properly composted or if used in their raw state. and finally of course with animal based manure, you know you have a higher probability of burning your crops. I've never burn my crops with a plant based compost here and actually the compost here they recommend even you can plant your vegetables in it straight. and you know try that with some manure based compost. You know in general it's not going to be as successful as if you use a plant based compost and that's why I prefer a plant based compost. And of course if you could source and make your own animal manure or composting you know the ingredients, you know hey that's pretty good but hey I still like the plant based compost myself. because that is the natural system no where in nature do we find big mounds of animal manure that's being used to grow food. There are copious amounts of plant materials used to grow other trees and plants in the forest but there's no big piles, you know shit in the forest. maybe some you know poop here and there from animals that are in the forest that will be mixed in with all the plants but no, you know not the massive amount of poop that's generated due to the massive you know, a calf O's and big industrial animal agriculture where there just really needing to get rid of the animal excrement or poop, that may actually cause challenges with runoff and all these things as well. So yeah, so how do you tell if something's a good compost, because I mean happens a lot. John is this a good compost and so he sends me pictures or somebody sends me description. this is what's in the compost. You know this and this and this and this. you know and by looking at something, I can't tell you how good it is, because it's not, it tells me what's should be in there but didn't tell me what is actually in there until I pick it up see it, look at it and smell it right. in this compost here I mean, I can see here that this compost is just really nice rich and black. you know unlike some companies actually may spray things on their compost to get it to turn darker, so that you think it's a really rich compost. They don't do none of that here I'll tell you firsthand they don't have the money to buy anything extra to do here. they're basically on a shoestring budget, just trying to keep their bills paid and keep this operation of flow which is quite sad to me and that's one of the reasons I wanted to make this video for you guys, you guys can support them because they are doing the right thing and I want more companies like composting company here Farm Dirt to pop up in other cities and other countries even in the world, because this is really the solution to some of the waste that's being produced, some of the you know vegetative waste matter, wood chips and food waste that account for a big percentage of what's going to the landfill and this can be diverted to you know create less gases being emitted into the atmosphere, and to create a valuable product so that more people and farms could grow food with basically the broken down plant material. So yeah I mean just looking at this stuff it's nice, rich and black and this is the green material here right. I would never buy this for my garden it's a big problem with a lot of compost I see. they have a lot of woody matter in there and when places don't filter out the woody matter, basically that means they're making more money off you because they're adding things that are going to necessarily be totally ready for your garden to use right now. And that's why I like that at this place they screen their finished compost. its what I'm sitting on and also I'm seeing a lot of that fungal matter with the white in here, the fungal hyphae’s, they screen it down to a quarter inch. So let's go ahead and take a look at the machine that they screen their compost with as well as the finished sexy compost they make here. All right so what you're looking at now are huge gigantic compost sifters and this is one tool that I don't yet have and I would like to get. I don't think I need one this big here this is for their operation and as you guys can see it's got a nice quarter inch screen on it. They basically put the compost that I showed you guys just a minute ago up in this big bin right there. They turn this machine on and it runs and basically all the finish compost drops out the bottom and then all the chips in, that you know inoculated mulch comes out the other end and for those you guys are looking up to start an operation, you want to get one of these guys. this is called the Settler made in Canada. they work really good this thing's never broken on them and they're at aglobalrepair.ca is their website because I know a lot of people, you know get these industrial things and they break down. so yeah this is definitely a well made unit here. Let's next I want to go ahead and show you guys some of the screened material that's coming out that is being rejected from the compost the finished compost they sell here. All right so what we're looking at now is end of the compost are here and we're looking at is all the reject materials. so as much as this was rejected from you know the bad compost they offer you know they're still going to use this stuff. the stuff is still quite viable. You know and as you guys you guys learned earlier, they inoculate, they use this stuff that's already been pre-inoculated and still has a plenty of you know of material in here, that's you know under a quarter inch in my opinion to inoculate their new piles and then also they make this stuff available for you guys you know to use as mulch underneath your trees to you know prevent you know water evaporation and all this kind of stuff. so yeah this is probably one of the best things you guys can put underneath trees and shrubs, you know because it is starting to break down and I mean that's what the goal of you know feeding trees, other trees and wood chipping right you can put a virgin wood chips but it takes a lot longer to break, break down than one that's already you know been through the process. I guess the next thing I want to do is actually I want to show you guys some of the finished compost. they just finished up the last batch that they did so I think there's a little bit of remnants that I can actually show you guys of what their finished compost looks like and share with you guys more about what to look for in a compost when you buy it. So this is what's left of, this is their area once it gets screened it goes into here and this is the bagging area, and the area that they sell the finished compost. I don't know if you guys can see it, but basically we just got a nice pile right here behind me and we'll do a close up for you guys. this is what a good compost should look like right there. see that it's nice rich in black. Right. This is a screen to a quarter inch size so that I like that a lot. there's not the big pieces of wood chips or bark and all this other stuff that they had in there. This is pure compost. I mean it kind of looks a little bit like dirt. But this is not in dirt and you smell it and it actually has a nice earthy smell, it doesn't stink, it doesn't smell, like it doesn't smell like wood chips anymore. Actually to me the smells like you're in the forest. I should be cool. I want to make a bed out of like fresh compost and like a lie in it every night. I think that'd be refreshing right. I don't know that be weird. I think that's how we would live like we lived in nature. We didn't have these artificial mattresses with polyester and other stuff. I think I might have to try that, but yeah they're still smell just, smells really good right. And the other thing you want to do is you want to take a look at the texture, look at this, see that texture there. I mean this is not wet at all, it flows really easy and it's not quite as thin as sand. you know a lot of companies will cut their stuff with sand and you want to take some between your fingers and feel it. Roll it like this. it should kind of even if it's not super way it should kind of roll into a ball. If you're rolling it like this and you feel like grains in your hand like sand like if you're at the beach then they're cutting with sand, that's not a good thing. And by doing this test. I could tell they're definitely not doing that here. And so smell you know, should smell earthy. you want to do the grit tests. No grit in this stuff you want to you know try to roll it into a ball, you want to just you know make sure it has a nice consistency. You know little chunks, no big pieces of stuff and a nice rich and black just like that right. I've seen a lot of compost they're just kind of like tan in color and they have sand. And these are all ways you could actually physically look at, and tell if it's good or not. Right. And aside from that, you know these are some good indicators but these indicators can always be tricked. they can spray stuff on their compost to make it look black and people do all kinds of stuff to cheat the system but what is not cheating the system is what I want to show you guys, that actually have you guys ask for next right. And you know they have soil testing so most tests that are done on compost are NPK testing which is standard nutrient testing. and most places will have this right. But you know while those are good tests right I want you guys to ask for the extra curricular activity tests, which actually most places do not have, but I believe they should if more people start asking for them. Maybe they would get them and what this test is here on the phone here. It's actually called the Earth Fort biological analysis soil amendment. and this the kind of gardening I teach. I teach biologic organic gardening. And that's why you know this is even more important than just the N.P.K. numbers are you know aside from adding the nutrients, which the compost does as nutrients. The reason why I'm really on the compost is for the bacterial and fungal action in the compost because these are your free labor force. They are your slaves. Compost you are my slaves right here. These are my slaves. They can sue you for you being their slaves once you own them. But anyway they're your workers they're going to basically break down the organic matter that's still left in the compost as well as break down the organic matter that's in your soil, in your garden and turn it into nutrients for your plants in a non water soluble state so these nutrients will not wash away like chemical nutrients will and what the biologic analysis Soil Amendment testing here does, it basically tells you about all the different bacteria and fungus in there. So for example, you know if you don't know how to read these are right because they have a reference range and you just want to make sure most of the numbers are falling within the reference range. Now you know depending on the kind of compost not every number is always going to be within the reference range some might be abnormally high and some might be in a range some of a bit low but as long as most of them are in range. You're pretty good. And of course there's always going to be numbers that are higher which is really good. So the best thing to do would be get more to source of composts with different you know things that are high. So for example this compost here is a really high end amoeba’s amoeba has the ranges from ten thousand to like a hundred thousand and this is like I don't even know it's like ten million. It's like some crazy ass big number. I can't even read a number that big it's kind of insane it's like pushing the limits of how high the amoeba is can get you know over here we're looking at the active bacteria in the active bacteria the expected ranges between three and thirty the active bacteria on this step is six hundred thirty one and on the total bacteria the total bacteria is expected ranges between three and three thousand and the number for this compost is six thousand four hundred eighty four the active fungi you know like I showed you guys are not the white fungal hyphae’s in there. the active fungi are the ranges between three and thirty and this is twenty-four point eight. So this is on the high side of the range. So that's a really good. Of course some other numbers are limit low but you know what. Not every compost could meet all these different criteria. So for you know a plant based compost you know fruit and vegetable companies would shift this is running really good. Of course in addition to this I would encourage you guys to get a fungal dominated compost that really focuses on the fungi. and you know aside from the place here, that's inside the city limits of Houston, not too far for you guys to drive if you guys want to go to a place that I visited that has really good compost also but it's a lot further. It's in Conroe Texas known as Nature's Way Resources. If I remember, I'll put a video up, with a link to the video I made there, at their place and besides having a plant based compost like here which is going to be different, you know they also have a fungal dominated compost in there which is one of the things I'd recommend for you guys to you know do a mixture of the fungal plus the bacterial compost they have here. I guess the final step I want to show you guys actually what this looks like when it's all bagged up and actually share with you guys a special way. All my viewers get a special discount on this awesome compost that I share with you guys today. So now I want to share with the guys the finished product here at Farm Dirt, in the plant base eroded compost you guys saw the whole process of how they make this as well as a lot of tips you know that they use here that you guys could also use for composting at home. Now if you guys want to get some of this amazing compost that I should do with you guys today that I actually use myself because on previous trips I've actually gotten this compost and I took it back to the West coast with me to use it in my very garden to plant things in and it works great. Definitely some good stuff I could totally vouch for it. I hooked you guys up with a special discount. this is sold here in the Houston area at some better garden centers, but you could go there and pay full price but if you want to get the special GYG discounted price, you're going to have to come here to Farm Dirt on a meal when they're open or see them at the farmer's market that I was just at today. I think it's on like Saturdays on Richmond, and see I'm there mention the G Y G code. you're going to get a special discount, this normally at this time. And this may be something to change. sells for nine dollars as the regular price but if you mention the GYG discount you're going to get a bag one cubic foot for seven bucks and I don't think I could make it for that cheap at home actually. That's definitely a good price. If you guys want to get a cubic yard They're not like making a ton of this stuff right now but also give me a call, mention the GYG discount. They'll hook you up with a special discount that I pre-negotiated with them right and what I really want you guys to know is that they're making a good quality product here. there may be other places that make compost in the Houston area and other places and they may be cheaper in price but you know what a lot of times, you guys get what you pay for. this is not always true but it's definitely true here. you know you're going to pay you're going to pay some money for the compost here, but you're definitely getting some good stuff that's going to grow some healthy vegetables, fruits and even ornamentals for you and your family. so I always encourage you guys if they've got some good stuff support them, and support places that are doing good work like diverting so much of the, you know food scraps and yard waste that would normally just go to the landfill. so I really applaud them for the work they're doing here. This is some dirty work because the last time I was here. It was raining there, you know their tractors were stuck in the mud and I was just getting hammered with rain and it just wasn't a fun day but they're out here working man. like seems like every time I come out here they're out here working. And you know doing really good stuff here to help the city of Houston be more sustainable but also help us local gardeners. Now for those you guys that don't live in Houston, don't worry. I've also hooked you guys up right. Farm dirt compost is now also just starting to sell, online. and of course the online price is going to have to be more expensive than the price that you get locally, because they got to ship it and the shipping actually costs more, unfortunately than the compost does. but nonetheless you guys mention the GYG code, put that code in on the website. It's going to give you guys a special discounted price, so that you guys, no matter where in the fifty states you live, they're going to send you a priority flat rate box stuffed full of their good plant based compost, that you guys learned about today. So yeah that's pretty much it. I'll post links down below to other websites. you guys can get some of this amazing compost. I'm going to be sure to take some of this compost home with me today, to use again in my gardening because its some of the best stuff and give to my you know, my girlfriend's parents. Garden that's here locally. They've been growing in it too because I got some of that for them last time and their stuff is growing amazing. So you know, once again I always encourage you guys to support local compost companies that are making good products when you can. and after watching this episode you know some things to look for, when you guys go to buy compost and hopefully this will help you know, minimize the questions I get. John is this a good compost? I mean, I got to go there, see how they make it, look and see and that's the other big thing that's important for me. You know, you want to always ask the compost company, "hey! Can I come down and see your facility, see how you make it?" right, and if they're just like, "Yeah! Come on down, we'll share with you. You know, that's good because they're open source, they have nothing to hide, right. But it's the companies that say, "Oh no. We don't want you to come down here, we don't want you to bring your camera." Those are the companies I'm quite worried about because like, why don't they want me there. What do they have to hide, what don't they want you to know, what are they putting your compost that they don't want you to know about right. So I'm really glad that they have an open door policy year and they showed me around you know, showed me everything and I got to snoop around and see all kind of stuff happening here right. They've got nothing to hide. So yeah definitely some good compost, some of the best compost, I've found here inside the city in Houston. So if you guys enjoyed this episode learning more about compost, how you guys could make it yourself and how you guys can get some of the best compost here in Houston and in all of Texas, please be sure to give me a thumbs up in future episodes when I come back to Houston. I'll come by and make more episodes, maybe interviewing some of the compost makers and owners and all this kind of stuff. Also be sure to click that Subscribe button right down below, to be notified of my new and upcoming episodes coming out every three to four days, you never know where I'll be showing up, or what you'll be learning on my YouTube channel. and be sure, finally to check my past episodes out over twelve and up episodes now, a wealth of information of the different compost yards, how to compost at home yourself, how to grow your food all aspects so that you guys can be more sustainable and grow food for you and your family, instead of eating out of the grocery store. Maybe you're eating out of the grocery store second hand, because you're getting the compost made here. in any case that's my mission. Hope you guys enjoy this episode. I got to get going. Once again, my name is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com we'll see next time, and until then, remember keep on growing.


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All right. This is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you once again. I'm traveling and I'm here checking out another cool place and I'm currently here in Houston, Texas. and where I'm at in Houston is actually the Fifth Ward, and for those guys who don't live in Houston the Fifth Ward is maybe not the most upper class neighborhoods, a lower class neighborhood when that maybe has gotten forgotten about. I mean I was just walking down the street there and there's piles of trash kind of sitting in the road. Anyways some people might consider this place trash, from today but I consider it gold. and where I'm at today is actually Farm Dirt Compost and they have a plant based, aerated compost and this is their little label here, 02, and their hours of operation. if you want to come here and buy their compost directly, its nine A.M. to three P.M. Monday through Friday and they also accept vegetative food waste and clean wood waste only. so yeah I mean besides just gardening, one of the most important things for me as a gardener is to have good compost, whether that means you're going to make yourself like many of you guys already do, or you know in some cases I need more compost than I could actually create myself. so I go out to visit places that make compost for you on a much bigger and a grandiose scale. and that's why I'm here today, to share this valuable resource with all you guys that live here, in the Houston area. Even the surrounding cities or even if you don't live near Houston, actually you can now mail order and get shipped directly to you, the farm dirt compost that you are going to learn about today. now we're sitting outside their shipping container and I can say we're going to go inside the shipping container and show you guys what's inside. But you know what, there's a packing shed and not much in there. What we really want to look at is a turn around to the yard here. And we're going to go out there and show you guys how they make the compost here in Houston, using renewable resources that are a waste product for many companies. It's actually - let's go start out by the street and show you guys a really good overview shot of what's going on here. So what we're looking at now, is I'm across the street from Farm Dirt Compost and as you guys can see behind me, you guys basically just see a whole big pile or literally a wall of wood chips happening. And this is one of the primary ingredients they use to make their plant based compost. So their plant based compost is made out of the wood chips and other you know tree leaves that are chipped up by landscape companies. the landscape companies then come here and pay a reduced fee to dump the chips here, instead of taken to the landfill where they basically just rot. And then they're combined with another ingredient to make the plant based compost that they're making here. So anyway let's go ahead into the yard and show you guys up close a delivery of the wood chips they've got and then we'll show you guys the other plant materials that they use as a source to create their awesome compost here. All right so what we're looking at now is one of the primary components of their plant based composts, right. it's right here. its basically as I stand here setting up my camera, a big landscaping truck came in, and they dumped this up. they dump this right here and what it is just shredded up wood chips or trees, with some of the leaves of the trees in there and it's already broken up into a smaller particle size so that can be easily composted. Now the reason why I want to share with this episode with you guys today on this particular company doing this work, is because you know not all compost are created equal and so many times they get gardeners saying, "John, is this a good compost?" because I don't know there's no real legal definition of what a compost is right. Actually some people would call this stuff, mulch what they're doing here. Actually all these piles on the outside are actually mulch piles. But nonetheless I mean there's no really good term on what compost is and so I want you guys to be familiar with actually looking at compost to be able to tell if it's a good compost or not. And I'll show you guys near the end of his video the product they produce here which in my opinion is the good compost by not only looking it, looking at it, feeling it, smelling it but by also asking for you know certain test reports to ensure they're making a good quality product. and unlike many compost that you guys may buy in the store right. They screen it to a nice size, which we'll cover in the episode and they also don't add inexpensive fillers. some of the places I've visited that make compost, they'll add fillers like sand to their compost which you know basically now you're paying a lot of money for sand and so while this compost here may cost a little bit of money at present time. It's like eighty-five dollars a yard. You know it's definitely worth it because it's not like you know; it's cut with sand. so like what, say you buy compost for forty-five dollars a yard, or half the price, but it's 50% percent sand. well that's the same price you're getting now you're buying sand. hope its good washed agriculture sand, not just some cheap sand that they're just using as a filler, or adding other filler products right. and the other thing that I like here, is that this is one hundred percent plant based compost. This is their only use in you know the wood chips and fruit and vegetable scraps that we'll see in a minute, to make the compost and in my opinion right to grow fruits and vegetables and fruit trees. We want to feed the plants what they're made out of, which is fruits and vegetables and trees right. The best food for trees is other trees. the best food for fruits and vegetables are other fruits or vegetables because the fruits and vegetables took up everything it needed. And then when it composted and decayed down, right, there's this nutrition that the plant needs. Of course you know depending on the source of the fruits and vegetables I would also add other trace minerals, which I'll talk about a bit later in this episode. Any case, next let's go over to an area where they're getting the shipments of the fruits and vegetables that they use the compost down. unfortunate because I am here in a Saturday and normally they only take deliveries on Monday through Friday. They don't have any fresh materials to show you. But I'll uncover some buried material. So besides the wood chips that you guys just saw, they get dumped off by the tree trimmers. The other valuable source of plant nutrition they're getting, comes in bins like this among other ways, from the local produce row here which is the wholesale produce market here in Houston. They get about one hundred of these little tote things here filled with you know, rotten fruits and vegetables and pieces of the chopped up fruits and vegetables right. And this is just basically the waste product of the produce industry and instead of going to the landfill which where rots and creates copious amounts of methane gas and other gases, here it is composted properly to create less of the different gases. But more importantly instead of just rotting in a landfill and never to be used again, it gets turned into good nutritious organic compost, that can be added to farms, gardens, your local shrubs and trees and even your lawn, to increase their growth because compost is the original way that nature fertilizes the trees, shrubs, the fruits and the vegetables, the ornamentals, the edibles, all the plants work on compost. And when we start trying to feed these synthetic fertilizers, that we think man is more intelligent than nature with these water soluble nutrients right. We're subverting the whole natural cycle of things and the compost, so I think especially in this day and age it's critical for companies like Farm Dirt to take some of these waste products that would end up in the landfill to make a valuable product out of it, to revive the local community and more important, us gardeners a good quality compost because I visit a lot of places and man, a lot of places they're not making good quality compost like they are here. So once they get, you know these bins from the produce row they combine that with other produce waste products from other sources, so this business actually started when the owner, or one of the owners called the Whole Foods up and said you know hey I see you chop up all the produce and you have rotten produce that you're thrown out every week. Hey can I get some of that produce to compost for my personal garden and Whole Foods like, no you know there's like liability issues and all this kind of stuff, anyways one of the owners has a yard in a landscaping company to like make compost and then he called that Whole Foods you know later, and said hey well I have a facility to take your compost or your food scraps to compost. and then once Whole Foods are, oh you have a facility, then they knew some of the legal issues might be you know diverted and then they're like yeah you get our compost and now, you know that was three years ago when they started this business and oh I do want to say that if you think John that place you're visiting looks real familiar. I saw you're on an episode of the Last Organic outpost in Houston and you visited the same yard. Well right at that time I showed this yard because this is the compost of the last organic outpost uses, but it's a separate entity making compost, you know for next, the next door neighbors and the community at large to purchase and buy and to you know sustainably you know reduce the amount of waste going into the landfill. and I think that's a big challenge in this society that we live in. we live in a disposable society. Right. And I want you guys to be producers instead of consumers right. Produce your own compost instead of come here, but of course if you can't do that you know and produce your own, come here and support them, because they are producing something that would normally you know just went to the landfill and been more of a you know in that whole consumption, mass consumption craziness cycle we have. So yeah they got they get the Whole Foods produce crafts as well as the local school district right. the local school district here wants to be the one of the greenest school districts and they're working with different schools in the school district to take their compost and then compost that here and create an amazing compost. So anyways let's go ahead and show you guys how the process specifically works with composting the wood chips and the food scraps. All right so what you're looking at now, is an active compost pile I'm sitting on it and I could actually feel that it is nice in warm. So what they do is they take proper ratios of the wood chips and the food scraps and they basically pile it up. And normally you know, they pile extra wood chips on the top, to keep all the bugs and the flies down, if they're doing their job properly. Maybe this area, maybe could have a few more wood chips on top and let's go ahead and dig underneath here and see what we could find. All right so what I'm finding is I'm finding a lot of the beer mash, so that the brewery process places that make brews and things they have the waste, kind of smells like oatmeal. and then underneath here we look further we find like big pieces - wow this is actually quite warm - of a watermelon and just the other fruits and vegetables in this mixture here. we're going to go and try to mix that back up for 'em. but basically that's what composting is. right you add some carbons and the right ratios of nitrogen. The carbon in the wood chips, the nitrogen is the food scraps and some of the leaves and what not. And compost happens. So composting is not rocket science right. One of the great sayings is that compost happens even if you don't get the ratio right. Everything will break down over time. That being said, its very important to them here at Farm Dirt to you know, minimize their composting cycle time. because they get shipments in every week. Lots of materials in and they've got to, as fast as they move this material in, they want to be moving it out, otherwise they're going to outgrow their small little space here. So they've done procedures and they're constantly improving their process to make it more efficient. Since I've been here just a couple years ago looks like they're really improving their process a lot. and they've got some upcoming changes that they talked to me about, that is even going to you know take them to the next level. But I might mention you guys later in this episode. Anyways one of the processes is to increase the productivity and decrease the amount of overall processing time is a ration of the piles, that cut off a week from their total processing time, which is from apples as they come in, rotten apples, to the dirt that goes out, its sixty days. So you guys at home should be able to produce a good compost in sixty days. I've been able to do it in the limit over a month, with my 13:17 composters but even on this massive industrial scale where they just have piles and piles of wood chips and food, in under sixty days. You know they have a finished compost product to sell. So yeah let's go ahead over to you know, one of the ways they speed up the composting process. So one of the ways they speed up the composting process, is by active aeration what you see in this little box here, little house and that's not a dog house. It's a blower house. So this house, houses a blower that has electricity plumbed into it. And they say there's blower comes out into this big P.V.C. tubing, then goes down and as you guys can see it just gets distributed down into these big pipes that then have a perforated tubing go underneath the compost piles that you know, are maybe five, six, feet tall and basically that forces air underneath it and forces the air up through the compost. and what this does, this feeds the microbial action in there right. The compost bacteria love air and when they get air, it's like us eating some chocolate cake. Well, I don't recommend chocolate cake, eating some chocolate persimmons and we're so happy and so excited and we're full of energy. we could do a lot of stuff. Well when the bacteria get air, they work overtime and they're so happy. They're working faster so they can shave a week off. their, you know the time that it takes to make the compost, because that's what it's all about here. Improving processes to make the time of the inputs coming in, and going out shorter, so that they could actually start producing more in less time. Now the next thing I want to do is actually take you guys over to another space in the yard and show you guys another tip they'll be soon using to decrease the composting time. So here I am again sitting on a mound of not compost, but activated mulch. this mulch here is not just the standard mulch that you'd buy of wood chips right, even though it looks like nice and dark and brown like some of them things are painted right, your local big box store. This is actually activated mulch. and what this is, is they take their finished compost product, they run it through their sifter that I'll show you guys in a minute and sift out all the quarter inch and below small particles. This is what gets bagged up and sold to you right. A lot of compost places might only sift down a half inch, and then they're leaving a lot of chunks. I don't like a lot of chunks in my compost. So all their chunks go into big piles like this, that they, they then they sell as activated mulch I think its about forty-five dollars a yard. And this is the mulch that you guys want if you guys want to like add nutrition. But also a mulch to your fruit trees and other trees around your property right. The reason why this is activated, is because it's already gone through the composting process, it was in one of those big piles that I saw you, that you guys saw earlier. but it's not the finished product they're selling directly. This is basically, while it does have a lot of little fine particulate compost still in there, this is a larger chunk. But these large chunks have already been inoculated with the bacteria in the fungi that's in there as you look at it. and as I'm looking at it now there's bacteria and fungi working on this stuff breaking it down and breaking up the constituent parts into plant nutrients for your trees and shrubs and things like that right. So if you are going to be using a mulch right, instead of just getting wood chips that are not a knock later even start to break down yet, and you have to go through that process, it be a lot wiser to get something like this it's already has the process. Now why am I telling you this? Because when they start a new pile of compost they take a good percentage of this inoculated mulch stuff, that actually has the activated bacteria and fungi and all the little microorganisms that make the compost. they add this to the wood, the virgin wood chips and the food scraps so that now, it basically kicks starts the process, kind of like using a starter culture, if you're doing fermented foods. and this is another thing that I recommend for you guys as home gardeners, making your own compost right. You could use your, your mulch that you screened off your last batch of compost, but I like to put in a scoop or two of my last batch of compost in my new compost, that'll just make things happen a lot faster. I don’t know if you guys can see this, but as you guys can see there's like compost wall above me. Maybe I should have maybe move the camera back a whole bunch. But there was a big whole compost wall behind me. this stuff is not quite ready, but it's getting ready to get harvested and then sifted out and then sold to one of you guys out there. but basically I want to show you guys this is because you know they got a nice lot of fungal hyphae, that’s all like I don't know if you guys can see, but it's like a white you know, in the compost instead of being dark, black and white. So this is definitely a really good sign. Now the other thing that they're not yet doing that they hope to implement soon once they get a seventy-two-hundred-dollar piece of equipment, is they're going to start to process their incoming food scraps and grind it to a smaller particle size that will create more surface area. and at the same time they're going to pull off some of the excess liquid off the produce. That then they could take and use to inoculate their, you know and make compost teas and inoculate their soil and so the don't have to deal with so much extra liquid in their compost and they could really dial in the amount of wood chips to ground up plant matter, or you know, fruit and vegetable scraps. So this is a really cool and that's going to help them save time, because once again, once things are broken down more for the bacteria, it's going to make it more easy for them to digest it, and you know finish the process of composting. Now you know, I talked to them about this, and they're not going to be basically shredding up their wood chips, they have done you know studies on grinding up their food scraps which worked really well. and they have home food scraps grinders for those guys do home composting to speed up your composting process. but they don't want to grind up the wood chips because they found out when they did this, there wasn't enough airflow in there because the wood chips you know, provide a lot of nooks and crannies in there. and when they grind up the food scraps, the food scraps will now attach to the different pieces of wood chips and compost faster, is what they're thinking and it'll be more efficient in their process and be able to save actually a lot of space and so may be able to move it more, more you know, wood chips in and more importantly, move it out quicker. Alright the next thing I want to do, is actually show you guys some of the finished compost that they produce here, that has not yet been screened. So now I'm sitting on another pile of what, plant based compost. I hate it when I go to places that have like cow bays to manure bays, chicken shit based compost. Because it's a lot smellier than here. Here actually like this finished compost that I'm sitting on, I mean it basically has no smell. Maybe I smell a little bit of wood something but mostly it's no smell and I want to encourage you guys as gardeners out there, you know to feed your plants other plants. So I encourage you guys to use plant based compost in general. it's a lot safer to use then animal manure based compost. Why is this? Well there can be many challenges with animal manure based compost, a lot of the stuff you buy at a big box store is number one, coming from the animal agriculture industry where they're feeding the animals GMO based corn and soy. and feeding them antibiotics and things like that which is not good because all that is going into the compost you guys are buying. and that's going in your food. In addition, they may be feeding you know or spraying on the G.M.O. corn or soy, things like roundup, things like bio solids, things like chemical fertilizers that may have heavy metal contamination. So that stuff gets run through the cow or the pig, the chicken, in the animal and then when you eat the animal then you're getting some that contamination, but it also comes out in their poop. So now when you're spreading the poop on your garden now you may be getting some of that contamination as well. and let's not talk about E. koi or other you know harmful bacteria that may be present in animal based manures, if not properly composted or if used in their raw state. and finally of course with animal based manure, you know you have a higher probability of burning your crops. I've never burn my crops with a plant based compost here and actually the compost here they recommend even you can plant your vegetables in it straight. and you know try that with some manure based compost. You know in general it's not going to be as successful as if you use a plant based compost and that's why I prefer a plant based compost. And of course if you could source and make your own animal manure or composting you know the ingredients, you know hey that's pretty good but hey I still like the plant based compost myself. because that is the natural system no where in nature do we find big mounds of animal manure that's being used to grow food. There are copious amounts of plant materials used to grow other trees and plants in the forest but there's no big piles, you know shit in the forest. maybe some you know poop here and there from animals that are in the forest that will be mixed in with all the plants but no, you know not the massive amount of poop that's generated due to the massive you know, a calf O's and big industrial animal agriculture where there just really needing to get rid of the animal excrement or poop, that may actually cause challenges with runoff and all these things as well. So yeah, so how do you tell if something's a good compost, because I mean happens a lot. John is this a good compost and so he sends me pictures or somebody sends me description. this is what's in the compost. You know this and this and this and this. you know and by looking at something, I can't tell you how good it is, because it's not, it tells me what's should be in there but didn't tell me what is actually in there until I pick it up see it, look at it and smell it right. in this compost here I mean, I can see here that this compost is just really nice rich and black. you know unlike some companies actually may spray things on their compost to get it to turn darker, so that you think it's a really rich compost. They don't do none of that here I'll tell you firsthand they don't have the money to buy anything extra to do here. they're basically on a shoestring budget, just trying to keep their bills paid and keep this operation of flow which is quite sad to me and that's one of the reasons I wanted to make this video for you guys, you guys can support them because they are doing the right thing and I want more companies like composting company here Farm Dirt to pop up in other cities and other countries even in the world, because this is really the solution to some of the waste that's being produced, some of the you know vegetative waste matter, wood chips and food waste that account for a big percentage of what's going to the landfill and this can be diverted to you know create less gases being emitted into the atmosphere, and to create a valuable product so that more people and farms could grow food with basically the broken down plant material. So yeah I mean just looking at this stuff it's nice, rich and black and this is the green material here right. I would never buy this for my garden it's a big problem with a lot of compost I see. they have a lot of woody matter in there and when places don't filter out the woody matter, basically that means they're making more money off you because they're adding things that are going to necessarily be totally ready for your garden to use right now. And that's why I like that at this place they screen their finished compost. its what I'm sitting on and also I'm seeing a lot of that fungal matter with the white in here, the fungal hyphae’s, they screen it down to a quarter inch. So let's go ahead and take a look at the machine that they screen their compost with as well as the finished sexy compost they make here. All right so what you're looking at now are huge gigantic compost sifters and this is one tool that I don't yet have and I would like to get. I don't think I need one this big here this is for their operation and as you guys can see it's got a nice quarter inch screen on it. They basically put the compost that I showed you guys just a minute ago up in this big bin right there. They turn this machine on and it runs and basically all the finish compost drops out the bottom and then all the chips in, that you know inoculated mulch comes out the other end and for those you guys are looking up to start an operation, you want to get one of these guys. this is called the Settler made in Canada. they work really good this thing's never broken on them and they're at aglobalrepair.ca is their website because I know a lot of people, you know get these industrial things and they break down. so yeah this is definitely a well made unit here. Let's next I want to go ahead and show you guys some of the screened material that's coming out that is being rejected from the compost the finished compost they sell here. All right so what we're looking at now is end of the compost are here and we're looking at is all the reject materials. so as much as this was rejected from you know the bad compost they offer you know they're still going to use this stuff. the stuff is still quite viable. You know and as you guys you guys learned earlier, they inoculate, they use this stuff that's already been pre-inoculated and still has a plenty of you know of material in here, that's you know under a quarter inch in my opinion to inoculate their new piles and then also they make this stuff available for you guys you know to use as mulch underneath your trees to you know prevent you know water evaporation and all this kind of stuff. so yeah this is probably one of the best things you guys can put underneath trees and shrubs, you know because it is starting to break down and I mean that's what the goal of you know feeding trees, other trees and wood chipping right you can put a virgin wood chips but it takes a lot longer to break, break down than one that's already you know been through the process. I guess the next thing I want to do is actually I want to show you guys some of the finished compost. they just finished up the last batch that they did so I think there's a little bit of remnants that I can actually show you guys of what their finished compost looks like and share with you guys more about what to look for in a compost when you buy it. So this is what's left of, this is their area once it gets screened it goes into here and this is the bagging area, and the area that they sell the finished compost. I don't know if you guys can see it, but basically we just got a nice pile right here behind me and we'll do a close up for you guys. this is what a good compost should look like right there. see that it's nice rich in black. Right. This is a screen to a quarter inch size so that I like that a lot. there's not the big pieces of wood chips or bark and all this other stuff that they had in there. This is pure compost. I mean it kind of looks a little bit like dirt. But this is not in dirt and you smell it and it actually has a nice earthy smell, it doesn't stink, it doesn't smell, like it doesn't smell like wood chips anymore. Actually to me the smells like you're in the forest. I should be cool. I want to make a bed out of like fresh compost and like a lie in it every night. I think that'd be refreshing right. I don't know that be weird. I think that's how we would live like we lived in nature. We didn't have these artificial mattresses with polyester and other stuff. I think I might have to try that, but yeah they're still smell just, smells really good right. And the other thing you want to do is you want to take a look at the texture, look at this, see that texture there. I mean this is not wet at all, it flows really easy and it's not quite as thin as sand. you know a lot of companies will cut their stuff with sand and you want to take some between your fingers and feel it. Roll it like this. it should kind of even if it's not super way it should kind of roll into a ball. If you're rolling it like this and you feel like grains in your hand like sand like if you're at the beach then they're cutting with sand, that's not a good thing. And by doing this test. I could tell they're definitely not doing that here. And so smell you know, should smell earthy. you want to do the grit tests. No grit in this stuff you want to you know try to roll it into a ball, you want to just you know make sure it has a nice consistency. You know little chunks, no big pieces of stuff and a nice rich and black just like that right. I've seen a lot of compost they're just kind of like tan in color and they have sand. And these are all ways you could actually physically look at, and tell if it's good or not. Right. And aside from that, you know these are some good indicators but these indicators can always be tricked. they can spray stuff on their compost to make it look black and people do all kinds of stuff to cheat the system but what is not cheating the system is what I want to show you guys, that actually have you guys ask for next right. And you know they have soil testing so most tests that are done on compost are NPK testing which is standard nutrient testing. and most places will have this right. But you know while those are good tests right I want you guys to ask for the extra curricular activity tests, which actually most places do not have, but I believe they should if more people start asking for them. Maybe they would get them and what this test is here on the phone here. It's actually called the Earth Fort biological analysis soil amendment. and this the kind of gardening I teach. I teach biologic organic gardening. And that's why you know this is even more important than just the N.P.K. numbers are you know aside from adding the nutrients, which the compost does as nutrients. The reason why I'm really on the compost is for the bacterial and fungal action in the compost because these are your free labor force. They are your slaves. Compost you are my slaves right here. These are my slaves. They can sue you for you being their slaves once you own them. But anyway they're your workers they're going to basically break down the organic matter that's still left in the compost as well as break down the organic matter that's in your soil, in your garden and turn it into nutrients for your plants in a non water soluble state so these nutrients will not wash away like chemical nutrients will and what the biologic analysis Soil Amendment testing here does, it basically tells you about all the different bacteria and fungus in there. So for example, you know if you don't know how to read these are right because they have a reference range and you just want to make sure most of the numbers are falling within the reference range. Now you know depending on the kind of compost not every number is always going to be within the reference range some might be abnormally high and some might be in a range some of a bit low but as long as most of them are in range. You're pretty good. And of course there's always going to be numbers that are higher which is really good. So the best thing to do would be get more to source of composts with different you know things that are high. So for example this compost here is a really high end amoeba’s amoeba has the ranges from ten thousand to like a hundred thousand and this is like I don't even know it's like ten million. It's like some crazy ass big number. I can't even read a number that big it's kind of insane it's like pushing the limits of how high the amoeba is can get you know over here we're looking at the active bacteria in the active bacteria the expected ranges between three and thirty the active bacteria on this step is six hundred thirty one and on the total bacteria the total bacteria is expected ranges between three and three thousand and the number for this compost is six thousand four hundred eighty four the active fungi you know like I showed you guys are not the white fungal hyphae’s in there. the active fungi are the ranges between three and thirty and this is twenty-four point eight. So this is on the high side of the range. So that's a really good. Of course some other numbers are limit low but you know what. Not every compost could meet all these different criteria. So for you know a plant based compost you know fruit and vegetable companies would shift this is running really good. Of course in addition to this I would encourage you guys to get a fungal dominated compost that really focuses on the fungi. and you know aside from the place here, that's inside the city limits of Houston, not too far for you guys to drive if you guys want to go to a place that I visited that has really good compost also but it's a lot further. It's in Conroe Texas known as Nature's Way Resources. If I remember, I'll put a video up, with a link to the video I made there, at their place and besides having a plant based compost like here which is going to be different, you know they also have a fungal dominated compost in there which is one of the things I'd recommend for you guys to you know do a mixture of the fungal plus the bacterial compost they have here. I guess the final step I want to show you guys actually what this looks like when it's all bagged up and actually share with you guys a special way. All my viewers get a special discount on this awesome compost that I share with you guys today. So now I want to share with the guys the finished product here at Farm Dirt, in the plant base eroded compost you guys saw the whole process of how they make this as well as a lot of tips you know that they use here that you guys could also use for composting at home. Now if you guys want to get some of this amazing compost that I should do with you guys today that I actually use myself because on previous trips I've actually gotten this compost and I took it back to the West coast with me to use it in my very garden to plant things in and it works great. Definitely some good stuff I could totally vouch for it. I hooked you guys up with a special discount. this is sold here in the Houston area at some better garden centers, but you could go there and pay full price but if you want to get the special GYG discounted price, you're going to have to come here to Farm Dirt on a meal when they're open or see them at the farmer's market that I was just at today. I think it's on like Saturdays on Richmond, and see I'm there mention the G Y G code. you're going to get a special discount, this normally at this time. And this may be something to change. sells for nine dollars as the regular price but if you mention the GYG discount you're going to get a bag one cubic foot for seven bucks and I don't think I could make it for that cheap at home actually. That's definitely a good price. If you guys want to get a cubic yard They're not like making a ton of this stuff right now but also give me a call, mention the GYG discount. They'll hook you up with a special discount that I pre-negotiated with them right and what I really want you guys to know is that they're making a good quality product here. there may be other places that make compost in the Houston area and other places and they may be cheaper in price but you know what a lot of times, you guys get what you pay for. this is not always true but it's definitely true here. you know you're going to pay you're going to pay some money for the compost here, but you're definitely getting some good stuff that's going to grow some healthy vegetables, fruits and even ornamentals for you and your family. so I always encourage you guys if they've got some good stuff support them, and support places that are doing good work like diverting so much of the, you know food scraps and yard waste that would normally just go to the landfill. so I really applaud them for the work they're doing here. This is some dirty work because the last time I was here. It was raining there, you know their tractors were stuck in the mud and I was just getting hammered with rain and it just wasn't a fun day but they're out here working man. like seems like every time I come out here they're out here working. And you know doing really good stuff here to help the city of Houston be more sustainable but also help us local gardeners. Now for those you guys that don't live in Houston, don't worry. I've also hooked you guys up right. Farm dirt compost is now also just starting to sell, online. and of course the online price is going to have to be more expensive than the price that you get locally, because they got to ship it and the shipping actually costs more, unfortunately than the compost does. but nonetheless you guys mention the GYG code, put that code in on the website. It's going to give you guys a special discounted price, so that you guys, no matter where in the fifty states you live, they're going to send you a priority flat rate box stuffed full of their good plant based compost, that you guys learned about today. So yeah that's pretty much it. I'll post links down below to other websites. you guys can get some of this amazing compost. I'm going to be sure to take some of this compost home with me today, to use again in my gardening because its some of the best stuff and give to my you know, my girlfriend's parents. Garden that's here locally. They've been growing in it too because I got some of that for them last time and their stuff is growing amazing. So you know, once again I always encourage you guys to support local compost companies that are making good products when you can. and after watching this episode you know some things to look for, when you guys go to buy compost and hopefully this will help you know, minimize the questions I get. John is this a good compost? I mean, I got to go there, see how they make it, look and see and that's the other big thing that's important for me. You know, you want to always ask the compost company, "hey! Can I come down and see your facility, see how you make it?" right, and if they're just like, "Yeah! Come on down, we'll share with you. You know, that's good because they're open source, they have nothing to hide, right. But it's the companies that say, "Oh no. We don't want you to come down here, we don't want you to bring your camera." Those are the companies I'm quite worried about because like, why don't they want me there. What do they have to hide, what don't they want you to know, what are they putting your compost that they don't want you to know about right. So I'm really glad that they have an open door policy year and they showed me around you know, showed me everything and I got to snoop around and see all kind of stuff happening here right. They've got nothing to hide. So yeah definitely some good compost, some of the best compost, I've found here inside the city in Houston. So if you guys enjoyed this episode learning more about compost, how you guys could make it yourself and how you guys can get some of the best compost here in Houston and in all of Texas, please be sure to give me a thumbs up in future episodes when I come back to Houston. I'll come by and make more episodes, maybe interviewing some of the compost makers and owners and all this kind of stuff. Also be sure to click that Subscribe button right down below, to be notified of my new and upcoming episodes coming out every three to four days, you never know where I'll be showing up, or what you'll be learning on my YouTube channel. and be sure, finally to check my past episodes out over twelve and up episodes now, a wealth of information of the different compost yards, how to compost at home yourself, how to grow your food all aspects so that you guys can be more sustainable and grow food for you and your family, instead of eating out of the grocery store. Maybe you're eating out of the grocery store second hand, because you're getting the compost made here. in any case that's my mission. Hope you guys enjoy this episode. I got to get going. Once again, my name is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com we'll see next time, and until then, remember keep on growing.


 
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How to Grow, Hydrate and Hold Cut Hellebores

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 193 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

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I'm Kelly, and I'm here with my friend Susan from Shady Grove Gardens. She's a grower here in Boone, North Carolina! Susan, why don't you tell us a little bit about what you do up at Shady Grove Gardens? All right. Well, we're growers and florist. And we've been doing-- this is year 31. 31, wow. We grow our flowers and use them for all our wedding designs. OK. So, we grow well over 300 different varieties, and we sell them to people like Kelly. Like me! Actually, to me! Yes. [LAUGHTER] And florist. So, I'm, like, nodding, like, oh, this is new information. But I of course know this, because Susan is one of the growers here in Boone. So, a lot of flowers that you saw whenever we were doing bunches of weddings and things like that, some of those things came from Susan's farm. Mhm! And we sell directly to brides, as well. OK, fantastic. So, before you started doing weddings and doing flowers just cut, you had a little bit of experience in landscape design. And then also tell us a little bit about your education. Well, I have a master's in Biology, and I have a Naturals degree and a Botany degree. And then I did landscape gardening, for about 20 years. And then we slowly transitioned into having a flower farm. So that's all we do, now. We have a flower farm and a nursery. We grow all our own seedlings. And I'm the grower, seedling, office mouse, designer. And Brent, my husband, is the main grower and farm manager. Yeah! Because they've got some flowers at their main place, where all of the seedlings and office work takes place. And they have a beautiful, you call it "The Peak," that's out-- just beautiful mountain views. I mean, one of the prettiest farms that I've ever been to. Fantastic views, great location. So, again, all of that then happens out at the Peak. Tell me a little bit about that Naturalist degree. What's included in that? Well, it's from Appalachian State. And, back then, we just did a lot of fieldwork. So it was all ornithology, mycology-- which is mushrooms-- You're going to have to tell me what-- so, mushrooms-- got it. Mushrooms and fungus, you know. So it was all fieldwork, as opposed to, like, learning how to do lab sorts of things. OK, sure. But I also took Plant Physiology and things like that, as well. Yeah, fantastic. Well, when it comes to hellebores, there are a few things that are really great that we want to share about keeping them hydrated. And one of them actually goes back to some of this plant physiology and some of those things that Susan's been talking about. And one of them is keeping the water that you're using-- having quite a full vase of water. Because having all of this water in here creates pressure that then pushes the water up through the stems! So that's one of the first things about hellebore hydration. And that would apply to a wide variety of plants, actually. So, it's great to have some deep water, whenever you're working with hellebores. We have several different types of hellebores here. And Susan really loves the ones that have their necks up, because they are a lot easier to use in arrangements. So, do you want to tell us a little bit about the ones that you brought today? All right. This one is actually a seedling, from my other hellebores around the yard. I will point out that it takes four years for them, at least, to bloom. And they don't move terribly well. So I love this one, and it's in a pot, so it's going probably back in my yard somewhere. OK, it's ready to go out. Uh-huh. This one is one that you can buy on the market. It's called Winter Thriller. There is a mix, and this one is Pink Ballerina. And it's a really nice ruffled double. But it does hang down a little bit. So, Kelly might be able to tell you how to solve that problem. [LAUGH] Yeah. Well, whenever they have kind of that natural facing, like, that their heads are moving down, sometimes what I'll do is take a branch-- like, for example, spiraea and quince are blooming at a similar time as the hellebore. And they both have, like, nice, branchy stems. So what I'll do is put this one-- you know, since this is a short stem, I put this kind of lower in the arrangement. But I would just, like, hook its little neck, here, onto one of those branches, or prop it over one of the branches, so that you could get that effect. And sometimes, too, seeing the backs of the stems, and the silhouettes that you get-- It just all depends what the point is, and what the purpose of that flower that you're using is, in your arrangement. Because this, even pointing down like this, I think, would be really lovely, depending on the lines and the shapes that you're using in your arrangement. But if you have some that are a little bit droopier, you can prop them up using those branches and things. So, love this. Pink Ballerina. Another one that's on the market right now, this one's called Pink Frost. And this is one-- I got a couple of these at Lowe's-- had them. I like the stiff stem on that one. Yeah. Very hardy. And that's what Susan-- as soon as Susan picked it, she's like, yeah, this is a really hardy one. And several years ago I visited Pine Knot Farms, which is where some of the research in this book took place. And I cut several different types from their garden. They were so gracious, to let me do that. And this was the variety that really held up well, comparatively. I mean, this went on for almost a month, I think, whenever I had it that first time. So I think this is a really great one, if you're looking to add some cuts to your garden. But really, most hellebores, I think, do hold up quite well. All of the progress that they've made in breeding and all those kinds of things, they're a great, strong plant. So, anyway, this one, I just cut from the garden, right before we came in to record today. So I'm going to give it a quick snip, exposing as much of this area as I can. And then I'm going to have some Quick Dip, here, from Floralife. And I'm just going to do a 1, 2, 3. [LAUGH] And then I'm going to put in that deep water. And then, same thing with this. And this one, I'm not 100% sure on what exactly this is called, but I got it here at Pine Knot Farms, if you really love it and you're looking for one that's similar. It's a very unique-- It doesn't have the picotee, like this Ballerina. I love the little spots. But this is more of a gradation in color, from white to this just really rich burgundy. And the back sides of the petals are so lovely, too. And a double, like the Ballerina that we have, here. And most of the hellebores on the market now are hybrids, so you just have to go by variety name and which ones you like. Yeah. There we go. OK. So those ones are in there, and they're ready to go. So, Quick Dip is one way that you can process your hellebore. And another way that you can do it, kind of an old-fashioned technique-- we just wanted to show a couple of different techniques that you could try out-- is to take-- And, Jessie, why don't we just get a close-up of this, if we can, here. We want to get water up into the stem as quickly as possible. So we're just doing a very small, gentle, super-gentle scoring of the stem. And that is also done with tulips, occasionally. And that just helps them get water into that-- what's it called? The xylem? Mhm. In the-- Yeah, in the xylem. In case you have a stem that's sealed off at the base, somehow, that allows more water uptake. And if there's air bubbles in there, like an embolism comes out. Mhm. So there we go! So, tell us a little bit about how the Quick Dip works. Because it serves somewhat kind of a similar purpose, when it comes to-- It does. --the air bubbles and the embolism-- things like that. In theory, you shouldn't have to do this on your own cuts. But with the ones that are shipped in, especially if you have them wilted, the Quick Dip, what it does is it changes the surface tension of the liquid and the water that you're trying to get taken up. So, it's acidic, and it's just-- that's all you need, is that few seconds to change that surface pH. So, the acid breaks down kind of the surface. Mhm. Mhm. And then it pops those bubbles and lets everything flow through freely! And that's similar to what you're doing with the slits. You're allowing the air bubbles to be dissolved, in one way or another. And you get more uptake. OK. Yeah, because sometimes with hellebores, we get those little, droopy necks at the top, especially when you're shipping them in wholesale. And for a long time-- Susan and I were just talking about how, for a long time, it was considered that hellebores just weren't a "good" cut flower. And how unfortunate that we lost that. But we moved into a season where a lot of our sourcing was coming from other countries. And we were doing a lot of shipping in planes and all those types of things. And so, comparatively, in the world of flowers, it was a little bit more complicated to get hellebores going, and because of their bloom season being whenever it's cooler-- things like this-- maybe flowers weren't as much in demand. So there was sort of this little period of history, in the cut-flower world, where they disappeared. But whenever we were doing cut flowers using things that were in our own backyard, before, you know, airplanes and all those types of transportation methods were a piece of it, this is something that you'll see in floral history and in art and different things. You'll see these being used. Well, the hybrids certainly have made them more popular, because there's nicer colors, better stems. But yes, back in the '40s, when people grew their own flowers as a florist, they used them. And then, the tropics, they don't do well in the tropics. They have to have that cold period. They bloom in the snow. They're Lenten roses. So, now that there's more North American growers, we have more hellebores. More hellebores. Yeah, and how lucky we are, because just the variety that's available, now. And Pine Knot Farm has done so much work in pushing us forward, in terms of just the interesting types and colors and, you know, all the doubles and picotees and all those beautiful gradiations in the colors of the petals. I mean, it's just fantastic. They have such a great variety, there. Tell us, Susan, a little bit about these little rubber-band guys. [LAUGH] We were talking about when the best time is to cut them. In the summertime, we, of course, whenever it's warmer, we want to cut them early in the morning or late in the evening. But what's interesting about hellebores is, they are blooming whenever it is freezing, unlike most other flowers. So you actually have to pay attention to, is it frozen? [LAUGH] Well, these were cut last night, at 11 o'clock at night. And they were frozen solid. So, I had my doubts about bringing them over to Kelly. But, sure enough-- Yeah, pull them out! --every single one of them-- Wobble them around a little bit. --looks just fine. They're a little more wilty than the ones I cut the day before, before the freeze, but not much. So here's day before the freeze, what we're looking at, here. And this one's not too terribly much different. I don't see a huge, like, visible difference. What do you think? I don't! Now, what you're going to notice, especially if you're getting ones from your own yard, is the buds probably will never look good. They may turn brown. If they were frozen. Or the immature ones, that stem might decline much faster. But the bigger ones, they will be fine. Mhm! Now, it does depend on how long they stay cold, and whether it's windy and they have wind chill and dehydration. But a short spurt of snow or deep cold, they are OK! Mhm. Yeah, and that's something else that's important to consider, is, what-- and, a lot of times, with cuts, when you're having things, if you're someone who's having things shipped to you, there is a whole life that that flower lived before it even landed at your doorstep. And so, you might be doing all of the by-the-book right things to do but still be like, but these never opened, or these just kind of-- you know, whatever. They had a whole life. They could have not been hydrated properly, whenever they were a plant in the ground. They could have been malnourished. It's like, how strong was that plant before it was actually cut? And so, one of the great things about hellebores, I think that they are-- it's something that I think everybody should have in their-- I think everybody should have these in their garden. They're very easy, once you've got them in the ground. They're easy. A very easy plant. And tell us a little bit about when you think the best time is to cut them. Like, you would water them two days before or-- Yeah, about-- --what do you think? You know, just make sure it's either rained, or you watered, about 48 hours out. And then you should be able to cut them early in the morning, as long as they're not frozen, is probably your best time. And bring them in immediately, and put them straight into water. Where you could go wrong is leaving them lay around, like I did with the one. Yeah, yeah! [LAUGH] But, even so, look at how-- I don't remember exactly which one it was, but there's only three to choose from. It's the one I cut with the knife. Oh, yes, this one. It's this one. So this one accidentally got left out overnight in freezing-cold weather. And I didn't pick it up till that afternoon. The next day, and it is perfectly fine. Yeah, look at this. And I didn't put it in anything. This just went into water. So that's a tough plant. You know, it's almost an evergreen. Now, you'll also notice on these blooms, here-- I think it's on this one-- you can see where there is some freeze damage from the past freeze. OK. Here, let me hold that out, so Jessie can see it really well. But, if you can just kind of get rid of this-- you good, Jessie? You see that OK? I mean, you can just pinch this out-- Right. And it's still perfectly fine to use. And I use them like that, because people love green flowers. Mhm? And so, these will all turn green in a few months. And that's generally when I use them. Because my brides are getting married in May and not in February or March. So, even the burgundies turn towards a green color. Yeah. They all sort of fade, a little bit, as they're aging. And-- good grief-- OK, so, this starts coming out-- well, I know, we're up in the mountains. It's a little bit cooler longer. But the amount of time that this stays on the plant is really fantastic-- that it's usable as a cut. I mean, you really have, I would say three-- Into June. I use them into June. --solid three months! Mhm. Yeah. So, their color tones and things are going to be changing throughout that period. And the look of them, of course, will change. So-- let's see. Do we have any where the seed pods are maybe a little bit more developed? A few. And there is a reason why it's called "Lenten rose." It's at its peak during Lent, which is now. Which is now, mhm. There was-- I think one of the white ones has a pod on it. OK. Because they're a little earlier. So, some of these will come in at different times. So you have to kind of look at the ones that work for your yard. Mmm-- I feel like this one might be kind of as close as we're doing to get-- Oh, that's right. --in terms of time period, right now. But these will actually swell out. So, this is the female part of the plant. Right? Yeah? Mhm. That's your ovary forming, there. Mhm! And then these are the male part of the plant. You can see the pollen popping off of them. So the pollen's popping down in here and then going down in. And these are going to, then-- these little parts, right here, Jessie. They're very small right now. Mmm. It's right here. Can you see that? That's going to swell. Mhm. And make seeds. That's the ovary, and that's where the seeds will come on and live. So, there's lots of different stages, so you can have it where it's, you know-- actually, in this book, there's tons of pictures in there I could show. There's a green seed pod. And they're very usable with the green seed pod on them. Mhm. Yeah, absolutely. So, here's a picture of the life stages of the hellebore. And here is the part where-- you know, this is what it's going to look like late in the season, once the seed pods have developed and ripened on the plant. But tell us a little bit, Susan, about this life cycle that we're looking at, here. I know you mentioned four years to bloom, on this. So, if you're growing them in your yard, and you let the seed pods drop the seeds-- which you can barely see in the photo, there-- you should, in theory, have seedlings the next year. But they're going to be tiny. They're going to be like these little seedlings you see here. Now, you can move them. And probably the best time to move them is when they're that small. Oh, OK. They don't especially like being divided. They don't especially like being moved. OK. But the other important thing is, once they get really big and mature, they make a better cut flower. So maybe that first year or so, you might not really expect those flowers to be great and hold up well. Kind of like a peony, maybe. Like, you know, that kind of three-year mark. Well, for a lot of-- you grow a lot of perennials. And three years is when they kind of have established and they're doing well. So, as far as bloom goes, for those little guys that you might be wanting to do yourself, don't expect to see anything for about four years. Yeah? [LAUGH] Patience, big-time. And that's why hellebores are not that commercially available or that inexpensive, if you're buying. Right. They are a more expensive plant, and there's a lot of time that's involved in babying those things, unlike some of these annuals that you can pop up pretty inexpensively, at Lowe's or different things. Like this one, here, the Pink Frost, I think that that was maybe $16 or $18, compared to some of the other, kind of, quick annuals that they have or biannuals that they have that are coming and going. Yes I saw some at Lowe's, just yesterday, day before. $17 for just the standard Lowe's gallon pot. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. But they're great when you can get them going and established. There's nothing else really happening in the garden at that time. That's true. So it is that kind of like-- I guess I think I plant them more for myself, because it's like, oh, here's something! [LAUGH] You know, spring is here. Anything else that you wanted to share? I started growing them because all my brides were asking for green-- Oh, OK! --and green flowers. Right, right. So, I needed something green, and there's only so many green flowers. And in June, and in May, perfect green flowers. Yeah, yeah. I also use the leaves. Mhm! Yeah, I love these. Mhm. These are so great. I'm not sure how you use them, exactly, but I like to use them low in arrangements, over the rim of the container, to frame some of the larger flowers. And the leaves you can use all season long. I might be-- am I destroying my plant by clipping from the leaves after they've bloomed? Maybe a little bit. [LAUGH] If it's a big plant, I think they can handle it. They can handle it? Mhm? OK, great! Well, I just wanted to share, again, this book. It's called Hellebores, a Comprehensive Guide. Burrell and Tyler are the authors on this. And it is one of the American Horticultural Society award-winning books. And you hop over-- this was at the Royal Horticultural Society gardens, in England. Whenever I was there, they have-- this is one of the ones that they have in their library. But it's a comprehensive guide. And there's all kinds of great resources in here and a lifetime of several people that are kind of summarized in here. And also, what we've got is, there's a plant trial, back here, that John Dole from NC State headed up, in the appendix-- which I guess I don't-- there's a little nutrient study, here, in C. Back here, in Appendix D of this book, there was a study that Fanelli and John Dole from NC State, the Department of Horticulture Science, put together-- a little experiment using hellebores as a cut flower. And their results-- and you can see all of, you know, what their control was and their temperature and all those kinds of things. But 17 and 1/2 days is where they landed. They were experimenting with cut-flower preservatives. So, like, not the Quick Dip specifically, but those kinds of hydrating solutions and holding solutions, versus when you're cutting the plant. Because, for almost-- a lot of people-- and Susan, you know, I would consider one of them-- that cutting them later, you know, finds that there's really not a whole lot of problem, once they've got those seed pods on them. So, that's what he was testing. You know, was there a notable difference between if the seed pods were developed versus if they weren't? And he didn't seem to find a major-- in this study, he didn't see a major difference. But it doesn't mean that there might not be for someone else. Like, this one's starting to form a seed pod. So I would prefer to use one like that, because it's a little more leathery. Sure, mhm. And I would assume that it would last longer than one that still has all its anthers. Very delicate and soft. Mhm. Exactly. John was using a hydrating solution and a holding solution. A holding solution is a professional solution you can get from Floralife, is the one he uses. Oh, and I think he did-- actually, in this experiment, I think he used-- And Chrysal. Yeah, I think he used both-- like, the kind of equivalents of both brands-- and didn't see a big difference. Basically, they have less sugar in them than the standard Floralife that you would get in the little packets. So that's really the main difference. The hydrator is just a solution you leave them in for several hours. And it's similar to Quick Dip-- Mhm, but the plant just sits in it for a while. --just a different brand. OK. Why do you think people-- why do you think that, like, higher sugar content that you would get in a packet, if you were buying flowers from a florist or something, why wouldn't it be the lower sugar count, if that actually makes them last longer? Yes. Because, when you give somebody regular Floralife, with a lot of sugar, that's carbohydrates. So that feeds the flower, and it also makes it continue to mature. OK. So, if you're a flower grower or a florist, you just want to hold that in stasis. So you just barely want to feed it. You don't want it to continue to mature, and you don't want to feed the bacteria. Of course, there's things in there to keep the bacteria from growing. But that's why they give it very little sugar. OK. And then the home person gets the product with the sugar. Right. So then they're really seeing kind of the best parts of the plant, and the rest of the life cycle of it, I guess. And most flowers are cut in bud, so you want them to stay in bud till they get to where they're going. Right And then that extra sugar lets them open. Mhm. Perfect! Well, thank you so much, Susan, for popping on to join us, today, and to talk about hellebores a little bit. This has been really fun. And we're excited to share these beautiful things with you. So, best of luck on your hellebore planting that you have coming up. And you let us know if you have any questions.
 
 
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I'm Kelly, and I'm here with my friend Susan from Shady Grove Gardens. She's a grower here in Boone, North Carolina! Susan, why don't you tell us a little bit about what you do up at Shady Grove Gardens? All right. Well, we're growers and florist. And we've been doing-- this is year 31. 31, wow. We grow our flowers and use them for all our wedding designs. OK. So, we grow well over 300 different varieties, and we sell them to people like Kelly. Like me! Actually, to me! Yes. [LAUGHTER] And florist. So, I'm, like, nodding, like, oh, this is new information. But I of course know this, because Susan is one of the growers here in Boone. So, a lot of flowers that you saw whenever we were doing bunches of weddings and things like that, some of those things came from Susan's farm. Mhm! And we sell directly to brides, as well. OK, fantastic. So, before you started doing weddings and doing flowers just cut, you had a little bit of experience in landscape design. And then also tell us a little bit about your education. Well, I have a master's in Biology, and I have a Naturals degree and a Botany degree. And then I did landscape gardening, for about 20 years. And then we slowly transitioned into having a flower farm. So that's all we do, now. We have a flower farm and a nursery. We grow all our own seedlings. And I'm the grower, seedling, office mouse, designer. And Brent, my husband, is the main grower and farm manager. Yeah! Because they've got some flowers at their main place, where all of the seedlings and office work takes place. And they have a beautiful, you call it "The Peak," that's out-- just beautiful mountain views. I mean, one of the prettiest farms that I've ever been to. Fantastic views, great location. So, again, all of that then happens out at the Peak. Tell me a little bit about that Naturalist degree. What's included in that? Well, it's from Appalachian State. And, back then, we just did a lot of fieldwork. So it was all ornithology, mycology-- which is mushrooms-- You're going to have to tell me what-- so, mushrooms-- got it. Mushrooms and fungus, you know. So it was all fieldwork, as opposed to, like, learning how to do lab sorts of things. OK, sure. But I also took Plant Physiology and things like that, as well. Yeah, fantastic. Well, when it comes to hellebores, there are a few things that are really great that we want to share about keeping them hydrated. And one of them actually goes back to some of this plant physiology and some of those things that Susan's been talking about. And one of them is keeping the water that you're using-- having quite a full vase of water. Because having all of this water in here creates pressure that then pushes the water up through the stems! So that's one of the first things about hellebore hydration. And that would apply to a wide variety of plants, actually. So, it's great to have some deep water, whenever you're working with hellebores. We have several different types of hellebores here. And Susan really loves the ones that have their necks up, because they are a lot easier to use in arrangements. So, do you want to tell us a little bit about the ones that you brought today? All right. This one is actually a seedling, from my other hellebores around the yard. I will point out that it takes four years for them, at least, to bloom. And they don't move terribly well. So I love this one, and it's in a pot, so it's going probably back in my yard somewhere. OK, it's ready to go out. Uh-huh. This one is one that you can buy on the market. It's called Winter Thriller. There is a mix, and this one is Pink Ballerina. And it's a really nice ruffled double. But it does hang down a little bit. So, Kelly might be able to tell you how to solve that problem. [LAUGH] Yeah. Well, whenever they have kind of that natural facing, like, that their heads are moving down, sometimes what I'll do is take a branch-- like, for example, spiraea and quince are blooming at a similar time as the hellebore. And they both have, like, nice, branchy stems. So what I'll do is put this one-- you know, since this is a short stem, I put this kind of lower in the arrangement. But I would just, like, hook its little neck, here, onto one of those branches, or prop it over one of the branches, so that you could get that effect. And sometimes, too, seeing the backs of the stems, and the silhouettes that you get-- It just all depends what the point is, and what the purpose of that flower that you're using is, in your arrangement. Because this, even pointing down like this, I think, would be really lovely, depending on the lines and the shapes that you're using in your arrangement. But if you have some that are a little bit droopier, you can prop them up using those branches and things. So, love this. Pink Ballerina. Another one that's on the market right now, this one's called Pink Frost. And this is one-- I got a couple of these at Lowe's-- had them. I like the stiff stem on that one. Yeah. Very hardy. And that's what Susan-- as soon as Susan picked it, she's like, yeah, this is a really hardy one. And several years ago I visited Pine Knot Farms, which is where some of the research in this book took place. And I cut several different types from their garden. They were so gracious, to let me do that. And this was the variety that really held up well, comparatively. I mean, this went on for almost a month, I think, whenever I had it that first time. So I think this is a really great one, if you're looking to add some cuts to your garden. But really, most hellebores, I think, do hold up quite well. All of the progress that they've made in breeding and all those kinds of things, they're a great, strong plant. So, anyway, this one, I just cut from the garden, right before we came in to record today. So I'm going to give it a quick snip, exposing as much of this area as I can. And then I'm going to have some Quick Dip, here, from Floralife. And I'm just going to do a 1, 2, 3. [LAUGH] And then I'm going to put in that deep water. And then, same thing with this. And this one, I'm not 100% sure on what exactly this is called, but I got it here at Pine Knot Farms, if you really love it and you're looking for one that's similar. It's a very unique-- It doesn't have the picotee, like this Ballerina. I love the little spots. But this is more of a gradation in color, from white to this just really rich burgundy. And the back sides of the petals are so lovely, too. And a double, like the Ballerina that we have, here. And most of the hellebores on the market now are hybrids, so you just have to go by variety name and which ones you like. Yeah. There we go. OK. So those ones are in there, and they're ready to go. So, Quick Dip is one way that you can process your hellebore. And another way that you can do it, kind of an old-fashioned technique-- we just wanted to show a couple of different techniques that you could try out-- is to take-- And, Jessie, why don't we just get a close-up of this, if we can, here. We want to get water up into the stem as quickly as possible. So we're just doing a very small, gentle, super-gentle scoring of the stem. And that is also done with tulips, occasionally. And that just helps them get water into that-- what's it called? The xylem? Mhm. In the-- Yeah, in the xylem. In case you have a stem that's sealed off at the base, somehow, that allows more water uptake. And if there's air bubbles in there, like an embolism comes out. Mhm. So there we go! So, tell us a little bit about how the Quick Dip works. Because it serves somewhat kind of a similar purpose, when it comes to-- It does. --the air bubbles and the embolism-- things like that. In theory, you shouldn't have to do this on your own cuts. But with the ones that are shipped in, especially if you have them wilted, the Quick Dip, what it does is it changes the surface tension of the liquid and the water that you're trying to get taken up. So, it's acidic, and it's just-- that's all you need, is that few seconds to change that surface pH. So, the acid breaks down kind of the surface. Mhm. Mhm. And then it pops those bubbles and lets everything flow through freely! And that's similar to what you're doing with the slits. You're allowing the air bubbles to be dissolved, in one way or another. And you get more uptake. OK. Yeah, because sometimes with hellebores, we get those little, droopy necks at the top, especially when you're shipping them in wholesale. And for a long time-- Susan and I were just talking about how, for a long time, it was considered that hellebores just weren't a "good" cut flower. And how unfortunate that we lost that. But we moved into a season where a lot of our sourcing was coming from other countries. And we were doing a lot of shipping in planes and all those types of things. And so, comparatively, in the world of flowers, it was a little bit more complicated to get hellebores going, and because of their bloom season being whenever it's cooler-- things like this-- maybe flowers weren't as much in demand. So there was sort of this little period of history, in the cut-flower world, where they disappeared. But whenever we were doing cut flowers using things that were in our own backyard, before, you know, airplanes and all those types of transportation methods were a piece of it, this is something that you'll see in floral history and in art and different things. You'll see these being used. Well, the hybrids certainly have made them more popular, because there's nicer colors, better stems. But yes, back in the '40s, when people grew their own flowers as a florist, they used them. And then, the tropics, they don't do well in the tropics. They have to have that cold period. They bloom in the snow. They're Lenten roses. So, now that there's more North American growers, we have more hellebores. More hellebores. Yeah, and how lucky we are, because just the variety that's available, now. And Pine Knot Farm has done so much work in pushing us forward, in terms of just the interesting types and colors and, you know, all the doubles and picotees and all those beautiful gradiations in the colors of the petals. I mean, it's just fantastic. They have such a great variety, there. Tell us, Susan, a little bit about these little rubber-band guys. [LAUGH] We were talking about when the best time is to cut them. In the summertime, we, of course, whenever it's warmer, we want to cut them early in the morning or late in the evening. But what's interesting about hellebores is, they are blooming whenever it is freezing, unlike most other flowers. So you actually have to pay attention to, is it frozen? [LAUGH] Well, these were cut last night, at 11 o'clock at night. And they were frozen solid. So, I had my doubts about bringing them over to Kelly. But, sure enough-- Yeah, pull them out! --every single one of them-- Wobble them around a little bit. --looks just fine. They're a little more wilty than the ones I cut the day before, before the freeze, but not much. So here's day before the freeze, what we're looking at, here. And this one's not too terribly much different. I don't see a huge, like, visible difference. What do you think? I don't! Now, what you're going to notice, especially if you're getting ones from your own yard, is the buds probably will never look good. They may turn brown. If they were frozen. Or the immature ones, that stem might decline much faster. But the bigger ones, they will be fine. Mhm! Now, it does depend on how long they stay cold, and whether it's windy and they have wind chill and dehydration. But a short spurt of snow or deep cold, they are OK! Mhm. Yeah, and that's something else that's important to consider, is, what-- and, a lot of times, with cuts, when you're having things, if you're someone who's having things shipped to you, there is a whole life that that flower lived before it even landed at your doorstep. And so, you might be doing all of the by-the-book right things to do but still be like, but these never opened, or these just kind of-- you know, whatever. They had a whole life. They could have not been hydrated properly, whenever they were a plant in the ground. They could have been malnourished. It's like, how strong was that plant before it was actually cut? And so, one of the great things about hellebores, I think that they are-- it's something that I think everybody should have in their-- I think everybody should have these in their garden. They're very easy, once you've got them in the ground. They're easy. A very easy plant. And tell us a little bit about when you think the best time is to cut them. Like, you would water them two days before or-- Yeah, about-- --what do you think? You know, just make sure it's either rained, or you watered, about 48 hours out. And then you should be able to cut them early in the morning, as long as they're not frozen, is probably your best time. And bring them in immediately, and put them straight into water. Where you could go wrong is leaving them lay around, like I did with the one. Yeah, yeah! [LAUGH] But, even so, look at how-- I don't remember exactly which one it was, but there's only three to choose from. It's the one I cut with the knife. Oh, yes, this one. It's this one. So this one accidentally got left out overnight in freezing-cold weather. And I didn't pick it up till that afternoon. The next day, and it is perfectly fine. Yeah, look at this. And I didn't put it in anything. This just went into water. So that's a tough plant. You know, it's almost an evergreen. Now, you'll also notice on these blooms, here-- I think it's on this one-- you can see where there is some freeze damage from the past freeze. OK. Here, let me hold that out, so Jessie can see it really well. But, if you can just kind of get rid of this-- you good, Jessie? You see that OK? I mean, you can just pinch this out-- Right. And it's still perfectly fine to use. And I use them like that, because people love green flowers. Mhm? And so, these will all turn green in a few months. And that's generally when I use them. Because my brides are getting married in May and not in February or March. So, even the burgundies turn towards a green color. Yeah. They all sort of fade, a little bit, as they're aging. And-- good grief-- OK, so, this starts coming out-- well, I know, we're up in the mountains. It's a little bit cooler longer. But the amount of time that this stays on the plant is really fantastic-- that it's usable as a cut. I mean, you really have, I would say three-- Into June. I use them into June. --solid three months! Mhm. Yeah. So, their color tones and things are going to be changing throughout that period. And the look of them, of course, will change. So-- let's see. Do we have any where the seed pods are maybe a little bit more developed? A few. And there is a reason why it's called "Lenten rose." It's at its peak during Lent, which is now. Which is now, mhm. There was-- I think one of the white ones has a pod on it. OK. Because they're a little earlier. So, some of these will come in at different times. So you have to kind of look at the ones that work for your yard. Mmm-- I feel like this one might be kind of as close as we're doing to get-- Oh, that's right. --in terms of time period, right now. But these will actually swell out. So, this is the female part of the plant. Right? Yeah? Mhm. That's your ovary forming, there. Mhm! And then these are the male part of the plant. You can see the pollen popping off of them. So the pollen's popping down in here and then going down in. And these are going to, then-- these little parts, right here, Jessie. They're very small right now. Mmm. It's right here. Can you see that? That's going to swell. Mhm. And make seeds. That's the ovary, and that's where the seeds will come on and live. So, there's lots of different stages, so you can have it where it's, you know-- actually, in this book, there's tons of pictures in there I could show. There's a green seed pod. And they're very usable with the green seed pod on them. Mhm. Yeah, absolutely. So, here's a picture of the life stages of the hellebore. And here is the part where-- you know, this is what it's going to look like late in the season, once the seed pods have developed and ripened on the plant. But tell us a little bit, Susan, about this life cycle that we're looking at, here. I know you mentioned four years to bloom, on this. So, if you're growing them in your yard, and you let the seed pods drop the seeds-- which you can barely see in the photo, there-- you should, in theory, have seedlings the next year. But they're going to be tiny. They're going to be like these little seedlings you see here. Now, you can move them. And probably the best time to move them is when they're that small. Oh, OK. They don't especially like being divided. They don't especially like being moved. OK. But the other important thing is, once they get really big and mature, they make a better cut flower. So maybe that first year or so, you might not really expect those flowers to be great and hold up well. Kind of like a peony, maybe. Like, you know, that kind of three-year mark. Well, for a lot of-- you grow a lot of perennials. And three years is when they kind of have established and they're doing well. So, as far as bloom goes, for those little guys that you might be wanting to do yourself, don't expect to see anything for about four years. Yeah? [LAUGH] Patience, big-time. And that's why hellebores are not that commercially available or that inexpensive, if you're buying. Right. They are a more expensive plant, and there's a lot of time that's involved in babying those things, unlike some of these annuals that you can pop up pretty inexpensively, at Lowe's or different things. Like this one, here, the Pink Frost, I think that that was maybe $16 or $18, compared to some of the other, kind of, quick annuals that they have or biannuals that they have that are coming and going. Yes I saw some at Lowe's, just yesterday, day before. $17 for just the standard Lowe's gallon pot. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. But they're great when you can get them going and established. There's nothing else really happening in the garden at that time. That's true. So it is that kind of like-- I guess I think I plant them more for myself, because it's like, oh, here's something! [LAUGH] You know, spring is here. Anything else that you wanted to share? I started growing them because all my brides were asking for green-- Oh, OK! --and green flowers. Right, right. So, I needed something green, and there's only so many green flowers. And in June, and in May, perfect green flowers. Yeah, yeah. I also use the leaves. Mhm! Yeah, I love these. Mhm. These are so great. I'm not sure how you use them, exactly, but I like to use them low in arrangements, over the rim of the container, to frame some of the larger flowers. And the leaves you can use all season long. I might be-- am I destroying my plant by clipping from the leaves after they've bloomed? Maybe a little bit. [LAUGH] If it's a big plant, I think they can handle it. They can handle it? Mhm? OK, great! Well, I just wanted to share, again, this book. It's called Hellebores, a Comprehensive Guide. Burrell and Tyler are the authors on this. And it is one of the American Horticultural Society award-winning books. And you hop over-- this was at the Royal Horticultural Society gardens, in England. Whenever I was there, they have-- this is one of the ones that they have in their library. But it's a comprehensive guide. And there's all kinds of great resources in here and a lifetime of several people that are kind of summarized in here. And also, what we've got is, there's a plant trial, back here, that John Dole from NC State headed up, in the appendix-- which I guess I don't-- there's a little nutrient study, here, in C. Back here, in Appendix D of this book, there was a study that Fanelli and John Dole from NC State, the Department of Horticulture Science, put together-- a little experiment using hellebores as a cut flower. And their results-- and you can see all of, you know, what their control was and their temperature and all those kinds of things. But 17 and 1/2 days is where they landed. They were experimenting with cut-flower preservatives. So, like, not the Quick Dip specifically, but those kinds of hydrating solutions and holding solutions, versus when you're cutting the plant. Because, for almost-- a lot of people-- and Susan, you know, I would consider one of them-- that cutting them later, you know, finds that there's really not a whole lot of problem, once they've got those seed pods on them. So, that's what he was testing. You know, was there a notable difference between if the seed pods were developed versus if they weren't? And he didn't seem to find a major-- in this study, he didn't see a major difference. But it doesn't mean that there might not be for someone else. Like, this one's starting to form a seed pod. So I would prefer to use one like that, because it's a little more leathery. Sure, mhm. And I would assume that it would last longer than one that still has all its anthers. Very delicate and soft. Mhm. Exactly. John was using a hydrating solution and a holding solution. A holding solution is a professional solution you can get from Floralife, is the one he uses. Oh, and I think he did-- actually, in this experiment, I think he used-- And Chrysal. Yeah, I think he used both-- like, the kind of equivalents of both brands-- and didn't see a big difference. Basically, they have less sugar in them than the standard Floralife that you would get in the little packets. So that's really the main difference. The hydrator is just a solution you leave them in for several hours. And it's similar to Quick Dip-- Mhm, but the plant just sits in it for a while. --just a different brand. OK. Why do you think people-- why do you think that, like, higher sugar content that you would get in a packet, if you were buying flowers from a florist or something, why wouldn't it be the lower sugar count, if that actually makes them last longer? Yes. Because, when you give somebody regular Floralife, with a lot of sugar, that's carbohydrates. So that feeds the flower, and it also makes it continue to mature. OK. So, if you're a flower grower or a florist, you just want to hold that in stasis. So you just barely want to feed it. You don't want it to continue to mature, and you don't want to feed the bacteria. Of course, there's things in there to keep the bacteria from growing. But that's why they give it very little sugar. OK. And then the home person gets the product with the sugar. Right. So then they're really seeing kind of the best parts of the plant, and the rest of the life cycle of it, I guess. And most flowers are cut in bud, so you want them to stay in bud till they get to where they're going. Right And then that extra sugar lets them open. Mhm. Perfect! Well, thank you so much, Susan, for popping on to join us, today, and to talk about hellebores a little bit. This has been really fun. And we're excited to share these beautiful things with you. So, best of luck on your hellebore planting that you have coming up. And you let us know if you have any questions.
 
 
 
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The top 10 tomato growing tips which will help you grow the best tomatoes ever

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 191 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

  
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growing fresh big and delicious tomatoes in your garden is not only easy but very rewarding in today's episode we look at 10 tomato growing tips that will help you grow your best tomatoes ever so sit back and enjoy this journey to tomato well so in this popular video that I had posted almost four years ago this is one of my most viewed videos I did receive a lot of comments especially for the fact that there was no talk during the video I'm trying to address most of those issues in this new video today's episode is divided into these 10 sections and I'm sure that once you go through these 10 sections you will have a great idea about how to grow great tomatoes in your garden so first let's look at the container sizes for tomatoes if you have growing tomatoes in raised beds or the ground you don't need to worry about container size however if you're growing your tomatoes in pots or containers let's look at what's the ideal size the minimum size of a container should be 16 inches what you see here is a 16 inch wide container and I recommend this as a bare minimum for growing tomatoes this sized container has enough room for the tomato plant to grow very well for the entire season and it was about 7 gallons of soil 7 to 8 gallons now the ideal container size for growing tomatoes is a whiskey barrel container the one that you see here on your screen right now and the whiskey barrel container is good for one tomato plant only I know a lot of people who plant two or three plants in one container that will not let your tomato plant grow very well because the roots won't have a lot of space to grow so the ideal container size for tomato is this whiskey barrel container and I'll provide links to some of the containers in the video description below so you can buy them but this is the ideal container size the shape doesn't really matter this is a square shaped container which contains about 8 gallons of soil and this is good enough to grow one tomato plant now if you do not have any space or just want the least container size possible you can grow tomatoes in a five-gallon container what you see here and I recommend that you only grow determinate tomato varieties in this kind of a container and we look at the determinate tomato varieties and in it determinate tomato varieties in the future sections of this video now let us talk about the planting technique a very important step in growing great Tomatoes make sure that when you're planting your Tomatoes you plant them firstly in a decently sized container or in the ground or the raised bed as we discussed in the previous section and when you take your plant out of the container make sure that you plant the tomato plant deep as deep as you can now why is that the tomato plant actually will grow roots all along the sides of its stem if you plant it deep so this is like giving a boost to the root system for your Tomatoes and this applies not only to containers but also to plant that you grow in raised beds or in the ground if you plant your tomato plants deep enough they will Bend a very strong root system they will also stay very still and firm and upright during storms and heavy winds so that's another advantage of planting your plants deep now let's look at the soil that you need to grow tomatoes so if you're growing in the ground you don't really have much choice but to amend your soil but when you're growing in containers let's look at the different types of soils that are available to your tomato plants the first mix that you're going to see is a common mix that I use for most of my tomato plants and containers and that is a mix of compost perlite and peat moss and once you have these three in equal proportions you can add amendments like azomite as you can see here we are adding some azomite here even add some organic tomato fertilizer before you plant your Tomatoes it's a good way to prepare your potting mix for your Tomatoes now let me tell you why I like this mix not only for tomatoes but other container plants firstly it's a very lightweight mix it has a lot of porosity because of the added perlite you can even use vermiculite if you want and the compost helps in moisture retention the compost and the peat moss together form a GERD water retentive mix so your potting mix is light and it is also water retentive it's a great combination to grow your plants and now let's take a look at a fast draining potting mix that will give you even more vigorous growth at an expense though which I will shortly explain you for this potting mix you need five parts of ground cover bark or wood chips which you can find at most home improvement stores you need one part of peat moss and one part of perlite now as long as you're mixing your ingredients in this proportion you will have a very fast planing mix you also need to add some garden lime to this mix because peat moss is slightly acidic and the garden lime actually helps reduce the acidity of the peat moss but you still need to test your soil pH once you have created the mix now mix all the ingredients together and what you get is a very lightweight very high draining potting mix and this will help your plants grow very fast it has a lot of space for the roots to grow I usually moist in this mix before I put it in my containers because it's so dry and here you can see it is such a nice looking potting mix and let's look at the pros and cons so the benefits of using this potting mix is that it lets your plant grow to their full genetic potential but the downside is that it requires a lot of watering because it's a very fast training mix you might need to water your plants once or even twice or hot days and then you also need to add a lot of fertilizer to your tomato plants or liquid fertilizer if you're using this mix because the nutrients get drained very quickly from this potting mix but if you have the time and the energy and the effort to use this mix go for it you won't be disappointed now soil for raised beds is slightly different than the one you use for containers soils for raised bed should have a lot of organic matter a lot of compost and a lot of soil mixed into it as well what I'm doing here is adding some leaves dried leaves and then adding some layer of soil and then also adding some more compost on the top this is my homemade compost and then I cover it with another layer of soil now by using this kind of a mix for your raised beds a layered mix it will give you the best results to grow tomatoes not only tomatoes but other vegetables as well but tomatoes benefit immensely from such a raised bed mix with a lot of organic matter once all this is mixed in just make sure you lay it out very well on your raised bed just top it off with some soil and you're ready to plant your Tomatoes compost has a lot of nutrients a lot of beneficial nutrients as well as a lot of microorganisms earthworms and other soil bacteria that are very helpful for your tomato plants so I highly recommend that you keep adding compost to your raised bed as much as you can another important component of your soil is your soil pH the ideal pH for tomatoes is between 6 to 7 and you can easily buy a soil testing kit see the video description for a product link to test your soil to get the best tomatoes a good watering schedule is the next most important thing for tomato plants now I recommend that you put your tomato plants on a drip irrigation schedule especially if you're growing in containers containers can dry up very fast depending on what kind of mix you use and by putting your tomatoes on a drip irrigation schedule you take the guesswork out of watering your plants the thumb rule is to water for just enough time that the container starts to drain from the bottom so it's about three minutes for me for most of my containers I use a wider emitter as you can see here these disky barrels have a lot more space so I use these emitters which throw out more water and when you are irrigating raised beds make sure you use micro sprinklers and then make sure that they run for at least about seven minutes for deep watering your tomato plants a lot of people are very afraid of over watering your tomato plants but don't worry in hot places like California and Florida for example you do need to water your tomato plants very well otherwise they will not grow that well and will not produce good tomatoes fertilizers or the next important thing to ensure the good growth of your tomato plants there are two types of fertilizers organic fertilizers and synthetic fertilizers each one of them has pros and cons and we'll soon see that organic fertilizers like this one that you see here are made from the byproducts of the animal industry and mostly consists of feathers bones blood some fertilizers even contain the remnants of fish which is a fish fertilizer so mostly animal based products although there are some products that contain like seaweed which is a plant based product now let's look at the pros and cons of using an organic tomato fertilizer the best thing is that it's good for the environment it's made from natural ingredients and they're slow releasing naturally so you don't have the problem of over applying a fertilizer to your plant the downside is that they are not immediately available to your plant and it might take up to four to six months for organic fertilizers to be available so to make organic fertilizers effective you need to apply them at regular intervals to your containers to your raised beds so that they are available in time when the plants need them the next type of fertilizers are the synthetic or the salt based fertilizers which are manufactured and most of my friends who use these kind of fertilizers are either vegans vegetarians or do not support the animal slaughter industry and let's look at the pros and cons of this fertilizer the benefit of this fertilizer salt based fertilizers or synthetic fertilizers is that they are readily available to the clients as soon as you apply it and some of them can even be a slow-release fertilizer which will last for up to three months downside is that when a lot of salt leeches into the water table it's not so good for the environment so if you are concerned about the environment and again this is up for debate because there's no real proof that synthetic fertilizers are really bad for the planet but if you do believe in that then I would recommend that you use organic fertilizers for the best use and to grow the best tomatoes and here is another tip when your plants are small and just beginning to grow use a high nitrogen fertilizer they are also called all-purpose fertilizers when your plants are established and they start flowering switch to a low nitrogen fertilizer that will help you grow a lot of tomatoes rather than growing greens your plants will produce a lot of tomatoes let's now look at some of the problems that you face when growing tomatoes insects the tomato hornworm is one of the most destructive tomato pests so if you see this large caterpillar just handpick and remove it otherwise it will just decimate your crop grubs are bite insects that are beneath the soil surface and chew on your tomato roots they also attract moles and Gophers and when they become adults they become the fig eater beetle which will devour your Tomatoes now let's look at some fungal diseases on Tomatoes rust which are brown powdery residues on the leaves and which are very evident here is one of the most common fungal diseases that you see on Tomatoes to prevent rust just remove the affected leaves the diseased leaves and then spray with neem oil to prevent this rust from spreading the next most common fungal disease is the leaf blight which will cause your tomato leaves to get yellow and diseased now the leaf blight doesn't really have a big effect on your yields of tomatoes however it's something that will make your plant look unsightly so here you can see some more leaf blight and it looks pretty similar to some of the other viral diseases that tomato has but in all cases these are mostly fungal diseases which will cause your leaves to get yellow tomatoes also are prone to some viral diseases like the leaf curl that you see here and although the leaf curl again doesn't really affect the vigor of the tomato plant it does make the plant to look a little unsightly as you can see here the leaves have curled and these viral diseases are usually transmitted by pests so the only solution to the viral diseases is to replace the plant and plant a new one for the fungal diseases you can spray with neem oil a very effective way to get rid of most fungal diseases for your tomato plants and it's organic as well so you can add one capful of neem oil to the water that's there in the small sprayer or if you're using a gallon sprayer for every gallon of water add 2 tablespoons of neem oil and then shake your container will shake your sprayer very well and then spray on your tomato plants this stops most of the fungal diseases on your tomato plants now make sure that you do this late in the day although neem doesn't have any effect on bees you still want to be careful so do this late in the day when the bees are not active in your garden what you see here is blossom and wrought a problem that affects both peppers and tomatoes what you're seeing here is blossom and rot on some peppers and you'll also see the blossom end rot on some Tomatoes like the Roma tomatoes San Marzano and the solution to blossom end rot is to first of all use a good watering schedule make sure that you use a fertilizer that's rich in calcium and that should help you prevent blossom end rot birds love your tomatoes just as much as you do so to prevent birds from eating your tomatoes just cover it with this net and this is also helpful to prevent your tomatoes from being eaten by rodents you can also leave a little bit of water a birdbath near your tomato plant and since the birds usually attack your tomato plants for the water or the seeds they will leave your tomatoes alone when they see the water now rodents also can decimate your tomato plant and if you see damage like this you probably have more than one rodent in your garden the solution is something I'm not going to discuss in this video there are a lot of ways you can get rid of rodents in your garden now let's look at some tomato varieties tomatoes are broadly classified as determinate and indeterminate depending on how they grow determinate tomatoes grow to a certain height and then produce tomatoes all at once in determinate tomatoes rather keep growing and keep producing tomatoes for a long time now there are some other varieties of tomatoes as well which you see on your screen and we're not going to go into the details of each variety because there are just too many types of tomatoes that exist now let's look at some common tomato varieties that you can grow for the first time gardener the early girl or the better boy variety is not only very easy to grow it also produces a lot of tomatoes so if you're starting out this is a great variety that I would recommend and the next variety that I highly recommend is the honey Gold tomato which is a yellow tomato that's really sweet and very prolific it's very similar to the Sun gold Tomatoes righty and produces a lot of delicious yellow color tomatoes the Juliette hybrid tomato was bred specifically for producing great fruits and having great disease resistance this is another very prolific tomato variety that you can grow in your home garden and I'm sure you won't be disappointed when you grow this variety this is a great type tomato and produces these grape sized red tomatoes that are absolutely delicious and the best part about growing the Juliet tomato is that it grows very well in a container you can grow one Juliet tomato plant in a whiskey barrel container and it will give you the best yield that you've ever seen from a tomato plant this is a very prolific variety produces lot of fruits and can withstand both high temperatures and cold weather the San Marzano is a very delicious taste kind of tomato that makes great ketchups and tomato sauces and paste this is another very prolific variety it's a heirloom variety which will give you a really good yield a lot of chefs just value the taste of this tomato and it really is absolutely delicious so try growing the san marzano at home and you will be pleasantly surprised now let's look at some other hybrid varieties this is the red pride hybrid tomato and remember that the hybrid tomatoes are just natural selection of tomato plants by crossbreeding across plants that are good in some way or the other the mountain pride hybrid is another example of a great tomato variety grows excellent in containers produces these large Tomatoes as you see here and for those of you who are looking to grow tomatoes with a large size the mountain pride hybrid is an excellent tomato variety to grow as you see here these are very large tomatoes and yielding from just one plant the Cherokee purple is a heirloom tomato variety heirlooms are tomatoes that have been bred over several years and they have always been grown from the seeds of the previous generation and that's what gives these Tomatoes an excellent taste they don't have great disease resistance but they taste really good the Cherokee purple is a purple color tomato that is very delicious as well a lot of people like the acidic taste of this tomato variety and that is what hair looms are famous for they taste excellent they don't have great disease resistance but they are very delicious the black creme is another example of a heirloom tomato variety not very easy to grow very challenging but produces some fruits that are very delicious now let's look at the propagation methods for tomato now you all know that tomatoes can be grown from seed that is the most ideal way to grow tomatoes you just start your seeds indoors 6 weeks before the growing season and then transplant them into containers after which you can transplant them to larger containers to the raised bed or the ground the other propagation method is to just plant some stocks of tomatoes now when you're pruning your tomato plants which you will do anyways you get these a tomato shoots which are cut from the plant all you do is just take a container and then plant your tomatoes stock into this container and what you get is another tomato plant which is very much identical to the parent plant so this is a great way to propagate Tomatoes and it is really a very easy way to propagate Tomatoes tomatoes do need to be staked and pruned and let's look at the pruning technique first now I usually prune tomatoes that I grow in my containers but I generally do not prune Tomatoes that are growing in the ground however a little bit of pruning is still okay just look around your plants and find these suckers that you see and try to cut them so that they don't over grow and don't cause a plant that you cannot manage however there is no hard and fast rule even if you do not prune your tomato plants you're still going to get a good harvest but pruning lets you maintain a better shape for your plant and in case of determinate tomatoes or in case of growing tomatoes in containers it helps you maintain the size of your tomato plants and remember to prune the dead leaves and branches from the bottom part of your tomato plant this improves air flow to your plant and keeps it free from a lot of diseases and pests so with the simple technique you can keep your tomato plants disease-free staking or supporting your tomato plants will let you grow vertically which is a great benefit the most common type of steak that we use is the four prong steak and this steak is very cheaply available in most garden stores the key to using this steak is to make sure that it goes down all the way into the ground what you do not want to do is leave the steak just Midway or not fully into the ground that way it doesn't work really well so what you do is just take the support and push the prongs deep into the soil and that really gives you a good support for your tomato plants the ultimate of cage is the other tomato cage that's very commonly available and it was great on 16-inch containers and it is almost perfectly sized for a container of this size for whiskey barrel containers I prefer to use the grow tall tomato cage which is pretty good-sized and just big enough for a whiskey barrel and comparing all the staking techniques together the four thong stake is pretty cheap but the grow tall tomato cage that you see here is actually very useful and can support very heavy tomato plants now let's get into some tips and tricks for growing tomatoes Epsom salt and organic amendment for your soil and it's very beneficial for tomatoes it contains magnesium and sulfur and most soils are deficient of these minerals and plants like tomatoes and peppers take up a lot of magnesium and sulfur so do feed your plants with Epsom salt once every three weeks and to prepare the solution we use two tablespoons in a two gallon container so it means that you add one tablespoon per gallon of water and then just add water let the Epsom salt dissolve in the water and then completely drench your plant with this Epsom salt solution and if you do this every three weeks or so you make sure that your soil stays very enriched with magnesium and sulfur and that will give you the best tomatoes once your tomato plant starts blooming it's important to hand pollinate your Tomatoes watch for open flowers and then just use a vibrating toothbrush to pollinate each flower of your tomato plant this dramatically increases yields tomatoes are mostly when pollinated but by using this technique you ensure more fruit production for your tomato plants and that brings us to the end of this episode and I'm sure that by watching all of this information about growing tomatoes you might have a lot of questions so do post them in the comment box below if you like our videos please do give us a thumbs up and we'll see you again soon happy gardening


 
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growing fresh big and delicious tomatoes in your garden is not only easy but very rewarding in today's episode we look at 10 tomato growing tips that will help you grow your best tomatoes ever so sit back and enjoy this journey to tomato well so in this popular video that I had posted almost four years ago this is one of my most viewed videos I did receive a lot of comments especially for the fact that there was no talk during the video I'm trying to address most of those issues in this new video today's episode is divided into these 10 sections and I'm sure that once you go through these 10 sections you will have a great idea about how to grow great tomatoes in your garden so first let's look at the container sizes for tomatoes if you have growing tomatoes in raised beds or the ground you don't need to worry about container size however if you're growing your tomatoes in pots or containers let's look at what's the ideal size the minimum size of a container should be 16 inches what you see here is a 16 inch wide container and I recommend this as a bare minimum for growing tomatoes this sized container has enough room for the tomato plant to grow very well for the entire season and it was about 7 gallons of soil 7 to 8 gallons now the ideal container size for growing tomatoes is a whiskey barrel container the one that you see here on your screen right now and the whiskey barrel container is good for one tomato plant only I know a lot of people who plant two or three plants in one container that will not let your tomato plant grow very well because the roots won't have a lot of space to grow so the ideal container size for tomato is this whiskey barrel container and I'll provide links to some of the containers in the video description below so you can buy them but this is the ideal container size the shape doesn't really matter this is a square shaped container which contains about 8 gallons of soil and this is good enough to grow one tomato plant now if you do not have any space or just want the least container size possible you can grow tomatoes in a five-gallon container what you see here and I recommend that you only grow determinate tomato varieties in this kind of a container and we look at the determinate tomato varieties and in it determinate tomato varieties in the future sections of this video now let us talk about the planting technique a very important step in growing great Tomatoes make sure that when you're planting your Tomatoes you plant them firstly in a decently sized container or in the ground or the raised bed as we discussed in the previous section and when you take your plant out of the container make sure that you plant the tomato plant deep as deep as you can now why is that the tomato plant actually will grow roots all along the sides of its stem if you plant it deep so this is like giving a boost to the root system for your Tomatoes and this applies not only to containers but also to plant that you grow in raised beds or in the ground if you plant your tomato plants deep enough they will Bend a very strong root system they will also stay very still and firm and upright during storms and heavy winds so that's another advantage of planting your plants deep now let's look at the soil that you need to grow tomatoes so if you're growing in the ground you don't really have much choice but to amend your soil but when you're growing in containers let's look at the different types of soils that are available to your tomato plants the first mix that you're going to see is a common mix that I use for most of my tomato plants and containers and that is a mix of compost perlite and peat moss and once you have these three in equal proportions you can add amendments like azomite as you can see here we are adding some azomite here even add some organic tomato fertilizer before you plant your Tomatoes it's a good way to prepare your potting mix for your Tomatoes now let me tell you why I like this mix not only for tomatoes but other container plants firstly it's a very lightweight mix it has a lot of porosity because of the added perlite you can even use vermiculite if you want and the compost helps in moisture retention the compost and the peat moss together form a GERD water retentive mix so your potting mix is light and it is also water retentive it's a great combination to grow your plants and now let's take a look at a fast draining potting mix that will give you even more vigorous growth at an expense though which I will shortly explain you for this potting mix you need five parts of ground cover bark or wood chips which you can find at most home improvement stores you need one part of peat moss and one part of perlite now as long as you're mixing your ingredients in this proportion you will have a very fast planing mix you also need to add some garden lime to this mix because peat moss is slightly acidic and the garden lime actually helps reduce the acidity of the peat moss but you still need to test your soil pH once you have created the mix now mix all the ingredients together and what you get is a very lightweight very high draining potting mix and this will help your plants grow very fast it has a lot of space for the roots to grow I usually moist in this mix before I put it in my containers because it's so dry and here you can see it is such a nice looking potting mix and let's look at the pros and cons so the benefits of using this potting mix is that it lets your plant grow to their full genetic potential but the downside is that it requires a lot of watering because it's a very fast training mix you might need to water your plants once or even twice or hot days and then you also need to add a lot of fertilizer to your tomato plants or liquid fertilizer if you're using this mix because the nutrients get drained very quickly from this potting mix but if you have the time and the energy and the effort to use this mix go for it you won't be disappointed now soil for raised beds is slightly different than the one you use for containers soils for raised bed should have a lot of organic matter a lot of compost and a lot of soil mixed into it as well what I'm doing here is adding some leaves dried leaves and then adding some layer of soil and then also adding some more compost on the top this is my homemade compost and then I cover it with another layer of soil now by using this kind of a mix for your raised beds a layered mix it will give you the best results to grow tomatoes not only tomatoes but other vegetables as well but tomatoes benefit immensely from such a raised bed mix with a lot of organic matter once all this is mixed in just make sure you lay it out very well on your raised bed just top it off with some soil and you're ready to plant your Tomatoes compost has a lot of nutrients a lot of beneficial nutrients as well as a lot of microorganisms earthworms and other soil bacteria that are very helpful for your tomato plants so I highly recommend that you keep adding compost to your raised bed as much as you can another important component of your soil is your soil pH the ideal pH for tomatoes is between 6 to 7 and you can easily buy a soil testing kit see the video description for a product link to test your soil to get the best tomatoes a good watering schedule is the next most important thing for tomato plants now I recommend that you put your tomato plants on a drip irrigation schedule especially if you're growing in containers containers can dry up very fast depending on what kind of mix you use and by putting your tomatoes on a drip irrigation schedule you take the guesswork out of watering your plants the thumb rule is to water for just enough time that the container starts to drain from the bottom so it's about three minutes for me for most of my containers I use a wider emitter as you can see here these disky barrels have a lot more space so I use these emitters which throw out more water and when you are irrigating raised beds make sure you use micro sprinklers and then make sure that they run for at least about seven minutes for deep watering your tomato plants a lot of people are very afraid of over watering your tomato plants but don't worry in hot places like California and Florida for example you do need to water your tomato plants very well otherwise they will not grow that well and will not produce good tomatoes fertilizers or the next important thing to ensure the good growth of your tomato plants there are two types of fertilizers organic fertilizers and synthetic fertilizers each one of them has pros and cons and we'll soon see that organic fertilizers like this one that you see here are made from the byproducts of the animal industry and mostly consists of feathers bones blood some fertilizers even contain the remnants of fish which is a fish fertilizer so mostly animal based products although there are some products that contain like seaweed which is a plant based product now let's look at the pros and cons of using an organic tomato fertilizer the best thing is that it's good for the environment it's made from natural ingredients and they're slow releasing naturally so you don't have the problem of over applying a fertilizer to your plant the downside is that they are not immediately available to your plant and it might take up to four to six months for organic fertilizers to be available so to make organic fertilizers effective you need to apply them at regular intervals to your containers to your raised beds so that they are available in time when the plants need them the next type of fertilizers are the synthetic or the salt based fertilizers which are manufactured and most of my friends who use these kind of fertilizers are either vegans vegetarians or do not support the animal slaughter industry and let's look at the pros and cons of this fertilizer the benefit of this fertilizer salt based fertilizers or synthetic fertilizers is that they are readily available to the clients as soon as you apply it and some of them can even be a slow-release fertilizer which will last for up to three months downside is that when a lot of salt leeches into the water table it's not so good for the environment so if you are concerned about the environment and again this is up for debate because there's no real proof that synthetic fertilizers are really bad for the planet but if you do believe in that then I would recommend that you use organic fertilizers for the best use and to grow the best tomatoes and here is another tip when your plants are small and just beginning to grow use a high nitrogen fertilizer they are also called all-purpose fertilizers when your plants are established and they start flowering switch to a low nitrogen fertilizer that will help you grow a lot of tomatoes rather than growing greens your plants will produce a lot of tomatoes let's now look at some of the problems that you face when growing tomatoes insects the tomato hornworm is one of the most destructive tomato pests so if you see this large caterpillar just handpick and remove it otherwise it will just decimate your crop grubs are bite insects that are beneath the soil surface and chew on your tomato roots they also attract moles and Gophers and when they become adults they become the fig eater beetle which will devour your Tomatoes now let's look at some fungal diseases on Tomatoes rust which are brown powdery residues on the leaves and which are very evident here is one of the most common fungal diseases that you see on Tomatoes to prevent rust just remove the affected leaves the diseased leaves and then spray with neem oil to prevent this rust from spreading the next most common fungal disease is the leaf blight which will cause your tomato leaves to get yellow and diseased now the leaf blight doesn't really have a big effect on your yields of tomatoes however it's something that will make your plant look unsightly so here you can see some more leaf blight and it looks pretty similar to some of the other viral diseases that tomato has but in all cases these are mostly fungal diseases which will cause your leaves to get yellow tomatoes also are prone to some viral diseases like the leaf curl that you see here and although the leaf curl again doesn't really affect the vigor of the tomato plant it does make the plant to look a little unsightly as you can see here the leaves have curled and these viral diseases are usually transmitted by pests so the only solution to the viral diseases is to replace the plant and plant a new one for the fungal diseases you can spray with neem oil a very effective way to get rid of most fungal diseases for your tomato plants and it's organic as well so you can add one capful of neem oil to the water that's there in the small sprayer or if you're using a gallon sprayer for every gallon of water add 2 tablespoons of neem oil and then shake your container will shake your sprayer very well and then spray on your tomato plants this stops most of the fungal diseases on your tomato plants now make sure that you do this late in the day although neem doesn't have any effect on bees you still want to be careful so do this late in the day when the bees are not active in your garden what you see here is blossom and wrought a problem that affects both peppers and tomatoes what you're seeing here is blossom and rot on some peppers and you'll also see the blossom end rot on some Tomatoes like the Roma tomatoes San Marzano and the solution to blossom end rot is to first of all use a good watering schedule make sure that you use a fertilizer that's rich in calcium and that should help you prevent blossom end rot birds love your tomatoes just as much as you do so to prevent birds from eating your tomatoes just cover it with this net and this is also helpful to prevent your tomatoes from being eaten by rodents you can also leave a little bit of water a birdbath near your tomato plant and since the birds usually attack your tomato plants for the water or the seeds they will leave your tomatoes alone when they see the water now rodents also can decimate your tomato plant and if you see damage like this you probably have more than one rodent in your garden the solution is something I'm not going to discuss in this video there are a lot of ways you can get rid of rodents in your garden now let's look at some tomato varieties tomatoes are broadly classified as determinate and indeterminate depending on how they grow determinate tomatoes grow to a certain height and then produce tomatoes all at once in determinate tomatoes rather keep growing and keep producing tomatoes for a long time now there are some other varieties of tomatoes as well which you see on your screen and we're not going to go into the details of each variety because there are just too many types of tomatoes that exist now let's look at some common tomato varieties that you can grow for the first time gardener the early girl or the better boy variety is not only very easy to grow it also produces a lot of tomatoes so if you're starting out this is a great variety that I would recommend and the next variety that I highly recommend is the honey Gold tomato which is a yellow tomato that's really sweet and very prolific it's very similar to the Sun gold Tomatoes righty and produces a lot of delicious yellow color tomatoes the Juliette hybrid tomato was bred specifically for producing great fruits and having great disease resistance this is another very prolific tomato variety that you can grow in your home garden and I'm sure you won't be disappointed when you grow this variety this is a great type tomato and produces these grape sized red tomatoes that are absolutely delicious and the best part about growing the Juliet tomato is that it grows very well in a container you can grow one Juliet tomato plant in a whiskey barrel container and it will give you the best yield that you've ever seen from a tomato plant this is a very prolific variety produces lot of fruits and can withstand both high temperatures and cold weather the San Marzano is a very delicious taste kind of tomato that makes great ketchups and tomato sauces and paste this is another very prolific variety it's a heirloom variety which will give you a really good yield a lot of chefs just value the taste of this tomato and it really is absolutely delicious so try growing the san marzano at home and you will be pleasantly surprised now let's look at some other hybrid varieties this is the red pride hybrid tomato and remember that the hybrid tomatoes are just natural selection of tomato plants by crossbreeding across plants that are good in some way or the other the mountain pride hybrid is another example of a great tomato variety grows excellent in containers produces these large Tomatoes as you see here and for those of you who are looking to grow tomatoes with a large size the mountain pride hybrid is an excellent tomato variety to grow as you see here these are very large tomatoes and yielding from just one plant the Cherokee purple is a heirloom tomato variety heirlooms are tomatoes that have been bred over several years and they have always been grown from the seeds of the previous generation and that's what gives these Tomatoes an excellent taste they don't have great disease resistance but they taste really good the Cherokee purple is a purple color tomato that is very delicious as well a lot of people like the acidic taste of this tomato variety and that is what hair looms are famous for they taste excellent they don't have great disease resistance but they are very delicious the black creme is another example of a heirloom tomato variety not very easy to grow very challenging but produces some fruits that are very delicious now let's look at the propagation methods for tomato now you all know that tomatoes can be grown from seed that is the most ideal way to grow tomatoes you just start your seeds indoors 6 weeks before the growing season and then transplant them into containers after which you can transplant them to larger containers to the raised bed or the ground the other propagation method is to just plant some stocks of tomatoes now when you're pruning your tomato plants which you will do anyways you get these a tomato shoots which are cut from the plant all you do is just take a container and then plant your tomatoes stock into this container and what you get is another tomato plant which is very much identical to the parent plant so this is a great way to propagate Tomatoes and it is really a very easy way to propagate Tomatoes tomatoes do need to be staked and pruned and let's look at the pruning technique first now I usually prune tomatoes that I grow in my containers but I generally do not prune Tomatoes that are growing in the ground however a little bit of pruning is still okay just look around your plants and find these suckers that you see and try to cut them so that they don't over grow and don't cause a plant that you cannot manage however there is no hard and fast rule even if you do not prune your tomato plants you're still going to get a good harvest but pruning lets you maintain a better shape for your plant and in case of determinate tomatoes or in case of growing tomatoes in containers it helps you maintain the size of your tomato plants and remember to prune the dead leaves and branches from the bottom part of your tomato plant this improves air flow to your plant and keeps it free from a lot of diseases and pests so with the simple technique you can keep your tomato plants disease-free staking or supporting your tomato plants will let you grow vertically which is a great benefit the most common type of steak that we use is the four prong steak and this steak is very cheaply available in most garden stores the key to using this steak is to make sure that it goes down all the way into the ground what you do not want to do is leave the steak just Midway or not fully into the ground that way it doesn't work really well so what you do is just take the support and push the prongs deep into the soil and that really gives you a good support for your tomato plants the ultimate of cage is the other tomato cage that's very commonly available and it was great on 16-inch containers and it is almost perfectly sized for a container of this size for whiskey barrel containers I prefer to use the grow tall tomato cage which is pretty good-sized and just big enough for a whiskey barrel and comparing all the staking techniques together the four thong stake is pretty cheap but the grow tall tomato cage that you see here is actually very useful and can support very heavy tomato plants now let's get into some tips and tricks for growing tomatoes Epsom salt and organic amendment for your soil and it's very beneficial for tomatoes it contains magnesium and sulfur and most soils are deficient of these minerals and plants like tomatoes and peppers take up a lot of magnesium and sulfur so do feed your plants with Epsom salt once every three weeks and to prepare the solution we use two tablespoons in a two gallon container so it means that you add one tablespoon per gallon of water and then just add water let the Epsom salt dissolve in the water and then completely drench your plant with this Epsom salt solution and if you do this every three weeks or so you make sure that your soil stays very enriched with magnesium and sulfur and that will give you the best tomatoes once your tomato plant starts blooming it's important to hand pollinate your Tomatoes watch for open flowers and then just use a vibrating toothbrush to pollinate each flower of your tomato plant this dramatically increases yields tomatoes are mostly when pollinated but by using this technique you ensure more fruit production for your tomato plants and that brings us to the end of this episode and I'm sure that by watching all of this information about growing tomatoes you might have a lot of questions so do post them in the comment box below if you like our videos please do give us a thumbs up and we'll see you again soon happy gardening


 
 
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how to grows veggies without adding any fertilizer or Soil Amendments.

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 108 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
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Alright this is John Kohler from growingyourgreens.com to bring you another exciting episode for you. I'm still here in Houston and I don't know what area in Houston it is, but doesn't looks like, you know, the best of neighbourhoods. But anyways, what I'm going to do today is actually visit the house right behind me, not the one over there with the bananas in the front, but this one behind the white fence there, the doors open, that has a red truck. This is going to be a interesting episode actually, this episode may challenge the beliefs you guys have about gardening. It's challenging some of the beliefs I have about gardening as well. So, the guy here, Tino, is actually from Greece and he's been growing, he's using little kid, he's been actually on this property about for last 4 to 5 years, when he's been actually growing food here. He does thing little bit differently, let me tell you this story actually. I first met Tino when I was actually at the Farm Dirt Compost, the place, and the guy their introduced me to him and he was like " You gotta meet this guy " and I was like driving off and I was kind of in a rush, because I had to like, you know get back to what I was doing, and he was like trying to tell me all this stuff and he was like, "You're gardening wrong! You don't need to add all the minerals, you don't need to add all the fertilizers, you don't need to draw and raise bed, It's all Wrong!" and I'm like, "Whoa, this guy is pretty interesting". But you know I'm always open like, even if somebody doesn't agree with me, that's fine. I know a lot of you guys may watch my videos and may not agree with everything I believe in, and that's fine. I'm just sharing my beliefs whether you want to believe what I believe, that's up to you guys right, totally up to you guys. But what I really like to do is I like to show many different styles of gardening, so that you guys could do whatever you want to do, right?, there's many kinds of gardener, I'm never going to say "Ooh this kind of gardening is the right way, this is the wrong way", depending on your particular situation, there are definitely better or worse ways to do it. So, actually in this situation, where we are here in Houston, with the given soil here, with the given climate, Tino's definitely figured out a way, you know, to garden and grow some food, actually with minimal inputs. Ok, so that was the first time I saw Tino and then I drove off. He didn't give me his contact and in front I'm like, maybe I'll run into that guy later. As luck turns out today, I was actually at the farmers market and he had a stand there, he was selling all kinds of plant starts, and actually he had the cheapest price for lettuce and other leafy greens at the market. It was like $5 for a nice size, flat of lettuce and other mixed greens that he was offering. So, we got to talking again and I'm like "Hey, what are you doing this afternoon?", he was like "Nothing", and I'm like "good can I come over and I want to see what you're doing and make a video". So, that's why I'm making a video for you guys to show you guy actually what he's doing, because he believes in, you know, gardening on the free and cheap, and I know that this is an episode a lot of you guys have been wanting for a long time, gardening on the free and cheap like, "John, you don't gotta waste money on that rock dust, you don't gotta bottle these worm castings, you don't gotta bottle these things that you garden", you could garden the free and cheap and it's not that hard. So, I don't wanna say that Tino is doing entirely free, there's a few things he brings in, but he actually brings in very few inputs for the impressive growth that he has and he does a lot of things himself, and builds things and he does a lot of techniques that I'm only gotta show you guys, maybe a few of them today, that actually in practices that he's done and learned overtime, by actually making mistakes, and that's why making mistakes is really good, because when you make a mistake, you learn how successfully not to do something. So, hopefully next time you'll do a bit better and he's actually even invented his little tools to do some of the things, you know , that he does, that I'll get to show you guys, that actually is quite impressive, actually that helped me out, it's something I'll be able to use now and save immense amounts of time. But yeah, he's definitely an interesting guy and he's from Greece and so I'm gonna call this episode, 'The Big Fat Greek Vegetable Garden Episode'. So let's go right behind the doors and show you guys what's growing on over here. So now we're at the gate for Tino's place here, and as you guys can see, he's got a nice white painted fence all the way around his property. This is not, maybe the nicest of areas so actually building a fence around your property, if you're able to do that, because I know that in some places you are not able to do that. Probably a good idea, right?, it keeps like stray animals and peoples from picking your stuff, but more importantly, also offers you guys some protection, form some of the elements, from some of the strong winds, he's blocking the wind with having a solid fence. Of course you could grow your own fence too, with many different plants and have trees and different things growing so tightly close together, which will be my first choice, rather than having a fence, just sitting here. Grow a living fence, it's actually gonna dig their roots in the soil and create further soil fertility. In any case, let's go beyond this fence and actually see what he's got growing on. Alright so now let's do a walk in to the yard here and as you guys could see, there is stuff growing everywhere, basically some are really long raise beds, he has lots of foods growing in all these raise beds and each bed is just a little bit different. But he does have some things that he does, you know, in all of them for sure, and as you guys could see , he also has a lot of plants starts. This is the back of his truck, he just got back from the farmers market. These are all the vegetables starts, he sells at the farmers market and this cooler right here, he basically just to harvest, just a part of his bed and it was like just full last night and he sold most of it at the farmers market, now he has this, some left over to eat for a salad for himself. But, you know, all that actually came from this bed over here, that he just clipped out and I'm looking at it and you could tell the clip from stuff out, but there's still so much more food in this bed. So, he says here this bed is about 45 Feet long and 4 Feet wide, it could feed about 5 people. So a family of 5, all the salad greens and greens they would want. So, I know a lot of you guys may have the space to do this. Let's see the other beds over here, this time of year, you know in December, he's growing lettuce primarily and some other leafy greens, dandelion, onions, some braska family plants and over on this side, he has all his nursery, starts that he's offering to people, and if he doesn't sell them, then he ends up planting them in his garden. So every gardener that I meet, there's things that we as gardeners can agree on and of course there's things that we may not agree on, where we have differences of opinion on, and that's alright, we're not gonna start World War III because we think that we should garden differently, that's alright. We can learn from each other, and I wanna encourage you guys in this episode to like, pick out the bits of things in this episode, that's gonna enhance your garden, and maybe even challenge your gardening style and to even adjust it, and make changes to improve what you're doing, and you know, maybe you believe in, what I'm gonna share with you guys today, maybe you don't. That's alright, I don't really care, but I want you guys to experiment, right, try some of the beds, how he's grown it. See if in your exact environment it actually grows better or maybe it's gonna grow worse, you know, than you're currently existing raise beds with sides. Anyways, one of the things that we both agree on here, Tino and me, is this guy, this roader tool, alright, he bought this, he used it a long time ago, but he no longer uses it to tiller, unless it's just maybe to clean up some of the in between the raised beds, but he does not till the soil. He believes in a no till method, this is very critical to both my style of gardening and Tino's style of gardening, you know. When you start disturbing the soil you lose fertility, you lose microbial life in there and these are the two things that we're trying to enhance with our gardening styles. Next I wanna show you guys, something else actually, that he used to do and that he actually gave up. That's maybe not exactly in agreeing to me, but that's alright because everybody has their own way of gardening. So one thing Tino doesn't do, is he doesn't create Compost Tea, he just simply doesn't believe in it. He tried it, he has a barrel here and what not, all the hoses and he used to create a Compost Tea but he didn't really see a difference, you know, with it. So he just basically discontinued the practise and you know I would say that maybe under ideal situation, when you got actually enough soil microbes in your garden, you might not need to use the Compost Tea, you know, I believe personally in diversity of microbes that, you know, can only be more beneficial, than not having them. But of course things are gonna grow with or without Compost Tea, things are gonna grow with or without, things like the rock dust. That I like to add, he doesn't even add the rock dust, doesn't believe in it and believe that you guys are wasting your money on rock dust, and that's cool, you know, we're gonna have a confrontation about that at the end of this, you know, he believes that all the nutrients are in the soil, and I agree, there's definitely nutrients in the soil, you know, and from what it looks like, things are growing really good. But I kind of wonder on like the, nutritional quality of the produce that is being grown, aside from just looking good, you know, if we did a breakdown of the nutrients in there, what would that look like. So that's what I think would be quite interesting to compare, lettuce at my garden, for example, compared to the lettuce at his garden, and kind of see where nutrition falls, and if the nutrition falls better in his favour maybe I'll abandon what I'm doing. But I don't know coz , you know, the thing for me is, like one of my main values with gardening is like, I almost lost my life, right, I've had major health condition and I'm totally, one of the main reasons why I'm gardening is to grow the highest quality food, or what I believe to be a highest quality food, and that's what I've have gone out and learned how to do, and that's what I share with you guys, and when I'm at my garden, but when I come to somebody else's garden, they might not have the same ideals as me. They might not have almost lost their life from a health condition, you know, they might not value their health as much as I do, so, they just wanna grow food on the free or cheap, but that's more important to them, and that's cool, you know, like, I'm not gonna tell you guys your values, I'm gonna tell you that, you know, in my opinion your life is the most valuable thing you guys own in the world, free and clear, and , you know, if you do things like smoking and maybe like, eat too many processed foods and junk foods, you know, that's gonna put your health in the toilet, and I don't choose to do that, but if you guys wanna do that, that's up to you, I don't really care. Anyways, let's show another thing, that actually both Tino and I both agree on. So now I'm inside Tino's house, and it's really just, you know, small house actually he said he converted his garage, that was his garage, into his living space and actually, the garden area that you guys just saw, he actually tore down a duplex that was outside. It was here like a 100 years, it was probably about time to either refurb it or tear it down, and he tore it down because he wanted to use the space instead of living for gardening and then just grow in a much and then actually live in a much smaller space, so his garden is actually about 5000 sq ft and his living space, I don't know, probably takes up the rest of the plot, maybe, I don't know, 3000 sq ft less, you know, just the walk ways is around the house or what not. So , you know, I wanna encourage you guys to , you know, he lives a minimalist lifestyle, he doesn't have much, he has a little bathroom, a little living area with a kitchen and a bedroom and stuff, and I think, you know, we've gotten too opulent in America and all these super huge houses, 2000, 4000 sq ft, and how much do you really use, how much you really need, it's just more space to fill up with junk you don't need. Anyways, one of the things he does in his kitchen is actually, he stores all his seeds on the top shelf there. You guys can see all the containers of seeds that he saves every year. So actually, the most of the things that he grows is actually from seeds that he saves. Of course, yes, he buys some seeds to get him started, but once he buys the seeds once, he grows that plant out too flourish him, saves the seeds and then he stores them up there and then he grows them out the following year. One of the things that actually he grows , actually that's quite good , is actually he'll go and buy produce from store and then he'll plant it. So, he's done this with green onions and he found that, green onions planted from the store didn't work so well. Instead what he found, were these guys, and these are like the little baby onions. They're called the pearl onions, and he likes these little pearl onions coz he'll just take these little pearl onions, that are like a couple bucks per bag, and there's a lots of these little onions here that most people might boil and eat or however they eat them. But he just takes these guys and he grows them out. So, now you just got, you know, I don't know, at least, like, several dozen plants for 2.50, and he says, these guys actually grow better than the green onions with the roots on them. So, yeah he definitely cuts a lot of cost, he's not growing on the total free but he's really doing it on a cheap. So, there's two main ways that Tino starts his seeds from, and these are the two ways that I use as well and would encourage you guys to use, right? Number one, he does direct seeding. Depending on what plant it is, he may direct seed them into his raised bed, I mean that's what I'm gonna show you guys now. So, he has a special technique for doing that, to, you know, preserve more soil moisture and to conserve water, you know, he uses sitting water here, I think, you should probably, maybe, catch some water off this roof, and what not to use that when he is able, but he uses sitting water and he only uses as much water as he needs, he doesn't like to use any excess water, and one of his beliefs is that, you gotta let fend for themselves. If you water your plants too much, their gonna be weak, their gonna be lazy, their roots are not gonna grow deep and seek out the water they need, as well as other nutrients in the soil, they need to fully thrive, and you know, overall actually, I do agree with that, you know, I think that's a good idea not to over-water plants, and many people, tend to over-water their plants which is definitely not a good thing in my opinion, and of course, it's not good to under-water your plants either. Anyways, as you guys could see, he's got one of his raised beds here, now, here's the thing, his raised beds, he does not have any sides on them, he does not believe in putting sides on your raised beds, because when you put a side on the raised beds, it may, you know, increase temperature a little bit, which is a pro, but he says the major con is, once it starts getting hot, you know, the sun will hit the sides of your raised beds, it'll heat up the soil, it'll cause more moisture loss inside the raised bed, which means you're gonna have to water more which means when you're watering more, you're gonna be leeching more nutrients out of your soil, and then its just a, you know, cycle. So, instead of a having sides on his beds, he just basically has a slope to raise bed, that actually he fills up with plants, so that the plants could cover the soil and he could actually grow more food in less space than having the sides. Another thing about Tino that he has learned very specific techniques that he does to, you know, start things from seed, to start things from tram plants to transplant things and I'm probably not going to be able to share with you guys all his techniques in this episode, but I'm gonna share a few of them, as much as I am able to retain and remember which hopefully is in line with what he shared with me. So, the start is seeds, basically he waters the soil or the ground where he's going to be planting. He then sprinkles the seed down all over and then I think he maybe waters a little bit more and then he puts the plastic over at the top, this clear, kind of plastic, and if we pull this up a little bit, you guys probably can't see underneath there too much, but some of the seeds underneath here are actually starting to germinate out, you know, when he puts the clear plastic over at the soil, it holds the moisture in, so it provides a nice place for the seeds to germinate, number one. Number two, it keeps the pests, like birds that might come down and eat your seeds away. Number three, it also keeps the ants and what not away, coz he does have a ant problems here, with the seeds and the ants and all this kind of stuff. So, it's basically covering the soil and protecting the soil. Now, here's the thing, he only will do this technique if it's under 80 Degrees in a day time, if it's over 80, he's not gonna use this. coz then you're gonna end up burning the soil. This also keeps, you know, the soil a bit warmer, so the seeds will have a nicer time to germinate, coz some seeds don't like to germinate when it's too cold, probably challenge that a lot of you guys are having right now, coz it's probably still winter time. But yeah, here in Houston, really nice day to day, we're in the 70's, and we're here in December. So, yeah, that's how he gets all this started, and this is just one of the ways, he does it. Let me go ahead and show you guys, after he does this, how the, all the seedlings look, in their raised bed. So, as you guys could see here's the bed, behind me here and this is one that he actually use the same technique that I should you, I don't know, maybe a month or two so ago and it looks like he's got some amazing growth, and he just literally threw out all the seeds. Here we have some spinach and, you know, it's growing really tightly and next to each other, as you guys could see also the lettuce behind me, it's also growing really tight and all next to each other, right? To him, there's no such thing as planting things too closely, but there is a problem with planting things too far apart. So I do encourage you guys, its in my opinion, its in probably Tino's as well, it's better to plant things too closely than too far apart, so that you're curving the soil. Plus, you know, the things that is actually planted too closely, to him, that's a good thing coz guess what, he'll come over and he'll pluck the things that are too close out of the bed, and then he'll transplant those into the six packs, which then is an income or revenue stream for him to make. He could also pull those up and just clip them, cut them back and eat them and let the other ones around them, grow. So, basically he's just growing more food in less space, this is actually quite intelligent. The other thing about this is that, you know, he doesn't add on any large amounts, any kind of compost or worm castings or rock dust or even any fertilizers, right, he just growing in the dirt that's sitting here, right, and in my opinion that's good and it's bad, I mean, we need to remember that, you know, depending on where you live, your soil could vary widely. You could actually be lucky and live in a place where that has fertile soil, you could also be unlucky, in maybe live in a place that maybe doesn't have the best of soil. Where I'm sitting right now is actually underneath, where his house used to sit. There was a house here, he tore it out, you know, the house was here for a hundred years, so the soil underneath the house has been basically covered for a hundred years and then he uncovered it, it probably hasn't been, you know, contaminated too much with all kinds of stuff, and so it's actually a fairly fertile and he's, you know, built it up over time. Because there is, the fact of the matter is, there is organic matter in most soils and here he has a clay soil, so, you know, it actually does and is actually quite nutritious, if it, you know, doesn't get water logged, and actually that's why we're sitting right now on these, 4 by 4's that actually is his walk ways, cause when it rains here, you get caked on the mud. But yeah, so yeah, it looks like, things are growing really good in here and next I wanna show you guys another technique he uses in his raised beds to grow, more food in less space. So, another technique he uses, besides planting things super close and super densely, is he actually does companion style planting, and he plants more than just one thing is a bed sometimes, you know, you guys saw where he had just mostly lettuce and spinach, but even in that bed, you know, every, so many feet he actually had an eggplant, little baby, that's gonna be growing up for the next season, after his lettuce or spinach is done, and in this bed, this is more of a cut and come again bed. He has things like the beets, he has a fennel, he has a cilantro, he has some parsley, he has a lettuce, all different kinds of stuff, and as you guys could see in the video there, this is really filled in, really nicely, it's like totally packed with plants, and he's proud of this fact, and actually I'm like yeah this is quite impressive, I like how, he's really densely seeded things, and they basically have to out compete themselves, and they just basically grow and, you know, what he's gonna do, he's gonna come in here and some of the bigger plants, he might actually just cut out and then those are the ones that he's gonna take to market, those are the ones that he's gonna eat, and then all the other ones, are basically just gonna fill in the space that was now created, when he did cut one out. In addition, , you know, he has planted things so closely and just basically three seeds down, that some of the seeds are coming up, so now there's new seedlings, that are this small, coming up in between the lettuces, so when he cuts down some of them, the new ones that are just emerging are now gonna get larger. So I mean, I think this is a technique that we can all learn and benefit from, you know, specially if you're trying to grow on the free and cheap, you could maximize your space, maximize the diversity for the most amount of yield. Up until now, you guys saw how basically he seeds his beds out and grows from seeds in place, I now wanna share with you guys, another way to do it, and you know, direct seed or planting from transplants, they both have their pros and cons, I like to personally do a little bit of each, and as it looks like here, so does Tino. So, now I wanted to share with you guys, just a, maybe a few more techniques he does, actually on my way to showing you guys the other way he starts his seeds out. These are his raised beds here, and as you guys could see, the soil is just mounted up to the sides and he's got things growing up the sides so that it just doesn't come to a edge, where he's not planting, it kind of slopes down mildly and he's been planting onions and different lettuces, right down the sides, so that, they'll actually fill it in, so it'll have a nice little narrow pathway in the middle, now it probably be a good idea to maybe do something like wood chips in between, so that you don't get all muddy, also the which was gonna break down over time, create more fertility. But anyways, he has all this stuff, here's the eggplant like I talked about planted within the lettuce, and also there's those little onion sets that I showed you guys earlier, little balls in between here. Over on this side, he has lots of different varieties of lettuces, including some of my favourite lettuces, those really dark rich lettuces that are at deeply pigmented, right. I wanna encourage you guys to eat deeply pigmented lettuce and other foods, coz they are higher in anti-oxidants. So yeah, and this is like, some of them really, this bed just really looks nice. He has, like so much food here, and I'm glad that he's probably one of the lowest priced sellers at the farmers market for your greens and by the looks of his greens, they're all quite healthy, and probably ones that you'd want to buy yourself, if you're not growing them yourself, here in Houston. he uses all organic methods. He doesn't sprays any kind of chemicals and all this kind of stuff, and actually he's getting some really superb results. So, another way besides direct seeding his plants, sometimes he'll actually start them in these little flats, you know, these are not plastic nursery flats, these are wooden flats that is he actually he made himself out of some 2 by 4 , and actually some, looks like, 1 by 6, fence post, like cedar fence post potentially, and that some good wood to use, coz it's gonna last a bit longer than just a pine or something. But these are nice, durable and stout. So, basically he fills this little container with a specific soil blend, that I'll share with you guys next, and then he basically grows his transplants. But to do that he does it in a few special ways to ensure he gets higher germination, because, once again, he doesn't want the water to dry out, he wants the proper moisture level. This is very important to him, to have a proper moisture level and also more importantly properly washed soil. So, the way that Tino starts his plants from the seed in the little containers are, he basically makes a little mini green house for them, and it's really simple, it's just this once again, the clear plastic that he likes so much and you guys could see, we'll go ahead and remove the plastic over here and underneath here , you guys could see, all these little baby starts, that are growing, that he says, that took like 4 days. These guys, are ready to have the plastic taken off, coz they are getting so tall, and that's another thing I wanna point out right, Tino does certain things for certain reason. If you guys looked, when I showed you guys these bins, side of the bins are made out of 2 by 4's, but the ends, but then the sides right, are actually made out of 2 by 6's and they're taller. This gives them about that much space, so that when he lays the plastic on top, it's not dragging on the top of the soil, so that gives the plants just a little bit amount of space to grow up. Once the plants almost touch the plastic, then that's time for the plastic to come off, coz otherwise the plants will start to bend and he doesn't want that at all, and yeah, he keeps nice little humid area for the plants to germinate, so this saves water, also creates a nice environment, you know, he's also right now seeding out some tomatoes, which generally like to germinate when it's warmer out, and by using this technique, he gets to warm up the soil, so that his tomato seeds could germinate here in Houston, even in December. So, now I wanna share with you guys, a special soil blend that Tino uses to start his transplants in, that I didn't get to show you guys yet. Now, this is the only time that actually he brings in some soil, but he also creates some, that I'll show you guys in a minute, to start his transplants, and he puts no coconut core, no peep moss and none of this stuff, right, he doesn't believe in it, right, and he's got a pretty good system down, I mean what he's doing, for the transplants is amazing, he's got some of the healthiest transplants that I've actually seen. One of the things I learned is to cover your wheel barrel, right, to cover the soil in the wheel barrel from the sun, the rain, all this kind of stuff. That's something I need to do, and this actually makes a nice little work table or work surface for you all too. So anyways let's go ahead and move this off, and as you guys could see here, he's got some really nice rich black soil, and one of his secrets is, he sips this down to quarter inch, so he gets comply by some compost from a certain place or maybe he gets a farm dirt compost sometimes. He sips it down, and then he adds some of his super potent compost that he's making right behind in a way that I've actually never seen before, which is gonna be good for you guys to see. But yeah, the soil is nice and filtered down, nice screened out, he has no big large chunks of stuff, that's very important and when I smell it, it actually has a nice mild neutral smell, looks like some really good stuff and this is where he starts all hi transplants in. Now, I know some of you guys might be thinking, "John, that's a really rich mixture of he's growing in all compost ", because they say don't grow in compost, you know , they say use a sterile soil medium. But, you know, one of the things that he does actually, once he puts this in a little six pack or tray, he'll actually wash, take the hose and he'll actually wash out, like, if you put coffee in a coffee maker, the water goes through and it leeches all the nutrients out of the coffee to put in your glass and you drink, right? He actually waters this compost down and there's like basically it's really brown and dark coming off and he does this for quite a while, depending on that the plants more mature or less mature, the plants more mature, they can handle a little bit stronger mix, but the plants that are baby, then he wants to kind of water a lot of the nutrients out of the plants, coz he says that might shock the plant. So yeah, so anyways, this mixture is mostly the stuff that he bought and brought in and the other stuff is what I'm going to show you guys next. Now, the reason why he does this is, this is the principal that I actually also agree with and why he treats his baby plants and his baby vegetables so well is because this, right? The most important time to determine the health of a plant over its life span is when it's a baby. If it had a rough time when it was a baby, if you're buying it from transplants from a nursery, that the roots are wrapping around the base and the basically the plant is root bound or if you are buying plants that aren't so healthy right? Those plants will not really ever turn out to their full genetic potential, they won't ever produce a lot of food, right?, coz they've already had hard times, they've already been stressed out, if like, you know I have friends and have been yelled at as a kid or maybe, you know, god forbid, beating as children and sometimes like you know, they have some issues when they grow older, now hopefully people can get counselling and stuff like that, but plants can't get counselling. So, you wanna start them off and give them the best environment, the best upbringing possible, whether you direct seed them or whether you start up from transplants, and that's actually one of the things he's doing here, you know, he strives to have the highest quality baby plants because in the end, that's gonna mean, he's gonna have higher quality, better tastier, larger large plants, and that's actually something that's not actually often talked about unfortunately in gardening. Anyways, let's go ahead and take a look at this unique way he's making compost, that I have never even seen before or even could've imagine. So, I know what you guys might be thinking, "John, what is that guy Tino have these big ass things in his yard, alright, is he a junk collector, well actually he has a few things kind of laying around like I do, but actually its pretty neat and tidy around here. These guys may seem a little bit out of place and look off, but actually they serve a very important purpose because instead of having a tumbling composter like I did, right?, he's repurposing something he got for free or cheap that I think is thrown out and I believe is a waste to throw these guys out because he's found an excellent use of them. He used to work in, you know, refrigeration and all this kinds of stuff. What these two things are, these are the ice makers, these are those big industrial ice makers that you might see in on the top there, that have all that, you know, machinery and equipment but the bottom is basically just an insulated, you know, brain that actually keeps the temperature regulated, so it keeps it cold inside there. Also has a nice little lid here that can be open closed. So when he's ready to harvest his compost, he just opens up this lid right?, and all his compost by gravity just drops to the bottom in here. So he has a really nice rich stuff. Now he's not using traditional composting like with worms, no no no, he's not using traditionally composting, that composts with heat actually. What he's doing is something unique and different and basically what he's doing is he's just modelling nature. He's speeding up the process and he's providing a home or a habitat for the creatures that live inside his ice box compost bins, right? and let me go ahead and show you guys, what some of them looks like, alright. So , each of these ice makers bottoms anyways, are at different stages, you know, the one on the other side is the stuff he's harvesting from, this is the stuff, it's kind of like letting digest and compost or more prominently break down over time. Like this one, coz it still has a little window here, that you could actually just, go in and you could actually see all the materials that he's been stacking up. So, basically it's open at the top, he basically puts in, you know, old okra twigs you know, food scraps, you know, yard wastes and things and basically just funnels down and you know, on the top there's not a lot of living material. It's kind of like a lot of dry, but this is the insulation level and as he packs more stuff on the top, all the stuff kind of works down at its own pace and breaks down, you know, here you could see some of the stuffs that's not really broken down, but in here, there's like a little area, that we could actually just dig into, and you could see this stuff, it's getting broken down and let me go ahead and open the door to show you guys what's breaking this organic material down. Alright, so this is the ice maker that still in process, not yet ready to be harvested, we'll open this guy up for you guys and look at that, I don't know if you guys could see that on a HD camera, but just in this ice bin thing here, I see all these little creatures and actually when I opened the door, they all like went into little like caves inside all this compost, you know, what these little creatures are, I see like rollie pollies, I see cockroaches and who knows what other kind of bugs are living in here. He didn't add these bugs I here, they just showed up, right? You provide food for the bugs, they're gonna show up and they're gonna chow it down, right?, you have a big table of tropical fruit, I'm gonna show up and I'm gonna eat it all, and that's what the bugs are doing. He's providing a nice home for them, they show up and they basically eat all the organic material and then they poop it out, which is creating a really rich, nutrition for his plants, you know, the bugs and things will basically breakdown the organic batter and when they poop out, they poop it out actually some of the richest biology, you know. So, they can be pooping out fungus or fungi, bacteria, fungi and different chitinease degraders, cellulose degraders and all these things. Its kind of like, you know, they have worm castings, which we know is so good, they also have meal worm castings, which is so good, and they also have other excrements from bugs, that, you know, in the forest, on the forest floor you just see all these bugs scurrying around and eating all the different organic matter, well hey he's just doing that in a more contained space so this is actually, instead of a worm bin, it's actually just a bug bin, using just the local bugs to breakdown his nutrients. This is something that's not really even talked about right?, and I think this is a really good way to do it. I mean there are black soldier flies all these different bugs, but you know, in my garden I have a lot of the little pill bugs or whatever and there just breaking down the leaf material and organic matter actually in my beds, so actually I don't even have to have a bin, and you know some of those bugs also if they're in your garden, maybe not be a good thing, they also chomp on your young plants. If you don't have a lot of organic matter, so this maybe a better option. So, you know, I like that he's doing this to create a really rich mix, so he uses some of this stuff with some of the box stuff to start off his transplant. So, I'm really glad I came to visit Tino today, coz one of the areas that actually I haven't been maybe the most successful as a gardener is starting transplants. So he has a system down, totally to get really good transplants. These are some of the healthiest transplants I've seen of all the places I've visited, like, he plants them really dense and then actually he plucks them out as he needs them. So, right here we have basically the, some celery that he planted, and as you guys could see in this half right here it's pretty thinned out, coz he's plucking all the large ones, and its the large ones that actually, he takes out of here. He could either, A, you know, put them into little six packs, like he's just done with these guys, and then sell them and then if he don't sell them, he can plant it in his garden, and other, or, he could actually just take these out and just pop them in his garden. So, he's gonna be actually starting, he's doing some beets right now, he's gonna pop out the beets and then put them in his garden to grow the beets, because he found that you know, if he just direct seed the beets, they don't come up so well. But if you put them in here first, then they work a lot better. SO, you know, you're only gonna learn this by maybe reading things online, or trying yourself, and see what works or not right? I always encourage you guys to try to, like, make your gardening life, like, easier and work less, right? So, if you direct seed things, hey, that's always the best, coz that's gonna be the least amount of effort, if you gotta transplant and do all these kinds of stuffs, its little bit more effort, but if it allows you to grow more food, it's definitely worth it. So, yeah, so what he did here was, he was just coming over and he was just popping out some of these guys and he waters these guys, and he just will pop out the little roots there, like that and take this little transplant and then he'll actually put it into a six pack or maybe even a 72 pack and make those available to people. Now the next thing I wanna share is actually, once he pops these guys out, I wanna show you guys his technique, that he uses, where he can actually transplant up to 2 thousand plants in one day just by himself, which to me is amazing coz like I transplant stuff all the time, and I'm really slow, you know, coz I don't have his technique down, so I'm gonna basically take his technique that he uses for transplants and run with it, coz it's actually quite intelligent and actually quite smart and he's actually even invented his own tool to do it. So, let's take a look at that next. So, now I'm gonna show you guys the first step to transplanting. Basically what he did was he took a, his a 6 pack here, he's actually using nice size six packs, you know. I encourage you guys always, when you're purchasing 6 packs, if you're gonna be using them, is to try to buy the ones that actually have, that hold the most soil. Some of them are like long and skinny, and in my opinion, those aren't that good, we wanna have lots of soil in there. So, as he filled up this with the soil mixture from the wheel barrel that I showed you guys earlier, and then he washes it down, it's very important step right? You could do it with like little hose, he just does it with a hose just like spray this down gently and basically he lets the water soak all the way through. So, now number 1, you're gonna have really nice rich soil, that's fully watered, but you're not just gonna, like, plant in it, where there's still water on top. You're gonna wanna give it some time to let the water drain out, and if you guys look at the coming out, I could see the water, even though the ground's like dirt. I could see the water that's coming out that looks like that coffee. We're leeching some of the nutrients out, or the tea out of the compost on to the ground, and he'll do this several times to bring it down to the level where he feels comfortable, and then plant his plants in that, right?, and as I said, you know, if the plants are younger, then he's gonna rinse it more, and if the plants are a bit bigger, then he doesn't rinse it as much. But this is a critical step to plant in a 100 percent straight, you know screen compost, which is you know, goes against the many gardeners style, which they ,"Oh you gotta use a sterile medium, coz if you use compost it could cause problems", but all his stuff's looking great. So, he's doing a lot of things that maybe go against convention gardening wisdom, and I would encourage you guys to try it, see what happens. So, now I'm gonna share with you guys Tino's revolutionary planting technique that even enlightened me actually. As you guys could see, we've actually already rinsed the soil out and it's a drained fairly well. Most of it has drained pretty well, except of these two cells, and so, that's very important, right? One of the most important thing he stresses is you wanna have well draining soil. If the soil is not draining and it stays wet, right?, you're gonna rot out your plant's roots, you know, and he has a high probability to success, not to say he doesn't lose a couple plants sometimes, coz you know whatever happens. But he does things to ensure his success of his baby plants. So, the first step is, once you have rinsed it all out, you're gonna have these little transplants here that you basically just pluck up. So the first step is to just put them in a wash, right?, you're gonna dunk them in the water, we dunk them in some water, and we bring them out, check it out, the roots are now all together, where as before, you know, the roots were kind of like, really bushy. So that's very important, number 1. Number 2, he has a special screwdriver, so this is not just any screwdriver, he took a standard screw driver here and took a special file, I think he used maybe a chainsaw file and he basically just put a notch in the tip of the screwdriver, and this is very important not to put a point in, but it's a kind of rounded notch, so you know, there's no sharp edges on the screw driver, that is gonna cut the roots of the plants you're transplanting, then all he does is, he takes a little plant here and he goes down, maybe a little bit above half way right?, coz basically, his whole goal is to get this roots, in the little cell as quickly and efficiently as possible, and so he basically, he'll put this down, sometimes he'll like formulate a figure 8, you know, to get it, if the roots really long, then he'll take the little screw driver, and the little tip there and then he'll put them in the roots so all kind of like line it up like this, kind of like right about maybe there, and then basically he pushes down in one fall swoop and then basically, he's now planted the plant. The other thing at the same time that, he's going down, he'll kind of like leave a little bit of hole, you know, as he comes down. What that Little hole's gonna do, that's gonna ensure the water directs down and also it's gonna funnel the water down so that it drains faster. This is another critical component, if you're growing in straight compost, coz I've seen sometimes the compost will not drain, and then you're gonna get water logged, and that's why many people use or grow, peat moss because it basically, give a larger method of air, larger , you know, probability of air or like a cushion basically. Where's in this case you gotta be more precise, and so you know, with this, like literally hundreds of plants starts over there it looks like he's pretty much precise every time. So yeah, this is something, that's gonna save me a lot of time, coz normally I would've just took these guys and try to plant these with all the roots hanging out, but just by simply dunking them into water, and having a little screwdriver thing, then you're gonna go ahead and go down, let me go ahead and give you guys a close up on this, its kind of cool. We're gonna go ahead and put this down, and he basically sometimes like, loops this around a little bit, and see if we could, sometimes he just loops this around a little bit, makes a little 'u' out of it or a circle, then he just shoves this all down just like that and this took me a couple times to figure out how to do it, but now, you know, I think he'd probably approve of my technique. But yeah, he just does whole little six packs like this and actually here's one that he did, so you guys could see, what it looks like. So next what I wanna show you guys is actually after he pots those up, kind of like this, he's potted them all up. These are kind of sitting out and depending on how large they are, he'll either put them in a shade, like if they're just transplanted out or sometimes he'll put them in area with the sun and he'll rotate this depending on his specific desires for the plant. If the plants getting too big, he wants the growth to slow down. he'll put it in shade, if he wants them to grow faster and get topped off, looking nice for market, he may put them in the sun. That's very important. The other things is sometimes, instead of doing the six packs, he'll also do, you know, large flats of 72. So look at this, this is like a really nice flat of lettuce here, and he'll even take sometimes the ones maybe not performing, underperforming, it's too small, he'll put it in a longer one so that, you know, there all consistent size. So you're gonna get some of the best plant starts. You know I popped up some of these roots and some of these guys, maybe like, we'll do it on these guys here, see, look at this, this is one of the starts he did and look at that, if you guys notice, there's no roots up near the top because he sucked this down in the ground, you know when he's transplanting, all the roots are at the bottom and these roots are not wrapping around each other yet. He'll also even come in and root prune in these guys sometimes, if the roots are getting too much, so that they actually don't get roop bound so that when you guys take his plant starts home, you're gonna get some amazing results, like he's getting in his garden here, and , you know, his price is actually quite affordable, some of the best prices I've seen in Houston, like if you're getting like just a standard 6 pack, it's like 2.50 for a healthy 6 pack, that's very important. If you guys, wanna buy, you know, whole flat, basically he'll give you a whole flat of 6 packs for, I think around, 12 bucks and if you're buying a 72, you got the hook-up deal, 20 bucks, right, and if you buy , like 5 flats of 72 plants like this, he'll even go down further, so I encourage you guys, if you guys are not starting you plant starts yourself, you live here in Houston area, definitely call him up, and he'll hook you up with some of the healthiest plant starts in the lowest prices that I've seen. I mean if I lived here, I'd definitely be getting some of the 72 packs you know, it's definitely easy way to go, because you're gonna have a higher level of success when you guys start out with healthy plants, like he's making here. I think the last part of this episode, I'd like to actually sit down with Tino, he is from Greece, originally, so he has a thick accent, so maybe hard for you guys to listen to him, so I'll try to do the best I can, to maybe, help him explain what he's trying to say and I hope as soon as I'm able to also getting subtitles on this for you guys. John - So, now I'm here with Tino, the gardener extraordinaire that has created this paradise here in Houston with all his amazing plants, that actually he doesn't add any fertilizers to, and all his amazing transplants, that you guys saw just a few of them, I mean it's just impressive the amount of healthy transplants he has going. I only have a limited amount of time left here today, before I actually have to take off, but I want to ask him a few questions about his garden and why he chooses to grow all this food here, for him and his family. So a teen of the first question is, Why are you growing all this food here, especially where your duplex used to be on your property. Tino - Because I like to, I like to grow and I can't eat all these, just some of myself, some I'll give it away to someone and I like to grow, I like garden, that's all I do. There's not a man, there's no you know, I like to do, I like what I'm doing. John - Yeah, so I mean he just basically loves gardening and I mean I love gardening, I mean it's good to get out in nature and have a hobby, that's a productive hobby and actually his hobby is quite productive, produces hundreds of plant starts or even thousands of plant starts for his garden and also you guys in the local area. So, another thing I wanna talk to you guys about, Tino, is that something I didn't get to mention in the video, that was important to me, that I didn't get to talk about is you know, another aspect of your gardening on the free or cheap, beside bringing not many inputs in is how you communicate with the plants. This is something I do myself and I know, you also do. So, you wanna talk little bit about talking and more importantly listening to your plants, and how important it is for your gardening style? Tino - The, the plants they, you can, you can watch them and they tell you story like they tell you, like , like if you play on cassette, they tell you like a, how can I explain that, that's I'm hard to explain that, you have to explain that. John - Can you explain it in Greek? Your language, your native language. Tino - No no no, I cannot, no no no. They tell you what they need, what they, just look at them, you see , how they are growing, you see how they, it's it's very, they tell you a story, the whole story, how they growing, like how, what they need, how they can be better, how they can, it's very, it's very simple but it's very complicated, you know, it could be very complicated for some, lot of people, then simple for some others, and I don't know how to explain that. John - Yeah, so I stumped him, he's having a hard time explaining, but I'll try to give you my best, so, basically he's saying, every plant will tell a story and you need to listen to the plant and I know, you know, I would call Tino here a plant whisperer like they have dog whisperers and all these things. He knows plants and you could listen to the plants and hear, maybe not hear what they are saying, but you could kind of feel their vibe, I mean, we are all interconnected on this planet, and we sometimes forget that, and you need to open up, to be able to listen more, you know. I mean that's one of the things that I learned is to become a better speaker, you need to become a better listener. So I encourage all you guys to listen to your garden, you know, he'll sit out on his chair just looking over his garden and listening to his plants and seeing them and feeling what they need and then he'll take appropriate action to do that, and I know a lot of you guys are new, you guys may think I'm crazy and Tino's crazy for talking to the plants and not talking to the plants and listening to the plants and all this stuff. But, you know what, one day its gonna click, you're gonna be in your garden and you're plants are gonna tell you, "John I need water", "John, hey put some of this on me" or "put some of that on me" or "hey, I need more sun, I need less sun", and whatever, they're gonna tell you some stuff, and then all you need, all your job is to do as a gardener is to react and give them what they really need, not what you think they need, and I think this causes a lot of challenges in gardening, "Oh, I, my plants need water", you flood the heck out of them man, they lose their life coz, you're flooding them out, right? I mean let's talk about that Tino, you, you water very minimally here, right?, you only water, when necessary, you let the plants fend for themselves, and why, why do you do this? Tino - Because, I have to water the plants when I start them, when I start I have to water the plants because, I can't, like some to start, something, then after, after they're watered, when they grow out, start growing, I let them go to find their own moisture, I try to harder the soil the most I can. So, keep the moisture on the soil and they're good to go, that's all you need, you don't need nothing else, that's all you need. By hardening the soil, with a plants, with a , then you've got everything. That's all you need. That's all. John - Yeah, so he has no irrigation system here and nothing like that, and I mean this time here in December, everything looks amazing. Tino - Just giving them basics, you know what I mean, give them the basics. It's like a raise a plants like raise a kid. That's the way I see it. You see, if you wanted the plants to succeed, just let them go the hard way , you know what I mean, they're gonna find their own way, they're gonna go deeper, they're gonna find moisture, they'll find what they need. So by giving the plants anything they need , so , they become lazy, so they depend on you, for work, for food, for disease, for everything. You have to fight all this, so let the plants to find what they need, by themselves. Don't give them what they need. They're gonna find it, give them the basics, that's the basic thing, moisture, that's all you need, and the rest is, they can do, they can do better by their own. John - Yeah,, I mean I , definitely agree like, right? My parents they didn't give me allowance I was the like kid that got all his money, I had to like go out and find a job and make money and I think that's why I turned out pretty good, you know. We all know them spoiled kids right?, they're just messed up in their lives, coz they've just been given everything, and likewise your plants are similar right? So, cut that water off your plants sometimes, you know, don't over water them, you know. I encourage you guys to check your soil moisture levels, make sure they have the proper amount of water, but don't give them too much. Make them fend for themselves and find their own water. Of course this also depends on your particular environment you live in and also your soil, so I wouldn't wanna say that anybody in Las Vegas should in the middle of a summer, let your plants fend for summer, coz that's gonna be a bit more challenging than it is here in Houston. So, the other thing, you know, that actually we maybe don't see eye to eye on, coz we have maybe different goals and values, which is alright, is, adding fertilizers, nutrition and worm castings, and even compost, like you add very little with any compost. I think you added some to this, but all your bed pretty much you don't add any compost. So, you wanna speak to all these things that people put in their gardens and why you feel, is not needed. Tino - You don't need it because you, you, need the worms, where they belong, in the ground. Their compost, their composting the ground, they make castings in the ground , they harden the soil, they have the things, they do more, you see, by buying the chemical product, that. By keeping the germs in the ground, and take them out of the bins, take it from the bins, they do much better. That's the way it's supposed to be. John - I would agree with that, he says, take your worms out of your bins and put them in the ground, provided you have, you know, the right temperatures year round, where they could actually live in the ground, like here there's no problem, other places may be more challenging. Put them in the ground so that worms can eat and digest and poop where you need them and they can irrigate the soil instead of having them, locked up in a bin. I mean. I'm definitely for that now, actually in my, I don't have a worm bin, all my worms are in the bin. I like to add some supplementary worm castings for my beds for additional fertility but I would agree the best is actually having the worms in the bin. Tino - The another thing is, you got the castings, you see the, the plants, every plant, the worms they make a tunnel under the soil. John - Worms make tunnels. Tino - All the tunnels they find castings, the plants will find the whole plants, the plans that hold the follow the tunnel, so the they'll now have to penetrate the hard soil. So they build it very strong root system, by building very strong root system, you're building a beautiful plant. Sheltered beautiful plant. That holds. You have to have a feet, strong feet to run a marathon, you know, you can't do it without strong feet. You can't have a healthy plant without healthy roots. The worms they play very, they do very, that's very important for the worms to be on the ground where your plants are and live, always live like a some kind, like leaves, you know that leaves that you, when you cut your plants, just cut them don't pull them out leave the rest of the roots to die so, you feed the worms, they can't. Sometimes that's this ground right here, sometimes I got, if I have a worm like this big, Lyme worms, I'm talking about Lyme worms, they by not tilling the soil, they, you see they building like, like a tunnel system, and by tilling the soil you can never till. John - Because the worms yeah, that'll destroy the soils, yeah. Irrigate the nutrients. Tino - That's very important for the plants, for the plants, to have a open tunnel underneath John - Yeah, it also causes irrigations too. Tino - They find food in the tunnel, they find oxygen, they find, they can built a very strong wall system. That's what you need, that's the basic, that's the most important thing for any plant. John - I mean I totally agree with Tino on this fact, the worms belong best in your beds. That's the best place for them and they do a lot of things in the beds as nature would want them to, so your plants could thrive. Tino - By Buying like a bag worm compost, and throw them on your plants, throw them on your beds is not gonna do nothing. It's do something, but it's missing the whole point, the whole point is missing. John - I agree with the worm castings on the top of the beds, mixed in , it's gonna help. Now some worm castings are better than others, coz some worm castings may have worm casting eggs, so now you're actually putting the eggs and the worm castings in the beds, so now the worms could hatch at the same time. Anyways let's we pretty much agree on the whole worm situation. Let's talk about something maybe that we don't maybe see eye to eye on, the rock dust. So, what do you think about the rock dust, Tino. Tino - What's rock dust? John - Rock dust, the ground up rocks. Tino - You, we're made of rocks, this planet itself is made by that, by big rocks. So, you don't have to pay from , you don't have to go to the, for sand and big rocks, you know. You got that underneath in your soil, you got everything you need. It's all accessible to your plants because the way you, the way you garden, the way you, you, cultivate your plants, that's not accessible, and then you have to bring all this stuff, plus it's money, the business a lot of things is involved, so you just put all this on the side and the sow seeds on the ground, and see what happens, and then you'll learn from there. Your next, next thing's gonna be, you're gonna move up better and better all the times, and then you're gonna end up, with something like a, you don't have to do nothing, you don't have to bring nothing from the outside, all that you have is something, plants and best of any kinds of vegetables, I think you have pretty much everything. I have no problem because I have everything, without bringing, without bringing nothing. So, it's good for, I mean, it's good for nature, it's good for the everybody. It's good for your health, its good for you, it's good for your money, it's good for your pocket, its good for everything. Plus you got the top quality vegetables, by doing this, you got much more, that's the point, that was the mission. By doing more you got less, that's the way it works for the vegetables. It doesn't work, maybe that doesn't work in other things, but the garden, that's the way it works. By doing less you got more. John - So yeah I mean, definitely this is Tino's opinion about this topic and maybe many of you guys too. I get a lot of flag by all the stuff I buy to put in my garden, right? But once again, just like Tino, this is his hobby, he, he puts a lot of time and love into his garden. I put you know some time and you know, some money and products into my garden which I believe are gonna help me, even if its psychological that my food is healthier, that I'm eating it, I'm eating healthier food in my mind, it's still helping me, right?, if I'm wasting money unnecessasarily, you know, based on the research I've done, in my trials and experiments I've done I believe, some of the things I add actually are helpful to my garden to create higher quality food and not to say that he's not growing amazing food here, because he has absolutely is, the thing to remember that there's many ways to garden, some soils are more nutritious]us than others and you can't just say, "Oh the guy Tino, I just grow with anything if you guys could live next door to Tino, then grow just like he does, guess what, you're gonna have the same remarkable success that he does coz you're gonna be in the same soil, the same climate, the same environment, right? But unfortunately, I know a lot of you guys live in Australia, the UK, maybe you live in Georgia, maybe you live in Maine, you know, things vary a lot. Then you have to like, maybe kind of learn how to do things little bit differently, and that's alright you know. I'm here to just share with you guys, what different people are doing. So, Tino, let's talk about something's that would probably both agree with, chemical fertilizers. What do you think about, chemical fertilizers. Tino - It's the, you had to see that, you had to see that, you see young kids with lot of problems, health problems you see, you see lot of, you never see, it's going, it's going like ,something like a disease. You got disease , you got problems everywhere, so we have to go back, I think you know better than nobody else, you know about this better. But top quality healthy food, consuming top quality healthy food, you got, normally you got your and I think, you know better than anybody else about this and it's, you contaminated your life, you contaminated your food, yourself. It's you have to live the plant, the plant is smart enough, the seed, the single seed is smart enough if it falls to the ground, and there are amount of moistures, he knows exactly what to do, and right temperature and moisture, he knows exactly what to do, he doesn't need nobody to tell. You don't need to go all this classes and all this crap and then you listen all this crap, and I mean, start by yourself, if you have a soil and you , luckily a piece of soil and little piece of space in your house, in your farm, if you have a soil, you need to measure things, you need to measure things, make sure you have the sunlight and drainage. It doesn't matter what kind of soil you have, of course it doesn't have to be contaminated, it doesn't matter m=what kind of soil you have, you can grow pretty much everything. You need a drainage, two important things, a drainage and sun light. John - And the right moisture Tino - The moisture's gonna, you're gonna have to, you have to do that. The plants have to do that. So, you can grow anything, it's nothing. It's unlimited, you can grow anywhere you could do anything. John - Yeah, I mean view all
 


 
 
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Alright this is John Kohler from growingyourgreens.com to bring you another exciting episode for you. I'm still here in Houston and I don't know what area in Houston it is, but doesn't looks like, you know, the best of neighbourhoods. But anyways, what I'm going to do today is actually visit the house right behind me, not the one over there with the bananas in the front, but this one behind the white fence there, the doors open, that has a red truck. This is going to be a interesting episode actually, this episode may challenge the beliefs you guys have about gardening. It's challenging some of the beliefs I have about gardening as well. So, the guy here, Tino, is actually from Greece and he's been growing, he's using little kid, he's been actually on this property about for last 4 to 5 years, when he's been actually growing food here. He does thing little bit differently, let me tell you this story actually. I first met Tino when I was actually at the Farm Dirt Compost, the place, and the guy their introduced me to him and he was like " You gotta meet this guy " and I was like driving off and I was kind of in a rush, because I had to like, you know get back to what I was doing, and he was like trying to tell me all this stuff and he was like, "You're gardening wrong! You don't need to add all the minerals, you don't need to add all the fertilizers, you don't need to draw and raise bed, It's all Wrong!" and I'm like, "Whoa, this guy is pretty interesting". But you know I'm always open like, even if somebody doesn't agree with me, that's fine. I know a lot of you guys may watch my videos and may not agree with everything I believe in, and that's fine. I'm just sharing my beliefs whether you want to believe what I believe, that's up to you guys right, totally up to you guys. But what I really like to do is I like to show many different styles of gardening, so that you guys could do whatever you want to do, right?, there's many kinds of gardener, I'm never going to say "Ooh this kind of gardening is the right way, this is the wrong way", depending on your particular situation, there are definitely better or worse ways to do it. So, actually in this situation, where we are here in Houston, with the given soil here, with the given climate, Tino's definitely figured out a way, you know, to garden and grow some food, actually with minimal inputs. Ok, so that was the first time I saw Tino and then I drove off. He didn't give me his contact and in front I'm like, maybe I'll run into that guy later. As luck turns out today, I was actually at the farmers market and he had a stand there, he was selling all kinds of plant starts, and actually he had the cheapest price for lettuce and other leafy greens at the market. It was like $5 for a nice size, flat of lettuce and other mixed greens that he was offering. So, we got to talking again and I'm like "Hey, what are you doing this afternoon?", he was like "Nothing", and I'm like "good can I come over and I want to see what you're doing and make a video". So, that's why I'm making a video for you guys to show you guy actually what he's doing, because he believes in, you know, gardening on the free and cheap, and I know that this is an episode a lot of you guys have been wanting for a long time, gardening on the free and cheap like, "John, you don't gotta waste money on that rock dust, you don't gotta bottle these worm castings, you don't gotta bottle these things that you garden", you could garden the free and cheap and it's not that hard. So, I don't wanna say that Tino is doing entirely free, there's a few things he brings in, but he actually brings in very few inputs for the impressive growth that he has and he does a lot of things himself, and builds things and he does a lot of techniques that I'm only gotta show you guys, maybe a few of them today, that actually in practices that he's done and learned overtime, by actually making mistakes, and that's why making mistakes is really good, because when you make a mistake, you learn how successfully not to do something. So, hopefully next time you'll do a bit better and he's actually even invented his little tools to do some of the things, you know , that he does, that I'll get to show you guys, that actually is quite impressive, actually that helped me out, it's something I'll be able to use now and save immense amounts of time. But yeah, he's definitely an interesting guy and he's from Greece and so I'm gonna call this episode, 'The Big Fat Greek Vegetable Garden Episode'. So let's go right behind the doors and show you guys what's growing on over here. So now we're at the gate for Tino's place here, and as you guys can see, he's got a nice white painted fence all the way around his property. This is not, maybe the nicest of areas so actually building a fence around your property, if you're able to do that, because I know that in some places you are not able to do that. Probably a good idea, right?, it keeps like stray animals and peoples from picking your stuff, but more importantly, also offers you guys some protection, form some of the elements, from some of the strong winds, he's blocking the wind with having a solid fence. Of course you could grow your own fence too, with many different plants and have trees and different things growing so tightly close together, which will be my first choice, rather than having a fence, just sitting here. Grow a living fence, it's actually gonna dig their roots in the soil and create further soil fertility. In any case, let's go beyond this fence and actually see what he's got growing on. Alright so now let's do a walk in to the yard here and as you guys could see, there is stuff growing everywhere, basically some are really long raise beds, he has lots of foods growing in all these raise beds and each bed is just a little bit different. But he does have some things that he does, you know, in all of them for sure, and as you guys could see , he also has a lot of plants starts. This is the back of his truck, he just got back from the farmers market. These are all the vegetables starts, he sells at the farmers market and this cooler right here, he basically just to harvest, just a part of his bed and it was like just full last night and he sold most of it at the farmers market, now he has this, some left over to eat for a salad for himself. But, you know, all that actually came from this bed over here, that he just clipped out and I'm looking at it and you could tell the clip from stuff out, but there's still so much more food in this bed. So, he says here this bed is about 45 Feet long and 4 Feet wide, it could feed about 5 people. So a family of 5, all the salad greens and greens they would want. So, I know a lot of you guys may have the space to do this. Let's see the other beds over here, this time of year, you know in December, he's growing lettuce primarily and some other leafy greens, dandelion, onions, some braska family plants and over on this side, he has all his nursery, starts that he's offering to people, and if he doesn't sell them, then he ends up planting them in his garden. So every gardener that I meet, there's things that we as gardeners can agree on and of course there's things that we may not agree on, where we have differences of opinion on, and that's alright, we're not gonna start World War III because we think that we should garden differently, that's alright. We can learn from each other, and I wanna encourage you guys in this episode to like, pick out the bits of things in this episode, that's gonna enhance your garden, and maybe even challenge your gardening style and to even adjust it, and make changes to improve what you're doing, and you know, maybe you believe in, what I'm gonna share with you guys today, maybe you don't. That's alright, I don't really care, but I want you guys to experiment, right, try some of the beds, how he's grown it. See if in your exact environment it actually grows better or maybe it's gonna grow worse, you know, than you're currently existing raise beds with sides. Anyways, one of the things that we both agree on here, Tino and me, is this guy, this roader tool, alright, he bought this, he used it a long time ago, but he no longer uses it to tiller, unless it's just maybe to clean up some of the in between the raised beds, but he does not till the soil. He believes in a no till method, this is very critical to both my style of gardening and Tino's style of gardening, you know. When you start disturbing the soil you lose fertility, you lose microbial life in there and these are the two things that we're trying to enhance with our gardening styles. Next I wanna show you guys, something else actually, that he used to do and that he actually gave up. That's maybe not exactly in agreeing to me, but that's alright because everybody has their own way of gardening. So one thing Tino doesn't do, is he doesn't create Compost Tea, he just simply doesn't believe in it. He tried it, he has a barrel here and what not, all the hoses and he used to create a Compost Tea but he didn't really see a difference, you know, with it. So he just basically discontinued the practise and you know I would say that maybe under ideal situation, when you got actually enough soil microbes in your garden, you might not need to use the Compost Tea, you know, I believe personally in diversity of microbes that, you know, can only be more beneficial, than not having them. But of course things are gonna grow with or without Compost Tea, things are gonna grow with or without, things like the rock dust. That I like to add, he doesn't even add the rock dust, doesn't believe in it and believe that you guys are wasting your money on rock dust, and that's cool, you know, we're gonna have a confrontation about that at the end of this, you know, he believes that all the nutrients are in the soil, and I agree, there's definitely nutrients in the soil, you know, and from what it looks like, things are growing really good. But I kind of wonder on like the, nutritional quality of the produce that is being grown, aside from just looking good, you know, if we did a breakdown of the nutrients in there, what would that look like. So that's what I think would be quite interesting to compare, lettuce at my garden, for example, compared to the lettuce at his garden, and kind of see where nutrition falls, and if the nutrition falls better in his favour maybe I'll abandon what I'm doing. But I don't know coz , you know, the thing for me is, like one of my main values with gardening is like, I almost lost my life, right, I've had major health condition and I'm totally, one of the main reasons why I'm gardening is to grow the highest quality food, or what I believe to be a highest quality food, and that's what I've have gone out and learned how to do, and that's what I share with you guys, and when I'm at my garden, but when I come to somebody else's garden, they might not have the same ideals as me. They might not have almost lost their life from a health condition, you know, they might not value their health as much as I do, so, they just wanna grow food on the free or cheap, but that's more important to them, and that's cool, you know, like, I'm not gonna tell you guys your values, I'm gonna tell you that, you know, in my opinion your life is the most valuable thing you guys own in the world, free and clear, and , you know, if you do things like smoking and maybe like, eat too many processed foods and junk foods, you know, that's gonna put your health in the toilet, and I don't choose to do that, but if you guys wanna do that, that's up to you, I don't really care. Anyways, let's show another thing, that actually both Tino and I both agree on. So now I'm inside Tino's house, and it's really just, you know, small house actually he said he converted his garage, that was his garage, into his living space and actually, the garden area that you guys just saw, he actually tore down a duplex that was outside. It was here like a 100 years, it was probably about time to either refurb it or tear it down, and he tore it down because he wanted to use the space instead of living for gardening and then just grow in a much and then actually live in a much smaller space, so his garden is actually about 5000 sq ft and his living space, I don't know, probably takes up the rest of the plot, maybe, I don't know, 3000 sq ft less, you know, just the walk ways is around the house or what not. So , you know, I wanna encourage you guys to , you know, he lives a minimalist lifestyle, he doesn't have much, he has a little bathroom, a little living area with a kitchen and a bedroom and stuff, and I think, you know, we've gotten too opulent in America and all these super huge houses, 2000, 4000 sq ft, and how much do you really use, how much you really need, it's just more space to fill up with junk you don't need. Anyways, one of the things he does in his kitchen is actually, he stores all his seeds on the top shelf there. You guys can see all the containers of seeds that he saves every year. So actually, the most of the things that he grows is actually from seeds that he saves. Of course, yes, he buys some seeds to get him started, but once he buys the seeds once, he grows that plant out too flourish him, saves the seeds and then he stores them up there and then he grows them out the following year. One of the things that actually he grows , actually that's quite good , is actually he'll go and buy produce from store and then he'll plant it. So, he's done this with green onions and he found that, green onions planted from the store didn't work so well. Instead what he found, were these guys, and these are like the little baby onions. They're called the pearl onions, and he likes these little pearl onions coz he'll just take these little pearl onions, that are like a couple bucks per bag, and there's a lots of these little onions here that most people might boil and eat or however they eat them. But he just takes these guys and he grows them out. So, now you just got, you know, I don't know, at least, like, several dozen plants for 2.50, and he says, these guys actually grow better than the green onions with the roots on them. So, yeah he definitely cuts a lot of cost, he's not growing on the total free but he's really doing it on a cheap. So, there's two main ways that Tino starts his seeds from, and these are the two ways that I use as well and would encourage you guys to use, right? Number one, he does direct seeding. Depending on what plant it is, he may direct seed them into his raised bed, I mean that's what I'm gonna show you guys now. So, he has a special technique for doing that, to, you know, preserve more soil moisture and to conserve water, you know, he uses sitting water here, I think, you should probably, maybe, catch some water off this roof, and what not to use that when he is able, but he uses sitting water and he only uses as much water as he needs, he doesn't like to use any excess water, and one of his beliefs is that, you gotta let fend for themselves. If you water your plants too much, their gonna be weak, their gonna be lazy, their roots are not gonna grow deep and seek out the water they need, as well as other nutrients in the soil, they need to fully thrive, and you know, overall actually, I do agree with that, you know, I think that's a good idea not to over-water plants, and many people, tend to over-water their plants which is definitely not a good thing in my opinion, and of course, it's not good to under-water your plants either. Anyways, as you guys could see, he's got one of his raised beds here, now, here's the thing, his raised beds, he does not have any sides on them, he does not believe in putting sides on your raised beds, because when you put a side on the raised beds, it may, you know, increase temperature a little bit, which is a pro, but he says the major con is, once it starts getting hot, you know, the sun will hit the sides of your raised beds, it'll heat up the soil, it'll cause more moisture loss inside the raised bed, which means you're gonna have to water more which means when you're watering more, you're gonna be leeching more nutrients out of your soil, and then its just a, you know, cycle. So, instead of a having sides on his beds, he just basically has a slope to raise bed, that actually he fills up with plants, so that the plants could cover the soil and he could actually grow more food in less space than having the sides. Another thing about Tino that he has learned very specific techniques that he does to, you know, start things from seed, to start things from tram plants to transplant things and I'm probably not going to be able to share with you guys all his techniques in this episode, but I'm gonna share a few of them, as much as I am able to retain and remember which hopefully is in line with what he shared with me. So, the start is seeds, basically he waters the soil or the ground where he's going to be planting. He then sprinkles the seed down all over and then I think he maybe waters a little bit more and then he puts the plastic over at the top, this clear, kind of plastic, and if we pull this up a little bit, you guys probably can't see underneath there too much, but some of the seeds underneath here are actually starting to germinate out, you know, when he puts the clear plastic over at the soil, it holds the moisture in, so it provides a nice place for the seeds to germinate, number one. Number two, it keeps the pests, like birds that might come down and eat your seeds away. Number three, it also keeps the ants and what not away, coz he does have a ant problems here, with the seeds and the ants and all this kind of stuff. So, it's basically covering the soil and protecting the soil. Now, here's the thing, he only will do this technique if it's under 80 Degrees in a day time, if it's over 80, he's not gonna use this. coz then you're gonna end up burning the soil. This also keeps, you know, the soil a bit warmer, so the seeds will have a nicer time to germinate, coz some seeds don't like to germinate when it's too cold, probably challenge that a lot of you guys are having right now, coz it's probably still winter time. But yeah, here in Houston, really nice day to day, we're in the 70's, and we're here in December. So, yeah, that's how he gets all this started, and this is just one of the ways, he does it. Let me go ahead and show you guys, after he does this, how the, all the seedlings look, in their raised bed. So, as you guys could see here's the bed, behind me here and this is one that he actually use the same technique that I should you, I don't know, maybe a month or two so ago and it looks like he's got some amazing growth, and he just literally threw out all the seeds. Here we have some spinach and, you know, it's growing really tightly and next to each other, as you guys could see also the lettuce behind me, it's also growing really tight and all next to each other, right? To him, there's no such thing as planting things too closely, but there is a problem with planting things too far apart. So I do encourage you guys, its in my opinion, its in probably Tino's as well, it's better to plant things too closely than too far apart, so that you're curving the soil. Plus, you know, the things that is actually planted too closely, to him, that's a good thing coz guess what, he'll come over and he'll pluck the things that are too close out of the bed, and then he'll transplant those into the six packs, which then is an income or revenue stream for him to make. He could also pull those up and just clip them, cut them back and eat them and let the other ones around them, grow. So, basically he's just growing more food in less space, this is actually quite intelligent. The other thing about this is that, you know, he doesn't add on any large amounts, any kind of compost or worm castings or rock dust or even any fertilizers, right, he just growing in the dirt that's sitting here, right, and in my opinion that's good and it's bad, I mean, we need to remember that, you know, depending on where you live, your soil could vary widely. You could actually be lucky and live in a place where that has fertile soil, you could also be unlucky, in maybe live in a place that maybe doesn't have the best of soil. Where I'm sitting right now is actually underneath, where his house used to sit. There was a house here, he tore it out, you know, the house was here for a hundred years, so the soil underneath the house has been basically covered for a hundred years and then he uncovered it, it probably hasn't been, you know, contaminated too much with all kinds of stuff, and so it's actually a fairly fertile and he's, you know, built it up over time. Because there is, the fact of the matter is, there is organic matter in most soils and here he has a clay soil, so, you know, it actually does and is actually quite nutritious, if it, you know, doesn't get water logged, and actually that's why we're sitting right now on these, 4 by 4's that actually is his walk ways, cause when it rains here, you get caked on the mud. But yeah, so yeah, it looks like, things are growing really good in here and next I wanna show you guys another technique he uses in his raised beds to grow, more food in less space. So, another technique he uses, besides planting things super close and super densely, is he actually does companion style planting, and he plants more than just one thing is a bed sometimes, you know, you guys saw where he had just mostly lettuce and spinach, but even in that bed, you know, every, so many feet he actually had an eggplant, little baby, that's gonna be growing up for the next season, after his lettuce or spinach is done, and in this bed, this is more of a cut and come again bed. He has things like the beets, he has a fennel, he has a cilantro, he has some parsley, he has a lettuce, all different kinds of stuff, and as you guys could see in the video there, this is really filled in, really nicely, it's like totally packed with plants, and he's proud of this fact, and actually I'm like yeah this is quite impressive, I like how, he's really densely seeded things, and they basically have to out compete themselves, and they just basically grow and, you know, what he's gonna do, he's gonna come in here and some of the bigger plants, he might actually just cut out and then those are the ones that he's gonna take to market, those are the ones that he's gonna eat, and then all the other ones, are basically just gonna fill in the space that was now created, when he did cut one out. In addition, , you know, he has planted things so closely and just basically three seeds down, that some of the seeds are coming up, so now there's new seedlings, that are this small, coming up in between the lettuces, so when he cuts down some of them, the new ones that are just emerging are now gonna get larger. So I mean, I think this is a technique that we can all learn and benefit from, you know, specially if you're trying to grow on the free and cheap, you could maximize your space, maximize the diversity for the most amount of yield. Up until now, you guys saw how basically he seeds his beds out and grows from seeds in place, I now wanna share with you guys, another way to do it, and you know, direct seed or planting from transplants, they both have their pros and cons, I like to personally do a little bit of each, and as it looks like here, so does Tino. So, now I wanted to share with you guys, just a, maybe a few more techniques he does, actually on my way to showing you guys the other way he starts his seeds out. These are his raised beds here, and as you guys could see, the soil is just mounted up to the sides and he's got things growing up the sides so that it just doesn't come to a edge, where he's not planting, it kind of slopes down mildly and he's been planting onions and different lettuces, right down the sides, so that, they'll actually fill it in, so it'll have a nice little narrow pathway in the middle, now it probably be a good idea to maybe do something like wood chips in between, so that you don't get all muddy, also the which was gonna break down over time, create more fertility. But anyways, he has all this stuff, here's the eggplant like I talked about planted within the lettuce, and also there's those little onion sets that I showed you guys earlier, little balls in between here. Over on this side, he has lots of different varieties of lettuces, including some of my favourite lettuces, those really dark rich lettuces that are at deeply pigmented, right. I wanna encourage you guys to eat deeply pigmented lettuce and other foods, coz they are higher in anti-oxidants. So yeah, and this is like, some of them really, this bed just really looks nice. He has, like so much food here, and I'm glad that he's probably one of the lowest priced sellers at the farmers market for your greens and by the looks of his greens, they're all quite healthy, and probably ones that you'd want to buy yourself, if you're not growing them yourself, here in Houston. he uses all organic methods. He doesn't sprays any kind of chemicals and all this kind of stuff, and actually he's getting some really superb results. So, another way besides direct seeding his plants, sometimes he'll actually start them in these little flats, you know, these are not plastic nursery flats, these are wooden flats that is he actually he made himself out of some 2 by 4 , and actually some, looks like, 1 by 6, fence post, like cedar fence post potentially, and that some good wood to use, coz it's gonna last a bit longer than just a pine or something. But these are nice, durable and stout. So, basically he fills this little container with a specific soil blend, that I'll share with you guys next, and then he basically grows his transplants. But to do that he does it in a few special ways to ensure he gets higher germination, because, once again, he doesn't want the water to dry out, he wants the proper moisture level. This is very important to him, to have a proper moisture level and also more importantly properly washed soil. So, the way that Tino starts his plants from the seed in the little containers are, he basically makes a little mini green house for them, and it's really simple, it's just this once again, the clear plastic that he likes so much and you guys could see, we'll go ahead and remove the plastic over here and underneath here , you guys could see, all these little baby starts, that are growing, that he says, that took like 4 days. These guys, are ready to have the plastic taken off, coz they are getting so tall, and that's another thing I wanna point out right, Tino does certain things for certain reason. If you guys looked, when I showed you guys these bins, side of the bins are made out of 2 by 4's, but the ends, but then the sides right, are actually made out of 2 by 6's and they're taller. This gives them about that much space, so that when he lays the plastic on top, it's not dragging on the top of the soil, so that gives the plants just a little bit amount of space to grow up. Once the plants almost touch the plastic, then that's time for the plastic to come off, coz otherwise the plants will start to bend and he doesn't want that at all, and yeah, he keeps nice little humid area for the plants to germinate, so this saves water, also creates a nice environment, you know, he's also right now seeding out some tomatoes, which generally like to germinate when it's warmer out, and by using this technique, he gets to warm up the soil, so that his tomato seeds could germinate here in Houston, even in December. So, now I wanna share with you guys, a special soil blend that Tino uses to start his transplants in, that I didn't get to show you guys yet. Now, this is the only time that actually he brings in some soil, but he also creates some, that I'll show you guys in a minute, to start his transplants, and he puts no coconut core, no peep moss and none of this stuff, right, he doesn't believe in it, right, and he's got a pretty good system down, I mean what he's doing, for the transplants is amazing, he's got some of the healthiest transplants that I've actually seen. One of the things I learned is to cover your wheel barrel, right, to cover the soil in the wheel barrel from the sun, the rain, all this kind of stuff. That's something I need to do, and this actually makes a nice little work table or work surface for you all too. So anyways let's go ahead and move this off, and as you guys could see here, he's got some really nice rich black soil, and one of his secrets is, he sips this down to quarter inch, so he gets comply by some compost from a certain place or maybe he gets a farm dirt compost sometimes. He sips it down, and then he adds some of his super potent compost that he's making right behind in a way that I've actually never seen before, which is gonna be good for you guys to see. But yeah, the soil is nice and filtered down, nice screened out, he has no big large chunks of stuff, that's very important and when I smell it, it actually has a nice mild neutral smell, looks like some really good stuff and this is where he starts all hi transplants in. Now, I know some of you guys might be thinking, "John, that's a really rich mixture of he's growing in all compost ", because they say don't grow in compost, you know , they say use a sterile soil medium. But, you know, one of the things that he does actually, once he puts this in a little six pack or tray, he'll actually wash, take the hose and he'll actually wash out, like, if you put coffee in a coffee maker, the water goes through and it leeches all the nutrients out of the coffee to put in your glass and you drink, right? He actually waters this compost down and there's like basically it's really brown and dark coming off and he does this for quite a while, depending on that the plants more mature or less mature, the plants more mature, they can handle a little bit stronger mix, but the plants that are baby, then he wants to kind of water a lot of the nutrients out of the plants, coz he says that might shock the plant. So yeah, so anyways, this mixture is mostly the stuff that he bought and brought in and the other stuff is what I'm going to show you guys next. Now, the reason why he does this is, this is the principal that I actually also agree with and why he treats his baby plants and his baby vegetables so well is because this, right? The most important time to determine the health of a plant over its life span is when it's a baby. If it had a rough time when it was a baby, if you're buying it from transplants from a nursery, that the roots are wrapping around the base and the basically the plant is root bound or if you are buying plants that aren't so healthy right? Those plants will not really ever turn out to their full genetic potential, they won't ever produce a lot of food, right?, coz they've already had hard times, they've already been stressed out, if like, you know I have friends and have been yelled at as a kid or maybe, you know, god forbid, beating as children and sometimes like you know, they have some issues when they grow older, now hopefully people can get counselling and stuff like that, but plants can't get counselling. So, you wanna start them off and give them the best environment, the best upbringing possible, whether you direct seed them or whether you start up from transplants, and that's actually one of the things he's doing here, you know, he strives to have the highest quality baby plants because in the end, that's gonna mean, he's gonna have higher quality, better tastier, larger large plants, and that's actually something that's not actually often talked about unfortunately in gardening. Anyways, let's go ahead and take a look at this unique way he's making compost, that I have never even seen before or even could've imagine. So, I know what you guys might be thinking, "John, what is that guy Tino have these big ass things in his yard, alright, is he a junk collector, well actually he has a few things kind of laying around like I do, but actually its pretty neat and tidy around here. These guys may seem a little bit out of place and look off, but actually they serve a very important purpose because instead of having a tumbling composter like I did, right?, he's repurposing something he got for free or cheap that I think is thrown out and I believe is a waste to throw these guys out because he's found an excellent use of them. He used to work in, you know, refrigeration and all this kinds of stuff. What these two things are, these are the ice makers, these are those big industrial ice makers that you might see in on the top there, that have all that, you know, machinery and equipment but the bottom is basically just an insulated, you know, brain that actually keeps the temperature regulated, so it keeps it cold inside there. Also has a nice little lid here that can be open closed. So when he's ready to harvest his compost, he just opens up this lid right?, and all his compost by gravity just drops to the bottom in here. So he has a really nice rich stuff. Now he's not using traditional composting like with worms, no no no, he's not using traditionally composting, that composts with heat actually. What he's doing is something unique and different and basically what he's doing is he's just modelling nature. He's speeding up the process and he's providing a home or a habitat for the creatures that live inside his ice box compost bins, right? and let me go ahead and show you guys, what some of them looks like, alright. So , each of these ice makers bottoms anyways, are at different stages, you know, the one on the other side is the stuff he's harvesting from, this is the stuff, it's kind of like letting digest and compost or more prominently break down over time. Like this one, coz it still has a little window here, that you could actually just, go in and you could actually see all the materials that he's been stacking up. So, basically it's open at the top, he basically puts in, you know, old okra twigs you know, food scraps, you know, yard wastes and things and basically just funnels down and you know, on the top there's not a lot of living material. It's kind of like a lot of dry, but this is the insulation level and as he packs more stuff on the top, all the stuff kind of works down at its own pace and breaks down, you know, here you could see some of the stuffs that's not really broken down, but in here, there's like a little area, that we could actually just dig into, and you could see this stuff, it's getting broken down and let me go ahead and open the door to show you guys what's breaking this organic material down. Alright, so this is the ice maker that still in process, not yet ready to be harvested, we'll open this guy up for you guys and look at that, I don't know if you guys could see that on a HD camera, but just in this ice bin thing here, I see all these little creatures and actually when I opened the door, they all like went into little like caves inside all this compost, you know, what these little creatures are, I see like rollie pollies, I see cockroaches and who knows what other kind of bugs are living in here. He didn't add these bugs I here, they just showed up, right? You provide food for the bugs, they're gonna show up and they're gonna chow it down, right?, you have a big table of tropical fruit, I'm gonna show up and I'm gonna eat it all, and that's what the bugs are doing. He's providing a nice home for them, they show up and they basically eat all the organic material and then they poop it out, which is creating a really rich, nutrition for his plants, you know, the bugs and things will basically breakdown the organic batter and when they poop out, they poop it out actually some of the richest biology, you know. So, they can be pooping out fungus or fungi, bacteria, fungi and different chitinease degraders, cellulose degraders and all these things. Its kind of like, you know, they have worm castings, which we know is so good, they also have meal worm castings, which is so good, and they also have other excrements from bugs, that, you know, in the forest, on the forest floor you just see all these bugs scurrying around and eating all the different organic matter, well hey he's just doing that in a more contained space so this is actually, instead of a worm bin, it's actually just a bug bin, using just the local bugs to breakdown his nutrients. This is something that's not really even talked about right?, and I think this is a really good way to do it. I mean there are black soldier flies all these different bugs, but you know, in my garden I have a lot of the little pill bugs or whatever and there just breaking down the leaf material and organic matter actually in my beds, so actually I don't even have to have a bin, and you know some of those bugs also if they're in your garden, maybe not be a good thing, they also chomp on your young plants. If you don't have a lot of organic matter, so this maybe a better option. So, you know, I like that he's doing this to create a really rich mix, so he uses some of this stuff with some of the box stuff to start off his transplant. So, I'm really glad I came to visit Tino today, coz one of the areas that actually I haven't been maybe the most successful as a gardener is starting transplants. So he has a system down, totally to get really good transplants. These are some of the healthiest transplants I've seen of all the places I've visited, like, he plants them really dense and then actually he plucks them out as he needs them. So, right here we have basically the, some celery that he planted, and as you guys could see in this half right here it's pretty thinned out, coz he's plucking all the large ones, and its the large ones that actually, he takes out of here. He could either, A, you know, put them into little six packs, like he's just done with these guys, and then sell them and then if he don't sell them, he can plant it in his garden, and other, or, he could actually just take these out and just pop them in his garden. So, he's gonna be actually starting, he's doing some beets right now, he's gonna pop out the beets and then put them in his garden to grow the beets, because he found that you know, if he just direct seed the beets, they don't come up so well. But if you put them in here first, then they work a lot better. SO, you know, you're only gonna learn this by maybe reading things online, or trying yourself, and see what works or not right? I always encourage you guys to try to, like, make your gardening life, like, easier and work less, right? So, if you direct seed things, hey, that's always the best, coz that's gonna be the least amount of effort, if you gotta transplant and do all these kinds of stuffs, its little bit more effort, but if it allows you to grow more food, it's definitely worth it. So, yeah, so what he did here was, he was just coming over and he was just popping out some of these guys and he waters these guys, and he just will pop out the little roots there, like that and take this little transplant and then he'll actually put it into a six pack or maybe even a 72 pack and make those available to people. Now the next thing I wanna share is actually, once he pops these guys out, I wanna show you guys his technique, that he uses, where he can actually transplant up to 2 thousand plants in one day just by himself, which to me is amazing coz like I transplant stuff all the time, and I'm really slow, you know, coz I don't have his technique down, so I'm gonna basically take his technique that he uses for transplants and run with it, coz it's actually quite intelligent and actually quite smart and he's actually even invented his own tool to do it. So, let's take a look at that next. So, now I'm gonna show you guys the first step to transplanting. Basically what he did was he took a, his a 6 pack here, he's actually using nice size six packs, you know. I encourage you guys always, when you're purchasing 6 packs, if you're gonna be using them, is to try to buy the ones that actually have, that hold the most soil. Some of them are like long and skinny, and in my opinion, those aren't that good, we wanna have lots of soil in there. So, as he filled up this with the soil mixture from the wheel barrel that I showed you guys earlier, and then he washes it down, it's very important step right? You could do it with like little hose, he just does it with a hose just like spray this down gently and basically he lets the water soak all the way through. So, now number 1, you're gonna have really nice rich soil, that's fully watered, but you're not just gonna, like, plant in it, where there's still water on top. You're gonna wanna give it some time to let the water drain out, and if you guys look at the coming out, I could see the water, even though the ground's like dirt. I could see the water that's coming out that looks like that coffee. We're leeching some of the nutrients out, or the tea out of the compost on to the ground, and he'll do this several times to bring it down to the level where he feels comfortable, and then plant his plants in that, right?, and as I said, you know, if the plants are younger, then he's gonna rinse it more, and if the plants are a bit bigger, then he doesn't rinse it as much. But this is a critical step to plant in a 100 percent straight, you know screen compost, which is you know, goes against the many gardeners style, which they ,"Oh you gotta use a sterile medium, coz if you use compost it could cause problems", but all his stuff's looking great. So, he's doing a lot of things that maybe go against convention gardening wisdom, and I would encourage you guys to try it, see what happens. So, now I'm gonna share with you guys Tino's revolutionary planting technique that even enlightened me actually. As you guys could see, we've actually already rinsed the soil out and it's a drained fairly well. Most of it has drained pretty well, except of these two cells, and so, that's very important, right? One of the most important thing he stresses is you wanna have well draining soil. If the soil is not draining and it stays wet, right?, you're gonna rot out your plant's roots, you know, and he has a high probability to success, not to say he doesn't lose a couple plants sometimes, coz you know whatever happens. But he does things to ensure his success of his baby plants. So, the first step is, once you have rinsed it all out, you're gonna have these little transplants here that you basically just pluck up. So the first step is to just put them in a wash, right?, you're gonna dunk them in the water, we dunk them in some water, and we bring them out, check it out, the roots are now all together, where as before, you know, the roots were kind of like, really bushy. So that's very important, number 1. Number 2, he has a special screwdriver, so this is not just any screwdriver, he took a standard screw driver here and took a special file, I think he used maybe a chainsaw file and he basically just put a notch in the tip of the screwdriver, and this is very important not to put a point in, but it's a kind of rounded notch, so you know, there's no sharp edges on the screw driver, that is gonna cut the roots of the plants you're transplanting, then all he does is, he takes a little plant here and he goes down, maybe a little bit above half way right?, coz basically, his whole goal is to get this roots, in the little cell as quickly and efficiently as possible, and so he basically, he'll put this down, sometimes he'll like formulate a figure 8, you know, to get it, if the roots really long, then he'll take the little screw driver, and the little tip there and then he'll put them in the roots so all kind of like line it up like this, kind of like right about maybe there, and then basically he pushes down in one fall swoop and then basically, he's now planted the plant. The other thing at the same time that, he's going down, he'll kind of like leave a little bit of hole, you know, as he comes down. What that Little hole's gonna do, that's gonna ensure the water directs down and also it's gonna funnel the water down so that it drains faster. This is another critical component, if you're growing in straight compost, coz I've seen sometimes the compost will not drain, and then you're gonna get water logged, and that's why many people use or grow, peat moss because it basically, give a larger method of air, larger , you know, probability of air or like a cushion basically. Where's in this case you gotta be more precise, and so you know, with this, like literally hundreds of plants starts over there it looks like he's pretty much precise every time. So yeah, this is something, that's gonna save me a lot of time, coz normally I would've just took these guys and try to plant these with all the roots hanging out, but just by simply dunking them into water, and having a little screwdriver thing, then you're gonna go ahead and go down, let me go ahead and give you guys a close up on this, its kind of cool. We're gonna go ahead and put this down, and he basically sometimes like, loops this around a little bit, and see if we could, sometimes he just loops this around a little bit, makes a little 'u' out of it or a circle, then he just shoves this all down just like that and this took me a couple times to figure out how to do it, but now, you know, I think he'd probably approve of my technique. But yeah, he just does whole little six packs like this and actually here's one that he did, so you guys could see, what it looks like. So next what I wanna show you guys is actually after he pots those up, kind of like this, he's potted them all up. These are kind of sitting out and depending on how large they are, he'll either put them in a shade, like if they're just transplanted out or sometimes he'll put them in area with the sun and he'll rotate this depending on his specific desires for the plant. If the plants getting too big, he wants the growth to slow down. he'll put it in shade, if he wants them to grow faster and get topped off, looking nice for market, he may put them in the sun. That's very important. The other things is sometimes, instead of doing the six packs, he'll also do, you know, large flats of 72. So look at this, this is like a really nice flat of lettuce here, and he'll even take sometimes the ones maybe not performing, underperforming, it's too small, he'll put it in a longer one so that, you know, there all consistent size. So you're gonna get some of the best plant starts. You know I popped up some of these roots and some of these guys, maybe like, we'll do it on these guys here, see, look at this, this is one of the starts he did and look at that, if you guys notice, there's no roots up near the top because he sucked this down in the ground, you know when he's transplanting, all the roots are at the bottom and these roots are not wrapping around each other yet. He'll also even come in and root prune in these guys sometimes, if the roots are getting too much, so that they actually don't get roop bound so that when you guys take his plant starts home, you're gonna get some amazing results, like he's getting in his garden here, and , you know, his price is actually quite affordable, some of the best prices I've seen in Houston, like if you're getting like just a standard 6 pack, it's like 2.50 for a healthy 6 pack, that's very important. If you guys, wanna buy, you know, whole flat, basically he'll give you a whole flat of 6 packs for, I think around, 12 bucks and if you're buying a 72, you got the hook-up deal, 20 bucks, right, and if you buy , like 5 flats of 72 plants like this, he'll even go down further, so I encourage you guys, if you guys are not starting you plant starts yourself, you live here in Houston area, definitely call him up, and he'll hook you up with some of the healthiest plant starts in the lowest prices that I've seen. I mean if I lived here, I'd definitely be getting some of the 72 packs you know, it's definitely easy way to go, because you're gonna have a higher level of success when you guys start out with healthy plants, like he's making here. I think the last part of this episode, I'd like to actually sit down with Tino, he is from Greece, originally, so he has a thick accent, so maybe hard for you guys to listen to him, so I'll try to do the best I can, to maybe, help him explain what he's trying to say and I hope as soon as I'm able to also getting subtitles on this for you guys. John - So, now I'm here with Tino, the gardener extraordinaire that has created this paradise here in Houston with all his amazing plants, that actually he doesn't add any fertilizers to, and all his amazing transplants, that you guys saw just a few of them, I mean it's just impressive the amount of healthy transplants he has going. I only have a limited amount of time left here today, before I actually have to take off, but I want to ask him a few questions about his garden and why he chooses to grow all this food here, for him and his family. So a teen of the first question is, Why are you growing all this food here, especially where your duplex used to be on your property. Tino - Because I like to, I like to grow and I can't eat all these, just some of myself, some I'll give it away to someone and I like to grow, I like garden, that's all I do. There's not a man, there's no you know, I like to do, I like what I'm doing. John - Yeah, so I mean he just basically loves gardening and I mean I love gardening, I mean it's good to get out in nature and have a hobby, that's a productive hobby and actually his hobby is quite productive, produces hundreds of plant starts or even thousands of plant starts for his garden and also you guys in the local area. So, another thing I wanna talk to you guys about, Tino, is that something I didn't get to mention in the video, that was important to me, that I didn't get to talk about is you know, another aspect of your gardening on the free or cheap, beside bringing not many inputs in is how you communicate with the plants. This is something I do myself and I know, you also do. So, you wanna talk little bit about talking and more importantly listening to your plants, and how important it is for your gardening style? Tino - The, the plants they, you can, you can watch them and they tell you story like they tell you, like , like if you play on cassette, they tell you like a, how can I explain that, that's I'm hard to explain that, you have to explain that. John - Can you explain it in Greek? Your language, your native language. Tino - No no no, I cannot, no no no. They tell you what they need, what they, just look at them, you see , how they are growing, you see how they, it's it's very, they tell you a story, the whole story, how they growing, like how, what they need, how they can be better, how they can, it's very, it's very simple but it's very complicated, you know, it could be very complicated for some, lot of people, then simple for some others, and I don't know how to explain that. John - Yeah, so I stumped him, he's having a hard time explaining, but I'll try to give you my best, so, basically he's saying, every plant will tell a story and you need to listen to the plant and I know, you know, I would call Tino here a plant whisperer like they have dog whisperers and all these things. He knows plants and you could listen to the plants and hear, maybe not hear what they are saying, but you could kind of feel their vibe, I mean, we are all interconnected on this planet, and we sometimes forget that, and you need to open up, to be able to listen more, you know. I mean that's one of the things that I learned is to become a better speaker, you need to become a better listener. So I encourage all you guys to listen to your garden, you know, he'll sit out on his chair just looking over his garden and listening to his plants and seeing them and feeling what they need and then he'll take appropriate action to do that, and I know a lot of you guys are new, you guys may think I'm crazy and Tino's crazy for talking to the plants and not talking to the plants and listening to the plants and all this stuff. But, you know what, one day its gonna click, you're gonna be in your garden and you're plants are gonna tell you, "John I need water", "John, hey put some of this on me" or "put some of that on me" or "hey, I need more sun, I need less sun", and whatever, they're gonna tell you some stuff, and then all you need, all your job is to do as a gardener is to react and give them what they really need, not what you think they need, and I think this causes a lot of challenges in gardening, "Oh, I, my plants need water", you flood the heck out of them man, they lose their life coz, you're flooding them out, right? I mean let's talk about that Tino, you, you water very minimally here, right?, you only water, when necessary, you let the plants fend for themselves, and why, why do you do this? Tino - Because, I have to water the plants when I start them, when I start I have to water the plants because, I can't, like some to start, something, then after, after they're watered, when they grow out, start growing, I let them go to find their own moisture, I try to harder the soil the most I can. So, keep the moisture on the soil and they're good to go, that's all you need, you don't need nothing else, that's all you need. By hardening the soil, with a plants, with a , then you've got everything. That's all you need. That's all. John - Yeah, so he has no irrigation system here and nothing like that, and I mean this time here in December, everything looks amazing. Tino - Just giving them basics, you know what I mean, give them the basics. It's like a raise a plants like raise a kid. That's the way I see it. You see, if you wanted the plants to succeed, just let them go the hard way , you know what I mean, they're gonna find their own way, they're gonna go deeper, they're gonna find moisture, they'll find what they need. So by giving the plants anything they need , so , they become lazy, so they depend on you, for work, for food, for disease, for everything. You have to fight all this, so let the plants to find what they need, by themselves. Don't give them what they need. They're gonna find it, give them the basics, that's the basic thing, moisture, that's all you need, and the rest is, they can do, they can do better by their own. John - Yeah,, I mean I , definitely agree like, right? My parents they didn't give me allowance I was the like kid that got all his money, I had to like go out and find a job and make money and I think that's why I turned out pretty good, you know. We all know them spoiled kids right?, they're just messed up in their lives, coz they've just been given everything, and likewise your plants are similar right? So, cut that water off your plants sometimes, you know, don't over water them, you know. I encourage you guys to check your soil moisture levels, make sure they have the proper amount of water, but don't give them too much. Make them fend for themselves and find their own water. Of course this also depends on your particular environment you live in and also your soil, so I wouldn't wanna say that anybody in Las Vegas should in the middle of a summer, let your plants fend for summer, coz that's gonna be a bit more challenging than it is here in Houston. So, the other thing, you know, that actually we maybe don't see eye to eye on, coz we have maybe different goals and values, which is alright, is, adding fertilizers, nutrition and worm castings, and even compost, like you add very little with any compost. I think you added some to this, but all your bed pretty much you don't add any compost. So, you wanna speak to all these things that people put in their gardens and why you feel, is not needed. Tino - You don't need it because you, you, need the worms, where they belong, in the ground. Their compost, their composting the ground, they make castings in the ground , they harden the soil, they have the things, they do more, you see, by buying the chemical product, that. By keeping the germs in the ground, and take them out of the bins, take it from the bins, they do much better. That's the way it's supposed to be. John - I would agree with that, he says, take your worms out of your bins and put them in the ground, provided you have, you know, the right temperatures year round, where they could actually live in the ground, like here there's no problem, other places may be more challenging. Put them in the ground so that worms can eat and digest and poop where you need them and they can irrigate the soil instead of having them, locked up in a bin. I mean. I'm definitely for that now, actually in my, I don't have a worm bin, all my worms are in the bin. I like to add some supplementary worm castings for my beds for additional fertility but I would agree the best is actually having the worms in the bin. Tino - The another thing is, you got the castings, you see the, the plants, every plant, the worms they make a tunnel under the soil. John - Worms make tunnels. Tino - All the tunnels they find castings, the plants will find the whole plants, the plans that hold the follow the tunnel, so the they'll now have to penetrate the hard soil. So they build it very strong root system, by building very strong root system, you're building a beautiful plant. Sheltered beautiful plant. That holds. You have to have a feet, strong feet to run a marathon, you know, you can't do it without strong feet. You can't have a healthy plant without healthy roots. The worms they play very, they do very, that's very important for the worms to be on the ground where your plants are and live, always live like a some kind, like leaves, you know that leaves that you, when you cut your plants, just cut them don't pull them out leave the rest of the roots to die so, you feed the worms, they can't. Sometimes that's this ground right here, sometimes I got, if I have a worm like this big, Lyme worms, I'm talking about Lyme worms, they by not tilling the soil, they, you see they building like, like a tunnel system, and by tilling the soil you can never till. John - Because the worms yeah, that'll destroy the soils, yeah. Irrigate the nutrients. Tino - That's very important for the plants, for the plants, to have a open tunnel underneath John - Yeah, it also causes irrigations too. Tino - They find food in the tunnel, they find oxygen, they find, they can built a very strong wall system. That's what you need, that's the basic, that's the most important thing for any plant. John - I mean I totally agree with Tino on this fact, the worms belong best in your beds. That's the best place for them and they do a lot of things in the beds as nature would want them to, so your plants could thrive. Tino - By Buying like a bag worm compost, and throw them on your plants, throw them on your beds is not gonna do nothing. It's do something, but it's missing the whole point, the whole point is missing. John - I agree with the worm castings on the top of the beds, mixed in , it's gonna help. Now some worm castings are better than others, coz some worm castings may have worm casting eggs, so now you're actually putting the eggs and the worm castings in the beds, so now the worms could hatch at the same time. Anyways let's we pretty much agree on the whole worm situation. Let's talk about something maybe that we don't maybe see eye to eye on, the rock dust. So, what do you think about the rock dust, Tino. Tino - What's rock dust? John - Rock dust, the ground up rocks. Tino - You, we're made of rocks, this planet itself is made by that, by big rocks. So, you don't have to pay from , you don't have to go to the, for sand and big rocks, you know. You got that underneath in your soil, you got everything you need. It's all accessible to your plants because the way you, the way you garden, the way you, you, cultivate your plants, that's not accessible, and then you have to bring all this stuff, plus it's money, the business a lot of things is involved, so you just put all this on the side and the sow seeds on the ground, and see what happens, and then you'll learn from there. Your next, next thing's gonna be, you're gonna move up better and better all the times, and then you're gonna end up, with something like a, you don't have to do nothing, you don't have to bring nothing from the outside, all that you have is something, plants and best of any kinds of vegetables, I think you have pretty much everything. I have no problem because I have everything, without bringing, without bringing nothing. So, it's good for, I mean, it's good for nature, it's good for the everybody. It's good for your health, its good for you, it's good for your money, it's good for your pocket, its good for everything. Plus you got the top quality vegetables, by doing this, you got much more, that's the point, that was the mission. By doing more you got less, that's the way it works for the vegetables. It doesn't work, maybe that doesn't work in other things, but the garden, that's the way it works. By doing less you got more. John - So yeah I mean, definitely this is Tino's opinion about this topic and maybe many of you guys too. I get a lot of flag by all the stuff I buy to put in my garden, right? But once again, just like Tino, this is his hobby, he, he puts a lot of time and love into his garden. I put you know some time and you know, some money and products into my garden which I believe are gonna help me, even if its psychological that my food is healthier, that I'm eating it, I'm eating healthier food in my mind, it's still helping me, right?, if I'm wasting money unnecessasarily, you know, based on the research I've done, in my trials and experiments I've done I believe, some of the things I add actually are helpful to my garden to create higher quality food and not to say that he's not growing amazing food here, because he has absolutely is, the thing to remember that there's many ways to garden, some soils are more nutritious]us than others and you can't just say, "Oh the guy Tino, I just grow with anything if you guys could live next door to Tino, then grow just like he does, guess what, you're gonna have the same remarkable success that he does coz you're gonna be in the same soil, the same climate, the same environment, right? But unfortunately, I know a lot of you guys live in Australia, the UK, maybe you live in Georgia, maybe you live in Maine, you know, things vary a lot. Then you have to like, maybe kind of learn how to do things little bit differently, and that's alright you know. I'm here to just share with you guys, what different people are doing. So, Tino, let's talk about something's that would probably both agree with, chemical fertilizers. What do you think about, chemical fertilizers. Tino - It's the, you had to see that, you had to see that, you see young kids with lot of problems, health problems you see, you see lot of, you never see, it's going, it's going like ,something like a disease. You got disease , you got problems everywhere, so we have to go back, I think you know better than nobody else, you know about this better. But top quality healthy food, consuming top quality healthy food, you got, normally you got your and I think, you know better than anybody else about this and it's, you contaminated your life, you contaminated your food, yourself. It's you have to live the plant, the plant is smart enough, the seed, the single seed is smart enough if it falls to the ground, and there are amount of moistures, he knows exactly what to do, and right temperature and moisture, he knows exactly what to do, he doesn't need nobody to tell. You don't need to go all this classes and all this crap and then you listen all this crap, and I mean, start by yourself, if you have a soil and you , luckily a piece of soil and little piece of space in your house, in your farm, if you have a soil, you need to measure things, you need to measure things, make sure you have the sunlight and drainage. It doesn't matter what kind of soil you have, of course it doesn't have to be contaminated, it doesn't matter m=what kind of soil you have, you can grow pretty much everything. You need a drainage, two important things, a drainage and sun light. John - And the right moisture Tino - The moisture's gonna, you're gonna have to, you have to do that. The plants have to do that. So, you can grow anything, it's nothing. It's unlimited, you can grow anywhere you could do anything. John - Yeah, I mean
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Garlic Farmers Share Practical Tips, Tricks And Experiences On How To Grow Garlic

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 111 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

 
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located in work with yards 500 soon here comes on the Chicago we click there for out and buy yourself so after rack to eat and those are two separate topic is improving air nadhaswaram manager question you can see some pictures of are currently you have two young children 53 that help us out and also have challenges anything specific to our farm share it wow we grow about a quarter acre of garlic see right now and we're looking to double triple that I work full-time arm and we kind of runs the farm basically and so we just want to share a little bit of our experience and then talk really about the specifics of our production system definitely causes certain age 12 working very few college so I was beginning of my working experience it was all consensual but everything from your transportation retail and a business I grow up a name and ended up in the Midwest and so grow up a city kid athlete and now went on to manage a couple farms their small-scale vegetable production apprenticed on caretaker farm you made it further that mask entities I believe it's the second oldest organic farm about 150 and remember TFA went on to Iowa to start a small farm to poor Julie see if we were right for each other while farming and then bird I together went on to victory acres and Auckland Indiana town that by Muncie and took a small farm from about 20 GSA's members to about 125 250 we had compiled Susan chicken so we comes out at all in a lot of different ways and now we're at our current location live in a small farm dream and garlic is hopefully a key part of that so another part of our honor is a reservist program officers serve directors house en vivo pela sauce on her the meat is that a good account of the farm again deliver a box office a lot how far away and I was really successful we ended up with raven star canada season and also requests for more vegetables all the time there you go I give all the heroes so that's great and repairing on doing on the trial started and we're open house so in terms of our specific garlic card production we were looking for a car with organic hardneck garlic we have complained by hand because if you don't I'm partner garlic it has to be oriented a certain way otherwise neck gets bent and people buy that so there's yet to be a machine that can do that efficiently and so we were looking to scale up production that could do that for us and also ease some of the labor fatigue that goes into planting molting those sorts of things also in terms of looking toward sustainability trying to find a system that we didn't have to tillage much we have vegetable farmers are guilty of probably older tility so we're trying to move away from that especially in our really sandy soils low organic matter we need to really work on that so that was kind of one of our goals we were kind of hoping the car to help us mulch for straw and eight and harvesting as well one of the products we have so far is a review of parts available so this is a 34-page document that's available on the state website that kind of part of our grant was working with Purdue University so they're AG engineering department at couple students that came our kind of figured out what we needed and it was their job to see what was out there and see if if they could come up with a better system something that wasn't commercially available so I'm not I can weld on my great Boulder so this was a great opportunity to partner and maybe come up with something that so that document is available so if you're thinking about ways to increase your comfort level whether your strawberries or any sort of crop I say you really useful document so this if you make it up polar productions's it actually looks like as you think about what kind of apartment she walked public on CBC it at this is a cheerful infield that's in October but we're discern if you had me try so if you can a photo capture and these are almost feels and then if our audience Jocelyn need to come out so before I left Travis went over top CEOs strategies rash young lady design stop being lost the monitor October chapter most of constructs on creating a mess and then compile tanking and yeah the amounts of that point and then I will come to your business and garlic and this is specifically what you're at an art form this is where we are doing everything right hand there's holes around athleta there are you coming all that hot and mulching it and you see if there is some composition matter that it is to be a little bit uncomfortable very hot and I want certain operating system and the event early to mid why do all strategic a variation four and one and that why Morris and cure so that's the basic production says that we're looking at will take questions at the end is going to be up for months time so here's the 10 so we have a lot of August on the race to jim carrey amount or a knee to out and then you're sure just and try to just back so that will be some tension in the day so that we currently do our system bought hands and knees work which over quarter acre doesn't sound like a lot but by doing that for four days straight really adds up we're terrified so part of the grant was to kind of look at okay where do we really spend a lot of our time and where can be maximized these of equipment if we're gonna spend money on it how are we going to use that so one of the things we did is looked at our system and timed it out okay we're spending our time if you add it all up planting harvesting and mulching is where we were spending six to nine o'clock and so and then we also kind of looked at okay what's the most physically hard I'm actually harvesting and hanging it who spent a lot of time there but that's actually somewhat easily but it's it's more upright word and it can kind of be done in different stages so we kind of looked at planting as kind of a big one that we were trying to find it directly so how do we eliminate that bending awkward positions how do we eliminate unnecessary tillage this card's going to be happy have to be able to drive through this pretty heavy cover crop and i'll show you some pictures here and then of course related that in our sandy soils know we have about inclusion of topsoil it's all yours so consorting that moisture is really important to us and then what's a scale appropriate machine for us i'm just going to walk from real quick kind of what the student at purdue found available options I here's a card you found and booking further details this car didn't end up working at a hand-cranked broke and couldn't really move along but maybe it has some merits this is something that's currently exists in the u.s. about 35 hundred dollars but we didn't know you know we're not doing strawberries are doing garlic could it drive through that type of heavy biomass sure this is another cart that's quite a bit more expensive you have to import it in the u.s. behind it as far as we can tell and then here's kind of a cream of crop the most ideal cart small tank on wheels but again it's pretty expensive so if you had a lot of acres it might might work so here are some of the unique features yes peacetreaty features of how we do are not so you can't get it's all there eight hundred dollars really important on our farm to both the soil I was nutrients create aeration garlic chopped strawberries you saw some of the parts for copper doing something that small medium scale program the municipal new or eager to hear robot but is not full time at this point and then also also something that people had passed planting weeding and harvesting mulching and why we bought something that can be well my heart we were all in shock like just across the street cause it were something that is cannibal politics for in your community so that was important to us to one and then I'm arises burger yeah and as with most grant projects you go into these ideal thinking ideal goals and how it ends up is often very different nah that's okay that's part of why share does these types of funding projects actually accomplish all your goals here's a picture of the tall cover crop these are our two boys here and some years that cover crops can be four feet any on you know how to follow those and it really probably kind of our fertility for our garlic so this is really important that you keep this here's what it looks like I've mode the strip where our bed is going to be with you too rose garlic / bed or so over that for you can't do it that any more intensively and then be rototill strip rototill and so you can see this pic map right here a cover crop that is going to have to be able to be driven over by some sort of machine if we're going to complain so here is a close up with our trip take this is after planting and here's new leaders and planting you can see that we have really a lot of cover crop / garlic area plants we do that again to the resort and we're actually moving towards the system where we don't throw it until it all but we just deep rip a row or a shame on our tractor so that Bianca so it all and so that's kind of uber kind of think through how we plan so here's a just our farm all 102 the shank rip through kind of see that there we do have some video on our youtube channel that shows that specifically we won't be kind of play that today but equal nation doesn't be certain state which we harvest and sell or it depends in july was before career plan around that let me know it's time harvest yeah so the garlic part here's actual car I'm constructed it's got a canopy here where a tarp can we put and then it's a laydown design I mean we have you know a place where we can I'm your direct a better pictures and some of the new students actually driving it around and we went through out for engineering students and two professors so turnover was really high uh not because the colored part is that difficult but that's just the nature of working with you know university students so that something we learned I was hoping to be up to about three quarter acre Darla production by the time but probably the cart never really got done which actually turned out to be the best thing because maybe family construction timeline these were really ready for so yeah you're groovy had to get an intuition which jose was gracious understand at this point you're apart they're having some trouble with that design in terms of how the wheels actually swimming when it's going down the road so we're almost there but now it's gotten a student new group students work so it is what it is so lessons learn the simple i think we tried to put too many things into one part maybe a couple versions down the road we could have done that but i think we need to acknowledge that up front and a motor and offensive that so ah the students really want to hold on mm-hmm you can do it yeah i know engineers i found that every few of the options why we found that this holds you to here for that petition for including that so that wasn't heard of this we've had enough time i mean if you think about it's going to take two years leave two and a half of free you know ideal world i got it don't try to do too much you come said that it's about the process we really have refined our growing process and really thinking about recognizing by one of you that valuable and then just a concept of working with students is great but there are some limits to that so if you go both ways any questions you got a couple minutes for questions so and thank you know yeah she would not SVA cost me my look-see girl you guys were praised his group setting yeah so we have a website where we sell hard nexium garlic and then be also be eating garlic and so we do any garlic for about fifty cents of all and then our seed goes for about anywhere from ten to twelve dollars pounds we're not certified organic we can't translate that higher price but that's certainly where yeah well I say I am around an hour either crazy i have your customers it cost us about thirty cents of linear wrote book to produce the garlic so we're about 50 tons of all that's pretty good profit increased but we should good one Nancy I'm in Russian cosmonaut the price of very nice and appreciate her tomorrow yeah well unfortunately one of the great things was working with for you is that they had the students each have a budget so that they come over some of the materials they didn't have to pay for so we did like a 50 55 here on that so that work I mean I got worked out great so we're about free ran into the project yeah somebody wants to make that hot man because how else once today the product if you design with a design what would it cost me but that was not right and that's where the students have their final report they'll have their materials list yes still in five yeah yeah excellent question yes met and eyes well anywhere the students end up with this I'm thinking we might just take the motor off and pull it with our prom that might be the simplest know they thought about that but I think the students weren't didn't know enough we weren't didn't how to staff to do that item but yeah I think that's that that's a give Iowa I was just a little later doctors didn't bring off yep those those are good points yeah yeah I mean that 34 page document there's kind of a an assessment of do we use electric wire why not is it along if you were to show me before I've seen that one okay your life yeah it would be not one bit of a shocker like it clearly yeah sure for your coat I wasn't good at something list hi um I want my color pop too winterkill because we're not going to we wanted to grow as long as possible and then be halt sometimes we melted the falls and when he melts in the spring and so I don't I can't come in there with a herbicide burn it down I planted so I can till it's oats radish and may feel ya we you know we burned through that really quick any other questions yeah oh yeah so we part of the reason we do two rows to a bed and then our bed for 36 inches on center is because of our soil fertility our soil so for basically sands and the way our cultivating factors set up that's kind of the easiest part the carpet was then designed for that get working why so rattle one better because a cover crop we give you the roller from mr. Bruton the question is have we considered using a roller print / as a cover-up yes the problem is roller primping like quickly winter peas it needs to be flowering to actually kill it at crimping and likewise the hope that happy yet great though so yeah we can consider the tiny differently yeah it might if it whimper killed but again ripping that narrow chain through we may not even need is what we're for actually I did not even touch yeah good question that are we growing more than one side of garlic yes we have about seven varieties right now so peace out for Ukrainian music during our carrier and then we have your father's that we're working on building top four they all generally want that yeah some of our we do like a porcelain with home and asiatic with a kind of three categories our Asiatics kind of be ready to rule the shirts loud the technique works often times yes a week straw we have quite a bit of pasture that I gotta cut for us in two weeks means a froth is hard to beat and ultimately we need to be it well we mulch it thick enough so we don't happen that's that's our goal but yeah if we do need to be very new bike videos no difference is you around yeah I got a little bit experiment we do apply a little bit of nitrogen but Neil because of our sandy soil so I'm starting to try to cut that back a little bit more and you know we're looking at a soil as we going down in the spot for four years so we have seen the court increasing here in the amount if a question is what benefit will apart give us in terms of increasing um right now we don't hire anyone for an eye and so but the car will any of us just in my thinking and looking at the numbers to double production and still do so you know here's Hernandez's get back to my work and heroes are this Natalie oh haha so long time it's just physical well-being exactly our goal is probably sunday Chronicle time just we're taking it slow we're going to do things that are bad for our family well the question was is the cart used I don't think it will but right now in the harvest were able to pull the plants other so it was so light that's one advantage over sands and pick it right wagon full buy from so that's much more efficient the question was what is your current yield on a quarter acre so we do start looking fine but we we plan to bold every six inches I know our rows are about 250 feet long and so we have which is saving attend groves so that's an x rated be at twenty-five hundred to five thousand volts and about probably 6 40 50 ton of that is actual market will see garlic in terms of size and grade and then the rest are great that's typically what we found that varies by variety but that's soon yeah when both the few years ago when we had that rip brought in nominating we're devastated a lot of garlic pops yes we do foliar feed calcium particularly because it's a nice oil calcium want to proceed to leach out and so we I do a little fish fertilizer and Palestinians I spray every well 14 days 30 during the month of end of April roommate we found that that Mesa significant difference the business hearts on fire upon that information on guerrilla website and a Facebook page and you know glad the day questions always willing to learn and grow from other people and grow garlic yeah Lisa yeah that she saw my gosh / Dupree Taylor you are mr. well in June and a pre-order and it goes with me past carefully how forever tonight a new vision right on see where she stores are a little rough yeah yeah


 
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located in work with yards 500 soon here comes on the Chicago we click there for out and buy yourself so after rack to eat and those are two separate topic is improving air nadhaswaram manager question you can see some pictures of are currently you have two young children 53 that help us out and also have challenges anything specific to our farm share it wow we grow about a quarter acre of garlic see right now and we're looking to double triple that I work full-time arm and we kind of runs the farm basically and so we just want to share a little bit of our experience and then talk really about the specifics of our production system definitely causes certain age 12 working very few college so I was beginning of my working experience it was all consensual but everything from your transportation retail and a business I grow up a name and ended up in the Midwest and so grow up a city kid athlete and now went on to manage a couple farms their small-scale vegetable production apprenticed on caretaker farm you made it further that mask entities I believe it's the second oldest organic farm about 150 and remember TFA went on to Iowa to start a small farm to poor Julie see if we were right for each other while farming and then bird I together went on to victory acres and Auckland Indiana town that by Muncie and took a small farm from about 20 GSA's members to about 125 250 we had compiled Susan chicken so we comes out at all in a lot of different ways and now we're at our current location live in a small farm dream and garlic is hopefully a key part of that so another part of our honor is a reservist program officers serve directors house en vivo pela sauce on her the meat is that a good account of the farm again deliver a box office a lot how far away and I was really successful we ended up with raven star canada season and also requests for more vegetables all the time there you go I give all the heroes so that's great and repairing on doing on the trial started and we're open house so in terms of our specific garlic card production we were looking for a car with organic hardneck garlic we have complained by hand because if you don't I'm partner garlic it has to be oriented a certain way otherwise neck gets bent and people buy that so there's yet to be a machine that can do that efficiently and so we were looking to scale up production that could do that for us and also ease some of the labor fatigue that goes into planting molting those sorts of things also in terms of looking toward sustainability trying to find a system that we didn't have to tillage much we have vegetable farmers are guilty of probably older tility so we're trying to move away from that especially in our really sandy soils low organic matter we need to really work on that so that was kind of one of our goals we were kind of hoping the car to help us mulch for straw and eight and harvesting as well one of the products we have so far is a review of parts available so this is a 34-page document that's available on the state website that kind of part of our grant was working with Purdue University so they're AG engineering department at couple students that came our kind of figured out what we needed and it was their job to see what was out there and see if if they could come up with a better system something that wasn't commercially available so I'm not I can weld on my great Boulder so this was a great opportunity to partner and maybe come up with something that so that document is available so if you're thinking about ways to increase your comfort level whether your strawberries or any sort of crop I say you really useful document so this if you make it up polar productions's it actually looks like as you think about what kind of apartment she walked public on CBC it at this is a cheerful infield that's in October but we're discern if you had me try so if you can a photo capture and these are almost feels and then if our audience Jocelyn need to come out so before I left Travis went over top CEOs strategies rash young lady design stop being lost the monitor October chapter most of constructs on creating a mess and then compile tanking and yeah the amounts of that point and then I will come to your business and garlic and this is specifically what you're at an art form this is where we are doing everything right hand there's holes around athleta there are you coming all that hot and mulching it and you see if there is some composition matter that it is to be a little bit uncomfortable very hot and I want certain operating system and the event early to mid why do all strategic a variation four and one and that why Morris and cure so that's the basic production says that we're looking at will take questions at the end is going to be up for months time so here's the 10 so we have a lot of August on the race to jim carrey amount or a knee to out and then you're sure just and try to just back so that will be some tension in the day so that we currently do our system bought hands and knees work which over quarter acre doesn't sound like a lot but by doing that for four days straight really adds up we're terrified so part of the grant was to kind of look at okay where do we really spend a lot of our time and where can be maximized these of equipment if we're gonna spend money on it how are we going to use that so one of the things we did is looked at our system and timed it out okay we're spending our time if you add it all up planting harvesting and mulching is where we were spending six to nine o'clock and so and then we also kind of looked at okay what's the most physically hard I'm actually harvesting and hanging it who spent a lot of time there but that's actually somewhat easily but it's it's more upright word and it can kind of be done in different stages so we kind of looked at planting as kind of a big one that we were trying to find it directly so how do we eliminate that bending awkward positions how do we eliminate unnecessary tillage this card's going to be happy have to be able to drive through this pretty heavy cover crop and i'll show you some pictures here and then of course related that in our sandy soils know we have about inclusion of topsoil it's all yours so consorting that moisture is really important to us and then what's a scale appropriate machine for us i'm just going to walk from real quick kind of what the student at purdue found available options I here's a card you found and booking further details this car didn't end up working at a hand-cranked broke and couldn't really move along but maybe it has some merits this is something that's currently exists in the u.s. about 35 hundred dollars but we didn't know you know we're not doing strawberries are doing garlic could it drive through that type of heavy biomass sure this is another cart that's quite a bit more expensive you have to import it in the u.s. behind it as far as we can tell and then here's kind of a cream of crop the most ideal cart small tank on wheels but again it's pretty expensive so if you had a lot of acres it might might work so here are some of the unique features yes peacetreaty features of how we do are not so you can't get it's all there eight hundred dollars really important on our farm to both the soil I was nutrients create aeration garlic chopped strawberries you saw some of the parts for copper doing something that small medium scale program the municipal new or eager to hear robot but is not full time at this point and then also also something that people had passed planting weeding and harvesting mulching and why we bought something that can be well my heart we were all in shock like just across the street cause it were something that is cannibal politics for in your community so that was important to us to one and then I'm arises burger yeah and as with most grant projects you go into these ideal thinking ideal goals and how it ends up is often very different nah that's okay that's part of why share does these types of funding projects actually accomplish all your goals here's a picture of the tall cover crop these are our two boys here and some years that cover crops can be four feet any on you know how to follow those and it really probably kind of our fertility for our garlic so this is really important that you keep this here's what it looks like I've mode the strip where our bed is going to be with you too rose garlic / bed or so over that for you can't do it that any more intensively and then be rototill strip rototill and so you can see this pic map right here a cover crop that is going to have to be able to be driven over by some sort of machine if we're going to complain so here is a close up with our trip take this is after planting and here's new leaders and planting you can see that we have really a lot of cover crop / garlic area plants we do that again to the resort and we're actually moving towards the system where we don't throw it until it all but we just deep rip a row or a shame on our tractor so that Bianca so it all and so that's kind of uber kind of think through how we plan so here's a just our farm all 102 the shank rip through kind of see that there we do have some video on our youtube channel that shows that specifically we won't be kind of play that today but equal nation doesn't be certain state which we harvest and sell or it depends in july was before career plan around that let me know it's time harvest yeah so the garlic part here's actual car I'm constructed it's got a canopy here where a tarp can we put and then it's a laydown design I mean we have you know a place where we can I'm your direct a better pictures and some of the new students actually driving it around and we went through out for engineering students and two professors so turnover was really high uh not because the colored part is that difficult but that's just the nature of working with you know university students so that something we learned I was hoping to be up to about three quarter acre Darla production by the time but probably the cart never really got done which actually turned out to be the best thing because maybe family construction timeline these were really ready for so yeah you're groovy had to get an intuition which jose was gracious understand at this point you're apart they're having some trouble with that design in terms of how the wheels actually swimming when it's going down the road so we're almost there but now it's gotten a student new group students work so it is what it is so lessons learn the simple i think we tried to put too many things into one part maybe a couple versions down the road we could have done that but i think we need to acknowledge that up front and a motor and offensive that so ah the students really want to hold on mm-hmm you can do it yeah i know engineers i found that every few of the options why we found that this holds you to here for that petition for including that so that wasn't heard of this we've had enough time i mean if you think about it's going to take two years leave two and a half of free you know ideal world i got it don't try to do too much you come said that it's about the process we really have refined our growing process and really thinking about recognizing by one of you that valuable and then just a concept of working with students is great but there are some limits to that so if you go both ways any questions you got a couple minutes for questions so and thank you know yeah she would not SVA cost me my look-see girl you guys were praised his group setting yeah so we have a website where we sell hard nexium garlic and then be also be eating garlic and so we do any garlic for about fifty cents of all and then our seed goes for about anywhere from ten to twelve dollars pounds we're not certified organic we can't translate that higher price but that's certainly where yeah well I say I am around an hour either crazy i have your customers it cost us about thirty cents of linear wrote book to produce the garlic so we're about 50 tons of all that's pretty good profit increased but we should good one Nancy I'm in Russian cosmonaut the price of very nice and appreciate her tomorrow yeah well unfortunately one of the great things was working with for you is that they had the students each have a budget so that they come over some of the materials they didn't have to pay for so we did like a 50 55 here on that so that work I mean I got worked out great so we're about free ran into the project yeah somebody wants to make that hot man because how else once today the product if you design with a design what would it cost me but that was not right and that's where the students have their final report they'll have their materials list yes still in five yeah yeah excellent question yes met and eyes well anywhere the students end up with this I'm thinking we might just take the motor off and pull it with our prom that might be the simplest know they thought about that but I think the students weren't didn't know enough we weren't didn't how to staff to do that item but yeah I think that's that that's a give Iowa I was just a little later doctors didn't bring off yep those those are good points yeah yeah I mean that 34 page document there's kind of a an assessment of do we use electric wire why not is it along if you were to show me before I've seen that one okay your life yeah it would be not one bit of a shocker like it clearly yeah sure for your coat I wasn't good at something list hi um I want my color pop too winterkill because we're not going to we wanted to grow as long as possible and then be halt sometimes we melted the falls and when he melts in the spring and so I don't I can't come in there with a herbicide burn it down I planted so I can till it's oats radish and may feel ya we you know we burned through that really quick any other questions yeah oh yeah so we part of the reason we do two rows to a bed and then our bed for 36 inches on center is because of our soil fertility our soil so for basically sands and the way our cultivating factors set up that's kind of the easiest part the carpet was then designed for that get working why so rattle one better because a cover crop we give you the roller from mr. Bruton the question is have we considered using a roller print / as a cover-up yes the problem is roller primping like quickly winter peas it needs to be flowering to actually kill it at crimping and likewise the hope that happy yet great though so yeah we can consider the tiny differently yeah it might if it whimper killed but again ripping that narrow chain through we may not even need is what we're for actually I did not even touch yeah good question that are we growing more than one side of garlic yes we have about seven varieties right now so peace out for Ukrainian music during our carrier and then we have your father's that we're working on building top four they all generally want that yeah some of our we do like a porcelain with home and asiatic with a kind of three categories our Asiatics kind of be ready to rule the shirts loud the technique works often times yes a week straw we have quite a bit of pasture that I gotta cut for us in two weeks means a froth is hard to beat and ultimately we need to be it well we mulch it thick enough so we don't happen that's that's our goal but yeah if we do need to be very new bike videos no difference is you around yeah I got a little bit experiment we do apply a little bit of nitrogen but Neil because of our sandy soil so I'm starting to try to cut that back a little bit more and you know we're looking at a soil as we going down in the spot for four years so we have seen the court increasing here in the amount if a question is what benefit will apart give us in terms of increasing um right now we don't hire anyone for an eye and so but the car will any of us just in my thinking and looking at the numbers to double production and still do so you know here's Hernandez's get back to my work and heroes are this Natalie oh haha so long time it's just physical well-being exactly our goal is probably sunday Chronicle time just we're taking it slow we're going to do things that are bad for our family well the question was is the cart used I don't think it will but right now in the harvest were able to pull the plants other so it was so light that's one advantage over sands and pick it right wagon full buy from so that's much more efficient the question was what is your current yield on a quarter acre so we do start looking fine but we we plan to bold every six inches I know our rows are about 250 feet long and so we have which is saving attend groves so that's an x rated be at twenty-five hundred to five thousand volts and about probably 6 40 50 ton of that is actual market will see garlic in terms of size and grade and then the rest are great that's typically what we found that varies by variety but that's soon yeah when both the few years ago when we had that rip brought in nominating we're devastated a lot of garlic pops yes we do foliar feed calcium particularly because it's a nice oil calcium want to proceed to leach out and so we I do a little fish fertilizer and Palestinians I spray every well 14 days 30 during the month of end of April roommate we found that that Mesa significant difference the business hearts on fire upon that information on guerrilla website and a Facebook page and you know glad the day questions always willing to learn and grow from other people and grow garlic yeah Lisa yeah that she saw my gosh / Dupree Taylor you are mr. well in June and a pre-order and it goes with me past carefully how forever tonight a new vision right on see where she stores are a little rough yeah yeah


 
 
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Top 5 tips for growing the most vegetables in small space gardens

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 126 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

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Alright, this is John Kohler with ‘GrowingYourGreens.com’ today we have another exciting episode for you and today we got my 2016 presentation for the ‘Homesteading Summit’, so I want to thank Margery and all the staff that’s running the ‘Homesteading Summit’ out there and allowing me as a participant. I greatly appreciate it and hope all you viewers and everybody watching this is going to benefit from my presentation. You guys seen a lot of different presentations in this homesteading summit, and I love these summits because it gets everybody’s different opinion on basically the topic that they’re an expert on and let me tell you, I am the expert –in my opinion- when it comes to fitting the most amount of food, into a small, small space so that you guys can produce as much food as you can even if you live on a small urban tract home lot which I happen to live on. I live in a big city, about a million people in the greater area here, and even in a small residential tract home, I grow a large portion of my food. So in this presentation, what I’ll be sharing with you guys is my top 5 tips so you guys can grow the most amount of food or more vegetables in small spaces. So this is –what you’re looking at is actually half of my backyard garden here, the other half’s maybe not as camera ready, cause I got a shade cloth over it. But, as you guys can see if you just look down, you guys barely can see actually any dirt or ground out there, you just basically see all green and that’s cause I have tons of plants growing down there. Since the first video that I made back in –I don’t know about nine years ago, 2009. I started converting my front yard into a raised bed edible vegetable garden, and here this is my backyard that I’ve also converted. And over the years I’ve planted and replanted things, I’ve visited hundreds of different farms and peoples yards, sharing with you guys how they’re doing it. So, every time I visit a place or even have a new season under my belt, I learn new stuff and this is all the information I share with you guys and I’m really happy and proud that my videos have reached –I don’t know- three hundred and thirty thousand people, that’s how many subscribers I have and my videos have been viewed over forty-seven million times and I have a collection of over twelve hundred free episodes, where you guys can glean knowledge on how to grow in small places, how to grow the best quality fruits, how to grow the best vegetables, and even just how to build your soil. So, even if you’re not going to grow in a small place, my videos can apply to you, because I visit many different farms and all different kinds of places in my travels that I cover in my episodes. Anyways, let’s get off my roof and lets head down and get into the top five tips so you guys can grow more food in a small space. So the first way to start growing more food in your space is to create what I call: Growable areas, you guys are thinking, “John, what is a grow-able area?” Well a growable area to me is just simply a place where you can actually plant the foods or plant the crops you want to grow, if you just have a backyard –when I got this property it was a lawn, maybe some weeds coming up. Like to me a lawn and weeds that’s not really a growable area, I did some conversion to create it into a growable area, actually I have videos converting this very backyard into a growable area, I think, I first weed wacked the whole yard then I put down raised beds and filled it with some good soil blend mixture and I then just started planting in it, and whether you make a raised beds, containers or just basically you know, do sheet mulching: So like you would take your property, over the grass lay like a couple layers of cardboard down, and just put compost up on top and then you grow in that even without making a raised bed, you need to create growable area and I strive to maximize the amount of my growable area. Of course within a growable area like the backyard here, you see 1, 2, 3, , 4 different raised beds down the row, and this is my pathway so I can get a wheel barrow. You’re going to want to have some walkways, and I’ve minimized the walkway size on some of my raised beds, in between some of these beds it’s just maybe a foot or so, maybe 16 inches and that’s just the bare minimum I need to walkthrough, so I could have the maximum amount of growing area. Some of these pathways, like the main pathways like here and I have a main pathway there that connects to the other side of the yard, are maybe like 33 to 36 inches wide. That allows me to easily push a wheel barrow through so I could take compost to where I need it, plus it kind of just gives me some space to move sometimes, if I’m bringing materials in or out. So, other than just the pathways, my whole backyard is growable space. What I like to do next for you guys is actually share with you guys the two main ways I create growable space: Raised beds and containers, and I’m doing that in a few different ways, so let’s go ahead and show you guys a few ways. So, what you’re looking at here is one of my growable areas or simply a raised bed, that basically Mel Bartholomew came up with, so thanks Mel if you’re watching this and I do recommend his book ‘Square Foot Gardening Method’ but here's a raised bed here and you can use things like wood or concrete blocks or bricks. I chose to use some concrete blocks here that were local and inexpensive, I also did not mortar them in, I basically can just stack them up, and fill it with the good soil mixture and start growing in it. So this creates a growable area, where as this was just grass and I just rolled and tilled the grass and just start planting in the grass, that may be a growable area for you, but I wouldn’t necessarily do it that way, because you’re not going to have the highest probability of success, just tilling up the ground and spreading the seeds, when you’re roller tilling you’re going to get a lot of weeds, so I want to get rid of that, you know page in history and create a new one, so that’s why I like the raised beds whether they’re concrete blocks or another material. Actually lets go to the other side of my yard to show you guys another material that I chose to use for my raised beds. So here's yet another material I’m using for my raised beds and these are basically just simply some plastic raised beds, these were on clearance at ‘Wal-Mart’ for ten bucks. They’re –I don’t know- maybe like 8 inches high and a 4-foot diameter, so they’re circular. Now, I prefer actually square raised beds, you can kind of fit more in and this kind of gives me some extra space here that I’m not growing in. But at the time I got these for ten bucks, that was definitely a good investment and they’re holding up nicely, they’ve held up for several years now, so I’ve definitely got my money’s worth and one day I’m probably going to convert this side of the yard to the concrete squared off raised beds that I really fit a lot more plants into. No matter what kind of raised bed you choose –you can get a prebuilt one, you could build your own out of wood, plastic, concrete, lots of different materials. I’ve seen people use like wonder board, tile, metal- whatever you choose, I would encourage you guys to make your raised beds minimum, 8 inches and 12 inches is a good max unless you have architectural or structural features that you want to like kind of look nice. So, my front yard raised beds in the front of the house, they’re as tall as 33 inches and as you get closer to the house they’re as short as 12 inches. So, I really like 12 inches, is which I find to be optimal, the more soil in the bed the healthier and the more room your plants have to spread out. Alright, so let me go ahead and show you guys the last way you can create some more growing space in your space without having a raised bed, and this is important for you guys that live in apartments, condos, or other places with a much smaller amount of space. So another way to create growing space is to use containers, so actually I have a big, giant pot here, I think it’s like 30 inches in diameter so I always encourage you guys to have the largest size pot you guys can afford. This is maybe 30 inches in diameter and maybe like two feet high, and actually its self-watering, so there's a water reservoir in here, so that’s really nice, makes taking care of my plants a little bit easier especially in the summer. But yea, in a container you can fill it with some good soil blend mixture, similar to a raised bed, maybe I do it a little bit differently and grow lots of food in there. So, in this bed I got things like spilanthes, I got some volunteer dandelion coming up, I got some marigolds, got this cool shiso, there's some basil in this bed, and a few tomatoes, and so yea even in a container you can grow lots of food, and I would encourage you guys, if you guys especially live in desert southwest -like I do- you want to definitely get the largest container you guys can and it’s also very important to put on an automatic irrigation system, containers in the desert southwest dry out particularly quickly and if you forget to water once, that’s the end of your plants, they’re ‘Kaput’, so for that reason I really encourage you guys to get a automatic irrigation system and even if you don’t live in the desert southwest I always encourage an automatic irrigation system so that you don’t have to water; so that you could literally go on vacation, come back, and then you have tons of food growing automatically for you. Let me go ahead and show you guys another smaller container that I’m using in my garden to grow a very specific crop and why. So in between some of my circular raised beds, they always leave a nice little space in the kitty corner –whatever-catty corner, between them so I’ve chosen to put some little pots inside here or containers to grow more food in. In some of these I have tomatoes, some of them I have dandelions, and this one actually I have mint: Mint is an herb that I love and I believe everybody should grow some herbs, they’re quite easy to grow, we’ll talk about this in a little bit. But mint really grows easily it doesn’t like take over the whole raised bed like if you planted it in with other herbs. It has its own little pot to grow and it flourishes and when you’re standing by it, it smells nice. I think this is maybe a chocolate mint or salad mint, but yea it smells really nice. So even amongst your raised beds you know, you can have containers next to them and yes this is on an automatic irrigation system. But, yea those are the top two ways I have to create growing space in your garden. Next let’s move on to the second way on how to grow more food in a small space. So, the next way that I have for you guys to grow more food in a smaller space, is to space your plants appropriately. If you pick up a standard seed packet like this ‘Organic Sweetie Tomatoes’, on the back it says things like, “days to germination, 7 to 10. Days to harvest 70 to 75. Planting depth, quarter inch. Spacing, row slash plant, three feet by two feet,” so if you follow the spacing on the seed packet, you’re going to space your plants every two to three feet and you’re not going to be able to fit a lot of plants in your small space that way. So what I prefer to do is I prefer to use a method known as ‘Bio-intensive spacing’ or ‘Square-Foot Gardening Spacing’ which is –they’re both fairly similar, basically it allows you when you have a good soil blend and rich soil it allows you to space things closer and grow things vertically and grow things closer together so you can have more plants in less space. More plants means you’re going to get a higher yield, in addition because you are planting the plants so closely, basically the ground gets shaded out, so the need for mulching is greatly reduced. And so you guys can see my peppers here -I don’t know if you guys can see- here is one you know trunk coming up here, one trunk coming here, one trunk coming up here, and basically the square-foot gardening spacing for peppers is about every twelve inches you should have a plant and as you guys can see these plants have progressed and grown and grown quite well over the season and they basically quite well filled in nicely. I mean all the way down I have plants every square-foot. So, this will allow you to maximize your yields in a smaller amount of space, because simply your packing more plants in. So the first tip was create the most growing area, second tip was to plant more plant density in the same amount of space and look up the ‘Square-foot Gardening Spacing’ or ‘Bio-intensive Spacing’ so you guys could plant the most. Every plants a little bit different, certain kinds of tomatoes like patio tomatoes, I’ll space like every one foot, some other kinds of larger tomatoes I could plant every 2 feet and then something like lettuce is like really close every 6 inches, and garlic and onions are going to be like every 4 inches. Peas I plant every 4 inches up a trellis, but every plant is a little bit different and some plants take more space than others, so for example zucchini: Is going to take a 3 foot radius circle, so if you have a 4-foot by 4-foot bed that’s going to take up the majority of your real-estate in there, now the zucchini is going to produce a lot of food but you’re also giving up a lot of space, so for that reason I like to grow zucchinis in a container off by themselves so they can just take up the whole space and not overflow into my raised beds but over flow onto a pathway where I can just move them aside and walk right through. Alright, so let’s get onto the third way to grow more food in a small space. So, the third way to maximize your food production in a small space is simply, grow vertically. This is very important to me because the horizontal space that I own is limited, its confined by the walls and we have a smaller craft home, but your air space, going up into the air is virtually unlimited and I think ‘Jack and the Giant Beanstalk’ he maximizes space efficiency for sure, and I don’t know if you guys are going to grow beanstalks that enter into the clouds but I’ve seen plenty of large fruit trees that grow 20, 30, 40, 50 feet up and that’s space you guys don’t have to pay for. Unfortunately none of my plants get 50 feet tall, some of them maybe push 10 feet tall, some of my tomatoes are pushing over 10 feet tall, my pepper this year over 7 feet tall at this point, but this is basically free space that you guys get to use that you don’t have to pay for. So, instead of growing a lot of low covering crops, grow some tall ones and under the tall crops grow some low covering crops so you could actually stack different plants in different layers, so I really like this a lot. What we’re showing you guys right now, is an example of one of my peppers that may be in the foreground shot that are growing up vertically and I have them all staked up; this is very important, you’re going to have a lot of stakes and trellises in a small residential space and then what we’re looking at here is my Malabar spinach vine. So, I love the Malabar spinach vines, they are a summer crop for me, they don’t like the frost, if you live in a tropical climate they can grow year round. But basically these guys grow up and they basically trellis themselves, as you guys can see they’re winding up the top of my trellis and they do this automatically; I mean that’s how they’re supposed to grow and on the other side that you’re not seeing, as you can see, I can pull a leaf over. But, this is my jicama vine, my jicama vine I mean that thing just vines out and loves growing high, I mean it would sprawl all over the ground and this would also sprawl over the ground if you didn’t have a trellis to put it up on, but you would not create as much food, because the area covering the surface is not going to be as much as the area when you take it vertically. Likewise some of the other plants in this bed, this is called the ‘Bolivian Pablo’ it grows nice and erect and tall as well, and grows lots of food instead of just vining out on the ground like my peanuts on the other side. But yea, growing vertically, critically important so I always encourage you guys especially around your fence lines –you know we have a fence- all around your property where you have walls, grow things vertically up those walls to cover the unsightly wall and also to grow you more food in that space; I think that’s definitely a valuable use of space and yet another way you guys can grow a lot of food in a small space. So, the next tip I have for you guys is to grow the most productive crops. That’s super critical, cause if you grow a crop that doesn’t grow a lot of food you’re not going to have a lot of food. So, what do I mean by growing the most productive crops? Well basically I can kind break this down, off the top of my head into four categories. Number first category is you’re going to want to grow crops that have a fast turn, you know I interviewed Kurtis Stone who’s a farmer and makes over a hundred-thousand dollars on an acre or something, so check my other videos for that, but the way he does that is by growing a lot of fast turn crops, crops that are done very quickly that create a high dollar volume for his income. But, as gardeners we could use this same technique to maximize the food that we’re growing. So for example, one of the fast turn crops I like is radishes, they can be done in as little as 3 weeks and you could have greens even quicker. Another great fast turn crop for you guys, that you guys don’t even need a yard to grow outside is sprouts and micro-greens. I grow buck-weed sprouts in as short as 1 day in the hot summer, I just sprout the seeds and they got little tails and I eat them, and I grew it. But, you could also grow micro-greens that can take up to 10 days or 2 weeks and grow things like wheatgrass and sunflower sprouts and buckwheat sprouts, these things are fast turn crops and there’s actually very highly nutritious crops as well that I want you guys to eat, but yea fast turn crops very important. Some other fast turn crops that I like, like I’m looking at here is my arugula. Arugula is a fairly fast grower as is mustard greens, as is the Komatsuna which is a Japanese mustard green, which I like more than mustard greens, they’re actually more edible than standard mustard greens that are actually quite hot and spicy unless you cook them. There’s also varieties of turnips and other crops that can be grown in as short as a month, some crops like can take 100 days to produce, so I always want you guys to pay attention to the days to harvest when you’re buying your plants and try to choose the plants that have a shorter days to harvest. This means you’re going to maximize the time that you’ll be able to harvest the crop -especially in the summer- before you get that dreaded frost. Aright so let’s see, let’s go into a few more ways besides fast turn crops, that I like to select the best crops or highest yielding crops to grow. So the next crop style I like to grow is climate appropriate crops, this is very important and critical cause if you grow a crop or a vegetable that doesn’t grow well in your area, you’re going to get poor yields. But, on the flipside if you grow a crop that is designed for your specific weather patterns, your specific situation, you’re going to get higher yields. So I always encourage you guys to support local seed sellers and buy seeds from your area and also save your own seeds, cause those crops as you grow them in the same area for year after year after year, they’re going to be more acclimatized to your specific situation. Here in the southwest desert, what I’m growing here is one whole large bed of sweet potatoes, which actually tubers are another excellent crop to grow. Tubers will produce the highest amount of calories in the least amount of space and often times you can use them actually as an under story. These are an under story to some tomatoes and Malabar spinach vines that I have growing up above it. So yea, very important, plant climate appropriate crops and find out what those are in your area. For my area I have plenty of videos sharing the crops that do the best in a desert area. So the next crop I want you guys to grow that’s going to yield the most food for you guys are perennial crops. Perennial vegetables are some of my favorite vegetables in the whole wide world, whether that’s my tree collards that we’ll look at next, or these guys which are my Egyptian perennial walking onions. This bed grows year round for me, sleet, snow, hail, 100 plus degree weather, no problem, my perennial onions keep putting off these delicious onion greens that are more nutritious than actually the onion bulbs themselves and also I can dig up the bulbs under the ground and then they create little bulbets on the top that I actually just harvested a little while ago and sent off to a lot of you guys, so you guys could grow the same walking onions I’m growing. But, yea perennial crops literally you plant them once, you dedicate an area and space for them and they come back every year or –some of the perennials that I like the most- just grow year round. Some other perennial crops could be herbs, certain herbs; my sage and rosemary they grow year round without me having to do anything. My mint, that also grows year round, so yea focus on perennial crops that’ll do well in your area or come back every year. So my favorite perennial crop over all others at this point in time from my climate zone are these guys right here: These are my perennial green tree collards and these are like collard greens but instead of you plant, they grow, they go to set seed and flower and they’re done; these guys just continue to grow, I mean these guys are toppling me, they’re pushing 8 feet tall now. I’ve had some over 15 feet tall in the past and with a nice large trunk. But these guys basically you have greens to eat every day in a mild climate, I think maybe it’s a zone 6 or above, other zones you may need to protect it to grow it in the winter time. But, yea here in my zone 9 this guy grows year round without any issues, there's a green variety and also a purple variety of the tree collards, so yea one of my favorites and you guys definitely got to grow those. These are normally only propagated by cutting, so don’t try to look for seeds. That being said and if they do go to seed, they rarely seed maybe only under stressful conditions, mine have gone to seed in the last couple of years. So, I have saved the seeds and make those available at the website, so you guys can get these. That being said, they are not true seeds, so the seeds that I’m producing are probably cross pollinated with tree collard genetics and also maybe some of my other brassica genetics that I’m growing in the winter time to create some new and unique crosses, so yea the tree collards. So the tree collards that’ll bring us into the next crop that I want you guys to grow to maximize the use of your small space. So the last crop I want you guys to grow in your small space are simply, leafy greens. As you guys can see over here I have like a whole bed of leafy greens, this happens to be the Egyptian spinach, and the Egyptian spinach is actually more nutritious than kale, but most of you guys haven’t heard of Egyptian spinach. I learned about it at a ‘Health Food Trade Show’ where they’re trying to sale Egyptian spinach in tablets, powdered and in tablets. So why not grow your own, it’s definitely healthier and my channel is actually called ‘Growing Your Greens’ and it’s called ‘Growing Your Greens’ for a reason: Because I want you guys to focus on some of the crops that are going to grow the most, because think about it, the leafy greens here as soon as the leaves emerge out of the plant, you can eat them. Whereas next door here I have my pepper greens which some people might eat pepper greens, but basically for the peppers you’re waiting for the plant to produce all the greens and then flower and fruit and make the peppers. So, it’s not as an efficient use of space as growing some greens, where even the baby delicate shoots are edible. In addition greens can be very expensive to buy and unfortunately greens are one of the things that really don’t ship to well, especially these Egyptian spinach greens. So this is going to also save you guys a lot more money and I want you guys to grow year round greens and consume your greens year round, even if that includes growing micro-greens and sprouts indoors in the winter. Greens are the most important foods with the most nutrients and the least amount of calories, I want to encourage you guys to eat a plant dominated diet, if you’re going to meat and other things that’s great but the majority of your diet, if you want to be healthy and truly healthy and disease proof yourself, you want to eat your vegetables. Especially the leafy greens, they have been shown to have a lot of phytochemicals, phytonutrients, vitamins and minerals that can help prevent disease. So the fifth and final way to grow more food in a small amount of space, is actually don’t grow food at all. As much as you saw that I’m growing a lot of food, I’m not really focused on growing food, what I’m focused on is actually growing and building my soil. Because if you think about it all the food that you’re going to be growing comes from the soil, so if you have crappy soil, crappy dirt you’re not going to have healthy plants that are going to produce to their genetic potential. My goal with everything I plant is to provide it an optimal growing environment including optimal soil, water, sunlight so that it can grow to its full potential, and that’s why I like –what- Kareem Abdul Jabar he’s 7 feet, he grew probably to his –or close to- his height potential anyways. But I want my plants to grow to their genetic potential so they grow taller, grow bigger, grow larger leaves, grow larger fruit, but more importantly for me grow healthier foods. And where I’m standing right now is actually in my compost alley, I have over 12 different composters. This is my favorite, it’s the ‘Joraform Composter’, ‘Joraform 400’ and inside here I’m creating my soil fertility –wow this is actually quite hot- by composting my food waste and also garden clippings from my garden, and in addition to the compost besides those two ingredients I also add things like the bio-char and the rock dust, which are critical components to have a higher quality compost. Now, this is just my bacterial sourced compost that I make myself, in addition to this compost I use another kind of compost that you guys probably haven’t heard of before. It’s actually called a ‘Fungal Dominated Compost’ this above all else, above the bacterial compost this is even more important because its missing from most of you guy’s gardens. The fungal dominated compost has lots of fungal activity , whereas the bacterial compost has lots of bacterial activity and I’m not saying we want to plant our vegetable gardens in fungal dominated soil only, but we want to bring that level of fungal activity up, because most fungal activity in most gardens that I’ve visited based on seeing how the crops grow, it’s really quite low. I did a video called ‘Supersize Your Vegetables with Woodchips and Rock Dust’ where they grew dinosaur kale leaves wider than my head. This boggled my mind and I still strive to grow kale leaves that large, I’ve grown chard leaves that large, but I’ve grown collard leaves that large but not the dinosaur kale leaves, and this is because they had a fungal rich and dominated environment. Because they’re grown in 100% slow composted woodchips using the mushrooms, so yea check that episode for more information about the fungal dominated compost so you guys can grow larger vegetables, which means more yield for you. Now besides just adding the compost which is mainly adding organic matter with also the micro-life, the microbial life in the compost. There's a few other things that I really want to educate you guys on that’s very important to add to your garden beds that are not usually talked about even in organic gardening. So, let’s actually go ahead and head over to the table and I’ll share with you guys these last two things that I’d like to add. So besides just the compost which is what many organic gardeners believe you need like, “The compost, it’s got everything in there you need,” well my opinion on this is simply this: If your composting fruit scraps and food scraps and things from your garden that’s not nutrient rich your compost is not going to have the nutrients in there. I’ve seen really poor compost being generated, some gardeners and farmers places that I’ve visited, maybe it went anaerobic, maybe it didn’t have enough nutrition in there, so the quality is not as good. So, for that reason I like to boost up my compost and add some additional ingredients, I add a lot of different things to my garden and you know each of them have their own place and I like to add them. But, I just want to share with you guys the two most important things that I believe you guys should add to your garden: The first one is a really rich worm castings, the reason why I like the worm castings is not because of the NPK numbers that it has inside there, but because it is one of the most biologically active nutrients you can add to your garden. Meaning, it has lots of bacteria, microbes, and fungi and different kootenays degraders, and salaiz degraders, that are going to work for you in your garden. They’re really the back bone of your garden, its these microbes, the food soil web that you may have often heard about, and so the worm castings whether you have worms in your raised beds like I do and they make their castings in place so you don’t have to transport them, or whether you bring them in like I have brought in these guys the ‘Worm Gold Plus’ as well as other worm castings in my garden and once again the reason for this is the microbes, in addition I also have used products such as ‘Micrisel Inoculants’ as well as ‘Bacterial Inoculants’ to my garden because it’s a very important part that is often left out, and if your microbes are too low than your production is also going to be low. If your microbes are at a high level than you’re going to have a greater level of success because the microbes are basically breaking down the organic matter and minerals and making those available for the plant. This is one of the reasons why the plants actually send down root exudates or basically sugars down to the roots for the microbes to feed on, so that there’s more microbes in the roots that could actually break down and take more nutrients and help the plant take up the nutrients. So yea, microbes very important no matter what way you get them. Another way I like to add them is actually through the compost tea, using some worm castings, some fungal dominated compost as well as some other ingredients and I do have an open source video on how to make your own recipe or buy a premade one. Now, I’ve saved the best for last, the best for last to what I believe every garden should be using and unfortunately many are still not, are the trace minerals. The trace minerals are key to growth based on my research and besides my research, also my experience. When I started adding trace minerals to my garden, my yields went up, the health of my plants went up, the taste of the food I grew also went up. So whether you get this brand the ‘Azomite’ brand, it’s a micronized trace minerals also known as rock dust but not all rock dust are created equal, they all have a different varying spectrum of minerals in there. This product claims they have up to like 70 different minerals or so and so I want to get these minerals in natures proportions, back into my garden and let my plants figure out what they need to uptake, instead of just giving them a ten, ten, ten NPK fertilizer which would mainly feed in three main minerals that your focused on as well as a lot of the other potentially mineral contaminants or heavy metals that they’re actually hiding in commercial fertilizers these days unfortunately. But yea, the trace minerals is the complete opposite of that, when you start adding trace minerals you will see that growth will increase, the health of your plants will increase and of course you’re going to have higher yields. Now I always encourage you guys to get hoard of cultural grade rock dust such as the ‘Azomite’ I also have used things like ‘CBD Minerals’ and ‘Excelarite’ and ‘Cascade Minerals’ there are so many different brands I have videos on them if you need to learn more about the rock dust and for the cheapest source you know you could always go to a local rock and stone quarry there digging up rocks out of the ground, crushing and screening them for underlayment’s of road ways and what not. But, they always have the fine particles of the dust that you may be able to buy for free or cheap near you. Now, the other way I like to add the trace minerals that are critical to plant growth are through sea minerals, so these –this sea mineral is actually is actually called the SEA-90 there's many of other different brands that I have used in the past ‘Ocean Grow’ and ‘Ocean Solution’ but the SEA-90 has 90 different minerals, trace minerals in small trace amounts. Now this product and many of the sea products have high sodium levels so for that reason we want to put trace amounts, we don’t sprinkle this stuff in our soil, put it directly on our plants not going to be a good thing. You literally take one teaspoon of this stuff mixed in one gallon of water, mix that up and then you can foil or feed and spray onto the soil of your plants to feed them and I like to do that no more than twice a month, for the sea minerals that have a sodium content in there, cause too much sodium not a good thing. But sodium is an essential nutrient, both for us and our plants and if its deficient, and I’ve had friends deficient in sodium -most of you guys probably watching have excess sodium which is not too good- that is not a good thing either. So yea, I want to encourage you guys to add the trace minerals to your garden, one of the most important things you could add, if you don’t believe in trace minerals just buy a bag and try it out. Do can experiment in half part of your garden with it and half without for the same exact plants, and after the seasons over, might take a couple of seasons for the minerals to get worked in and broken down through the microbial action –very important- you will see a difference. Yea so I mean I think that's pretty much it, that’s sums up my ‘Top 5 Ways to Increase the Amount of Food’ you guys can grow in a small space, be sure to share this video and this presentation with others that may like it and that it can be helpful for. In the end I want to close by basically telling you that I want you guys to focus your diets around growing fruits and vegetables. Growing fruits and vegetables in my opinion, in my experience they’re much easier than taking care of animals. If you have chickens, goats, turkeys, pigs, sheep, whatever, they’re like having second children. They need your attention constantly like much more -my plants they don’t ‘Baaa’ back to me, or ‘Cluck’ at me, or ‘Crow’ at me, or do anything, they’re just waiting for my automatic irrigation system to kick on every day, I can go out of town and they’re done. I don’t got to feed them every day, I’m feeding them by growing them in good compost, good soil and besides just that they’re so much easier to take care of than animals is they’re much more nutritious for us. The big problem with today in America is all the processed food that people eating and even besides the processed foods is the high amounts of animal consumption that’s being eaten on a daily basis. I really want to encourage you guys to eat more vegetables, eat more fruits and vegetables. If we look back to traditional peoples they didn’t just have diets of three meals of meat a day, like most Americans are eating. Meat was a treat, I like that meat is a treat; it should be a treat for you guys, have small amounts of meat everyday if you need to eat the meat or just go meatless. Meatless Mondays and do a meatless Monday every day, eat more vegetables because you will be healthier. Vegetables are one of the things that are shown to be predominately eaten in the blue zones around the world where people live the longest and are the healthiest. They do eat some meat right, but small amounts, small percentage maybe 10% of total calories from meat and most Americans are eating 30 or 40 percent or more. So I just really want you guys to eat the vegetables, this is what I learned how to turn my health around, cause I almost lost my life when I was in my twenties and I learned that the best way to live was to eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, so that’s what I grow, that’s what I teach, and that’s what I’ve simply learned over all these years and I want to share and pass on the knowledge I’ve learned with you guys, and that’s what I simply do on my YouTube channel. So if you’re not already a subscriber please check me out at ‘GrowingYourGreens.com’ which will forward you to my YouTube channel and be sure to click that subscribe button so you don’t miss out on any of my exciting upcoming episodes. I want to thank you guys for just staying till the end of this presentation for the ‘Homesteading Summit’ I want to thank Margery and all the staff there at ‘Homesteading Summit’ for putting this on, I think it’s a great event to create more awareness and to get more people to grow food because that’s why I do the work I do. So once again my names John Kohler with ‘GrowingYourGreens.com’ we’ll see you next time and until then remember: Keep on growing.


 
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Alright, this is John Kohler with ‘GrowingYourGreens.com’ today we have another exciting episode for you and today we got my 2016 presentation for the ‘Homesteading Summit’, so I want to thank Margery and all the staff that’s running the ‘Homesteading Summit’ out there and allowing me as a participant. I greatly appreciate it and hope all you viewers and everybody watching this is going to benefit from my presentation. You guys seen a lot of different presentations in this homesteading summit, and I love these summits because it gets everybody’s different opinion on basically the topic that they’re an expert on and let me tell you, I am the expert –in my opinion- when it comes to fitting the most amount of food, into a small, small space so that you guys can produce as much food as you can even if you live on a small urban tract home lot which I happen to live on. I live in a big city, about a million people in the greater area here, and even in a small residential tract home, I grow a large portion of my food. So in this presentation, what I’ll be sharing with you guys is my top 5 tips so you guys can grow the most amount of food or more vegetables in small spaces. So this is –what you’re looking at is actually half of my backyard garden here, the other half’s maybe not as camera ready, cause I got a shade cloth over it. But, as you guys can see if you just look down, you guys barely can see actually any dirt or ground out there, you just basically see all green and that’s cause I have tons of plants growing down there. Since the first video that I made back in –I don’t know about nine years ago, 2009. I started converting my front yard into a raised bed edible vegetable garden, and here this is my backyard that I’ve also converted. And over the years I’ve planted and replanted things, I’ve visited hundreds of different farms and peoples yards, sharing with you guys how they’re doing it. So, every time I visit a place or even have a new season under my belt, I learn new stuff and this is all the information I share with you guys and I’m really happy and proud that my videos have reached –I don’t know- three hundred and thirty thousand people, that’s how many subscribers I have and my videos have been viewed over forty-seven million times and I have a collection of over twelve hundred free episodes, where you guys can glean knowledge on how to grow in small places, how to grow the best quality fruits, how to grow the best vegetables, and even just how to build your soil. So, even if you’re not going to grow in a small place, my videos can apply to you, because I visit many different farms and all different kinds of places in my travels that I cover in my episodes. Anyways, let’s get off my roof and lets head down and get into the top five tips so you guys can grow more food in a small space. So the first way to start growing more food in your space is to create what I call: Growable areas, you guys are thinking, “John, what is a grow-able area?” Well a growable area to me is just simply a place where you can actually plant the foods or plant the crops you want to grow, if you just have a backyard –when I got this property it was a lawn, maybe some weeds coming up. Like to me a lawn and weeds that’s not really a growable area, I did some conversion to create it into a growable area, actually I have videos converting this very backyard into a growable area, I think, I first weed wacked the whole yard then I put down raised beds and filled it with some good soil blend mixture and I then just started planting in it, and whether you make a raised beds, containers or just basically you know, do sheet mulching: So like you would take your property, over the grass lay like a couple layers of cardboard down, and just put compost up on top and then you grow in that even without making a raised bed, you need to create growable area and I strive to maximize the amount of my growable area. Of course within a growable area like the backyard here, you see 1, 2, 3, , 4 different raised beds down the row, and this is my pathway so I can get a wheel barrow. You’re going to want to have some walkways, and I’ve minimized the walkway size on some of my raised beds, in between some of these beds it’s just maybe a foot or so, maybe 16 inches and that’s just the bare minimum I need to walkthrough, so I could have the maximum amount of growing area. Some of these pathways, like the main pathways like here and I have a main pathway there that connects to the other side of the yard, are maybe like 33 to 36 inches wide. That allows me to easily push a wheel barrow through so I could take compost to where I need it, plus it kind of just gives me some space to move sometimes, if I’m bringing materials in or out. So, other than just the pathways, my whole backyard is growable space. What I like to do next for you guys is actually share with you guys the two main ways I create growable space: Raised beds and containers, and I’m doing that in a few different ways, so let’s go ahead and show you guys a few ways. So, what you’re looking at here is one of my growable areas or simply a raised bed, that basically Mel Bartholomew came up with, so thanks Mel if you’re watching this and I do recommend his book ‘Square Foot Gardening Method’ but here's a raised bed here and you can use things like wood or concrete blocks or bricks. I chose to use some concrete blocks here that were local and inexpensive, I also did not mortar them in, I basically can just stack them up, and fill it with the good soil mixture and start growing in it. So this creates a growable area, where as this was just grass and I just rolled and tilled the grass and just start planting in the grass, that may be a growable area for you, but I wouldn’t necessarily do it that way, because you’re not going to have the highest probability of success, just tilling up the ground and spreading the seeds, when you’re roller tilling you’re going to get a lot of weeds, so I want to get rid of that, you know page in history and create a new one, so that’s why I like the raised beds whether they’re concrete blocks or another material. Actually lets go to the other side of my yard to show you guys another material that I chose to use for my raised beds. So here's yet another material I’m using for my raised beds and these are basically just simply some plastic raised beds, these were on clearance at ‘Wal-Mart’ for ten bucks. They’re –I don’t know- maybe like 8 inches high and a 4-foot diameter, so they’re circular. Now, I prefer actually square raised beds, you can kind of fit more in and this kind of gives me some extra space here that I’m not growing in. But at the time I got these for ten bucks, that was definitely a good investment and they’re holding up nicely, they’ve held up for several years now, so I’ve definitely got my money’s worth and one day I’m probably going to convert this side of the yard to the concrete squared off raised beds that I really fit a lot more plants into. No matter what kind of raised bed you choose –you can get a prebuilt one, you could build your own out of wood, plastic, concrete, lots of different materials. I’ve seen people use like wonder board, tile, metal- whatever you choose, I would encourage you guys to make your raised beds minimum, 8 inches and 12 inches is a good max unless you have architectural or structural features that you want to like kind of look nice. So, my front yard raised beds in the front of the house, they’re as tall as 33 inches and as you get closer to the house they’re as short as 12 inches. So, I really like 12 inches, is which I find to be optimal, the more soil in the bed the healthier and the more room your plants have to spread out. Alright, so let me go ahead and show you guys the last way you can create some more growing space in your space without having a raised bed, and this is important for you guys that live in apartments, condos, or other places with a much smaller amount of space. So another way to create growing space is to use containers, so actually I have a big, giant pot here, I think it’s like 30 inches in diameter so I always encourage you guys to have the largest size pot you guys can afford. This is maybe 30 inches in diameter and maybe like two feet high, and actually its self-watering, so there's a water reservoir in here, so that’s really nice, makes taking care of my plants a little bit easier especially in the summer. But yea, in a container you can fill it with some good soil blend mixture, similar to a raised bed, maybe I do it a little bit differently and grow lots of food in there. So, in this bed I got things like spilanthes, I got some volunteer dandelion coming up, I got some marigolds, got this cool shiso, there's some basil in this bed, and a few tomatoes, and so yea even in a container you can grow lots of food, and I would encourage you guys, if you guys especially live in desert southwest -like I do- you want to definitely get the largest container you guys can and it’s also very important to put on an automatic irrigation system, containers in the desert southwest dry out particularly quickly and if you forget to water once, that’s the end of your plants, they’re ‘Kaput’, so for that reason I really encourage you guys to get a automatic irrigation system and even if you don’t live in the desert southwest I always encourage an automatic irrigation system so that you don’t have to water; so that you could literally go on vacation, come back, and then you have tons of food growing automatically for you. Let me go ahead and show you guys another smaller container that I’m using in my garden to grow a very specific crop and why. So in between some of my circular raised beds, they always leave a nice little space in the kitty corner –whatever-catty corner, between them so I’ve chosen to put some little pots inside here or containers to grow more food in. In some of these I have tomatoes, some of them I have dandelions, and this one actually I have mint: Mint is an herb that I love and I believe everybody should grow some herbs, they’re quite easy to grow, we’ll talk about this in a little bit. But mint really grows easily it doesn’t like take over the whole raised bed like if you planted it in with other herbs. It has its own little pot to grow and it flourishes and when you’re standing by it, it smells nice. I think this is maybe a chocolate mint or salad mint, but yea it smells really nice. So even amongst your raised beds you know, you can have containers next to them and yes this is on an automatic irrigation system. But, yea those are the top two ways I have to create growing space in your garden. Next let’s move on to the second way on how to grow more food in a small space. So, the next way that I have for you guys to grow more food in a smaller space, is to space your plants appropriately. If you pick up a standard seed packet like this ‘Organic Sweetie Tomatoes’, on the back it says things like, “days to germination, 7 to 10. Days to harvest 70 to 75. Planting depth, quarter inch. Spacing, row slash plant, three feet by two feet,” so if you follow the spacing on the seed packet, you’re going to space your plants every two to three feet and you’re not going to be able to fit a lot of plants in your small space that way. So what I prefer to do is I prefer to use a method known as ‘Bio-intensive spacing’ or ‘Square-Foot Gardening Spacing’ which is –they’re both fairly similar, basically it allows you when you have a good soil blend and rich soil it allows you to space things closer and grow things vertically and grow things closer together so you can have more plants in less space. More plants means you’re going to get a higher yield, in addition because you are planting the plants so closely, basically the ground gets shaded out, so the need for mulching is greatly reduced. And so you guys can see my peppers here -I don’t know if you guys can see- here is one you know trunk coming up here, one trunk coming here, one trunk coming up here, and basically the square-foot gardening spacing for peppers is about every twelve inches you should have a plant and as you guys can see these plants have progressed and grown and grown quite well over the season and they basically quite well filled in nicely. I mean all the way down I have plants every square-foot. So, this will allow you to maximize your yields in a smaller amount of space, because simply your packing more plants in. So the first tip was create the most growing area, second tip was to plant more plant density in the same amount of space and look up the ‘Square-foot Gardening Spacing’ or ‘Bio-intensive Spacing’ so you guys could plant the most. Every plants a little bit different, certain kinds of tomatoes like patio tomatoes, I’ll space like every one foot, some other kinds of larger tomatoes I could plant every 2 feet and then something like lettuce is like really close every 6 inches, and garlic and onions are going to be like every 4 inches. Peas I plant every 4 inches up a trellis, but every plant is a little bit different and some plants take more space than others, so for example zucchini: Is going to take a 3 foot radius circle, so if you have a 4-foot by 4-foot bed that’s going to take up the majority of your real-estate in there, now the zucchini is going to produce a lot of food but you’re also giving up a lot of space, so for that reason I like to grow zucchinis in a container off by themselves so they can just take up the whole space and not overflow into my raised beds but over flow onto a pathway where I can just move them aside and walk right through. Alright, so let’s get onto the third way to grow more food in a small space. So, the third way to maximize your food production in a small space is simply, grow vertically. This is very important to me because the horizontal space that I own is limited, its confined by the walls and we have a smaller craft home, but your air space, going up into the air is virtually unlimited and I think ‘Jack and the Giant Beanstalk’ he maximizes space efficiency for sure, and I don’t know if you guys are going to grow beanstalks that enter into the clouds but I’ve seen plenty of large fruit trees that grow 20, 30, 40, 50 feet up and that’s space you guys don’t have to pay for. Unfortunately none of my plants get 50 feet tall, some of them maybe push 10 feet tall, some of my tomatoes are pushing over 10 feet tall, my pepper this year over 7 feet tall at this point, but this is basically free space that you guys get to use that you don’t have to pay for. So, instead of growing a lot of low covering crops, grow some tall ones and under the tall crops grow some low covering crops so you could actually stack different plants in different layers, so I really like this a lot. What we’re showing you guys right now, is an example of one of my peppers that may be in the foreground shot that are growing up vertically and I have them all staked up; this is very important, you’re going to have a lot of stakes and trellises in a small residential space and then what we’re looking at here is my Malabar spinach vine. So, I love the Malabar spinach vines, they are a summer crop for me, they don’t like the frost, if you live in a tropical climate they can grow year round. But basically these guys grow up and they basically trellis themselves, as you guys can see they’re winding up the top of my trellis and they do this automatically; I mean that’s how they’re supposed to grow and on the other side that you’re not seeing, as you can see, I can pull a leaf over. But, this is my jicama vine, my jicama vine I mean that thing just vines out and loves growing high, I mean it would sprawl all over the ground and this would also sprawl over the ground if you didn’t have a trellis to put it up on, but you would not create as much food, because the area covering the surface is not going to be as much as the area when you take it vertically. Likewise some of the other plants in this bed, this is called the ‘Bolivian Pablo’ it grows nice and erect and tall as well, and grows lots of food instead of just vining out on the ground like my peanuts on the other side. But yea, growing vertically, critically important so I always encourage you guys especially around your fence lines –you know we have a fence- all around your property where you have walls, grow things vertically up those walls to cover the unsightly wall and also to grow you more food in that space; I think that’s definitely a valuable use of space and yet another way you guys can grow a lot of food in a small space. So, the next tip I have for you guys is to grow the most productive crops. That’s super critical, cause if you grow a crop that doesn’t grow a lot of food you’re not going to have a lot of food. So, what do I mean by growing the most productive crops? Well basically I can kind break this down, off the top of my head into four categories. Number first category is you’re going to want to grow crops that have a fast turn, you know I interviewed Kurtis Stone who’s a farmer and makes over a hundred-thousand dollars on an acre or something, so check my other videos for that, but the way he does that is by growing a lot of fast turn crops, crops that are done very quickly that create a high dollar volume for his income. But, as gardeners we could use this same technique to maximize the food that we’re growing. So for example, one of the fast turn crops I like is radishes, they can be done in as little as 3 weeks and you could have greens even quicker. Another great fast turn crop for you guys, that you guys don’t even need a yard to grow outside is sprouts and micro-greens. I grow buck-weed sprouts in as short as 1 day in the hot summer, I just sprout the seeds and they got little tails and I eat them, and I grew it. But, you could also grow micro-greens that can take up to 10 days or 2 weeks and grow things like wheatgrass and sunflower sprouts and buckwheat sprouts, these things are fast turn crops and there’s actually very highly nutritious crops as well that I want you guys to eat, but yea fast turn crops very important. Some other fast turn crops that I like, like I’m looking at here is my arugula. Arugula is a fairly fast grower as is mustard greens, as is the Komatsuna which is a Japanese mustard green, which I like more than mustard greens, they’re actually more edible than standard mustard greens that are actually quite hot and spicy unless you cook them. There’s also varieties of turnips and other crops that can be grown in as short as a month, some crops like can take 100 days to produce, so I always want you guys to pay attention to the days to harvest when you’re buying your plants and try to choose the plants that have a shorter days to harvest. This means you’re going to maximize the time that you’ll be able to harvest the crop -especially in the summer- before you get that dreaded frost. Aright so let’s see, let’s go into a few more ways besides fast turn crops, that I like to select the best crops or highest yielding crops to grow. So the next crop style I like to grow is climate appropriate crops, this is very important and critical cause if you grow a crop or a vegetable that doesn’t grow well in your area, you’re going to get poor yields. But, on the flipside if you grow a crop that is designed for your specific weather patterns, your specific situation, you’re going to get higher yields. So I always encourage you guys to support local seed sellers and buy seeds from your area and also save your own seeds, cause those crops as you grow them in the same area for year after year after year, they’re going to be more acclimatized to your specific situation. Here in the southwest desert, what I’m growing here is one whole large bed of sweet potatoes, which actually tubers are another excellent crop to grow. Tubers will produce the highest amount of calories in the least amount of space and often times you can use them actually as an under story. These are an under story to some tomatoes and Malabar spinach vines that I have growing up above it. So yea, very important, plant climate appropriate crops and find out what those are in your area. For my area I have plenty of videos sharing the crops that do the best in a desert area. So the next crop I want you guys to grow that’s going to yield the most food for you guys are perennial crops. Perennial vegetables are some of my favorite vegetables in the whole wide world, whether that’s my tree collards that we’ll look at next, or these guys which are my Egyptian perennial walking onions. This bed grows year round for me, sleet, snow, hail, 100 plus degree weather, no problem, my perennial onions keep putting off these delicious onion greens that are more nutritious than actually the onion bulbs themselves and also I can dig up the bulbs under the ground and then they create little bulbets on the top that I actually just harvested a little while ago and sent off to a lot of you guys, so you guys could grow the same walking onions I’m growing. But, yea perennial crops literally you plant them once, you dedicate an area and space for them and they come back every year or –some of the perennials that I like the most- just grow year round. Some other perennial crops could be herbs, certain herbs; my sage and rosemary they grow year round without me having to do anything. My mint, that also grows year round, so yea focus on perennial crops that’ll do well in your area or come back every year. So my favorite perennial crop over all others at this point in time from my climate zone are these guys right here: These are my perennial green tree collards and these are like collard greens but instead of you plant, they grow, they go to set seed and flower and they’re done; these guys just continue to grow, I mean these guys are toppling me, they’re pushing 8 feet tall now. I’ve had some over 15 feet tall in the past and with a nice large trunk. But these guys basically you have greens to eat every day in a mild climate, I think maybe it’s a zone 6 or above, other zones you may need to protect it to grow it in the winter time. But, yea here in my zone 9 this guy grows year round without any issues, there's a green variety and also a purple variety of the tree collards, so yea one of my favorites and you guys definitely got to grow those. These are normally only propagated by cutting, so don’t try to look for seeds. That being said and if they do go to seed, they rarely seed maybe only under stressful conditions, mine have gone to seed in the last couple of years. So, I have saved the seeds and make those available at the website, so you guys can get these. That being said, they are not true seeds, so the seeds that I’m producing are probably cross pollinated with tree collard genetics and also maybe some of my other brassica genetics that I’m growing in the winter time to create some new and unique crosses, so yea the tree collards. So the tree collards that’ll bring us into the next crop that I want you guys to grow to maximize the use of your small space. So the last crop I want you guys to grow in your small space are simply, leafy greens. As you guys can see over here I have like a whole bed of leafy greens, this happens to be the Egyptian spinach, and the Egyptian spinach is actually more nutritious than kale, but most of you guys haven’t heard of Egyptian spinach. I learned about it at a ‘Health Food Trade Show’ where they’re trying to sale Egyptian spinach in tablets, powdered and in tablets. So why not grow your own, it’s definitely healthier and my channel is actually called ‘Growing Your Greens’ and it’s called ‘Growing Your Greens’ for a reason: Because I want you guys to focus on some of the crops that are going to grow the most, because think about it, the leafy greens here as soon as the leaves emerge out of the plant, you can eat them. Whereas next door here I have my pepper greens which some people might eat pepper greens, but basically for the peppers you’re waiting for the plant to produce all the greens and then flower and fruit and make the peppers. So, it’s not as an efficient use of space as growing some greens, where even the baby delicate shoots are edible. In addition greens can be very expensive to buy and unfortunately greens are one of the things that really don’t ship to well, especially these Egyptian spinach greens. So this is going to also save you guys a lot more money and I want you guys to grow year round greens and consume your greens year round, even if that includes growing micro-greens and sprouts indoors in the winter. Greens are the most important foods with the most nutrients and the least amount of calories, I want to encourage you guys to eat a plant dominated diet, if you’re going to meat and other things that’s great but the majority of your diet, if you want to be healthy and truly healthy and disease proof yourself, you want to eat your vegetables. Especially the leafy greens, they have been shown to have a lot of phytochemicals, phytonutrients, vitamins and minerals that can help prevent disease. So the fifth and final way to grow more food in a small amount of space, is actually don’t grow food at all. As much as you saw that I’m growing a lot of food, I’m not really focused on growing food, what I’m focused on is actually growing and building my soil. Because if you think about it all the food that you’re going to be growing comes from the soil, so if you have crappy soil, crappy dirt you’re not going to have healthy plants that are going to produce to their genetic potential. My goal with everything I plant is to provide it an optimal growing environment including optimal soil, water, sunlight so that it can grow to its full potential, and that’s why I like –what- Kareem Abdul Jabar he’s 7 feet, he grew probably to his –or close to- his height potential anyways. But I want my plants to grow to their genetic potential so they grow taller, grow bigger, grow larger leaves, grow larger fruit, but more importantly for me grow healthier foods. And where I’m standing right now is actually in my compost alley, I have over 12 different composters. This is my favorite, it’s the ‘Joraform Composter’, ‘Joraform 400’ and inside here I’m creating my soil fertility –wow this is actually quite hot- by composting my food waste and also garden clippings from my garden, and in addition to the compost besides those two ingredients I also add things like the bio-char and the rock dust, which are critical components to have a higher quality compost. Now, this is just my bacterial sourced compost that I make myself, in addition to this compost I use another kind of compost that you guys probably haven’t heard of before. It’s actually called a ‘Fungal Dominated Compost’ this above all else, above the bacterial compost this is even more important because its missing from most of you guy’s gardens. The fungal dominated compost has lots of fungal activity , whereas the bacterial compost has lots of bacterial activity and I’m not saying we want to plant our vegetable gardens in fungal dominated soil only, but we want to bring that level of fungal activity up, because most fungal activity in most gardens that I’ve visited based on seeing how the crops grow, it’s really quite low. I did a video called ‘Supersize Your Vegetables with Woodchips and Rock Dust’ where they grew dinosaur kale leaves wider than my head. This boggled my mind and I still strive to grow kale leaves that large, I’ve grown chard leaves that large, but I’ve grown collard leaves that large but not the dinosaur kale leaves, and this is because they had a fungal rich and dominated environment. Because they’re grown in 100% slow composted woodchips using the mushrooms, so yea check that episode for more information about the fungal dominated compost so you guys can grow larger vegetables, which means more yield for you. Now besides just adding the compost which is mainly adding organic matter with also the micro-life, the microbial life in the compost. There's a few other things that I really want to educate you guys on that’s very important to add to your garden beds that are not usually talked about even in organic gardening. So, let’s actually go ahead and head over to the table and I’ll share with you guys these last two things that I’d like to add. So besides just the compost which is what many organic gardeners believe you need like, “The compost, it’s got everything in there you need,” well my opinion on this is simply this: If your composting fruit scraps and food scraps and things from your garden that’s not nutrient rich your compost is not going to have the nutrients in there. I’ve seen really poor compost being generated, some gardeners and farmers places that I’ve visited, maybe it went anaerobic, maybe it didn’t have enough nutrition in there, so the quality is not as good. So, for that reason I like to boost up my compost and add some additional ingredients, I add a lot of different things to my garden and you know each of them have their own place and I like to add them. But, I just want to share with you guys the two most important things that I believe you guys should add to your garden: The first one is a really rich worm castings, the reason why I like the worm castings is not because of the NPK numbers that it has inside there, but because it is one of the most biologically active nutrients you can add to your garden. Meaning, it has lots of bacteria, microbes, and fungi and different kootenays degraders, and salaiz degraders, that are going to work for you in your garden. They’re really the back bone of your garden, its these microbes, the food soil web that you may have often heard about, and so the worm castings whether you have worms in your raised beds like I do and they make their castings in place so you don’t have to transport them, or whether you bring them in like I have brought in these guys the ‘Worm Gold Plus’ as well as other worm castings in my garden and once again the reason for this is the microbes, in addition I also have used products such as ‘Micrisel Inoculants’ as well as ‘Bacterial Inoculants’ to my garden because it’s a very important part that is often left out, and if your microbes are too low than your production is also going to be low. If your microbes are at a high level than you’re going to have a greater level of success because the microbes are basically breaking down the organic matter and minerals and making those available for the plant. This is one of the reasons why the plants actually send down root exudates or basically sugars down to the roots for the microbes to feed on, so that there’s more microbes in the roots that could actually break down and take more nutrients and help the plant take up the nutrients. So yea, microbes very important no matter what way you get them. Another way I like to add them is actually through the compost tea, using some worm castings, some fungal dominated compost as well as some other ingredients and I do have an open source video on how to make your own recipe or buy a premade one. Now, I’ve saved the best for last, the best for last to what I believe every garden should be using and unfortunately many are still not, are the trace minerals. The trace minerals are key to growth based on my research and besides my research, also my experience. When I started adding trace minerals to my garden, my yields went up, the health of my plants went up, the taste of the food I grew also went up. So whether you get this brand the ‘Azomite’ brand, it’s a micronized trace minerals also known as rock dust but not all rock dust are created equal, they all have a different varying spectrum of minerals in there. This product claims they have up to like 70 different minerals or so and so I want to get these minerals in natures proportions, back into my garden and let my plants figure out what they need to uptake, instead of just giving them a ten, ten, ten NPK fertilizer which would mainly feed in three main minerals that your focused on as well as a lot of the other potentially mineral contaminants or heavy metals that they’re actually hiding in commercial fertilizers these days unfortunately. But yea, the trace minerals is the complete opposite of that, when you start adding trace minerals you will see that growth will increase, the health of your plants will increase and of course you’re going to have higher yields. Now I always encourage you guys to get hoard of cultural grade rock dust such as the ‘Azomite’ I also have used things like ‘CBD Minerals’ and ‘Excelarite’ and ‘Cascade Minerals’ there are so many different brands I have videos on them if you need to learn more about the rock dust and for the cheapest source you know you could always go to a local rock and stone quarry there digging up rocks out of the ground, crushing and screening them for underlayment’s of road ways and what not. But, they always have the fine particles of the dust that you may be able to buy for free or cheap near you. Now, the other way I like to add the trace minerals that are critical to plant growth are through sea minerals, so these –this sea mineral is actually is actually called the SEA-90 there's many of other different brands that I have used in the past ‘Ocean Grow’ and ‘Ocean Solution’ but the SEA-90 has 90 different minerals, trace minerals in small trace amounts. Now this product and many of the sea products have high sodium levels so for that reason we want to put trace amounts, we don’t sprinkle this stuff in our soil, put it directly on our plants not going to be a good thing. You literally take one teaspoon of this stuff mixed in one gallon of water, mix that up and then you can foil or feed and spray onto the soil of your plants to feed them and I like to do that no more than twice a month, for the sea minerals that have a sodium content in there, cause too much sodium not a good thing. But sodium is an essential nutrient, both for us and our plants and if its deficient, and I’ve had friends deficient in sodium -most of you guys probably watching have excess sodium which is not too good- that is not a good thing either. So yea, I want to encourage you guys to add the trace minerals to your garden, one of the most important things you could add, if you don’t believe in trace minerals just buy a bag and try it out. Do can experiment in half part of your garden with it and half without for the same exact plants, and after the seasons over, might take a couple of seasons for the minerals to get worked in and broken down through the microbial action –very important- you will see a difference. Yea so I mean I think that's pretty much it, that’s sums up my ‘Top 5 Ways to Increase the Amount of Food’ you guys can grow in a small space, be sure to share this video and this presentation with others that may like it and that it can be helpful for. In the end I want to close by basically telling you that I want you guys to focus your diets around growing fruits and vegetables. Growing fruits and vegetables in my opinion, in my experience they’re much easier than taking care of animals. If you have chickens, goats, turkeys, pigs, sheep, whatever, they’re like having second children. They need your attention constantly like much more -my plants they don’t ‘Baaa’ back to me, or ‘Cluck’ at me, or ‘Crow’ at me, or do anything, they’re just waiting for my automatic irrigation system to kick on every day, I can go out of town and they’re done. I don’t got to feed them every day, I’m feeding them by growing them in good compost, good soil and besides just that they’re so much easier to take care of than animals is they’re much more nutritious for us. The big problem with today in America is all the processed food that people eating and even besides the processed foods is the high amounts of animal consumption that’s being eaten on a daily basis. I really want to encourage you guys to eat more vegetables, eat more fruits and vegetables. If we look back to traditional peoples they didn’t just have diets of three meals of meat a day, like most Americans are eating. Meat was a treat, I like that meat is a treat; it should be a treat for you guys, have small amounts of meat everyday if you need to eat the meat or just go meatless. Meatless Mondays and do a meatless Monday every day, eat more vegetables because you will be healthier. Vegetables are one of the things that are shown to be predominately eaten in the blue zones around the world where people live the longest and are the healthiest. They do eat some meat right, but small amounts, small percentage maybe 10% of total calories from meat and most Americans are eating 30 or 40 percent or more. So I just really want you guys to eat the vegetables, this is what I learned how to turn my health around, cause I almost lost my life when I was in my twenties and I learned that the best way to live was to eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, so that’s what I grow, that’s what I teach, and that’s what I’ve simply learned over all these years and I want to share and pass on the knowledge I’ve learned with you guys, and that’s what I simply do on my YouTube channel. So if you’re not already a subscriber please check me out at ‘GrowingYourGreens.com’ which will forward you to my YouTube channel and be sure to click that subscribe button so you don’t miss out on any of my exciting upcoming episodes. I want to thank you guys for just staying till the end of this presentation for the ‘Homesteading Summit’ I want to thank Margery and all the staff there at ‘Homesteading Summit’ for putting this on, I think it’s a great event to create more awareness and to get more people to grow food because that’s why I do the work I do. So once again my names John Kohler with ‘GrowingYourGreens.com’ we’ll see you next time and until then remember: Keep on growing.


 
 
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How to grow Flame seedless (a hybrid of Thompson seedless) grapes in your garden.

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 199 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

 
 
 
 
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the 2 year grape journey is a sweet and interesting journey of planting Thompson seedless grapes all the way to harvest so sit back and enjoy as we go through grape paradise so we started our grapes back in january of 2015 this is the flame seedless grape we got this at home people and you can get these grape plants at any gardening center in your area and the first thing you need to do is once you get the package you just open it and you want to make sure that the roots stay hydrated while you're preparing your potting mix or while you are planning to plant this in the ground as you can see here this is a bare rooted plant and you just keep it in water just make sure the roots stay hydrated while you prepare your potting mix we will be planting this in a container you can plant it in the ground as well and here we go it's just a simple container with water and now we're going to prepare our potting mix we're going to be using a large pot grape trees grow into very large plants and need a lot of space for the roots so we're gonna be using this container, it has a lot of holes drilled as you can see a common question that a lot of users ask me is if you need holes in containers when growing plants and the answer is yes you do we're going to be using a mix of peat moss one-third of peat moss i'm just using this compressed bale of peat moss that you can get at any garden store make sure that you break up the pieces very well and to this mix we're going to be adding one-third of compost now i'm using some homemade compost here you can buy bagged compost if you want and some of my compost is unfinished so I'm going to be removing some of the unfinished compost from this mix and make sure that i have a lot of finished compost now it doesn't really matter even if you have a lot of unfinished compost it will eventually break down but i just want to make sure that the compost that I have is almost finished and I'm going to be mixing this in very well with the peat moss and what I'm going to be doing for the third part is adding some vermiculite now I had an option to use perlite here i just had some vermiculite with me and it was relatively hot weather not very hot but it was sunny and I just want to make sure that there is adequate moisture retention for the plant especially moving into the spring season and the summer season now you can substitute this with perlite, perlite is equally good it improve drainage and it doesn't retain moisture though vermiculite does retain moisture while providing good drainage for your plants the potting mix for your plants now mix in thoroughly and your potting mix is created now I'm gonna be just adding this potting mix to our container a large container now this is a pretty large container as you can see here it's probably about 22 inches in diameter and about 20 inches high very similar to a whiskey barrel container but just a little better shaped now when you add the potting mix just make sure that you add some water at every stage so if you fill up the entire container and then add water you're going to be having some issues with the drainage so what I'm doing is I'm adding some potting mix adding some water and then continuing to add the potting mix until we complete the container now it's time to plant we're gonna be planting it just this way as you see here is just make sure that the plant is well balanced in the center and then you can add additional potting mix along the sides to make sure that the plant is well seated and this is exactly what you need to do for planting your plant and what we have done before this is made sure that the roots are hydrated so that the plant roots doesn't dry and the plant is not in shock and finally you need to water the plant so just make sure you water it a few times make sure that the potting mix is well soaked then and it might take some time for the mix to start draining just be patient you might have to water this two or three times and this is the trellis for our grape plant as you can see here not this one this one is the one on the raised bed but the one along the wall the wooden trellis or the arbor of the home that's right next to the wall so fast forward one month and you can see that the plant has started producing a lot of new growth now as long as you get this new growth you can consider your planting as a success you're gonna be getting a lot more shoots growing from this grape plant now now as you can see here I have tied some mason line now what does Mason line does is it is a strong trellis support for these grape plans to grow and what I'm going to do is as the plant grows i'm just going to train it to grow around this string or this Mason line you can get Mason lines very easily at any hardware store I'll also try to provide a link in the video description below now let's go back to the selection for the grape plant the reason we chose flame seedless grapes to plant is because they require less chilling hours or chill hours now it's very important to understand what is chill hours in places like Southern California we get very less cold in the winters so the chill hours is a number which tells you whether your fruit plants will produce fruit or not for that year so this variety of grape the flames seedless requires very less chill hours if you noticed when we planted the plant if you notice the package it had a chill hour rating of hundred chill hours now usually we get about a hundred to 200 chill hours every year during the winters however some years are exceptions for example the year before last we got just 72 chill hours as you saw here we trimmed off some of the shoots that were growing towards the bottom during the first year you want to make sure that you grow two to three main branches some people recommend growing just one branch but i would recommend growing at least two branches for your grape plant and the reason is it eventually becomes easier to manage your grape plant in the second and the third and the later years and as you can see here our Mason lines are still intact and we are training our grape plant around this support trellis support using the Mason line and in the first year you can see that the plant is producing some buds and some flowers and it looks like it's going to be producing some grapes now remember that during the first year it is recommended that you remove all the fruit from your grapes so that your plant concentrates on growing shoots now I did not do that because I just wanted to see if this would produce any grapes and the results are interesting so I'll let you watch the video through this year and see what do you think about it you can see here it's going pretty well it's following our trellis and coming back to the chill hours just make sure that you buy your grape plant with the chill hours that are specific to your region most of the grapes have very high children quirements and they will not grow in your area if you have warm winters so in April you can see that the plant has produced a lot more foliage and the grapes that it produced are also growing a little larger but the plant has shown a lot of lush growth now let's talk about the fertilizer requirements for grapes now grapes must have adequate nutrition and fertilizer during the growing season which is February through September and every three months you need to make sure that you add some kind of fertilizer so you can follow the schedule that you see on your screen here and that's a good idea of when you should add fertilizer to your grape plant you can use organic fruit tree fertilizer you can you slow release fertilizer all of them work very well for growing grapes we keep training our plants as we discussed as they keep growing just make sure that you train them we've been doing that for a while now and you can see that the plants are now reaching towards the arbor that they're supposed to grow on so how about the grapes that were growing on the plant what happened to them by now i recommend that you remove all your grapes during the first year just cut them and throw them away just because they won't produce true grapes now what happened in my case is the gape plant was growing very well and the grapes were actually showing on the plant but one fine day when I looked at the grapes on the plant they had all dried and vanished so they didn't really produce well they were premature fruits and it's best to get rid of them so yes if you're growing grapes for the first year you can just cut and threw away all your grapes it might be difficult to do that but as you can see here the plant has grown into a very lush green plant so that's our progress of the grape plant in the first year and as you can see here it's now june in the first year and the plant has produced a very nice network of stems that we grow very well in the next growing season so let's look at how the next growing season turns up so the plant has remained dormant for the fall in the winter season and now in march of the next year mar 2016 the plant has grown into a very nice network of stems a lot of leaves are now sprouting and showing up you can see a lot of new growth in the plants right here in March which is the spring season now you must add fertilizer for your grape plants starting the season March is the first month when you should start adding fertilizer you can even do it in February and you can see here the plant is now producing a lot of new growth and some new buds that now look like grapes bunches of grapes growing and the key to getting good fruit from your grape plant is that you need to see a lot of these bunches being produced on the plant if you see one or two you're not going to get a lot of fruits from your grape plant so in April you can see that there's more lush green foliage produced by the plant and more buds that are growing and these buds will form flowers and eventually form grapes so all-in-all the plant looks very beautiful and just look at the fruits here these are the buds and they will eventually open up into flowers and they look very pretty you can see some of the buds that have transformed into fruits and you can see those dried flowers along the fruits and the grapes are very interesting fruits they look pretty interesting and you can see that they already start looking like grapes like a bunch of grapes at this stage here's another flower you can see very clearly the flowers the buds sprouting into flowers and they are self pollinating you don't need any other pollinators for your grape plant and you here you can see we have about three to four main branches now you can limit your grape plant to less than that I just had enough space for about three branches and I let it grow and you can see that the plant has grown very vigorously on the support and is growing very well now in the next year or the second year and it will continue to grow that way you can see more greenery and more buds and more fruit being produced in your plants now grapes need full Sun to grow so if you have areas which do not get about eight hours of Sun it's not a good idea to grow grapes there and this is one of the reasons why I planted my grape plant in a container because i thought i could move it later now in me you can see that the plants have a lot of more bunches of grapes growing and the grapes are now showing a lot of definition and unlike the first year where they just fell off the plant the fruits are now staying very well on the tree you can see a nice view of the garden and the arbor and the trellis where the grape plant is growing and I thought this was the best part of the garden that I could utilize to grow grapes because there's a lot of space here we got a lot of good support and I could just place the container along the wall of the support to grow my grape plant so when you grow your grape plant just make sure that you choose a nice spot so that the grapes can grow along the support and then produce all these beautiful grapes that you can see here if you've been following my monthly videos I've shown my grapes harvest during the summer months and the beautiful grapes the Thompson seedless grapes produces grapes that grow from green to yellow to red as they ripen here we can see big bunches of grapes growing and now it really looks like you're going to be getting a lot of grapes for harvest during the season and by elevating the grapes to a height you make sure that rodents stay away from all birds stay away from at it might be possible that birds might eat some of your grapes especially when they're very ripe now in June we made our first harvest and as you can see here the grapes are about dark green to slightly light green here and what I'm doing is I'm not harvesting the whole bunch I'm just harvesting a few grapes from the sides and what I realized was that these grapes were still very good to eat now if you look at the grapes they are not really ripe they don't look very ripe as they don't look like yellow or red in color so they actually taste tangy now some people like eating tangy grapes they're not extremely sweet but they have a very unique flavor so if you're one of those folks that like to eat tangy grapes this is a good time to harvest your grapes and you can start eating them you can even start putting them in smoothies make grape juice out of it they are all very good uses for that and once I realized that the grapes were sweet enough to harvest we harvested our first bunch of grapes and its really very rewarding to harvest something like grapes in your backyard grapes are extremely easy to grow in the California weather so if you live in the coastal areas, California or any other area that is conducive to growing grapes you should try it out you can see here more bunches of grapes that are now ripening and slowly we started seeing that we had a lot of grapes to harvest on any given day we would harvest 2 or 3 bunches of grapes as you can see here beautiful-looking grapes and we are still in june so towards the end of june is when we saw that the grapes were turning slightly yellow as you can see here in fact the grapes that are right for actually falling down from the vine the grapevine so we make sure that we harvested every now and then and here you can clearly see a very good harvest and at this stage the grapes are sweet so we went from tangy tasting grapes to sweet grapes by end of june and with this kind of color with this kind of a yellow color the grapes are very nice very delicious and nice to eat now in July we saw that the grapes started turning even more sweet and the colors are color was turning towards red as you can see here slightly red and at this stage when the grapes start turning red they taste very sweet you can see here most of these groups are reddish yellow in color and here you can clearly see the grapes turning red in color and these are the ripe grapes these are extremely sweet very delicious to eat and if you want you can wait till this stage but what I've realized is that if you wait for all your grapes to be in the stage you want to lose a lot of grapes because they're going to fall down from the tree so what I recommend as a harvest schedule is to start in june harvest slowly from july through august and you're going to get a really good harvest that way so here you can see beautiful harvest and growing grapes is a real pleasure it's very rewarding so i highly recommend that you start growing grapes in your area if you can once again beautiful-looking harvest as you can see here and for a harvest season from june through august it's a long harvest season from just one plant you can expect a lot of grapes and as you can see here this plant is quite large and it did produce a lot of grapes this year for the second year now the Thompson seedless grapes are the one variety I highly recommend that you grow in your home garden it's a very easy variety you to grow and it produces a lot but if you do want to try out some other variety that's perfectly fine just make sure that the chill hours match the chill hours in your area once again you can see here beautiful-looking grapes right out of the grape vine and in August you can see that we continue to harvest our grapes and they're the same they're reddish-yellow very delicious and the sun has really increased the amount of sugar in the fruit and they're tasting very sweet now at the end of august you can start pruning your grape plant once you have harvested all your fruits and you want to make sure that you remove all the dead and diseased stems remove all the dead leaves and make sure that your plant is ready for the next growing season so there we have it folks that was our two-year grape journey this journey took a long time to film and make so I'd appreciate if you could give us a thumbs up if you like this video if you like all our videos and you would like to support us do click on the support button on our Channel and that way you can contribute towards the success of California Gardening and i also want to tell you that when you're buying your grape plant if you have a costco a local costco do check it out they have some great deals on grape plants and you can buy them for a very good price i wish you all a very happy 2017 we'll see you again soon happy gardening view all
 


 
 
 
 
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the 2 year grape journey is a sweet and interesting journey of planting Thompson seedless grapes all the way to harvest so sit back and enjoy as we go through grape paradise so we started our grapes back in january of 2015 this is the flame seedless grape we got this at home people and you can get these grape plants at any gardening center in your area and the first thing you need to do is once you get the package you just open it and you want to make sure that the roots stay hydrated while you're preparing your potting mix or while you are planning to plant this in the ground as you can see here this is a bare rooted plant and you just keep it in water just make sure the roots stay hydrated while you prepare your potting mix we will be planting this in a container you can plant it in the ground as well and here we go it's just a simple container with water and now we're going to prepare our potting mix we're going to be using a large pot grape trees grow into very large plants and need a lot of space for the roots so we're gonna be using this container, it has a lot of holes drilled as you can see a common question that a lot of users ask me is if you need holes in containers when growing plants and the answer is yes you do we're going to be using a mix of peat moss one-third of peat moss i'm just using this compressed bale of peat moss that you can get at any garden store make sure that you break up the pieces very well and to this mix we're going to be adding one-third of compost now i'm using some homemade compost here you can buy bagged compost if you want and some of my compost is unfinished so I'm going to be removing some of the unfinished compost from this mix and make sure that i have a lot of finished compost now it doesn't really matter even if you have a lot of unfinished compost it will eventually break down but i just want to make sure that the compost that I have is almost finished and I'm going to be mixing this in very well with the peat moss and what I'm going to be doing for the third part is adding some vermiculite now I had an option to use perlite here i just had some vermiculite with me and it was relatively hot weather not very hot but it was sunny and I just want to make sure that there is adequate moisture retention for the plant especially moving into the spring season and the summer season now you can substitute this with perlite, perlite is equally good it improve drainage and it doesn't retain moisture though vermiculite does retain moisture while providing good drainage for your plants the potting mix for your plants now mix in thoroughly and your potting mix is created now I'm gonna be just adding this potting mix to our container a large container now this is a pretty large container as you can see here it's probably about 22 inches in diameter and about 20 inches high very similar to a whiskey barrel container but just a little better shaped now when you add the potting mix just make sure that you add some water at every stage so if you fill up the entire container and then add water you're going to be having some issues with the drainage so what I'm doing is I'm adding some potting mix adding some water and then continuing to add the potting mix until we complete the container now it's time to plant we're gonna be planting it just this way as you see here is just make sure that the plant is well balanced in the center and then you can add additional potting mix along the sides to make sure that the plant is well seated and this is exactly what you need to do for planting your plant and what we have done before this is made sure that the roots are hydrated so that the plant roots doesn't dry and the plant is not in shock and finally you need to water the plant so just make sure you water it a few times make sure that the potting mix is well soaked then and it might take some time for the mix to start draining just be patient you might have to water this two or three times and this is the trellis for our grape plant as you can see here not this one this one is the one on the raised bed but the one along the wall the wooden trellis or the arbor of the home that's right next to the wall so fast forward one month and you can see that the plant has started producing a lot of new growth now as long as you get this new growth you can consider your planting as a success you're gonna be getting a lot more shoots growing from this grape plant now now as you can see here I have tied some mason line now what does Mason line does is it is a strong trellis support for these grape plans to grow and what I'm going to do is as the plant grows i'm just going to train it to grow around this string or this Mason line you can get Mason lines very easily at any hardware store I'll also try to provide a link in the video description below now let's go back to the selection for the grape plant the reason we chose flame seedless grapes to plant is because they require less chilling hours or chill hours now it's very important to understand what is chill hours in places like Southern California we get very less cold in the winters so the chill hours is a number which tells you whether your fruit plants will produce fruit or not for that year so this variety of grape the flames seedless requires very less chill hours if you noticed when we planted the plant if you notice the package it had a chill hour rating of hundred chill hours now usually we get about a hundred to 200 chill hours every year during the winters however some years are exceptions for example the year before last we got just 72 chill hours as you saw here we trimmed off some of the shoots that were growing towards the bottom during the first year you want to make sure that you grow two to three main branches some people recommend growing just one branch but i would recommend growing at least two branches for your grape plant and the reason is it eventually becomes easier to manage your grape plant in the second and the third and the later years and as you can see here our Mason lines are still intact and we are training our grape plant around this support trellis support using the Mason line and in the first year you can see that the plant is producing some buds and some flowers and it looks like it's going to be producing some grapes now remember that during the first year it is recommended that you remove all the fruit from your grapes so that your plant concentrates on growing shoots now I did not do that because I just wanted to see if this would produce any grapes and the results are interesting so I'll let you watch the video through this year and see what do you think about it you can see here it's going pretty well it's following our trellis and coming back to the chill hours just make sure that you buy your grape plant with the chill hours that are specific to your region most of the grapes have very high children quirements and they will not grow in your area if you have warm winters so in April you can see that the plant has produced a lot more foliage and the grapes that it produced are also growing a little larger but the plant has shown a lot of lush growth now let's talk about the fertilizer requirements for grapes now grapes must have adequate nutrition and fertilizer during the growing season which is February through September and every three months you need to make sure that you add some kind of fertilizer so you can follow the schedule that you see on your screen here and that's a good idea of when you should add fertilizer to your grape plant you can use organic fruit tree fertilizer you can you slow release fertilizer all of them work very well for growing grapes we keep training our plants as we discussed as they keep growing just make sure that you train them we've been doing that for a while now and you can see that the plants are now reaching towards the arbor that they're supposed to grow on so how about the grapes that were growing on the plant what happened to them by now i recommend that you remove all your grapes during the first year just cut them and throw them away just because they won't produce true grapes now what happened in my case is the gape plant was growing very well and the grapes were actually showing on the plant but one fine day when I looked at the grapes on the plant they had all dried and vanished so they didn't really produce well they were premature fruits and it's best to get rid of them so yes if you're growing grapes for the first year you can just cut and threw away all your grapes it might be difficult to do that but as you can see here the plant has grown into a very lush green plant so that's our progress of the grape plant in the first year and as you can see here it's now june in the first year and the plant has produced a very nice network of stems that we grow very well in the next growing season so let's look at how the next growing season turns up so the plant has remained dormant for the fall in the winter season and now in march of the next year mar 2016 the plant has grown into a very nice network of stems a lot of leaves are now sprouting and showing up you can see a lot of new growth in the plants right here in March which is the spring season now you must add fertilizer for your grape plants starting the season March is the first month when you should start adding fertilizer you can even do it in February and you can see here the plant is now producing a lot of new growth and some new buds that now look like grapes bunches of grapes growing and the key to getting good fruit from your grape plant is that you need to see a lot of these bunches being produced on the plant if you see one or two you're not going to get a lot of fruits from your grape plant so in April you can see that there's more lush green foliage produced by the plant and more buds that are growing and these buds will form flowers and eventually form grapes so all-in-all the plant looks very beautiful and just look at the fruits here these are the buds and they will eventually open up into flowers and they look very pretty you can see some of the buds that have transformed into fruits and you can see those dried flowers along the fruits and the grapes are very interesting fruits they look pretty interesting and you can see that they already start looking like grapes like a bunch of grapes at this stage here's another flower you can see very clearly the flowers the buds sprouting into flowers and they are self pollinating you don't need any other pollinators for your grape plant and you here you can see we have about three to four main branches now you can limit your grape plant to less than that I just had enough space for about three branches and I let it grow and you can see that the plant has grown very vigorously on the support and is growing very well now in the next year or the second year and it will continue to grow that way you can see more greenery and more buds and more fruit being produced in your plants now grapes need full Sun to grow so if you have areas which do not get about eight hours of Sun it's not a good idea to grow grapes there and this is one of the reasons why I planted my grape plant in a container because i thought i could move it later now in me you can see that the plants have a lot of more bunches of grapes growing and the grapes are now showing a lot of definition and unlike the first year where they just fell off the plant the fruits are now staying very well on the tree you can see a nice view of the garden and the arbor and the trellis where the grape plant is growing and I thought this was the best part of the garden that I could utilize to grow grapes because there's a lot of space here we got a lot of good support and I could just place the container along the wall of the support to grow my grape plant so when you grow your grape plant just make sure that you choose a nice spot so that the grapes can grow along the support and then produce all these beautiful grapes that you can see here if you've been following my monthly videos I've shown my grapes harvest during the summer months and the beautiful grapes the Thompson seedless grapes produces grapes that grow from green to yellow to red as they ripen here we can see big bunches of grapes growing and now it really looks like you're going to be getting a lot of grapes for harvest during the season and by elevating the grapes to a height you make sure that rodents stay away from all birds stay away from at it might be possible that birds might eat some of your grapes especially when they're very ripe now in June we made our first harvest and as you can see here the grapes are about dark green to slightly light green here and what I'm doing is I'm not harvesting the whole bunch I'm just harvesting a few grapes from the sides and what I realized was that these grapes were still very good to eat now if you look at the grapes they are not really ripe they don't look very ripe as they don't look like yellow or red in color so they actually taste tangy now some people like eating tangy grapes they're not extremely sweet but they have a very unique flavor so if you're one of those folks that like to eat tangy grapes this is a good time to harvest your grapes and you can start eating them you can even start putting them in smoothies make grape juice out of it they are all very good uses for that and once I realized that the grapes were sweet enough to harvest we harvested our first bunch of grapes and its really very rewarding to harvest something like grapes in your backyard grapes are extremely easy to grow in the California weather so if you live in the coastal areas, California or any other area that is conducive to growing grapes you should try it out you can see here more bunches of grapes that are now ripening and slowly we started seeing that we had a lot of grapes to harvest on any given day we would harvest 2 or 3 bunches of grapes as you can see here beautiful-looking grapes and we are still in june so towards the end of june is when we saw that the grapes were turning slightly yellow as you can see here in fact the grapes that are right for actually falling down from the vine the grapevine so we make sure that we harvested every now and then and here you can clearly see a very good harvest and at this stage the grapes are sweet so we went from tangy tasting grapes to sweet grapes by end of june and with this kind of color with this kind of a yellow color the grapes are very nice very delicious and nice to eat now in July we saw that the grapes started turning even more sweet and the colors are color was turning towards red as you can see here slightly red and at this stage when the grapes start turning red they taste very sweet you can see here most of these groups are reddish yellow in color and here you can clearly see the grapes turning red in color and these are the ripe grapes these are extremely sweet very delicious to eat and if you want you can wait till this stage but what I've realized is that if you wait for all your grapes to be in the stage you want to lose a lot of grapes because they're going to fall down from the tree so what I recommend as a harvest schedule is to start in june harvest slowly from july through august and you're going to get a really good harvest that way so here you can see beautiful harvest and growing grapes is a real pleasure it's very rewarding so i highly recommend that you start growing grapes in your area if you can once again beautiful-looking harvest as you can see here and for a harvest season from june through august it's a long harvest season from just one plant you can expect a lot of grapes and as you can see here this plant is quite large and it did produce a lot of grapes this year for the second year now the Thompson seedless grapes are the one variety I highly recommend that you grow in your home garden it's a very easy variety you to grow and it produces a lot but if you do want to try out some other variety that's perfectly fine just make sure that the chill hours match the chill hours in your area once again you can see here beautiful-looking grapes right out of the grape vine and in August you can see that we continue to harvest our grapes and they're the same they're reddish-yellow very delicious and the sun has really increased the amount of sugar in the fruit and they're tasting very sweet now at the end of august you can start pruning your grape plant once you have harvested all your fruits and you want to make sure that you remove all the dead and diseased stems remove all the dead leaves and make sure that your plant is ready for the next growing season so there we have it folks that was our two-year grape journey this journey took a long time to film and make so I'd appreciate if you could give us a thumbs up if you like this video if you like all our videos and you would like to support us do click on the support button on our Channel and that way you can contribute towards the success of California Gardening and i also want to tell you that when you're buying your grape plant if you have a costco a local costco do check it out they have some great deals on grape plants and you can buy them for a very good price i wish you all a very happy 2017 we'll see you again soon happy gardening

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how to take free local resources including food waste, coffee grounds and more and turn them into compost and then feed them to the worms

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 137 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

 
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Alright! This is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com today we have another very exciting episode for you. I am here in Chicago, Illinois and I’m at a cool place and no, it’s not a farm you can see behind me. They are not like really growing stuff here. Well actually, they are growing something in here. They are growing worms and making worm castings, an essential element for you guys’ farm or home garden. So, I’m here today to share with you guys what they are doing and they are doing something amazing that every municipality, every city, every state, everywhere in the country should be doing what they are doing here, in this yard, I don’t know, West 48th Street here in Chicago and they are turning food scraps and things from the waste stream that will normally get put into the landfill. Rot, create methane, gas and which really not serve, you know, the purpose of feeding the earth back. It just rots, it’s just a waste when things have to go to the landfills. So I’m really glad that they are diverting, uh, food waste here and what they get delivered here in, you know, big sacks that are all delivered actually by bicycles which is, uh, super cool. The sacks have things like coffee, you know, beans, residuals after they press out the coffee and then they also have things like food scraps in some of the plastic bags there that they get from different farms, grocery stores and restaurants. Over on this side, they got a bunch of five-gallon buckets. The five-gallon buckets, they collect from different, you know, people. Well, they don’t actually collect them, they have haulers that collect them and then they drop them off here and people basically put their food waste in there and then they come here and get composted, not necessarily composted. The worms eat them…the worms don’t even eat them. Well you will learn more about that in a minute. They basically give that…they feed it to the worms and then they make, you know, the worms have babies because they are nice and happy. Then, the worms also make the worm castings which is one of the best nutrients that you guys should be adding to your gardens. You guys should definitely be having your own worms in the garden to make castings right there in your garden beds. You don’t need to keep adding the castings, I mean, garden beds, you just actually add a few worms in the beginning and provided you have a good system and you are not, you know, putting chemical fertilizers and all this crap to kill your worms and if you give them enough water and food source, which is like compost, worms love to eat compost or food scraps, they are going to multiply. Then at some point, like, you are going to dig in your soil like, “I knew it” and you are going to feel bad, “Oh My God! I just cut a worm up in half when I’m planting my [?]transplants” because they are so many worms in there, right. That’s a good problem to have, to have overabundance of worms and worm eggs, you know, this kind of stuff. But I know a lot of you guys are new gardeners so you guys got to start somewhere so, you know, the place you should start, maybe even order some worms from Nature’s Little Recyclers and we are going to go ahead and go into the yard today and show you guys the process that it goes through from food to worms to how they grow them indoors year round, here in Chicago even when there is snow on the ground outside, in the winter time and how they grow even in the summer time. They grow indoors and also outside. In the summer, they convert, you know, because it can get too hot in the building for the worms, they get up for the right temperature, they grow outside. So yeah, let’s go ahead and take you on this journey of how they actually grow worms and worm castings here at Nature’s Little Recyclers. Alright, so they got this big huge fence and let’s see if I can open this up. I got to pull. Alright, come on inside. So, the first thing I have learnt about having a worm farm, that is really cool, is that all your feed stock you are feeding your worms are free or can be free because it is unfortunate that some worm farms use Purina worm chow to feed their worms. Such thing is a travesty, is a waste. That stuff should not even be sold because they are so many things going to the landfill that they are rescuing and you can feed your worms for free without having to buy worm chow to feed your worms and make Purina a rich company. Anyways, I don’t advocate you guys eating any kind of processed foods, whether that’s for your worms, you know, for your pets, Purina dog foods or processed foods for you. I want you guys to eat real foods like they are feeding the worms. Now, I don’t know that I necessarily, you know, eat this stuff right here, the coffee grounds maybe if I was starving. It’s priceless nutrients in there, it actually smells quite good but they get things like coffee grounds and, you know, in these bags here. I don’t know what they got, let’s see. All they use are these bio-degradable plastics bags. Oh, they got some egg shells in here and they got all these shreds and these, uh, little sticks here and whatever, these stems. These looks like stems of like collard greens or kale. Maybe, there is a kale chip factory that’s stripping these and then use them to cook with and they strip these off and then they come here to feed the worms. So, you know, the feed stock is free and they don’t have to keep buying this. So this is super-intelligent. Actually, one of the owners here started selling worms when I think when he was a teenager. He picked up a book, you know, “Start a worm farm and make money” or something like that, right. And you guys can do this too, start one of these up, if you guys-, wherever you guys live in the world except in Chicago because they are doing it here. No wait! If you are in Chicago, do it too because, guess what, there are so much extra trash and waste going to the landfill. These are needed like multiple companies like these in every single city around the country so that we can take things like coffee grounds and food scraps out of the whole landfill system. And then, guess what, you get free inputs to feed the worms and then, guess what, you get to grow the worms, sell the worms. You can sell the worm eggs. You can also sell their castings. Or better yet, use them for your own garden or farm and you can set this up as a side business, right. So yeah, really cool. So this is just one of the feed sources they get from more industrial suppliers like coffee, you know, by the big huge bag, the grounds and all the food scraps but they also, you know, work with some local delivery companies that actual pick up the compost from people and they deliver that here. So let me go ahead and show you guys some of that food stock they get for the worms in the five-gallon buckets over yonder. Alright, so now I’m sitting amongst all these five-gallon buckets. Five-gallon buckets are great resource and unfortunately also go to the landfill, you know. Check with local delis or bakeries, they get a lot of goods shipped in these buckets to the, you know, to the delis whether that’s pickles or olives or to the bakeries, whether that’s like some kind of crazy, nasty whipped cream and all these frostings that I don’t recommend you guys to eat, or fruit compote, fillings with like all kind of artificial stuff in there. And I’ll tell you, I got some buckets from the bakery and had to wash them out. Man! That stuff didn’t wash out and it’s like, man, people eat this stuff and I could barely get it washed out just in my shower like with just water like it just wouldn’t dissolve. What happens when you eat that stuff? I don’t even want to know. But anyways, they got a lot of buckets here and in the buckets, basically once again they got the bio-degradable bags and they just collect these from households and people. They got all kind of different stuff in here. I should open this up. It smells kind of like it’s been fermented a little bit and inside here, we got, you know, a piece of carrot...Hey man! These are good pieces of carrots, man. They should have juiced these. I don’t know what they had thought about feeding them to the worms and it looks like they got pieces of onions in there. I mean, every one is a little bit different. They might have lemons in some. Let’s see what’s in this side. Oh look at this, they got cilantro in there. Oh, they shouldn’t have this little tag on there. No, this is Italian parsley, sorry. That’s pretty much well used. Oh, they got celery in here. They got some celery. This might have been good celery but right now, this is good worm food, right. Check it out, in nature there is no such thing as waste. I challenge you to challenge me on that. Find some waste in nature. If it is not made by man, if it is not made out of plastic, right, everything is bio-degradable and is returned to the earth. Even us, right. And I want you guys to think about this and do more to return things you use on your farm or in your garden and return it to the earth or feed it to the worms and check this out, you know, even man-made polystyrene or whatever that stuff is, the foam-packing material, right, they found out that mealworms can even digest that stuff, right. Nature is incredible, it’s only when we get involved and start, like you know, making plastics and do all these things that are not necessarily directly at the nature, do we create waste. So I want you guys to, you know, focus on using more natural products in your lives, whether it is in your garden or especially in your home and try to shy away from plastics. I know we can’t get away from plastics completely because plastics make it possible but they can serve us in a useful way where we are reusing buckets, you know, and reusing and reusing. I use them to collect compost in my personal kitchen that I take out to my compost tumblers, right, and I collect, you know, harvest things into the bucket, right and I cut down my plants and I put those in the bucket to take to my composters. There are so many uses of the five-gallon buckets and I want to encourage you guys to get some, you know, and divert them from the landfills and use them and reuse them in your garden until they burst up in the UV sun after a couple of years, right. I really did a video actually, one of my favorite videos I made, believe it or not, I made it like five, six years ago that made me use a five-gallon bucket. I’ll put a link down below if I remember that. Check that out, I definitely had a fun time making it and even this day, I remember that video. It’s one of my all-time favorites, so yeah, check it out. Anyway, as you guys can see, they got, like, so much food to feed the worms. They got some like backlog here so anyways, let’s go ahead in next and show you guys how they grow the worms or actually, how they used to grow the worms, how they grow the worms now and I have got the whole process. Let’s go ahead and share with you inside the worm farm inside the building. So now we are inside the building of Nature’s Little Recyclers and in the winter, spring, fall, this is the perfect environment to be growing worms. They are not growing food; they are growing worms. Well, it might be food for some different fish and creatures that like to eat worms. Birds, they love worms. But they are growing the worms in here and, you know, you got to have the right temperature, the right moisture level and there are experts in knowing all this stuff because they have been doing this for a long time. And how it is, is that it’s not even that expensive to keep worms. Well, they are using these plastic totes. These have definitely been around the block or two a few times. And, you know, they have put some holes in there for some aeration and, you know, some drainage so that it’s not too moist in there for the worms and they just basically put all the different inputs that you guys saw into these bins and then they put worms in there and the worms eat the garbage or the food scraps and all the input materials that they are getting for free. Now, here is the thing that you probably never heard before, right. The worms don’t really eat the food. “What John? How does that work? You put the food in there, the worms eat it, it comes out their rear end and make some, you know, worm castings.” That’s not exactly it. I mean, we might eat food and you might think we digest it and it comes out of our other end. But, believe it or not, inside us, we have beneficial microbes or our microbiomes. Things like lactobacillus and other beneficial bacteria and they help us digest our food, right. Much like the worms. The worms don’t really digest. They got no teeth to even break up stuff. They eat the food particles…they don’t even eat the food particles. The bacteria break down the food particles and then the worms eat all that stuff, right and in the worm’s gut, they could actually digest… the bacteria digest the food particles and the worm absorbs that. So yeah, the worms don’t directly eat it. They have a whole host of microbiome that help them do that. Check this out, just like in our poop, when we poop, right, our poop when we poop it out, it’s mostly bacteria and when the worms make the worm castings, it’s also mostly bacteria and other beneficial organisms, right. These are the very organisms that are going to help, you know, bring in and create more fertility to your soil by adding, you know, a whole host of different organisms that are going to go into your soil and actually break down the organic matter in your soils and make that available for the plants. That’s the reason why worm castings are so important. Now, this is the first way they were doing this and one time they have like five hundred of these bins and you guys can get one of these bins at Home Depot or Walmart and keep your own worms. It’s super simple, super easy. I’m not going to get into how to do that specifically. There are plenty YouTube videos on doing that but you guys can easily do that. But they had some challenges with it, you know, doing it this way in a large commercial system so they got to something even better than this. So let me go ahead and show you guys that next. So the new container they are using to grow their worms are these guys, they are actually called max crates or something like that and basically, if you ever go to, you know, buy apples at the grocery store, you might see one of these guys with all the apples or almonds in there. They buy these brand new and they also get some that are being reused from the recycling industry when these no longer have a good purpose or life in whatever they are used for in the beginning. They just simply take these and because they are a lot larger, they don’t need to have as many plus these are stackable. They can stack these up to ten how they usually stack them and be like three high and they modified this and made it even better than just what it is. Basically what they did, they took a drill and they drilled some holes on here, they drilled some dredge in here and they put some holes on the side and put some PVC that run all the way through the crate and what it does is they perforated it, they put holes in the PVC tubes. So this adds extra aeration into, you know, into the bin there so the worms can have a little bit more aeration but is also important for the first step of feeding the worms. So they don’t just instantly take one of these guys with all the tubes and stuff and put all the food scraps in there and they put the worms in. No, no, no… they have to go through a thermophilic step first, you know, for it to be, I guess, the law and also, you know, it prevents pathogens and also the other thing it does is that it breaks down some of the matter and start composting it and it creates more bacteria and breaks up the cell walls for the worms so that it actually makes a better worm food right for them. So next they fill this up with their mixtures that they are getting outside including this stuff in this bag here which is actually called coffee bean chaff and they mix up appropriate mixture including some cardboard and what not and so they have like a really very food source. They mix it up and basically they let this thermophilic composter to compost for a few days or a couple weeks or whatever and they hook about here, blowers to these pipes and then they blow air through there. So this encourages the compost to happen faster. Once they got it up to a hot temperature and it cools down, then and only then, will they actually put the worms in there. So now, the compost is broken down a little bit and the worms really go to town and like it a lot more than just raw food scraps, right. Then, they feed the worms and after that, they harvest it, right. That’s how simple this system is to make and then, you know, if you have appropriate levels of water which they only maybe water once a month. Depending if they have wet food scraps, they don’t even need to add water to this system. They have a mixture of different things and it’s just super sustainable when they are getting free feed stock to feed the worms, right. Most gardens or whatever, maybe you are making your own compost and stuff and all people may bring in input from the outside, right. This is super-intelligent because it diverts waste that will normally go into the landfills. I guess the next step that I want to show you guys is once they got all this, they sift these stuff out to make the worm castings that they sell to gardeners all over the country and also people can pick up in the local area and yeah, so let’s go ahead and show you guys how they sift out this stuff after it has been in there for a good long time and the worms have digested. So the next thing I want to share with you guys, actually how they stacked those bins. You guys can see they got these bins stacked up three tall. The top two bins actually have the worms and the bottom bin collects all the leachate, or that is, the liquid that runs off and out of these bins. So some people might call that worm tea but that’s not worm tea, let’s not get these, you know, um, terminologies confused. That is basically the leachate or the worm pee, alright. Worm pee, worm tea, they rhyme but they are not the same thing. You know, this is different than the aerated worm compost tea that I will show you guys in a minute. This stuff it may be good for your garden. Some gardeners say it’s not good for your garden. My personal opinion on the leachate is you want to take the leachate you want to dilute it down. Yes. Adding it back to the soil is just yet another way to get organic matter and further nutrients back into the soil. That’s one of the best ways you guys could use the leachate. But whatever you do, don’t call it a compost tea, because of my opinion, it’s not. So once the worms eat the food, you know, and go through the whole bedding material, they take the bedding material and they put it into this device right here, which is a sifter or sorter and I’m going to actually demonstrate it right here. They are going to make me put this stuff like right here and throw it in there. Oh! There are worms, I see worms crawling around. Then what happens is that they press this button on the back and what’s happening now is that this thing shakes and there are two sets of this. This first section has small holes. So this catches all the worm castings and then they ship out to people around the country. And next, [?]as they go, as they go down. Then over on this area, what happens is that they have larger holes. So this area is designed to catch all the worm eggs which they use in how they keep their breeding stock up so that they can have more babies to sell to you guys. And then the final section, the big chunks just fall of the front which then they rotate them back in and refeed the worms. That’s pretty much how simple what is, you know, sort out all the worm castings in specially designed screens that does this all for them. Let me go ahead and turn this guy off. I think I need one of this guys to sift all my compost, maybe I’ll have like a little bit bigger holes than what they got here but this thing is really cool. Next, we are going to show you guys after they sift this stuff out, they have the castings, they have the big stuff that they throw back in. Then what they are going to do is pick out and select the worms they get to ship out to you guys. So let’s go to the area they have setup where they actually, you know, select out and ship worms. So after they sift out the worm and the castings that you guys saw, they are left with a few things, right. They are left with this right here, which is a hundred percent, mostly pure worm castings which is basically the worm poop. This stuff is rich and biologically active and the main reason why I like these worm castings compared to many other ones is because of what they are feeding their worms, right. We are only as healthy as the food we eat. Your dog is only as healthy as the food he eats and the worms are only as healthy and the castings are only as good as the food they are eating. So, I don’t necessarily like worms that are been fed Purina worm chow or manure or GMO corn or any kind of these things. I like what they are using here. They are using a wide variety of fruits and vegetable scraps and cardboard, coffee grounds and actually, you know, they get egg shells in and even, like, you know, bones and all these crazy things, mixed diverse food source. This is what we want for us. When you hear diversity, as good as kale is, don’t just eat kale all day. You want to eat kale, collard, spinach, lettuce, arugula, you know, radicchio, [xx], [xx], lovages, spinach. You want to eat all the different things and have a diverse diet. That’s what they are really doing to the worms here and that’s why I like these castings. These are really nice castings and when you get a casting, you should be able to smell it and it shouldn’t smell bad. If your casting smells bad, then you have some big problems. They should have a neutral smell and they should look nice, rich dark and black just like these ones right here. So you know, uh, they are left with the castings like one bucket of these guys which are worth the weight in gold for your garden and then there have left a bunch more of the larger material that, you know, they feed in and feed back into the worms. So once they get the finished worm castings, they can actually ship out the worm castings to you or they can create a value added product with the worm castings and I also encourage you guys to do what you want with your worm castings. What they do is that they got this big huge vortex brewery here and then they compost tea out of it or, you know what, casting tea, right. This is not the same as the leachate or the liquid that comes out of the worm dens, right. This is totally different because this is aerobic. They bubble this up and they brew it up and the bacteria multiply then sell this in the local area and use it on the farms that they work with to help, you know, re-establish bacterial and fungal colonies in the soil so that the soil can be more productive. You guys can do this too but the problem with compost tea is that you got to use it or lose it. So you bubble it for about twenty-four hours and then you want to spread it out immediately, you don’t want to let it sit because the colony count will actually go down if you don’t bubble it enough or if you bubble it too long. Be sure to click a link down below if I remember to put the link in the video down below to an open-source compost tea recipe that uses, you know, predominantly worm castings as one of the sources to increase the biological activity of your garden. So now what I want to do is I want to share with you guys actually how they screen out the worms and select them to ship to you. It is a very intelligent process. You know, a lot of worm sellers may just use a rotating tumbler that sorts out the worms and when you do that, you might get damaged worms. And, you know, when you get the box, you open it up, it kind of smells funky that’s because some of the worms didn’t make it and their bodies are decomposing. It’s like…it’s gross, right. So I’m glad they actually hand select and ship out the worms to you and check out how they do this. This is super-smart. They are using nature, you know, or worms’ natural tendencies to their advantage so that they can harvest them. In these, we got these heat lamps. It’s actually quite hot. I’m glad I don’t work in here eight hours a day sorting worms. But what they do is heat up the top of the soil. So what’s this like? This is like the sun coming down and heating the earth and when that happens, the worms don’t want to be out in the sun. They don’t like sun-bathing like all these ladies in Hawaii and stuff, right. They want to be under the ground where it’s like nice and cool and they are collected, you know, and chill out underneath the ground. They don’t want to be in the sun because they will dry up, right. Yeah, we have all seen those shoveled-up worms. It’s sad when you see those shoveled-up worms, right. So what happens is that the worms have a natural tendency when it’s hot on the surface of the soil, they are going to burrow down. So then all the worms burrow to the bottom and then they basically scoop out the stuff from the top, scoop it to the side and then they harvest the stuff on the bottom and…Wow! Look at this, man! This is where the worms are. Look at that, they are like tons of worms here. I don’t know if you guys can see them in the bottom there. This is what then they put in the bags to ship to you guys and how they pack it is really cool because, you know, unlike a lot of places where they use a lot of plastic, you know, they are trying to do things as sustainable and renewable as possible. And everything they ship you except for the plastic tape that’s covering on the box, you can compost or you can feed back to your worms including the cardboard that should be shredded. Actually, inside the box they use newspaper from the local area. They are using that as a, you know, packing material. Inside here, they have a paper bag that helps keep some of the moisture in for the worms and as a second barrier in case some of the worms get out of what’s inside here and they basically ship it in this little cloak bag that they have tied it off. All this is made out of cotton. This is all compostable and so the worms can breathe. Now another thing that they do which is super-intelligent, they actually add some peat moss, uh, you know, in here so it keeps a more stable environment for the worms. So you are insured you are going to get live worms and they only ship a few times a week, um, you know, to insure you are going to get the freshest, most alive worms, you know, without ones that are not alive, that have croaked during the shipment. So this is really cool they are shipping it in this way. Yeah, Oh! The other thing I wanted to show you guys, actually they showed me a worm egg. Let me see if I can find it over here, man. Oh yeah right, the worm egg. Here’s the worm egg right here. Man, it’s so small and tiny. It’s fallen down, I’m losing it. Alright, here’s the worm egg. I don’t know if you guys will be able to see that but I got a HD camera now. Here’s the little worm egg. I don’t know if you guys can see that there. So small and tiny, it kind of like, uh, you know, looks like a little seed, it’s kind of clear and this will hatch a bunch of the worms. So, you know, some places they sell worm eggs. They keep them here to use and sell locally. They don’t ship them out and then they use that to repopulate their stores of worms so that they could have even a larger army to break down all the food scraps so that they can make more worms to sell and, you know, more worm castings to give out to you guys. So yeah, really cool. You know, worms work in nature naturally so, you know, you don’t have to grow worms in these big bins, you don’t have to, like, you know, sort out your worms, right. You could avoid all this by just putting live worms in your garden. If you have like twenty garden beds, you want to order like a pound of worms and divide it into twenty portions and put a few worms in each garden bed, right. If you provide the worms a good home, a good environment, you have a nice moisture level, you have good organic matter in there, they are going to be happy. They are going to eat all the food scraps and all the compost, you know, degraded stuff in there and create more fertility and add fertility to your soil and you are not even doing any work to add this fertility. The worms are doing all the work. It’s how nature works, right. You guys got to get some worms if you have never added worms to your garden. I mean, one of the things I do is that I put worm eggs into my garden, I have added worms to my garden. When I see one of my raised beds may have like a lot of worms and some beds don’t have worms, I will like move them to different beds and when I dig up to plant the plants and when I find a worm, I’m like “Oh! Where am I going to put you? I’m going to put you over here because I don’t see many worms in that bed, right.” So we want to get an even distribution of worms in all our different raised beds so that they can start working for us. They are free labor and free labor is the labor that I like the most, right, when I have workers working for me including the bacteria, the fungi, the worms that help cultivate these things for your garden. Alright, so what we are going to do next is actually we are going to talk to Dale Hubbard, the CEO here and he is going to share with you guys a lot more about worms that you and I actually never heard of. So now I’m here with Dale, the CEO of Nature’s Little Recyclers and you will never guess by looking at this guy with his dirty hands that he is the CEO but he keeps this whole business running and I’m glad that he is just a guy like one of us, right. He is not some big huffy business-suit sitting in some office doing crap and getting paid a lot of money. He actually probably works hard for his money – Dale Hubbard: I do. John: - by the looks of it. But anyways, we are here to ask him a few questions today on why it's important that his business is here operating and why they even got started and whole bunch of other things about worms that you guys probably never heard anywhere else. So Dale, the first question I have for you is “Why did you guys start this business because it’s you and your partner, Ed, right?” Dale: Yup. So the number one reason why we started this business was, um, He wanted to grow…actually, my partner wanted to grow earthworms. He is like, looking for another thing to do and [xx] “I think I want to grow earthworms.” At first, I thought he was crazy. I was like “No way you are growing earthworms. This is crazy. I’m not helping you.” Then he goes down to a place called The Plant Chicago, which is an indoor vertical farm and he started processing all the waste and producing compost and then I started meeting all the farmers and everybody and I realized that in Chicago, the one reason we don’t have more farms here is because the soil is so bad. It’s full of mercury and lead and in order to produce good, um, good healthier organic food, we need to build up the soil to feed. So we figured by taking the trash, uh, compost and feed it to our worms, we get high grade of fertilizers for it. John: That’s awesome. Yes, so let’s talk about this mercury and lead. I mean, this is why I encourage you guys to grow in raised beds instead of growing in the ground especially if you guys are in a big city. You want to bring in some stuff and the worm castings should be a big part of that, you know. I think I was over at your other facility because this is the indoor facility. The outdoor facility, you know, you guys were using wood chips in addition to the food scraps and the waste and the worms to break that down. So what are you guys doing over there so that the farmer can be successful growing there because you help out that farm as well as other farms and communal gardens and things in the area, right? Dale: Yeah, absolutely. So one of the big things we do is we work with other development projects to get the farms off the ground and over there, what we are doing is, we are converting a parking lot, I think it’s a half-acre lot and we are changing it into a [?]high grow able food. So by this time next year, there is going to be an organic farm there. John: That’s awesome, that’s awesome. So, you know, um, let’s talk about, like, diverting the food waste. As you guys can see behind us, we got the bags, we got all the buckets full of waste that they have yet to process or they have to process by throwing into the bins and the worms have to process it. But let’s talk about why, you know, it’s so important to divert all this waste that will normally go into the landfill. Dale: So yeah, the number one thing that is produced in the landfill is methane and what’s causing it, is the food waste. What happens to the food waste is that it gets trapped in the landfill and lose oxygen and therefore goes anaerobic and produces methane. So number one producer of methane. Um, everybody gives the cows the bad rep but they are actually number two. So by processing it this way, there is no methane produced and the fact that it not only stops methane from getting produced, it also [xx] carbon-dioxide in the process. So it reverses both effects of the most dangerous gases in global warming. John: Wow! So yeah, all you guys still throwing out your food waste, minimally compost them or better yet, like they are doing here, feed them to worms and if you guys are looking for a second job or a new, you know, thing to get into aside because you hate your job, right, you can work with worms all day and start a worm business. Get these castings, get these worms out to people, your local community and ship them all over. We need more of the businesses like this and that’s why I’m here sharing with you guys, uh, them today. So the next question. Let’s talk about the worms. You know, Dale told me that the worms actually don’t eat the food. So what’s up with this? I see you put the food in there and the food disappears but the worms are not eating it? What’s going on? Dale: So actually, worms are…it’s not just the worms, the extra whole microbial process that comes with the worms, what they do is they create enzymes and microbes that break down the food for the worms. Then, when the food becomes soft and almost liquefied, then the worms go through it and eat it all. John: So Dale, the next question I have for you is actually, uh, you know, what percentage of these nutrients…you are going through a lot of food scraps and food waste here but I know you are not getting it all, what percentage are you saving and what percentage is still going, you know, to the landfill? Dale: So actually, we only save a fraction of, uh, compost or what is produced in Chicago. We…all of Chicago, all the composting programs only two percent of stuff is actually diverted from the landfill. The other ninety-eight still goes to the landfill and that’s pretty much true across the country. So almost all this stuff is still going to the landfills so we need lots of people to compost, we need a lots of worm farmers, a lot of more composters to get it done. John: Yeah, it’s a great, a great business to have, right. So let’s talk about now, let’s talk about shipping the worms and shipping the worm castings to people all over the country. Dale: Yeah. John: Right, why did you guys decide to, like you know, sell them and ship them instead of just sell them in the local area? Dale: So the number one reason we decided to ship them was, uh, is the internet, right. We can ship to the whole country, you know, which is a click of a button versus locally, it was hard to get our name out and stuff. So we started selling on national sites like Amazon, our very own website which allowed us to, um, get a lot of early sales and promote our brand tremendously. John: That’s awesome. Yeah, I mean, that’s one of the reason why I’m here because I actually found them on the internet. Found their website, found their prices. Actually, their prices on delivered worms are, like, the lowest prices I found and we will talk more about that and give you guys a special deal at the end but they have amazing prices on the worms and they also sell the castings. These are so beneficial to you guys’ garden. So Dale, what are some of the reasons why worms and the worm castings are beneficial for people in their gardens and why should they use them? Dale: Sure, well the number one source in organic fertilizer has a lot of nutrients and micro-nutrients you won’t get from normal fertilizer, uh, normal soil. They also can help with pest control, um, and they increase the water retention of your soil. So farmers are calling this, black gold. John: Yeah, black gold. So let’s talk about the word ‘humus’, right. You know that word and why the worm castings is one of the best humus out there? Dale: So humus allow air to get into the soil so you, kind of, break up soil. One of the projects, one of the reasons we use, uh, in one of our projects, we use worm castings because it’s an old farm land that is compacted. It had been traditionally, conventionally farmed for decades and all those soil became compacted out in the edge of the city. So we are using worm castings to put air and humus back into it in order to allow to start growing organically again. John: That’s awesome. Yeah, I mean, worm castings – they are an essential part of my gardening style and I want them to be a part of yours also. The best way of course is to have your own worms in your raised beds or have your own worm box, if you want to do a worm box, or a worm bin like you guys saw a little bit earlier and to get started, you will need the worms. That’s why Dale could help you out. So you guys saw the process, how they pick out the worms, ship you guys the worms and you can buy the worms and then put them into your garden. So Dale, when somebody buys the worms and they get them shipped to you, right when they get the box, what should they do? Should they leave the box sitting there for a week before they get to them or where do they put them once they get them? Dale: So the first thing we always say is to open the box right away to make sure the worms are in a good condition. Um, the number one thing you need to do is to moisture them, that’s the biggest thing you need to do. They can sit in the container for up to two weeks as long you add moisture to the system, uh, to the container but otherwise, we recommend feeding it right away to your bins as fast as you can. That will be the best thing for the worms. John: Yeah. So, you know, set up your own worm bin to put them in there to get them growing or just simply, like I mentioned, you put them into your garden beds. You know, take a little bit and put in every garden bed provided you have a good soil mixture with high organic matter and you have the right water. That’s where they are supposed to live. Worms are supposed to live in the soil, not necessarily in the bin like they are doing here but this allows them to grow and propagate and get those out to more people and as they are doing, diverting the food waste, one of the more important things you guys could do. So because, you know, I visited them and I liked their stuff, I also negotiated with Dale, the CEO of the company, a good discount for you guys, so we are going to get for you guys a 10% discount on any of the products on their website and so you are going to want to order from them. I definitely can approve of their castings that I saw and handled personally as well as the worms, they look like they got some really nice ones. So you guys can get, not only the lowest price that they have without my discount, you are going to get my discount too. So you probably not going to find lower price online if you want to buy, you know, a pack of worms. So Dale, how many worms come in a pack? Dale: So a pound of worms usually contains a thousand, about a thousand worms. We deliver more than a thousand worms in it. Actually, it is usually a good thing to start like a five-gallon bin at your home garden… Oh! And John, I got a gift for you. There you go. John: Oh cool man! Check it out, he’s given me my own package of worms in the paper bag like they would come shipped to you and in a cloak bag inside with all the bedding material just like you guys are going to order and I’m going to take this back on the airplane tonight when I fly back to, um, Vegas. I’m sure the TSA is going to have fun stopping me. “What you got in that bag?” Then I’m going to say, “I’ve got worms. You want some.” So yeah, so now you guys can order the same ones. I’m going to order some castings. So Dale, somebody wants to learn more about you guys and your company and what you guys are doing and want to reach out to you, they want to start one of these, you know, wherever they live. How can they get a hold of you? Dale: So this way, you can get hold of us, at nlrwormshop.com, it’s our website and NLR Worms is also on social media, Facebook, twitter, all of it. Um, so that it is will be the easy way you can contact us. John: Cool. They also have a cool YouTube channel that I checked out that probably doesn’t have a lot of views but maybe they will get more views after you guys see this video today. So, yeah. Any other last comments or things you would like to share to my viewers today about the worms, about the worm composting, about diverting the food waste or anything that we talked about. Dale: Um, we say we produce the best worms. We give it a 100% guarantee on all our products so if you aren’t happy, we take it back and all this [?]money they can choose, could help to make the world a better place. John: That’s awesome, man. That’s why I make these videos so the world can be a better place through the education work that I’m able to do to, you know, highlight companies like Dale’s here and adds, you know, are doing good in the world. This is how we are going to create a better world by showing what good people are doing to create solutions in the world instead of creating more problems. They are creating a solution for the food waste and instead of creating problems by, you know, processing petroleum and fracking, creating more problems. Let’s create solution in our world. One of the ways you guys can easily do that is to start composting, start worm composting and of course, start growing your own food so you can become a producer instead of a consumer in our unfortunately consumers’ society that we live in. It’s not going to happen overnight, right. You can start growing a small portion of your food and every little bit helps. Every bit of food scraps you don’t put into the landfill is helping out the world. It’s going to also help build your garden too. So I encourage you guys to do that today. If you want to learn how, be sure to click that subscribe button right down below. Our videos come out every 3 – 4 days educating you guys on all ranges of subjects so that you guys could, you know, grow more food at home. Also check my past episodes, I have over 1100 episodes online sharing with you guys all the knowledge you will need to grow your own food, compost, make worm compost, make regular compost, whatever you guys want to do and also be sure to like this video. You guys like this video. If I get enough likes, I’m going to come back on my next trip and we are going to get more into detail on how they do their process because this was just a general overview video. Also be sure to check that link down below to go to their website to get the special deal on the worms and don’t forget the coupon code GYG You are not going to get that anywhere else. So hope you guys enjoy this episode. Once again, my name is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com. Will see you next time and until then, remember keep on growing.


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Alright! This is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com today we have another very exciting episode for you. I am here in Chicago, Illinois and I’m at a cool place and no, it’s not a farm you can see behind me. They are not like really growing stuff here. Well actually, they are growing something in here. They are growing worms and making worm castings, an essential element for you guys’ farm or home garden. So, I’m here today to share with you guys what they are doing and they are doing something amazing that every municipality, every city, every state, everywhere in the country should be doing what they are doing here, in this yard, I don’t know, West 48th Street here in Chicago and they are turning food scraps and things from the waste stream that will normally get put into the landfill. Rot, create methane, gas and which really not serve, you know, the purpose of feeding the earth back. It just rots, it’s just a waste when things have to go to the landfills. So I’m really glad that they are diverting, uh, food waste here and what they get delivered here in, you know, big sacks that are all delivered actually by bicycles which is, uh, super cool. The sacks have things like coffee, you know, beans, residuals after they press out the coffee and then they also have things like food scraps in some of the plastic bags there that they get from different farms, grocery stores and restaurants. Over on this side, they got a bunch of five-gallon buckets. The five-gallon buckets, they collect from different, you know, people. Well, they don’t actually collect them, they have haulers that collect them and then they drop them off here and people basically put their food waste in there and then they come here and get composted, not necessarily composted. The worms eat them…the worms don’t even eat them. Well you will learn more about that in a minute. They basically give that…they feed it to the worms and then they make, you know, the worms have babies because they are nice and happy. Then, the worms also make the worm castings which is one of the best nutrients that you guys should be adding to your gardens. You guys should definitely be having your own worms in the garden to make castings right there in your garden beds. You don’t need to keep adding the castings, I mean, garden beds, you just actually add a few worms in the beginning and provided you have a good system and you are not, you know, putting chemical fertilizers and all this crap to kill your worms and if you give them enough water and food source, which is like compost, worms love to eat compost or food scraps, they are going to multiply. Then at some point, like, you are going to dig in your soil like, “I knew it” and you are going to feel bad, “Oh My God! I just cut a worm up in half when I’m planting my [?]transplants” because they are so many worms in there, right. That’s a good problem to have, to have overabundance of worms and worm eggs, you know, this kind of stuff. But I know a lot of you guys are new gardeners so you guys got to start somewhere so, you know, the place you should start, maybe even order some worms from Nature’s Little Recyclers and we are going to go ahead and go into the yard today and show you guys the process that it goes through from food to worms to how they grow them indoors year round, here in Chicago even when there is snow on the ground outside, in the winter time and how they grow even in the summer time. They grow indoors and also outside. In the summer, they convert, you know, because it can get too hot in the building for the worms, they get up for the right temperature, they grow outside. So yeah, let’s go ahead and take you on this journey of how they actually grow worms and worm castings here at Nature’s Little Recyclers. Alright, so they got this big huge fence and let’s see if I can open this up. I got to pull. Alright, come on inside. So, the first thing I have learnt about having a worm farm, that is really cool, is that all your feed stock you are feeding your worms are free or can be free because it is unfortunate that some worm farms use Purina worm chow to feed their worms. Such thing is a travesty, is a waste. That stuff should not even be sold because they are so many things going to the landfill that they are rescuing and you can feed your worms for free without having to buy worm chow to feed your worms and make Purina a rich company. Anyways, I don’t advocate you guys eating any kind of processed foods, whether that’s for your worms, you know, for your pets, Purina dog foods or processed foods for you. I want you guys to eat real foods like they are feeding the worms. Now, I don’t know that I necessarily, you know, eat this stuff right here, the coffee grounds maybe if I was starving. It’s priceless nutrients in there, it actually smells quite good but they get things like coffee grounds and, you know, in these bags here. I don’t know what they got, let’s see. All they use are these bio-degradable plastics bags. Oh, they got some egg shells in here and they got all these shreds and these, uh, little sticks here and whatever, these stems. These looks like stems of like collard greens or kale. Maybe, there is a kale chip factory that’s stripping these and then use them to cook with and they strip these off and then they come here to feed the worms. So, you know, the feed stock is free and they don’t have to keep buying this. So this is super-intelligent. Actually, one of the owners here started selling worms when I think when he was a teenager. He picked up a book, you know, “Start a worm farm and make money” or something like that, right. And you guys can do this too, start one of these up, if you guys-, wherever you guys live in the world except in Chicago because they are doing it here. No wait! If you are in Chicago, do it too because, guess what, there are so much extra trash and waste going to the landfill. These are needed like multiple companies like these in every single city around the country so that we can take things like coffee grounds and food scraps out of the whole landfill system. And then, guess what, you get free inputs to feed the worms and then, guess what, you get to grow the worms, sell the worms. You can sell the worm eggs. You can also sell their castings. Or better yet, use them for your own garden or farm and you can set this up as a side business, right. So yeah, really cool. So this is just one of the feed sources they get from more industrial suppliers like coffee, you know, by the big huge bag, the grounds and all the food scraps but they also, you know, work with some local delivery companies that actual pick up the compost from people and they deliver that here. So let me go ahead and show you guys some of that food stock they get for the worms in the five-gallon buckets over yonder. Alright, so now I’m sitting amongst all these five-gallon buckets. Five-gallon buckets are great resource and unfortunately also go to the landfill, you know. Check with local delis or bakeries, they get a lot of goods shipped in these buckets to the, you know, to the delis whether that’s pickles or olives or to the bakeries, whether that’s like some kind of crazy, nasty whipped cream and all these frostings that I don’t recommend you guys to eat, or fruit compote, fillings with like all kind of artificial stuff in there. And I’ll tell you, I got some buckets from the bakery and had to wash them out. Man! That stuff didn’t wash out and it’s like, man, people eat this stuff and I could barely get it washed out just in my shower like with just water like it just wouldn’t dissolve. What happens when you eat that stuff? I don’t even want to know. But anyways, they got a lot of buckets here and in the buckets, basically once again they got the bio-degradable bags and they just collect these from households and people. They got all kind of different stuff in here. I should open this up. It smells kind of like it’s been fermented a little bit and inside here, we got, you know, a piece of carrot...Hey man! These are good pieces of carrots, man. They should have juiced these. I don’t know what they had thought about feeding them to the worms and it looks like they got pieces of onions in there. I mean, every one is a little bit different. They might have lemons in some. Let’s see what’s in this side. Oh look at this, they got cilantro in there. Oh, they shouldn’t have this little tag on there. No, this is Italian parsley, sorry. That’s pretty much well used. Oh, they got celery in here. They got some celery. This might have been good celery but right now, this is good worm food, right. Check it out, in nature there is no such thing as waste. I challenge you to challenge me on that. Find some waste in nature. If it is not made by man, if it is not made out of plastic, right, everything is bio-degradable and is returned to the earth. Even us, right. And I want you guys to think about this and do more to return things you use on your farm or in your garden and return it to the earth or feed it to the worms and check this out, you know, even man-made polystyrene or whatever that stuff is, the foam-packing material, right, they found out that mealworms can even digest that stuff, right. Nature is incredible, it’s only when we get involved and start, like you know, making plastics and do all these things that are not necessarily directly at the nature, do we create waste. So I want you guys to, you know, focus on using more natural products in your lives, whether it is in your garden or especially in your home and try to shy away from plastics. I know we can’t get away from plastics completely because plastics make it possible but they can serve us in a useful way where we are reusing buckets, you know, and reusing and reusing. I use them to collect compost in my personal kitchen that I take out to my compost tumblers, right, and I collect, you know, harvest things into the bucket, right and I cut down my plants and I put those in the bucket to take to my composters. There are so many uses of the five-gallon buckets and I want to encourage you guys to get some, you know, and divert them from the landfills and use them and reuse them in your garden until they burst up in the UV sun after a couple of years, right. I really did a video actually, one of my favorite videos I made, believe it or not, I made it like five, six years ago that made me use a five-gallon bucket. I’ll put a link down below if I remember that. Check that out, I definitely had a fun time making it and even this day, I remember that video. It’s one of my all-time favorites, so yeah, check it out. Anyway, as you guys can see, they got, like, so much food to feed the worms. They got some like backlog here so anyways, let’s go ahead in next and show you guys how they grow the worms or actually, how they used to grow the worms, how they grow the worms now and I have got the whole process. Let’s go ahead and share with you inside the worm farm inside the building. So now we are inside the building of Nature’s Little Recyclers and in the winter, spring, fall, this is the perfect environment to be growing worms. They are not growing food; they are growing worms. Well, it might be food for some different fish and creatures that like to eat worms. Birds, they love worms. But they are growing the worms in here and, you know, you got to have the right temperature, the right moisture level and there are experts in knowing all this stuff because they have been doing this for a long time. And how it is, is that it’s not even that expensive to keep worms. Well, they are using these plastic totes. These have definitely been around the block or two a few times. And, you know, they have put some holes in there for some aeration and, you know, some drainage so that it’s not too moist in there for the worms and they just basically put all the different inputs that you guys saw into these bins and then they put worms in there and the worms eat the garbage or the food scraps and all the input materials that they are getting for free. Now, here is the thing that you probably never heard before, right. The worms don’t really eat the food. “What John? How does that work? You put the food in there, the worms eat it, it comes out their rear end and make some, you know, worm castings.” That’s not exactly it. I mean, we might eat food and you might think we digest it and it comes out of our other end. But, believe it or not, inside us, we have beneficial microbes or our microbiomes. Things like lactobacillus and other beneficial bacteria and they help us digest our food, right. Much like the worms. The worms don’t really digest. They got no teeth to even break up stuff. They eat the food particles…they don’t even eat the food particles. The bacteria break down the food particles and then the worms eat all that stuff, right and in the worm’s gut, they could actually digest… the bacteria digest the food particles and the worm absorbs that. So yeah, the worms don’t directly eat it. They have a whole host of microbiome that help them do that. Check this out, just like in our poop, when we poop, right, our poop when we poop it out, it’s mostly bacteria and when the worms make the worm castings, it’s also mostly bacteria and other beneficial organisms, right. These are the very organisms that are going to help, you know, bring in and create more fertility to your soil by adding, you know, a whole host of different organisms that are going to go into your soil and actually break down the organic matter in your soils and make that available for the plants. That’s the reason why worm castings are so important. Now, this is the first way they were doing this and one time they have like five hundred of these bins and you guys can get one of these bins at Home Depot or Walmart and keep your own worms. It’s super simple, super easy. I’m not going to get into how to do that specifically. There are plenty YouTube videos on doing that but you guys can easily do that. But they had some challenges with it, you know, doing it this way in a large commercial system so they got to something even better than this. So let me go ahead and show you guys that next. So the new container they are using to grow their worms are these guys, they are actually called max crates or something like that and basically, if you ever go to, you know, buy apples at the grocery store, you might see one of these guys with all the apples or almonds in there. They buy these brand new and they also get some that are being reused from the recycling industry when these no longer have a good purpose or life in whatever they are used for in the beginning. They just simply take these and because they are a lot larger, they don’t need to have as many plus these are stackable. They can stack these up to ten how they usually stack them and be like three high and they modified this and made it even better than just what it is. Basically what they did, they took a drill and they drilled some holes on here, they drilled some dredge in here and they put some holes on the side and put some PVC that run all the way through the crate and what it does is they perforated it, they put holes in the PVC tubes. So this adds extra aeration into, you know, into the bin there so the worms can have a little bit more aeration but is also important for the first step of feeding the worms. So they don’t just instantly take one of these guys with all the tubes and stuff and put all the food scraps in there and they put the worms in. No, no, no… they have to go through a thermophilic step first, you know, for it to be, I guess, the law and also, you know, it prevents pathogens and also the other thing it does is that it breaks down some of the matter and start composting it and it creates more bacteria and breaks up the cell walls for the worms so that it actually makes a better worm food right for them. So next they fill this up with their mixtures that they are getting outside including this stuff in this bag here which is actually called coffee bean chaff and they mix up appropriate mixture including some cardboard and what not and so they have like a really very food source. They mix it up and basically they let this thermophilic composter to compost for a few days or a couple weeks or whatever and they hook about here, blowers to these pipes and then they blow air through there. So this encourages the compost to happen faster. Once they got it up to a hot temperature and it cools down, then and only then, will they actually put the worms in there. So now, the compost is broken down a little bit and the worms really go to town and like it a lot more than just raw food scraps, right. Then, they feed the worms and after that, they harvest it, right. That’s how simple this system is to make and then, you know, if you have appropriate levels of water which they only maybe water once a month. Depending if they have wet food scraps, they don’t even need to add water to this system. They have a mixture of different things and it’s just super sustainable when they are getting free feed stock to feed the worms, right. Most gardens or whatever, maybe you are making your own compost and stuff and all people may bring in input from the outside, right. This is super-intelligent because it diverts waste that will normally go into the landfills. I guess the next step that I want to show you guys is once they got all this, they sift these stuff out to make the worm castings that they sell to gardeners all over the country and also people can pick up in the local area and yeah, so let’s go ahead and show you guys how they sift out this stuff after it has been in there for a good long time and the worms have digested. So the next thing I want to share with you guys, actually how they stacked those bins. You guys can see they got these bins stacked up three tall. The top two bins actually have the worms and the bottom bin collects all the leachate, or that is, the liquid that runs off and out of these bins. So some people might call that worm tea but that’s not worm tea, let’s not get these, you know, um, terminologies confused. That is basically the leachate or the worm pee, alright. Worm pee, worm tea, they rhyme but they are not the same thing. You know, this is different than the aerated worm compost tea that I will show you guys in a minute. This stuff it may be good for your garden. Some gardeners say it’s not good for your garden. My personal opinion on the leachate is you want to take the leachate you want to dilute it down. Yes. Adding it back to the soil is just yet another way to get organic matter and further nutrients back into the soil. That’s one of the best ways you guys could use the leachate. But whatever you do, don’t call it a compost tea, because of my opinion, it’s not. So once the worms eat the food, you know, and go through the whole bedding material, they take the bedding material and they put it into this device right here, which is a sifter or sorter and I’m going to actually demonstrate it right here. They are going to make me put this stuff like right here and throw it in there. Oh! There are worms, I see worms crawling around. Then what happens is that they press this button on the back and what’s happening now is that this thing shakes and there are two sets of this. This first section has small holes. So this catches all the worm castings and then they ship out to people around the country. And next, [?]as they go, as they go down. Then over on this area, what happens is that they have larger holes. So this area is designed to catch all the worm eggs which they use in how they keep their breeding stock up so that they can have more babies to sell to you guys. And then the final section, the big chunks just fall of the front which then they rotate them back in and refeed the worms. That’s pretty much how simple what is, you know, sort out all the worm castings in specially designed screens that does this all for them. Let me go ahead and turn this guy off. I think I need one of this guys to sift all my compost, maybe I’ll have like a little bit bigger holes than what they got here but this thing is really cool. Next, we are going to show you guys after they sift this stuff out, they have the castings, they have the big stuff that they throw back in. Then what they are going to do is pick out and select the worms they get to ship out to you guys. So let’s go to the area they have setup where they actually, you know, select out and ship worms. So after they sift out the worm and the castings that you guys saw, they are left with a few things, right. They are left with this right here, which is a hundred percent, mostly pure worm castings which is basically the worm poop. This stuff is rich and biologically active and the main reason why I like these worm castings compared to many other ones is because of what they are feeding their worms, right. We are only as healthy as the food we eat. Your dog is only as healthy as the food he eats and the worms are only as healthy and the castings are only as good as the food they are eating. So, I don’t necessarily like worms that are been fed Purina worm chow or manure or GMO corn or any kind of these things. I like what they are using here. They are using a wide variety of fruits and vegetable scraps and cardboard, coffee grounds and actually, you know, they get egg shells in and even, like, you know, bones and all these crazy things, mixed diverse food source. This is what we want for us. When you hear diversity, as good as kale is, don’t just eat kale all day. You want to eat kale, collard, spinach, lettuce, arugula, you know, radicchio, [xx], [xx], lovages, spinach. You want to eat all the different things and have a diverse diet. That’s what they are really doing to the worms here and that’s why I like these castings. These are really nice castings and when you get a casting, you should be able to smell it and it shouldn’t smell bad. If your casting smells bad, then you have some big problems. They should have a neutral smell and they should look nice, rich dark and black just like these ones right here. So you know, uh, they are left with the castings like one bucket of these guys which are worth the weight in gold for your garden and then there have left a bunch more of the larger material that, you know, they feed in and feed back into the worms. So once they get the finished worm castings, they can actually ship out the worm castings to you or they can create a value added product with the worm castings and I also encourage you guys to do what you want with your worm castings. What they do is that they got this big huge vortex brewery here and then they compost tea out of it or, you know what, casting tea, right. This is not the same as the leachate or the liquid that comes out of the worm dens, right. This is totally different because this is aerobic. They bubble this up and they brew it up and the bacteria multiply then sell this in the local area and use it on the farms that they work with to help, you know, re-establish bacterial and fungal colonies in the soil so that the soil can be more productive. You guys can do this too but the problem with compost tea is that you got to use it or lose it. So you bubble it for about twenty-four hours and then you want to spread it out immediately, you don’t want to let it sit because the colony count will actually go down if you don’t bubble it enough or if you bubble it too long. Be sure to click a link down below if I remember to put the link in the video down below to an open-source compost tea recipe that uses, you know, predominantly worm castings as one of the sources to increase the biological activity of your garden. So now what I want to do is I want to share with you guys actually how they screen out the worms and select them to ship to you. It is a very intelligent process. You know, a lot of worm sellers may just use a rotating tumbler that sorts out the worms and when you do that, you might get damaged worms. And, you know, when you get the box, you open it up, it kind of smells funky that’s because some of the worms didn’t make it and their bodies are decomposing. It’s like…it’s gross, right. So I’m glad they actually hand select and ship out the worms to you and check out how they do this. This is super-smart. They are using nature, you know, or worms’ natural tendencies to their advantage so that they can harvest them. In these, we got these heat lamps. It’s actually quite hot. I’m glad I don’t work in here eight hours a day sorting worms. But what they do is heat up the top of the soil. So what’s this like? This is like the sun coming down and heating the earth and when that happens, the worms don’t want to be out in the sun. They don’t like sun-bathing like all these ladies in Hawaii and stuff, right. They want to be under the ground where it’s like nice and cool and they are collected, you know, and chill out underneath the ground. They don’t want to be in the sun because they will dry up, right. Yeah, we have all seen those shoveled-up worms. It’s sad when you see those shoveled-up worms, right. So what happens is that the worms have a natural tendency when it’s hot on the surface of the soil, they are going to burrow down. So then all the worms burrow to the bottom and then they basically scoop out the stuff from the top, scoop it to the side and then they harvest the stuff on the bottom and…Wow! Look at this, man! This is where the worms are. Look at that, they are like tons of worms here. I don’t know if you guys can see them in the bottom there. This is what then they put in the bags to ship to you guys and how they pack it is really cool because, you know, unlike a lot of places where they use a lot of plastic, you know, they are trying to do things as sustainable and renewable as possible. And everything they ship you except for the plastic tape that’s covering on the box, you can compost or you can feed back to your worms including the cardboard that should be shredded. Actually, inside the box they use newspaper from the local area. They are using that as a, you know, packing material. Inside here, they have a paper bag that helps keep some of the moisture in for the worms and as a second barrier in case some of the worms get out of what’s inside here and they basically ship it in this little cloak bag that they have tied it off. All this is made out of cotton. This is all compostable and so the worms can breathe. Now another thing that they do which is super-intelligent, they actually add some peat moss, uh, you know, in here so it keeps a more stable environment for the worms. So you are insured you are going to get live worms and they only ship a few times a week, um, you know, to insure you are going to get the freshest, most alive worms, you know, without ones that are not alive, that have croaked during the shipment. So this is really cool they are shipping it in this way. Yeah, Oh! The other thing I wanted to show you guys, actually they showed me a worm egg. Let me see if I can find it over here, man. Oh yeah right, the worm egg. Here’s the worm egg right here. Man, it’s so small and tiny. It’s fallen down, I’m losing it. Alright, here’s the worm egg. I don’t know if you guys will be able to see that but I got a HD camera now. Here’s the little worm egg. I don’t know if you guys can see that there. So small and tiny, it kind of like, uh, you know, looks like a little seed, it’s kind of clear and this will hatch a bunch of the worms. So, you know, some places they sell worm eggs. They keep them here to use and sell locally. They don’t ship them out and then they use that to repopulate their stores of worms so that they could have even a larger army to break down all the food scraps so that they can make more worms to sell and, you know, more worm castings to give out to you guys. So yeah, really cool. You know, worms work in nature naturally so, you know, you don’t have to grow worms in these big bins, you don’t have to, like, you know, sort out your worms, right. You could avoid all this by just putting live worms in your garden. If you have like twenty garden beds, you want to order like a pound of worms and divide it into twenty portions and put a few worms in each garden bed, right. If you provide the worms a good home, a good environment, you have a nice moisture level, you have good organic matter in there, they are going to be happy. They are going to eat all the food scraps and all the compost, you know, degraded stuff in there and create more fertility and add fertility to your soil and you are not even doing any work to add this fertility. The worms are doing all the work. It’s how nature works, right. You guys got to get some worms if you have never added worms to your garden. I mean, one of the things I do is that I put worm eggs into my garden, I have added worms to my garden. When I see one of my raised beds may have like a lot of worms and some beds don’t have worms, I will like move them to different beds and when I dig up to plant the plants and when I find a worm, I’m like “Oh! Where am I going to put you? I’m going to put you over here because I don’t see many worms in that bed, right.” So we want to get an even distribution of worms in all our different raised beds so that they can start working for us. They are free labor and free labor is the labor that I like the most, right, when I have workers working for me including the bacteria, the fungi, the worms that help cultivate these things for your garden. Alright, so what we are going to do next is actually we are going to talk to Dale Hubbard, the CEO here and he is going to share with you guys a lot more about worms that you and I actually never heard of. So now I’m here with Dale, the CEO of Nature’s Little Recyclers and you will never guess by looking at this guy with his dirty hands that he is the CEO but he keeps this whole business running and I’m glad that he is just a guy like one of us, right. He is not some big huffy business-suit sitting in some office doing crap and getting paid a lot of money. He actually probably works hard for his money – Dale Hubbard: I do. John: - by the looks of it. But anyways, we are here to ask him a few questions today on why it's important that his business is here operating and why they even got started and whole bunch of other things about worms that you guys probably never heard anywhere else. So Dale, the first question I have for you is “Why did you guys start this business because it’s you and your partner, Ed, right?” Dale: Yup. So the number one reason why we started this business was, um, He wanted to grow…actually, my partner wanted to grow earthworms. He is like, looking for another thing to do and [xx] “I think I want to grow earthworms.” At first, I thought he was crazy. I was like “No way you are growing earthworms. This is crazy. I’m not helping you.” Then he goes down to a place called The Plant Chicago, which is an indoor vertical farm and he started processing all the waste and producing compost and then I started meeting all the farmers and everybody and I realized that in Chicago, the one reason we don’t have more farms here is because the soil is so bad. It’s full of mercury and lead and in order to produce good, um, good healthier organic food, we need to build up the soil to feed. So we figured by taking the trash, uh, compost and feed it to our worms, we get high grade of fertilizers for it. John: That’s awesome. Yes, so let’s talk about this mercury and lead. I mean, this is why I encourage you guys to grow in raised beds instead of growing in the ground especially if you guys are in a big city. You want to bring in some stuff and the worm castings should be a big part of that, you know. I think I was over at your other facility because this is the indoor facility. The outdoor facility, you know, you guys were using wood chips in addition to the food scraps and the waste and the worms to break that down. So what are you guys doing over there so that the farmer can be successful growing there because you help out that farm as well as other farms and communal gardens and things in the area, right? Dale: Yeah, absolutely. So one of the big things we do is we work with other development projects to get the farms off the ground and over there, what we are doing is, we are converting a parking lot, I think it’s a half-acre lot and we are changing it into a [?]high grow able food. So by this time next year, there is going to be an organic farm there. John: That’s awesome, that’s awesome. So, you know, um, let’s talk about, like, diverting the food waste. As you guys can see behind us, we got the bags, we got all the buckets full of waste that they have yet to process or they have to process by throwing into the bins and the worms have to process it. But let’s talk about why, you know, it’s so important to divert all this waste that will normally go into the landfill. Dale: So yeah, the number one thing that is produced in the landfill is methane and what’s causing it, is the food waste. What happens to the food waste is that it gets trapped in the landfill and lose oxygen and therefore goes anaerobic and produces methane. So number one producer of methane. Um, everybody gives the cows the bad rep but they are actually number two. So by processing it this way, there is no methane produced and the fact that it not only stops methane from getting produced, it also [xx] carbon-dioxide in the process. So it reverses both effects of the most dangerous gases in global warming. John: Wow! So yeah, all you guys still throwing out your food waste, minimally compost them or better yet, like they are doing here, feed them to worms and if you guys are looking for a second job or a new, you know, thing to get into aside because you hate your job, right, you can work with worms all day and start a worm business. Get these castings, get these worms out to people, your local community and ship them all over. We need more of the businesses like this and that’s why I’m here sharing with you guys, uh, them today. So the next question. Let’s talk about the worms. You know, Dale told me that the worms actually don’t eat the food. So what’s up with this? I see you put the food in there and the food disappears but the worms are not eating it? What’s going on? Dale: So actually, worms are…it’s not just the worms, the extra whole microbial process that comes with the worms, what they do is they create enzymes and microbes that break down the food for the worms. Then, when the food becomes soft and almost liquefied, then the worms go through it and eat it all. John: So Dale, the next question I have for you is actually, uh, you know, what percentage of these nutrients…you are going through a lot of food scraps and food waste here but I know you are not getting it all, what percentage are you saving and what percentage is still going, you know, to the landfill? Dale: So actually, we only save a fraction of, uh, compost or what is produced in Chicago. We…all of Chicago, all the composting programs only two percent of stuff is actually diverted from the landfill. The other ninety-eight still goes to the landfill and that’s pretty much true across the country. So almost all this stuff is still going to the landfills so we need lots of people to compost, we need a lots of worm farmers, a lot of more composters to get it done. John: Yeah, it’s a great, a great business to have, right. So let’s talk about now, let’s talk about shipping the worms and shipping the worm castings to people all over the country. Dale: Yeah. John: Right, why did you guys decide to, like you know, sell them and ship them instead of just sell them in the local area? Dale: So the number one reason we decided to ship them was, uh, is the internet, right. We can ship to the whole country, you know, which is a click of a button versus locally, it was hard to get our name out and stuff. So we started selling on national sites like Amazon, our very own website which allowed us to, um, get a lot of early sales and promote our brand tremendously. John: That’s awesome. Yeah, I mean, that’s one of the reason why I’m here because I actually found them on the internet. Found their website, found their prices. Actually, their prices on delivered worms are, like, the lowest prices I found and we will talk more about that and give you guys a special deal at the end but they have amazing prices on the worms and they also sell the castings. These are so beneficial to you guys’ garden. So Dale, what are some of the reasons why worms and the worm castings are beneficial for people in their gardens and why should they use them? Dale: Sure, well the number one source in organic fertilizer has a lot of nutrients and micro-nutrients you won’t get from normal fertilizer, uh, normal soil. They also can help with pest control, um, and they increase the water retention of your soil. So farmers are calling this, black gold. John: Yeah, black gold. So let’s talk about the word ‘humus’, right. You know that word and why the worm castings is one of the best humus out there? Dale: So humus allow air to get into the soil so you, kind of, break up soil. One of the projects, one of the reasons we use, uh, in one of our projects, we use worm castings because it’s an old farm land that is compacted. It had been traditionally, conventionally farmed for decades and all those soil became compacted out in the edge of the city. So we are using worm castings to put air and humus back into it in order to allow to start growing organically again. John: That’s awesome. Yeah, I mean, worm castings – they are an essential part of my gardening style and I want them to be a part of yours also. The best way of course is to have your own worms in your raised beds or have your own worm box, if you want to do a worm box, or a worm bin like you guys saw a little bit earlier and to get started, you will need the worms. That’s why Dale could help you out. So you guys saw the process, how they pick out the worms, ship you guys the worms and you can buy the worms and then put them into your garden. So Dale, when somebody buys the worms and they get them shipped to you, right when they get the box, what should they do? Should they leave the box sitting there for a week before they get to them or where do they put them once they get them? Dale: So the first thing we always say is to open the box right away to make sure the worms are in a good condition. Um, the number one thing you need to do is to moisture them, that’s the biggest thing you need to do. They can sit in the container for up to two weeks as long you add moisture to the system, uh, to the container but otherwise, we recommend feeding it right away to your bins as fast as you can. That will be the best thing for the worms. John: Yeah. So, you know, set up your own worm bin to put them in there to get them growing or just simply, like I mentioned, you put them into your garden beds. You know, take a little bit and put in every garden bed provided you have a good soil mixture with high organic matter and you have the right water. That’s where they are supposed to live. Worms are supposed to live in the soil, not necessarily in the bin like they are doing here but this allows them to grow and propagate and get those out to more people and as they are doing, diverting the food waste, one of the more important things you guys could do. So because, you know, I visited them and I liked their stuff, I also negotiated with Dale, the CEO of the company, a good discount for you guys, so we are going to get for you guys a 10% discount on any of the products on their website and so you are going to want to order from them. I definitely can approve of their castings that I saw and handled personally as well as the worms, they look like they got some really nice ones. So you guys can get, not only the lowest price that they have without my discount, you are going to get my discount too. So you probably not going to find lower price online if you want to buy, you know, a pack of worms. So Dale, how many worms come in a pack? Dale: So a pound of worms usually contains a thousand, about a thousand worms. We deliver more than a thousand worms in it. Actually, it is usually a good thing to start like a five-gallon bin at your home garden… Oh! And John, I got a gift for you. There you go. John: Oh cool man! Check it out, he’s given me my own package of worms in the paper bag like they would come shipped to you and in a cloak bag inside with all the bedding material just like you guys are going to order and I’m going to take this back on the airplane tonight when I fly back to, um, Vegas. I’m sure the TSA is going to have fun stopping me. “What you got in that bag?” Then I’m going to say, “I’ve got worms. You want some.” So yeah, so now you guys can order the same ones. I’m going to order some castings. So Dale, somebody wants to learn more about you guys and your company and what you guys are doing and want to reach out to you, they want to start one of these, you know, wherever they live. How can they get a hold of you? Dale: So this way, you can get hold of us, at nlrwormshop.com, it’s our website and NLR Worms is also on social media, Facebook, twitter, all of it. Um, so that it is will be the easy way you can contact us. John: Cool. They also have a cool YouTube channel that I checked out that probably doesn’t have a lot of views but maybe they will get more views after you guys see this video today. So, yeah. Any other last comments or things you would like to share to my viewers today about the worms, about the worm composting, about diverting the food waste or anything that we talked about. Dale: Um, we say we produce the best worms. We give it a 100% guarantee on all our products so if you aren’t happy, we take it back and all this [?]money they can choose, could help to make the world a better place. John: That’s awesome, man. That’s why I make these videos so the world can be a better place through the education work that I’m able to do to, you know, highlight companies like Dale’s here and adds, you know, are doing good in the world. This is how we are going to create a better world by showing what good people are doing to create solutions in the world instead of creating more problems. They are creating a solution for the food waste and instead of creating problems by, you know, processing petroleum and fracking, creating more problems. Let’s create solution in our world. One of the ways you guys can easily do that is to start composting, start worm composting and of course, start growing your own food so you can become a producer instead of a consumer in our unfortunately consumers’ society that we live in. It’s not going to happen overnight, right. You can start growing a small portion of your food and every little bit helps. Every bit of food scraps you don’t put into the landfill is helping out the world. It’s going to also help build your garden too. So I encourage you guys to do that today. If you want to learn how, be sure to click that subscribe button right down below. Our videos come out every 3 – 4 days educating you guys on all ranges of subjects so that you guys could, you know, grow more food at home. Also check my past episodes, I have over 1100 episodes online sharing with you guys all the knowledge you will need to grow your own food, compost, make worm compost, make regular compost, whatever you guys want to do and also be sure to like this video. You guys like this video. If I get enough likes, I’m going to come back on my next trip and we are going to get more into detail on how they do their process because this was just a general overview video. Also be sure to check that link down below to go to their website to get the special deal on the worms and don’t forget the coupon code GYG You are not going to get that anywhere else. So hope you guys enjoy this episode. Once again, my name is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com. Will see you next time and until then, remember keep on growing.


 
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How to Double your pepper production in your garden without pruning

Blaslov Fishing posted the article • 0 comments • 165 views • 2017-09-22 05:48 • came from similar tags

 

 
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Alright! This is John Kohler at GrowingYourGreens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you and this one is a garden update. It’s currently October. End of the season. As you guys can see, things are going crazy here. Probably one of my best growing seasons yet. And I believe it’s because of maybe a few things I’m doing a little bit differently this year than last year. I’m doing, uh, you know, some trials. So, that’s what I want show you guys in this episode. Basically let you guys know that I always want to encourage you guys to try and experimenting new, different things in your garden. Even if you’ve done the same thing for the last fifty years because you’re older than I am and you’ve been gardening even more years than I am old! [laughs] Right… And, you know, you can always try new stuff just because you’ve done it a certain way for all of these years doesn’t mean there isn’t a better way to do it. And that’s why I’m on a continual learning and growing process to check out new, different things that I can add to my soil to see if I can even boost my growth, boost the quality of my food even better and, more importantly for me, boost the taste of the food. And some of the food that I’ve grown this year, like tomatoes and peppers, cucumbers, they’re off the hook! It really reminds me... Oh yeah, don’t forget about figs and pineapple guavas that I’ve been eating today. I’ve been mixing them into my diet for the last couple of days, just eating 99.9% out of my garden. But yeah, the food you grow is amazing and I’m always trying to increase it and even make it better. Even if you think you’ve got good stuff. Anyways, let’s head in my garden to show you guys what I want to show you today and how I’m really maximizing some of the genetic potential of some of my plants. So, as we walk in, I want show you guys these ones. This is known as the Bolivian cucumbers, also known as the Achocha. I’m currently harvesting more seeds for you guys. So, if you guys missed my episode on the best, most tolerant cucumber that grows like a weed episode, check it down below. I still do have seeds available at growyourgreens.ecwid.com if you guys want to get some seeds. Yeah, this thing is growing like crazy! Alright, welcome to my little jungle in the city. Figs are going off like crazy and I’m harvesting all kinds of stuff. My cucumbers are doing really well. It’s getting kind of colder so you guys can see some of the damage on the cucumbers right now, but the Bolivian cucumbers, no problem whatsoever. But the reason for this episode is that I want to take you guys down and show you guys my pepper bed over here. So this is my pepper bed. Look at how many peppers are in there. Like, these plants are totally maxed out. I counted I think on one of these plants over here there’s like twelve peppers on one plant. They’re all in different stages of ripening. You know, I like to leave my peppers on the plant, you know, until they’re fully ripe and ready to eat. And of course, what is ripe to one person is maybe not ripe to another person, so I really like to get them nice and deep red. Let me see if I can find one that is really a deep color, right? So here’s one that’s like a deep, rich, red color, right? The longer you keep the fruit on the plant, the more it will ripen up, the deeper and the more intense the color is. This is like some really bright red lipstick on a girl that’s really nice and dark, right? As compared to this pepper right here that’s not quite ripe yet, right? The darker the color—the more color, the more vibrancy in the fruit, the higher the anti-oxidant level, which means the healthier it is for you to eat. In addition, some plants such as the plants or the fruits in the Solanaceae family, such as the tomato and the pepper, the eggplants and all these things you know, have some toxins in there. So, like, when you eat the green pepper you kind of get that weird flavor. That may be some toxins. So, I want make sure these plants especially have really ripe fruit for lower negative attributes and better or more positive attributes. So, the main thing that I want to show you guys here is, like-- if you come over here… And look at this plant right here, I mean, it is… This plant is just loaded with peppers. Look at that. Have you ever seen a pepper plant that loaded with peppers? It’s totally amazing! And if you guys have been watching me for any length of time, I’ll post a link down below to a quick tour video I did a couple of months ago, maybe it was filmed two to three months ago now. And in that video, right before I put the video up or made the video, actually, I added some nutrients to this half of the pepper bed and this half of the pepper bed. I think the distinction line is maybe right here. I put a little green peg in. So, this side got a brand new worm casting that I’m playing with for the first time. And this side got my standby worm casting that I’ve been, you know, talking about and using for many years now. And it’s really cool when you do a side by side comparison to see the difference. So, on this side, if you guys look, we’ll do a pan shot of the peppers on this side. So this is one half of the bed that I used my brand new worm casting. You guys can see that there’s just so many peppers in here. It’s like, loaded right in here. All in here, so many ripe peppers, they’re just like, totally close together. Now, I did plant this square foot gardening style, like about twelve inches, eleven – twelve inches apart. And that’s this half. Now let’s go to this half over here… As you guys can see, some of these plants are a little bit more stunted, more smaller. All these are the same peppers from plants starting at the same time and some of these peppers have a lot less peppers on them. Like, a lot less. Also, I wanted to show you guys this. Over on this side we got some parsley growing. You can see how it looks, I mean, some of this looks pretty good. I planted parsley, like, on the ends. I really love parsley. Definitely one of the best herbs you can eat. It’s no longer a garnish, you should be eating it every day. And specially if you guys have bad breath, or your significant other complains about your bad breath, eat some parsley. That’ll help to make your breath taste good. Let me go ahead and show you guys the parsley on this other side. Once again, this is the same bed. We have all the same starting soil. We have the same watering schedule for the whole thing and on this side, check out this parsley. This parsley, like, overgrew my peppers here. You can see there’s a pepper just underneath all the parsley but this parsley has just really taken off. I mean, there’s peppers underneath the parsley. I didn’t expect the parsley to get this big. This is some of the biggest and, more importantly, tastiest parsley I’ve ever had. The parsley is actually—it, like, tastes-- It has a sweetness, I’m not going to say, like, I’d say it’s sweeter than a Granny Smith apple. And if I did a Briggs test on this parsley, probably the best parsley that I’ve seen a Briggs test on and that I’ve ever grown like, by far. So the parsley on this side. And, yeah, I want show you guys this side too. I mean, this is the same side where I have the new worm castings but, like, look at this inside here. Look at all these peppers on this one plant here. I mean, this thing is loaded, man! This is just pepper haven here. Look at this plant, man. I counted, some of these plants have twelve, thirteen, fourteen peppers on them. Totally amazing. Yeah, so now I’m glad that I finally shot this for you. Because I was waiting until I shoot this for you guys until I harvested them all. Because now I can harvest them, because now I don’t have to show them on the video anymore. But what I attribute the massive explosive growth and the higher yields and, of course, the good flavor with are a few things. So actually I’m going to go ahead and sit down and talk to you guys more about what I did to get these amazing yields, and specially what I did specifically on this side or this half of the bed that really blew up my growth. So now I want show you guys some of the practices I did to achieve this amazing outcome, right? Basically, as you guys know that have been following me for a while, you know, I’ve put very specific ingredients into my soil. I’ve been building this soil for many, many, many years now, since I first put this garden in. Which, if you guys haven’t seen, you could check back, you know, when I put this garden many, many, many years ago. I don’t even remember how many years ago, I stopped counting. But, you know, I filled this originally with compost and rock dust. And then over the years would add different nutritional amendments to my soil. I dare not call them fertilizers, because fertilizers are kind of something that wears out over time. And everything that I’ve added enriches and makes the soil fertility even better. So, the rock dust for the trace minerals. I’ve added different kinds of worm castings over the years. I’ve used the John and Bob’s products. I’ve used things like biochar, Kelp Meal. And, you know, a host of other things. Oh, of course, something really important too that I haven’t put as much as I’d like on, but I did really enrich it this past year. Between the change out of the seasons I put on the fungal dominated compost or a wood chip compost. And so, that added a lot of fertility to my soil. Check my past episodes for what exactly I do. But, you know, this whole bed started off with all those things I just mentioned on both sides. We got the plants planted when they’re pretty young, then I basically top dressed with two different worm castings. Yes, that’s right, worm castings. They’re probably one of my favorite things to add to your garden because they’re nature’s fertilizers. This is not something man made in a chemical factory like the miracle crab fertilizer you can buy at your store. This is what nature would feed the plants naturally because of the earth worms. And yes, I have plenty of earth worms in my garden eating, and digesting all of the different organic matter in my soil. Including all of the compost that I add every year. So, they’re creating extra fertility there. But just to make sure I topped it off with two different kinds of worm castings. So on this half of the bed, up to this little peg here we had the all new casting that I haven’t ever used before. It’s this stuff right here. This is the OGS, or Organic Solutions Premium Worm Castings. This is CDFA, Certified Organic Registered. It’s a product of California and this is a premium worm casting. So don’t confuse these premium worm castings with just standard worm castings. Alright? That’s the new one I tried. That’s where I got this explosive growth that you guys are looking at some of it right now. Just look at all the peppers. All you guys are seeing is red, I don’t know if it’s really clear on the camera. But I can look back in here, man, and it just puts a smile on my face, all the peppers! One of the reasons, cause these peppers taste amazing, I could just eat peppers, tomatoes and cucumbers out of my garden. And that was my dinner, you know? A while back. Because it just tastes so good you don’t need dressing when you got good flavored food. And I know you guys that have grown your own tomatoes know this. But, like, yes, you can have really sweet and delicious peppers that taste astronomically better than the store. And this is what I want for you guys, and this is why I make these videos. To show you guys what I’m up to, what I’m doing and how I get the specific results I get, so that you guys can duplicate that if you want to. Alright, so, on the other half of the bed, those were good, but they weren’t as good as this side. I used my favorite worm castings that I’ve been talking about for a long time. This is the Worm Gold Plus worm castings, right? And this one actually has Kelp and rock dust inside there. And so, this is the one I’ve been using for a long time, I even had George Hahn, the inventor of the Gold Worm Plus worm castings on. If I remember I’ll put a link down below to his video. The reason why I like the Worm Gold Plus is because he says he has very high chitinase degraders and very high cellulose degraders. Which, basically, the cellulose degraders allow the plants to convert more nutrients faster. And then the chinis degraders basically give your plants immunity against pests. And so that’s his claim de fame on there. And, of course, along with those are other nutrients. And then he also adds the rock dust and the Kelp which are two good things. But despite doing this, I didn’t get as good a yield on the back side of the bed as I did on the front side, all else being equal. So, you know, these OGS warm castings, I don’t exactly know what they’re putting in there, but I know they feed [the worms] a wide variety of things. They feed, I think, soluble humates, and grains and different things like insect frass. All different kinds of things to create these worm castings, right? I haven’t seen the specs or the data on this, but when I do, I’m expecting to see very high numbers and a very good quality casting. I mean, of course numbers are important on a piece of paper, but of course what even speaks more than numbers on a piece of paper is just how well it has grown for me this year. So, yeah, that’s pretty much my secret this year. I mean, of course doing all of the things that I normally do, but then, you know, you guys should probably get this stuff. The OGS worm castings. If you want to increase your growth. I mean, in some areas I got 50% more peppers than some areas where I did Worm Gold. The difference wasn’t as dramatic. I did a couple other beds with the same ratios and splits and, I mean, sometimes the difference was only 25% more but generally, it always favored the OGS castings that made higher yields. So, specially if you’re growing something like peppers that, you know, at the store lately I’ve seen peppers for $5 a pound for organic, sometimes I see them as high as $9,99 a pound for organic peppers. That’s why I grow these instead of tomatoes, cause they’re more expensive. But now, let’s maximize the yield. Twelve peppers per plant planted every eleven to twelve inches. That’s amazing, right? That’s a lot of food! You’re probably thinking “John, how are you going to eat all that food? How are you going to eat all those peppers?” Well, I juice peppers. Me and my girlfriend we love to juice peppers. We’ll juice enough peppers to make 32 ounces of juice for us each. And then we’ll turn that into a, basically a soup base for us by blending in some nuts, and some seeds, and adding in chopped up lettuces and other vegetables and cucumbers and some zucchini. And I even put in some seaweed, and some miso, and natto in there. It’s kind of like an udon style soup, man. But made with fresh peppers, so it’s super high in vitamin C, super high anti-oxidant. Other ways I’ll use them is to eat them straight, when they taste this good it’s easy to eat them straight. Dip them in guacamole, make a hummus dip or some other kind of dip of spread to put on and then just eat it. It’s super delicious. And then of course if I have extra, then I dehydrate them. So, I dehydrate them and then I actually add those later on in the year when I don’t have my peppers for the soup basis. When I’m buying peppers from the store ‘cause they’re going to be out of season pretty soon. So, to add back some extra flavor and use it as a thickener and to just make it healthier for me. So that’s how I use all of my peppers if you’re wondering. I definitely had a good time this season, I’m looking forward to planting out. Pretty soon, after I pull all the ripe peppers and then it will get replanted for the winter time. So, if you guys want to know where to get the OGS castings… Let’s see, their contact information is Organic Solutions LLC. They’re at 8053849020 and it’s organicsolutions.com. If you want to get the cheapest price and the Organic Solutions worm castings delivered to you guys, you want to visit my friend Josh at boogiebrew.net/gyg. Actually, he’s where I got these castings that I put on my garden. So you know you’re getting good stuff, you get it from Josh. And he’s where I got the Worm Gold Plus, right? So he has both of these. I guess the best deal is if you get a box half and half of each, but if it was me I’d probably just get the full box of the OGS. I’m not going to say these are cheap castings, right? I guess if you get the Worm Gold Plus and this box it’s maybe around a dollar a pound. But if you’re getting just these alone, the OGS castings, it’s going to be more expensive. But still, I guess the big part of it is the shipping cost. If you live locally, like in southern California, some Whole Foods stores actually even sell this stuff here. It might be more expensive at Whole Foods than ordering from Josh, actually. Or call OGS at Camarillo, in California. Go to them directly. So, yeah. It’s definitely good worm castings, definitely good results. I just top dressed, actually, each plant and the area around the plant after they were all planted, so I didn’t even dig it in. Optimally I like to dig it in with the soil and then maybe top dress later. Because as you guys can see the results speak for themselves. It’s very impressive. So yeah, specially if you’re growing different herbs, fruits, medicinal herbs, whatever. Use some of this stuff to increase your yield, bump your yields. If you’re a farmer you’re going to bump your profits. And if you’re a home gardener you’re just going to be eating more food out of your garden than out of the grocery store, and that’s what I want for each and every one of you. We need to move away from this system where we’re slaves to the system. Where we are consumers to the system, where we keep buying and buying and more crap and more crap. We want to become producers, and there’s little tricks you can do to produce more and consume less. Because when you produce high quality fruits and vegetables, you need to eat less of them to get the same nutrition. So, if you guys enjoyed this episode and want me to visit OGS and do a in depth video on how they make their stuff, give me a thumbs up! If I get a thousand thumbs up on these videos I’m going to go down to OGS myself personally. And give you guys a personal tour, we’re going to interview the owners and learn all about the OGS worm castings. You know, worm casting is only as good as what they’re feeding the worms. And I’ve used a lot of worm castings over the years, specially the EB stone worm castings. Those were pretty crappy. Anyways, there’s all other kinds of worm castings. Just cause it’s worm castings doesn’t automatically make it good. You want to ask what are they feeding the worms. We want to remember, quality over quantity. It’s very important in a lot of things in life. Specially things you do in the bedroom. So, anyways, give me a thumbs up if you want me to visit OGS. Also, be sure to check out my past episodes. My past episodes are a wealth of knowledge. I have over 1200 episodes at this time to teach you guys all aspects of how to grow your own food at home. And also be sure to click that subscribe button right down below so you don’t miss out on any of my new and upcoming episodes I have coming up, every three to four days, you never know where I’m going to show up or what you will be learning and how your life will be enriched due to what you learn off my videos. So, in any case, I got to get to harvesting some peppers now. Once again, my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com. We’ll see you next time. And until then, remember, keep on growing!


 
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Alright! This is John Kohler at GrowingYourGreens.com. Today we have another exciting episode for you and this one is a garden update. It’s currently October. End of the season. As you guys can see, things are going crazy here. Probably one of my best growing seasons yet. And I believe it’s because of maybe a few things I’m doing a little bit differently this year than last year. I’m doing, uh, you know, some trials. So, that’s what I want show you guys in this episode. Basically let you guys know that I always want to encourage you guys to try and experimenting new, different things in your garden. Even if you’ve done the same thing for the last fifty years because you’re older than I am and you’ve been gardening even more years than I am old! [laughs] Right… And, you know, you can always try new stuff just because you’ve done it a certain way for all of these years doesn’t mean there isn’t a better way to do it. And that’s why I’m on a continual learning and growing process to check out new, different things that I can add to my soil to see if I can even boost my growth, boost the quality of my food even better and, more importantly for me, boost the taste of the food. And some of the food that I’ve grown this year, like tomatoes and peppers, cucumbers, they’re off the hook! It really reminds me... Oh yeah, don’t forget about figs and pineapple guavas that I’ve been eating today. I’ve been mixing them into my diet for the last couple of days, just eating 99.9% out of my garden. But yeah, the food you grow is amazing and I’m always trying to increase it and even make it better. Even if you think you’ve got good stuff. Anyways, let’s head in my garden to show you guys what I want to show you today and how I’m really maximizing some of the genetic potential of some of my plants. So, as we walk in, I want show you guys these ones. This is known as the Bolivian cucumbers, also known as the Achocha. I’m currently harvesting more seeds for you guys. So, if you guys missed my episode on the best, most tolerant cucumber that grows like a weed episode, check it down below. I still do have seeds available at growyourgreens.ecwid.com if you guys want to get some seeds. Yeah, this thing is growing like crazy! Alright, welcome to my little jungle in the city. Figs are going off like crazy and I’m harvesting all kinds of stuff. My cucumbers are doing really well. It’s getting kind of colder so you guys can see some of the damage on the cucumbers right now, but the Bolivian cucumbers, no problem whatsoever. But the reason for this episode is that I want to take you guys down and show you guys my pepper bed over here. So this is my pepper bed. Look at how many peppers are in there. Like, these plants are totally maxed out. I counted I think on one of these plants over here there’s like twelve peppers on one plant. They’re all in different stages of ripening. You know, I like to leave my peppers on the plant, you know, until they’re fully ripe and ready to eat. And of course, what is ripe to one person is maybe not ripe to another person, so I really like to get them nice and deep red. Let me see if I can find one that is really a deep color, right? So here’s one that’s like a deep, rich, red color, right? The longer you keep the fruit on the plant, the more it will ripen up, the deeper and the more intense the color is. This is like some really bright red lipstick on a girl that’s really nice and dark, right? As compared to this pepper right here that’s not quite ripe yet, right? The darker the color—the more color, the more vibrancy in the fruit, the higher the anti-oxidant level, which means the healthier it is for you to eat. In addition, some plants such as the plants or the fruits in the Solanaceae family, such as the tomato and the pepper, the eggplants and all these things you know, have some toxins in there. So, like, when you eat the green pepper you kind of get that weird flavor. That may be some toxins. So, I want make sure these plants especially have really ripe fruit for lower negative attributes and better or more positive attributes. So, the main thing that I want to show you guys here is, like-- if you come over here… And look at this plant right here, I mean, it is… This plant is just loaded with peppers. Look at that. Have you ever seen a pepper plant that loaded with peppers? It’s totally amazing! And if you guys have been watching me for any length of time, I’ll post a link down below to a quick tour video I did a couple of months ago, maybe it was filmed two to three months ago now. And in that video, right before I put the video up or made the video, actually, I added some nutrients to this half of the pepper bed and this half of the pepper bed. I think the distinction line is maybe right here. I put a little green peg in. So, this side got a brand new worm casting that I’m playing with for the first time. And this side got my standby worm casting that I’ve been, you know, talking about and using for many years now. And it’s really cool when you do a side by side comparison to see the difference. So, on this side, if you guys look, we’ll do a pan shot of the peppers on this side. So this is one half of the bed that I used my brand new worm casting. You guys can see that there’s just so many peppers in here. It’s like, loaded right in here. All in here, so many ripe peppers, they’re just like, totally close together. Now, I did plant this square foot gardening style, like about twelve inches, eleven – twelve inches apart. And that’s this half. Now let’s go to this half over here… As you guys can see, some of these plants are a little bit more stunted, more smaller. All these are the same peppers from plants starting at the same time and some of these peppers have a lot less peppers on them. Like, a lot less. Also, I wanted to show you guys this. Over on this side we got some parsley growing. You can see how it looks, I mean, some of this looks pretty good. I planted parsley, like, on the ends. I really love parsley. Definitely one of the best herbs you can eat. It’s no longer a garnish, you should be eating it every day. And specially if you guys have bad breath, or your significant other complains about your bad breath, eat some parsley. That’ll help to make your breath taste good. Let me go ahead and show you guys the parsley on this other side. Once again, this is the same bed. We have all the same starting soil. We have the same watering schedule for the whole thing and on this side, check out this parsley. This parsley, like, overgrew my peppers here. You can see there’s a pepper just underneath all the parsley but this parsley has just really taken off. I mean, there’s peppers underneath the parsley. I didn’t expect the parsley to get this big. This is some of the biggest and, more importantly, tastiest parsley I’ve ever had. The parsley is actually—it, like, tastes-- It has a sweetness, I’m not going to say, like, I’d say it’s sweeter than a Granny Smith apple. And if I did a Briggs test on this parsley, probably the best parsley that I’ve seen a Briggs test on and that I’ve ever grown like, by far. So the parsley on this side. And, yeah, I want show you guys this side too. I mean, this is the same side where I have the new worm castings but, like, look at this inside here. Look at all these peppers on this one plant here. I mean, this thing is loaded, man! This is just pepper haven here. Look at this plant, man. I counted, some of these plants have twelve, thirteen, fourteen peppers on them. Totally amazing. Yeah, so now I’m glad that I finally shot this for you. Because I was waiting until I shoot this for you guys until I harvested them all. Because now I can harvest them, because now I don’t have to show them on the video anymore. But what I attribute the massive explosive growth and the higher yields and, of course, the good flavor with are a few things. So actually I’m going to go ahead and sit down and talk to you guys more about what I did to get these amazing yields, and specially what I did specifically on this side or this half of the bed that really blew up my growth. So now I want show you guys some of the practices I did to achieve this amazing outcome, right? Basically, as you guys know that have been following me for a while, you know, I’ve put very specific ingredients into my soil. I’ve been building this soil for many, many, many years now, since I first put this garden in. Which, if you guys haven’t seen, you could check back, you know, when I put this garden many, many, many years ago. I don’t even remember how many years ago, I stopped counting. But, you know, I filled this originally with compost and rock dust. And then over the years would add different nutritional amendments to my soil. I dare not call them fertilizers, because fertilizers are kind of something that wears out over time. And everything that I’ve added enriches and makes the soil fertility even better. So, the rock dust for the trace minerals. I’ve added different kinds of worm castings over the years. I’ve used the John and Bob’s products. I’ve used things like biochar, Kelp Meal. And, you know, a host of other things. Oh, of course, something really important too that I haven’t put as much as I’d like on, but I did really enrich it this past year. Between the change out of the seasons I put on the fungal dominated compost or a wood chip compost. And so, that added a lot of fertility to my soil. Check my past episodes for what exactly I do. But, you know, this whole bed started off with all those things I just mentioned on both sides. We got the plants planted when they’re pretty young, then I basically top dressed with two different worm castings. Yes, that’s right, worm castings. They’re probably one of my favorite things to add to your garden because they’re nature’s fertilizers. This is not something man made in a chemical factory like the miracle crab fertilizer you can buy at your store. This is what nature would feed the plants naturally because of the earth worms. And yes, I have plenty of earth worms in my garden eating, and digesting all of the different organic matter in my soil. Including all of the compost that I add every year. So, they’re creating extra fertility there. But just to make sure I topped it off with two different kinds of worm castings. So on this half of the bed, up to this little peg here we had the all new casting that I haven’t ever used before. It’s this stuff right here. This is the OGS, or Organic Solutions Premium Worm Castings. This is CDFA, Certified Organic Registered. It’s a product of California and this is a premium worm casting. So don’t confuse these premium worm castings with just standard worm castings. Alright? That’s the new one I tried. That’s where I got this explosive growth that you guys are looking at some of it right now. Just look at all the peppers. All you guys are seeing is red, I don’t know if it’s really clear on the camera. But I can look back in here, man, and it just puts a smile on my face, all the peppers! One of the reasons, cause these peppers taste amazing, I could just eat peppers, tomatoes and cucumbers out of my garden. And that was my dinner, you know? A while back. Because it just tastes so good you don’t need dressing when you got good flavored food. And I know you guys that have grown your own tomatoes know this. But, like, yes, you can have really sweet and delicious peppers that taste astronomically better than the store. And this is what I want for you guys, and this is why I make these videos. To show you guys what I’m up to, what I’m doing and how I get the specific results I get, so that you guys can duplicate that if you want to. Alright, so, on the other half of the bed, those were good, but they weren’t as good as this side. I used my favorite worm castings that I’ve been talking about for a long time. This is the Worm Gold Plus worm castings, right? And this one actually has Kelp and rock dust inside there. And so, this is the one I’ve been using for a long time, I even had George Hahn, the inventor of the Gold Worm Plus worm castings on. If I remember I’ll put a link down below to his video. The reason why I like the Worm Gold Plus is because he says he has very high chitinase degraders and very high cellulose degraders. Which, basically, the cellulose degraders allow the plants to convert more nutrients faster. And then the chinis degraders basically give your plants immunity against pests. And so that’s his claim de fame on there. And, of course, along with those are other nutrients. And then he also adds the rock dust and the Kelp which are two good things. But despite doing this, I didn’t get as good a yield on the back side of the bed as I did on the front side, all else being equal. So, you know, these OGS warm castings, I don’t exactly know what they’re putting in there, but I know they feed [the worms] a wide variety of things. They feed, I think, soluble humates, and grains and different things like insect frass. All different kinds of things to create these worm castings, right? I haven’t seen the specs or the data on this, but when I do, I’m expecting to see very high numbers and a very good quality casting. I mean, of course numbers are important on a piece of paper, but of course what even speaks more than numbers on a piece of paper is just how well it has grown for me this year. So, yeah, that’s pretty much my secret this year. I mean, of course doing all of the things that I normally do, but then, you know, you guys should probably get this stuff. The OGS worm castings. If you want to increase your growth. I mean, in some areas I got 50% more peppers than some areas where I did Worm Gold. The difference wasn’t as dramatic. I did a couple other beds with the same ratios and splits and, I mean, sometimes the difference was only 25% more but generally, it always favored the OGS castings that made higher yields. So, specially if you’re growing something like peppers that, you know, at the store lately I’ve seen peppers for $5 a pound for organic, sometimes I see them as high as $9,99 a pound for organic peppers. That’s why I grow these instead of tomatoes, cause they’re more expensive. But now, let’s maximize the yield. Twelve peppers per plant planted every eleven to twelve inches. That’s amazing, right? That’s a lot of food! You’re probably thinking “John, how are you going to eat all that food? How are you going to eat all those peppers?” Well, I juice peppers. Me and my girlfriend we love to juice peppers. We’ll juice enough peppers to make 32 ounces of juice for us each. And then we’ll turn that into a, basically a soup base for us by blending in some nuts, and some seeds, and adding in chopped up lettuces and other vegetables and cucumbers and some zucchini. And I even put in some seaweed, and some miso, and natto in there. It’s kind of like an udon style soup, man. But made with fresh peppers, so it’s super high in vitamin C, super high anti-oxidant. Other ways I’ll use them is to eat them straight, when they taste this good it’s easy to eat them straight. Dip them in guacamole, make a hummus dip or some other kind of dip of spread to put on and then just eat it. It’s super delicious. And then of course if I have extra, then I dehydrate them. So, I dehydrate them and then I actually add those later on in the year when I don’t have my peppers for the soup basis. When I’m buying peppers from the store ‘cause they’re going to be out of season pretty soon. So, to add back some extra flavor and use it as a thickener and to just make it healthier for me. So that’s how I use all of my peppers if you’re wondering. I definitely had a good time this season, I’m looking forward to planting out. Pretty soon, after I pull all the ripe peppers and then it will get replanted for the winter time. So, if you guys want to know where to get the OGS castings… Let’s see, their contact information is Organic Solutions LLC. They’re at 8053849020 and it’s organicsolutions.com. If you want to get the cheapest price and the Organic Solutions worm castings delivered to you guys, you want to visit my friend Josh at boogiebrew.net/gyg. Actually, he’s where I got these castings that I put on my garden. So you know you’re getting good stuff, you get it from Josh. And he’s where I got the Worm Gold Plus, right? So he has both of these. I guess the best deal is if you get a box half and half of each, but if it was me I’d probably just get the full box of the OGS. I’m not going to say these are cheap castings, right? I guess if you get the Worm Gold Plus and this box it’s maybe around a dollar a pound. But if you’re getting just these alone, the OGS castings, it’s going to be more expensive. But still, I guess the big part of it is the shipping cost. If you live locally, like in southern California, some Whole Foods stores actually even sell this stuff here. It might be more expensive at Whole Foods than ordering from Josh, actually. Or call OGS at Camarillo, in California. Go to them directly. So, yeah. It’s definitely good worm castings, definitely good results. I just top dressed, actually, each plant and the area around the plant after they were all planted, so I didn’t even dig it in. Optimally I like to dig it in with the soil and then maybe top dress later. Because as you guys can see the results speak for themselves. It’s very impressive. So yeah, specially if you’re growing different herbs, fruits, medicinal herbs, whatever. Use some of this stuff to increase your yield, bump your yields. If you’re a farmer you’re going to bump your profits. And if you’re a home gardener you’re just going to be eating more food out of your garden than out of the grocery store, and that’s what I want for each and every one of you. We need to move away from this system where we’re slaves to the system. Where we are consumers to the system, where we keep buying and buying and more crap and more crap. We want to become producers, and there’s little tricks you can do to produce more and consume less. Because when you produce high quality fruits and vegetables, you need to eat less of them to get the same nutrition. So, if you guys enjoyed this episode and want me to visit OGS and do a in depth video on how they make their stuff, give me a thumbs up! If I get a thousand thumbs up on these videos I’m going to go down to OGS myself personally. And give you guys a personal tour, we’re going to interview the owners and learn all about the OGS worm castings. You know, worm casting is only as good as what they’re feeding the worms. And I’ve used a lot of worm castings over the years, specially the EB stone worm castings. Those were pretty crappy. Anyways, there’s all other kinds of worm castings. Just cause it’s worm castings doesn’t automatically make it good. You want to ask what are they feeding the worms. We want to remember, quality over quantity. It’s very important in a lot of things in life. Specially things you do in the bedroom. So, anyways, give me a thumbs up if you want me to visit OGS. Also, be sure to check out my past episodes. My past episodes are a wealth of knowledge. I have over 1200 episodes at this time to teach you guys all aspects of how to grow your own food at home. And also be sure to click that subscribe button right down below so you don’t miss out on any of my new and upcoming episodes I have coming up, every three to four days, you never know where I’m going to show up or what you will be learning and how your life will be enriched due to what you learn off my videos. So, in any case, I got to get to harvesting some peppers now. Once again, my name is John Kohler with GrowingYourGreens.com. We’ll see you next time. And until then, remember, keep on growing!


 
 
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How to Grow a Vegetable Garden without Fertilizer & Soil Amendments(video inside)

Joe Eli posted the article • 0 comments • 130 views • 2017-09-18 03:00 • came from similar tags

 

 

 

Alright this is John Kohler from growingyourgreens.com to bring you another exciting episode for you. I'm still here in Houston and I don't know what area in Houston it is, but doesn't looks like, you know, the best of neighbourhoods. But anyways, what I'm going to do today is actually visit the house right behind me, not the one over there with the bananas in the front, but this one behind the white fence there, the doors open, that has a red truck. This is going to be a interesting episode actually, this episode may challenge the beliefs you guys have about gardening. It's challenging some of the beliefs I have about gardening as well. So, the guy here, Tino, is actually from Greece and he's been growing, he's using little kid, he's been actually on this property about for last 4 to 5 years, when he's been actually growing food here. He does thing little bit differently, let me tell you this story actually. I first met Tino when I was actually at the Farm Dirt Compost, the place, and the guy their introduced me to him and he was like " You gotta meet this guy " and I was like driving off and I was kind of in a rush, because I had to like, you know get back to what I was doing, and he was like trying to tell me all this stuff and he was like, "You're gardening wrong! You don't need to add all the minerals, you don't need to add all the fertilizers, you don't need to draw and raise bed, It's all Wrong!" and I'm like, "Whoa, this guy is pretty interesting". But you know I'm always open like, even if somebody doesn't agree with me, that's fine. I know a lot of you guys may watch my videos and may not agree with everything I believe in, and that's fine. I'm just sharing my beliefs whether you want to believe what I believe, that's up to you guys right, totally up to you guys. But what I really like to do is I like to show many different styles of gardening, so that you guys could do whatever you want to do, right?, there's many kinds of gardener, I'm never going to say "Ooh this kind of gardening is the right way, this is the wrong way", depending on your particular situation, there are definitely better or worse ways to do it. So, actually in this situation, where we are here in Houston, with the given soil here, with the given climate, Tino's definitely figured out a way, you know, to garden and grow some food, actually with minimal inputs. Ok, so that was the first time I saw Tino and then I drove off. He didn't give me his contact and in front I'm like, maybe I'll run into that guy later. As luck turns out today, I was actually at the farmers market and he had a stand there, he was selling all kinds of plant starts, and actually he had the cheapest price for lettuce and other leafy greens at the market. It was like $5 for a nice size, flat of lettuce and other mixed greens that he was offering. So, we got to talking again and I'm like "Hey, what are you doing this afternoon?", he was like "Nothing", and I'm like "good can I come over and I want to see what you're doing and make a video". So, that's why I'm making a video for you guys to show you guy actually what he's doing, because he believes in, you know, gardening on the free and cheap, and I know that this is an episode a lot of you guys have been wanting for a long time, gardening on the free and cheap like, "John, you don't gotta waste money on that rock dust, you don't gotta bottle these worm castings, you don't gotta bottle these things that you garden", you could garden the free and cheap and it's not that hard. So, I don't wanna say that Tino is doing entirely free, there's a few things he brings in, but he actually brings in very few inputs for the impressive growth that he has and he does a lot of things himself, and builds things and he does a lot of techniques that I'm only gotta show you guys, maybe a few of them today, that actually in practices that he's done and learned overtime, by actually making mistakes, and that's why making mistakes is really good, because when you make a mistake, you learn how successfully not to do something. So, hopefully next time you'll do a bit better and he's actually even invented his little tools to do some of the things, you know , that he does, that I'll get to show you guys, that actually is quite impressive, actually that helped me out, it's something I'll be able to use now and save immense amounts of time. But yeah, he's definitely an interesting guy and he's from Greece and so I'm gonna call this episode, 'The Big Fat Greek Vegetable Garden Episode'. So let's go right behind the doors and show you guys what's growing on over here. So now we're at the gate for Tino's place here, and as you guys can see, he's got a nice white painted fence all the way around his property. This is not, maybe the nicest of areas so actually building a fence around your property, if you're able to do that, because I know that in some places you are not able to do that. Probably a good idea, right?, it keeps like stray animals and peoples from picking your stuff, but more importantly, also offers you guys some protection, form some of the elements, from some of the strong winds, he's blocking the wind with having a solid fence. Of course you could grow your own fence too, with many different plants and have trees and different things growing so tightly close together, which will be my first choice, rather than having a fence, just sitting here. Grow a living fence, it's actually gonna dig their roots in the soil and create further soil fertility. In any case, let's go beyond this fence and actually see what he's got growing on. Alright so now let's do a walk in to the yard here and as you guys could see, there is stuff growing everywhere, basically some are really long raise beds, he has lots of foods growing in all these raise beds and each bed is just a little bit different. But he does have some things that he does, you know, in all of them for sure, and as you guys could see , he also has a lot of plants starts. This is the back of his truck, he just got back from the farmers market. These are all the vegetables starts, he sells at the farmers market and this cooler right here, he basically just to harvest, just a part of his bed and it was like just full last night and he sold most of it at the farmers market, now he has this, some left over to eat for a salad for himself. But, you know, all that actually came from this bed over here, that he just clipped out and I'm looking at it and you could tell the clip from stuff out, but there's still so much more food in this bed. So, he says here this bed is about 45 Feet long and 4 Feet wide, it could feed about 5 people. So a family of 5, all the salad greens and greens they would want. So, I know a lot of you guys may have the space to do this. Let's see the other beds over here, this time of year, you know in December, he's growing lettuce primarily and some other leafy greens, dandelion, onions, some braska family plants and over on this side, he has all his nursery, starts that he's offering to people, and if he doesn't sell them, then he ends up planting them in his garden. So every gardener that I meet, there's things that we as gardeners can agree on and of course there's things that we may not agree on, where we have differences of opinion on, and that's alright, we're not gonna start World War III because we think that we should garden differently, that's alright. We can learn from each other, and I wanna encourage you guys in this episode to like, pick out the bits of things in this episode, that's gonna enhance your garden, and maybe even challenge your gardening style and to even adjust it, and make changes to improve what you're doing, and you know, maybe you believe in, what I'm gonna share with you guys today, maybe you don't. That's alright, I don't really care, but I want you guys to experiment, right, try some of the beds, how he's grown it. See if in your exact environment it actually grows better or maybe it's gonna grow worse, you know, than you're currently existing raise beds with sides. Anyways, one of the things that we both agree on here, Tino and me, is this guy, this roader tool, alright, he bought this, he used it a long time ago, but he no longer uses it to tiller, unless it's just maybe to clean up some of the in between the raised beds, but he does not till the soil. He believes in a no till method, this is very critical to both my style of gardening and Tino's style of gardening, you know. When you start disturbing the soil you lose fertility, you lose microbial life in there and these are the two things that we're trying to enhance with our gardening styles. Next I wanna show you guys, something else actually, that he used to do and that he actually gave up. That's maybe not exactly in agreeing to me, but that's alright because everybody has their own way of gardening. So one thing Tino doesn't do, is he doesn't create Compost Tea, he just simply doesn't believe in it. He tried it, he has a barrel here and what not, all the hoses and he used to create a Compost Tea but he didn't really see a difference, you know, with it. So he just basically discontinued the practise and you know I would say that maybe under ideal situation, when you got actually enough soil microbes in your garden, you might not need to use the Compost Tea, you know, I believe personally in diversity of microbes that, you know, can only be more beneficial, than not having them. But of course things are gonna grow with or without Compost Tea, things are gonna grow with or without, things like the rock dust. That I like to add, he doesn't even add the rock dust, doesn't believe in it and believe that you guys are wasting your money on rock dust, and that's cool, you know, we're gonna have a confrontation about that at the end of this, you know, he believes that all the nutrients are in the soil, and I agree, there's definitely nutrients in the soil, you know, and from what it looks like, things are growing really good. But I kind of wonder on like the, nutritional quality of the produce that is being grown, aside from just looking good, you know, if we did a breakdown of the nutrients in there, what would that look like. So that's what I think would be quite interesting to compare, lettuce at my garden, for example, compared to the lettuce at his garden, and kind of see where nutrition falls, and if the nutrition falls better in his favour maybe I'll abandon what I'm doing. But I don't know coz , you know, the thing for me is, like one of my main values with gardening is like, I almost lost my life, right, I've had major health condition and I'm totally, one of the main reasons why I'm gardening is to grow the highest quality food, or what I believe to be a highest quality food, and that's what I've have gone out and learned how to do, and that's what I share with you guys, and when I'm at my garden, but when I come to somebody else's garden, they might not have the same ideals as me. They might not have almost lost their life from a health condition, you know, they might not value their health as much as I do, so, they just wanna grow food on the free or cheap, but that's more important to them, and that's cool, you know, like, I'm not gonna tell you guys your values, I'm gonna tell you that, you know, in my opinion your life is the most valuable thing you guys own in the world, free and clear, and , you know, if you do things like smoking and maybe like, eat too many processed foods and junk foods, you know, that's gonna put your health in the toilet, and I don't choose to do that, but if you guys wanna do that, that's up to you, I don't really care. Anyways, let's show another thing, that actually both Tino and I both agree on. So now I'm inside Tino's house, and it's really just, you know, small house actually he said he converted his garage, that was his garage, into his living space and actually, the garden area that you guys just saw, he actually tore down a duplex that was outside. It was here like a 100 years, it was probably about time to either refurb it or tear it down, and he tore it down because he wanted to use the space instead of living for gardening and then just grow in a much and then actually live in a much smaller space, so his garden is actually about 5000 sq ft and his living space, I don't know, probably takes up the rest of the plot, maybe, I don't know, 3000 sq ft less, you know, just the walk ways is around the house or what not. So , you know, I wanna encourage you guys to , you know, he lives a minimalist lifestyle, he doesn't have much, he has a little bathroom, a little living area with a kitchen and a bedroom and stuff, and I think, you know, we've gotten too opulent in America and all these super huge houses, 2000, 4000 sq ft, and how much do you really use, how much you really need, it's just more space to fill up with junk you don't need. Anyways, one of the things he does in his kitchen is actually, he stores all his seeds on the top shelf there. You guys can see all the containers of seeds that he saves every year. So actually, the most of the things that he grows is actually from seeds that he saves. Of course, yes, he buys some seeds to get him started, but once he buys the seeds once, he grows that plant out too flourish him, saves the seeds and then he stores them up there and then he grows them out the following year. One of the things that actually he grows , actually that's quite good , is actually he'll go and buy produce from store and then he'll plant it. So, he's done this with green onions and he found that, green onions planted from the store didn't work so well. Instead what he found, were these guys, and these are like the little baby onions. They're called the pearl onions, and he likes these little pearl onions coz he'll just take these little pearl onions, that are like a couple bucks per bag, and there's a lots of these little onions here that most people might boil and eat or however they eat them. But he just takes these guys and he grows them out. So, now you just got, you know, I don't know, at least, like, several dozen plants for 2.50, and he says, these guys actually grow better than the green onions with the roots on them. So, yeah he definitely cuts a lot of cost, he's not growing on the total free but he's really doing it on a cheap. So, there's two main ways that Tino starts his seeds from, and these are the two ways that I use as well and would encourage you guys to use, right? Number one, he does direct seeding. Depending on what plant it is, he may direct seed them into his raised bed, I mean that's what I'm gonna show you guys now. So, he has a special technique for doing that, to, you know, preserve more soil moisture and to conserve water, you know, he uses sitting water here, I think, you should probably, maybe, catch some water off this roof, and what not to use that when he is able, but he uses sitting water and he only uses as much water as he needs, he doesn't like to use any excess water, and one of his beliefs is that, you gotta let fend for themselves. If you water your plants too much, their gonna be weak, their gonna be lazy, their roots are not gonna grow deep and seek out the water they need, as well as other nutrients in the soil, they need to fully thrive, and you know, overall actually, I do agree with that, you know, I think that's a good idea not to over-water plants, and many people, tend to over-water their plants which is definitely not a good thing in my opinion, and of course, it's not good to under-water your plants either. Anyways, as you guys could see, he's got one of his raised beds here, now, here's the thing, his raised beds, he does not have any sides on them, he does not believe in putting sides on your raised beds, because when you put a side on the raised beds, it may, you know, increase temperature a little bit, which is a pro, but he says the major con is, once it starts getting hot, you know, the sun will hit the sides of your raised beds, it'll heat up the soil, it'll cause more moisture loss inside the raised bed, which means you're gonna have to water more which means when you're watering more, you're gonna be leeching more nutrients out of your soil, and then its just a, you know, cycle. So, instead of a having sides on his beds, he just basically has a slope to raise bed, that actually he fills up with plants, so that the plants could cover the soil and he could actually grow more food in less space than having the sides. Another thing about Tino that he has learned very specific techniques that he does to, you know, start things from seed, to start things from tram plants to transplant things and I'm probably not going to be able to share with you guys all his techniques in this episode, but I'm gonna share a few of them, as much as I am able to retain and remember which hopefully is in line with what he shared with me. So, the start is seeds, basically he waters the soil or the ground where he's going to be planting. He then sprinkles the seed down all over and then I think he maybe waters a little bit more and then he puts the plastic over at the top, this clear, kind of plastic, and if we pull this up a little bit, you guys probably can't see underneath there too much, but some of the seeds underneath here are actually starting to germinate out, you know, when he puts the clear plastic over at the soil, it holds the moisture in, so it provides a nice place for the seeds to germinate, number one. Number two, it keeps the pests, like birds that might come down and eat your seeds away. Number three, it also keeps the ants and what not away, coz he does have a ant problems here, with the seeds and the ants and all this kind of stuff. So, it's basically covering the soil and protecting the soil. Now, here's the thing, he only will do this technique if it's under 80 Degrees in a day time, if it's over 80, he's not gonna use this. coz then you're gonna end up burning the soil. This also keeps, you know, the soil a bit warmer, so the seeds will have a nicer time to germinate, coz some seeds don't like to germinate when it's too cold, probably challenge that a lot of you guys are having right now, coz it's probably still winter time. But yeah, here in Houston, really nice day to day, we're in the 70's, and we're here in December. So, yeah, that's how he gets all this started, and this is just one of the ways, he does it. Let me go ahead and show you guys, after he does this, how the, all the seedlings look, in their raised bed. So, as you guys could see here's the bed, behind me here and this is one that he actually use the same technique that I should you, I don't know, maybe a month or two so ago and it looks like he's got some amazing growth, and he just literally threw out all the seeds. Here we have some spinach and, you know, it's growing really tightly and next to each other, as you guys could see also the lettuce behind me, it's also growing really tight and all next to each other, right? To him, there's no such thing as planting things too closely, but there is a problem with planting things too far apart. So I do encourage you guys, its in my opinion, its in probably Tino's as well, it's better to plant things too closely than too far apart, so that you're curving the soil. Plus, you know, the things that is actually planted too closely, to him, that's a good thing coz guess what, he'll come over and he'll pluck the things that are too close out of the bed, and then he'll transplant those into the six packs, which then is an income or revenue stream for him to make. He could also pull those up and just clip them, cut them back and eat them and let the other ones around them, grow. So, basically he's just growing more food in less space, this is actually quite intelligent. The other thing about this is that, you know, he doesn't add on any large amounts, any kind of compost or worm castings or rock dust or even any fertilizers, right, he just growing in the dirt that's sitting here, right, and in my opinion that's good and it's bad, I mean, we need to remember that, you know, depending on where you live, your soil could vary widely. You could actually be lucky and live in a place where that has fertile soil, you could also be unlucky, in maybe live in a place that maybe doesn't have the best of soil. Where I'm sitting right now is actually underneath, where his house used to sit. There was a house here, he tore it out, you know, the house was here for a hundred years, so the soil underneath the house has been basically covered for a hundred years and then he uncovered it, it probably hasn't been, you know, contaminated too much with all kinds of stuff, and so it's actually a fairly fertile and he's, you know, built it up over time. Because there is, the fact of the matter is, there is organic matter in most soils and here he has a clay soil, so, you know, it actually does and is actually quite nutritious, if it, you know, doesn't get water logged, and actually that's why we're sitting right now on these, 4 by 4's that actually is his walk ways, cause when it rains here, you get caked on the mud. But yeah, so yeah, it looks like, things are growing really good in here and next I wanna show you guys another technique he uses in his raised beds to grow, more food in less space. So, another technique he uses, besides planting things super close and super densely, is he actually does companion style planting, and he plants more than just one thing is a bed sometimes, you know, you guys saw where he had just mostly lettuce and spinach, but even in that bed, you know, every, so many feet he actually had an eggplant, little baby, that's gonna be growing up for the next season, after his lettuce or spinach is done, and in this bed, this is more of a cut and come again bed. He has things like the beets, he has a fennel, he has a cilantro, he has some parsley, he has a lettuce, all different kinds of stuff, and as you guys could see in the video there, this is really filled in, really nicely, it's like totally packed with plants, and he's proud of this fact, and actually I'm like yeah this is quite impressive, I like how, he's really densely seeded things, and they basically have to out compete themselves, and they just basically grow and, you know, what he's gonna do, he's gonna come in here and some of the bigger plants, he might actually just cut out and then those are the ones that he's gonna take to market, those are the ones that he's gonna eat, and then all the other ones, are basically just gonna fill in the space that was now created, when he did cut one out. In addition, , you know, he has planted things so closely and just basically three seeds down, that some of the seeds are coming up, so now there's new seedlings, that are this small, coming up in between the lettuces, so when he cuts down some of them, the new ones that are just emerging are now gonna get larger. So I mean, I think this is a technique that we can all learn and benefit from, you know, specially if you're trying to grow on the free and cheap, you could maximize your space, maximize the diversity for the most amount of yield. Up until now, you guys saw how basically he seeds his beds out and grows from seeds in place, I now wanna share with you guys, another way to do it, and you know, direct seed or planting from transplants, they both have their pros and cons, I like to personally do a little bit of each, and as it looks like here, so does Tino. So, now I wanted to share with you guys, just a, maybe a few more techniques he does, actually on my way to showing you guys the other way he starts his seeds out. These are his raised beds here, and as you guys could see, the soil is just mounted up to the sides and he's got things growing up the sides so that it just doesn't come to a edge, where he's not planting, it kind of slopes down mildly and he's been planting onions and different lettuces, right down the sides, so that, they'll actually fill it in, so it'll have a nice little narrow pathway in the middle, now it probably be a good idea to maybe do something like wood chips in between, so that you don't get all muddy, also the which was gonna break down over time, create more fertility. But anyways, he has all this stuff, here's the eggplant like I talked about planted within the lettuce, and also there's those little onion sets that I showed you guys earlier, little balls in between here. Over on this side, he has lots of different varieties of lettuces, including some of my favourite lettuces, those really dark rich lettuces that are at deeply pigmented, right. I wanna encourage you guys to eat deeply pigmented lettuce and other foods, coz they are higher in anti-oxidants. So yeah, and this is like, some of them really, this bed just really looks nice. He has, like so much food here, and I'm glad that he's probably one of the lowest priced sellers at the farmers market for your greens and by the looks of his greens, they're all quite healthy, and probably ones that you'd want to buy yourself, if you're not growing them yourself, here in Houston. he uses all organic methods. He doesn't sprays any kind of chemicals and all this kind of stuff, and actually he's getting some really superb results. So, another way besides direct seeding his plants, sometimes he'll actually start them in these little flats, you know, these are not plastic nursery flats, these are wooden flats that is he actually he made himself out of some 2 by 4 , and actually some, looks like, 1 by 6, fence post, like cedar fence post potentially, and that some good wood to use, coz it's gonna last a bit longer than just a pine or something. But these are nice, durable and stout. So, basically he fills this little container with a specific soil blend, that I'll share with you guys next, and then he basically grows his transplants. But to do that he does it in a few special ways to ensure he gets higher germination, because, once again, he doesn't want the water to dry out, he wants the proper moisture level. This is very important to him, to have a proper moisture level and also more importantly properly washed soil. So, the way that Tino starts his plants from the seed in the little containers are, he basically makes a little mini green house for them, and it's really simple, it's just this once again, the clear plastic that he likes so much and you guys could see, we'll go ahead and remove the plastic over here and underneath here , you guys could see, all these little baby starts, that are growing, that he says, that took like 4 days. These guys, are ready to have the plastic taken off, coz they are getting so tall, and that's another thing I wanna point out right, Tino does certain things for certain reason. If you guys looked, when I showed you guys these bins, side of the bins are made out of 2 by 4's, but the ends, but then the sides right, are actually made out of 2 by 6's and they're taller. This gives them about that much space, so that when he lays the plastic on top, it's not dragging on the top of the soil, so that gives the plants just a little bit amount of space to grow up. Once the plants almost touch the plastic, then that's time for the plastic to come off, coz otherwise the plants will start to bend and he doesn't want that at all, and yeah, he keeps nice little humid area for the plants to germinate, so this saves water, also creates a nice environment, you know, he's also right now seeding out some tomatoes, which generally like to germinate when it's warmer out, and by using this technique, he gets to warm up the soil, so that his tomato seeds could germinate here in Houston, even in December. So, now I wanna share with you guys, a special soil blend that Tino uses to start his transplants in, that I didn't get to show you guys yet. Now, this is the only time that actually he brings in some soil, but he also creates some, that I'll show you guys in a minute, to start his transplants, and he puts no coconut core, no peep moss and none of this stuff, right, he doesn't believe in it, right, and he's got a pretty good system down, I mean what he's doing, for the transplants is amazing, he's got some of the healthiest transplants that I've actually seen. One of the things I learned is to cover your wheel barrel, right, to cover the soil in the wheel barrel from the sun, the rain, all this kind of stuff. That's something I need to do, and this actually makes a nice little work table or work surface for you all too. So anyways let's go ahead and move this off, and as you guys could see here, he's got some really nice rich black soil, and one of his secrets is, he sips this down to quarter inch, so he gets comply by some compost from a certain place or maybe he gets a farm dirt compost sometimes. He sips it down, and then he adds some of his super potent compost that he's making right behind in a way that I've actually never seen before, which is gonna be good for you guys to see. But yeah, the soil is nice and filtered down, nice screened out, he has no big large chunks of stuff, that's very important and when I smell it, it actually has a nice mild neutral smell, looks like some really good stuff and this is where he starts all hi transplants in. Now, I know some of you guys might be thinking, "John, that's a really rich mixture of he's growing in all compost ", because they say don't grow in compost, you know , they say use a sterile soil medium. But, you know, one of the things that he does actually, once he puts this in a little six pack or tray, he'll actually wash, take the hose and he'll actually wash out, like, if you put coffee in a coffee maker, the water goes through and it leeches all the nutrients out of the coffee to put in your glass and you drink, right? He actually waters this compost down and there's like basically it's really brown and dark coming off and he does this for quite a while, depending on that the plants more mature or less mature, the plants more mature, they can handle a little bit stronger mix, but the plants that are baby, then he wants to kind of water a lot of the nutrients out of the plants, coz he says that might shock the plant. So yeah, so anyways, this mixture is mostly the stuff that he bought and brought in and the other stuff is what I'm going to show you guys next. Now, the reason why he does this is, this is the principal that I actually also agree with and why he treats his baby plants and his baby vegetables so well is because this, right? The most important time to determine the health of a plant over its life span is when it's a baby. If it had a rough time when it was a baby, if you're buying it from transplants from a nursery, that the roots are wrapping around the base and the basically the plant is root bound or if you are buying plants that aren't so healthy right? Those plants will not really ever turn out to their full genetic potential, they won't ever produce a lot of food, right?, coz they've already had hard times, they've already been stressed out, if like, you know I have friends and have been yelled at as a kid or maybe, you know, god forbid, beating as children and sometimes like you know, they have some issues when they grow older, now hopefully people can get counselling and stuff like that, but plants can't get counselling. So, you wanna start them off and give them the best environment, the best upbringing possible, whether you direct seed them or whether you start up from transplants, and that's actually one of the things he's doing here, you know, he strives to have the highest quality baby plants because in the end, that's gonna mean, he's gonna have higher quality, better tastier, larger large plants, and that's actually something that's not actually often talked about unfortunately in gardening. Anyways, let's go ahead and take a look at this unique way he's making compost, that I have never even seen before or even could've imagine. So, I know what you guys might be thinking, "John, what is that guy Tino have these big ass things in his yard, alright, is he a junk collector, well actually he has a few things kind of laying around like I do, but actually its pretty neat and tidy around here. These guys may seem a little bit out of place and look off, but actually they serve a very important purpose because instead of having a tumbling composter like I did, right?, he's repurposing something he got for free or cheap that I think is thrown out and I believe is a waste to throw these guys out because he's found an excellent use of them. He used to work in, you know, refrigeration and all this kinds of stuff. What these two things are, these are the ice makers, these are those big industrial ice makers that you might see in on the top there, that have all that, you know, machinery and equipment but the bottom is basically just an insulated, you know, brain that actually keeps the temperature regulated, so it keeps it cold inside there. Also has a nice little lid here that can be open closed. So when he's ready to harvest his compost, he just opens up this lid right?, and all his compost by gravity just drops to the bottom in here. So he has a really nice rich stuff. Now he's not using traditional composting like with worms, no no no, he's not using traditionally composting, that composts with heat actually. What he's doing is something unique and different and basically what he's doing is he's just modelling nature. He's speeding up the process and he's providing a home or a habitat for the creatures that live inside his ice box compost bins, right? and let me go ahead and show you guys, what some of them looks like, alright. So , each of these ice makers bottoms anyways, are at different stages, you know, the one on the other side is the stuff he's harvesting from, this is the stuff, it's kind of like letting digest and compost or more prominently break down over time. Like this one, coz it still has a little window here, that you could actually just, go in and you could actually see all the materials that he's been stacking up. So, basically it's open at the top, he basically puts in, you know, old okra twigs you know, food scraps, you know, yard wastes and things and basically just funnels down and you know, on the top there's not a lot of living material. It's kind of like a lot of dry, but this is the insulation level and as he packs more stuff on the top, all the stuff kind of works down at its own pace and breaks down, you know, here you could see some of the stuffs that's not really broken down, but in here, there's like a little area, that we could actually just dig into, and you could see this stuff, it's getting broken down and let me go ahead and open the door to show you guys what's breaking this organic material down. Alright, so this is the ice maker that still in process, not yet ready to be harvested, we'll open this guy up for you guys and look at that, I don't know if you guys could see that on a HD camera, but just in this ice bin thing here, I see all these little creatures and actually when I opened the door, they all like went into little like caves inside all this compost, you know, what these little creatures are, I see like rollie pollies, I see cockroaches and who knows what other kind of bugs are living in here. He didn't add these bugs I here, they just showed up, right? You provide food for the bugs, they're gonna show up and they're gonna chow it down, right?, you have a big table of tropical fruit, I'm gonna show up and I'm gonna eat it all, and that's what the bugs are doing. He's providing a nice home for them, they show up and they basically eat all the organic material and then they poop it out, which is creating a really rich, nutrition for his plants, you know, the bugs and things will basically breakdown the organic batter and when they poop out, they poop it out actually some of the richest biology, you know. So, they can be pooping out fungus or fungi, bacteria, fungi and different chitinease degraders, cellulose degraders and all these things. Its kind of like, you know, they have worm castings, which we know is so good, they also have meal worm castings, which is so good, and they also have other excrements from bugs, that, you know, in the forest, on the forest floor you just see all these bugs scurrying around and eating all the different organic matter, well hey he's just doing that in a more contained space so this is actually, instead of a worm bin, it's actually just a bug bin, using just the local bugs to breakdown his nutrients. This is something that's not really even talked about right?, and I think this is a really good way to do it. I mean there are black soldier flies all these different bugs, but you know, in my garden I have a lot of the little pill bugs or whatever and there just breaking down the leaf material and organic matter actually in my beds, so actually I don't even have to have a bin, and you know some of those bugs also if they're in your garden, maybe not be a good thing, they also chomp on your young plants. If you don't have a lot of organic matter, so this maybe a better option. So, you know, I like that he's doing this to create a really rich mix, so he uses some of this stuff with some of the box stuff to start off his transplant. So, I'm really glad I came to visit Tino today, coz one of the areas that actually I haven't been maybe the most successful as a gardener is starting transplants. So he has a system down, totally to get really good transplants. These are some of the healthiest transplants I've seen of all the places I've visited, like, he plants them really dense and then actually he plucks them out as he needs them. So, right here we have basically the, some celery that he planted, and as you guys could see in this half right here it's pretty thinned out, coz he's plucking all the large ones, and its the large ones that actually, he takes out of here. He could either, A, you know, put them into little six packs, like he's just done with these guys, and then sell them and then if he don't sell them, he can plant it in his garden, and other, or, he could actually just take these out and just pop them in his garden. So, he's gonna be actually starting, he's doing some beets right now, he's gonna pop out the beets and then put them in his garden to grow the beets, because he found that you know, if he just direct seed the beets, they don't come up so well. But if you put them in here first, then they work a lot better. SO, you know, you're only gonna learn this by maybe reading things online, or trying yourself, and see what works or not right? I always encourage you guys to try to, like, make your gardening life, like, easier and work less, right? So, if you direct seed things, hey, that's always the best, coz that's gonna be the least amount of effort, if you gotta transplant and do all these kinds of stuffs, its little bit more effort, but if it allows you to grow more food, it's definitely worth it. So, yeah, so what he did here was, he was just coming over and he was just popping out some of these guys and he waters these guys, and he just will pop out the little roots there, like that and take this little transplant and then he'll actually put it into a six pack or maybe even a 72 pack and make those available to people. Now the next thing I wanna share is actually, once he pops these guys out, I wanna show you guys his technique, that he uses, where he can actually transplant up to 2 thousand plants in one day just by himself, which to me is amazing coz like I transplant stuff all the time, and I'm really slow, you know, coz I don't have his technique down, so I'm gonna basically take his technique that he uses for transplants and run with it, coz it's actually quite intelligent and actually quite smart and he's actually even invented his own tool to do it. So, let's take a look at that next. So, now I'm gonna show you guys the first step to transplanting. Basically what he did was he took a, his a 6 pack here, he's actually using nice size six packs, you know. I encourage you guys always, when you're purchasing 6 packs, if you're gonna be using them, is to try to buy the ones that actually have, that hold the most soil. Some of them are like long and skinny, and in my opinion, those aren't that good, we wanna have lots of soil in there. So, as he filled up this with the soil mixture from the wheel barrel that I showed you guys earlier, and then he washes it down, it's very important step right? You could do it with like little hose, he just does it with a hose just like spray this down gently and basically he lets the water soak all the way through. So, now number 1, you're gonna have really nice rich soil, that's fully watered, but you're not just gonna, like, plant in it, where there's still water on top. You're gonna wanna give it some time to let the water drain out, and if you guys look at the coming out, I could see the water, even though the ground's like dirt. I could see the water that's coming out that looks like that coffee. We're leeching some of the nutrients out, or the tea out of the compost on to the ground, and he'll do this several times to bring it down to the level where he feels comfortable, and then plant his plants in that, right?, and as I said, you know, if the plants are younger, then he's gonna rinse it more, and if the plants are a bit bigger, then he doesn't rinse it as much. But this is a critical step to plant in a 100 percent straight, you know screen compost, which is you know, goes against the many gardeners style, which they ,"Oh you gotta use a sterile medium, coz if you use compost it could cause problems", but all his stuff's looking great. So, he's doing a lot of things that maybe go against convention gardening wisdom, and I would encourage you guys to try it, see what happens. So, now I'm gonna share with you guys Tino's revolutionary planting technique that even enlightened me actually. As you guys could see, we've actually already rinsed the soil out and it's a drained fairly well. Most of it has drained pretty well, except of these two cells, and so, that's very important, right? One of the most important thing he stresses is you wanna have well draining soil. If the soil is not draining and it stays wet, right?, you're gonna rot out your plant's roots, you know, and he has a high probability to success, not to say he doesn't lose a couple plants sometimes, coz you know whatever happens. But he does things to ensure his success of his baby plants. So, the first step is, once you have rinsed it all out, you're gonna have these little transplants here that you basically just pluck up. So the first step is to just put them in a wash, right?, you're gonna dunk them in the water, we dunk them in some water, and we bring them out, check it out, the roots are now all together, where as before, you know, the roots were kind of like, really bushy. So that's very important, number 1. Number 2, he has a special screwdriver, so this is not just any screwdriver, he took a standard screw driver here and took a special file, I think he used maybe a chainsaw file and he basically just put a notch in the tip of the screwdriver, and this is very important not to put a point in, but it's a kind of rounded notch, so you know, there's no sharp edges on the screw driver, that is gonna cut the roots of the plants you're transplanting, then all he does is, he takes a little plant here and he goes down, maybe a little bit above half way right?, coz basically, his whole goal is to get this roots, in the little cell as quickly and efficiently as possible, and so he basically, he'll put this down, sometimes he'll like formulate a figure 8, you know, to get it, if the roots really long, then he'll take the little screw driver, and the little tip there and then he'll put them in the roots so all kind of like line it up like this, kind of like right about maybe there, and then basically he pushes down in one fall swoop and then basically, he's now planted the plant. The other thing at the same time that, he's going down, he'll kind of like leave a little bit of hole, you know, as he comes down. What that Little hole's gonna do, that's gonna ensure the water directs down and also it's gonna funnel the water down so that it drains faster. This is another critical component, if you're growing in straight compost, coz I've seen sometimes the compost will not drain, and then you're gonna get water logged, and that's why many people use or grow, peat moss because it basically, give a larger method of air, larger , you know, probability of air or like a cushion basically. Where's in this case you gotta be more precise, and so you know, with this, like literally hundreds of plants starts over there it looks like he's pretty much precise every time. So yeah, this is something, that's gonna save me a lot of time, coz normally I would've just took these guys and try to plant these with all the roots hanging out, but just by simply dunking them into water, and having a little screwdriver thing, then you're gonna go ahead and go down, let me go ahead and give you guys a close up on this, its kind of cool. We're gonna go ahead and put this down, and he basically sometimes like, loops this around a little bit, and see if we could, sometimes he just loops this around a little bit, makes a little 'u' out of it or a circle, then he just shoves this all down just like that and this took me a couple times to figure out how to do it, but now, you know, I think he'd probably approve of my technique. But yeah, he just does whole little six packs like this and actually here's one that he did, so you guys could see, what it looks like. So next what I wanna show you guys is actually after he pots those up, kind of like this, he's potted them all up. These are kind of sitting out and depending on how large they are, he'll either put them in a shade, like if they're just transplanted out or sometimes he'll put them in area with the sun and he'll rotate this depending on his specific desires for the plant. If the plants getting too big, he wants the growth to slow down. he'll put it in shade, if he wants them to grow faster and get topped off, looking nice for market, he may put them in the sun. That's very important. The other things is sometimes, instead of doing the six packs, he'll also do, you know, large flats of 72. So look at this, this is like a really nice flat of lettuce here, and he'll even take sometimes the ones maybe not performing, underperforming, it's too small, he'll put it in a longer one so that, you know, there all consistent size. So you're gonna get some of the best plant starts. You know I popped up some of these roots and some of these guys, maybe like, we'll do it on these guys here, see, look at this, this is one of the starts he did and look at that, if you guys notice, there's no roots up near the top because he sucked this down in the ground, you know when he's transplanting, all the roots are at the bottom and these roots are not wrapping around each other yet. He'll also even come in and root prune in these guys sometimes, if the roots are getting too much, so that they actually don't get roop bound so that when you guys take his plant starts home, you're gonna get some amazing results, like he's getting in his garden here, and , you know, his price is actually quite affordable, some of the best prices I've seen in Houston, like if you're getting like just a standard 6 pack, it's like 2.50 for a healthy 6 pack, that's very important. If you guys, wanna buy, you know, whole flat, basically he'll give you a whole flat of 6 packs for, I think around, 12 bucks and if you're buying a 72, you got the hook-up deal, 20 bucks, right, and if you buy , like 5 flats of 72 plants like this, he'll even go down further, so I encourage you guys, if you guys are not starting you plant starts yourself, you live here in Houston area, definitely call him up, and he'll hook you up with some of the healthiest plant starts in the lowest prices that I've seen. I mean if I lived here, I'd definitely be getting some of the 72 packs you know, it's definitely easy way to go, because you're gonna have a higher level of success when you guys start out with healthy plants, like he's making here. I think the last part of this episode, I'd like to actually sit down with Tino, he is from Greece, originally, so he has a thick accent, so maybe hard for you guys to listen to him, so I'll try to do the best I can, to maybe, help him explain what he's trying to say and I hope as soon as I'm able to also getting subtitles on this for you guys. John - So, now I'm here with Tino, the gardener extraordinaire that has created this paradise here in Houston with all his amazing plants, that actually he doesn't add any fertilizers to, and all his amazing transplants, that you guys saw just a few of them, I mean it's just impressive the amount of healthy transplants he has going. I only have a limited amount of time left here today, before I actually have to take off, but I want to ask him a few questions about his garden and why he chooses to grow all this food here, for him and his family. So a teen of the first question is, Why are you growing all this food here, especially where your duplex used to be on your property. Tino - Because I like to, I like to grow and I can't eat all these, just some of myself, some I'll give it away to someone and I like to grow, I like garden, that's all I do. There's not a man, there's no you know, I like to do, I like what I'm doing. John - Yeah, so I mean he just basically loves gardening and I mean I love gardening, I mean it's good to get out in nature and have a hobby, that's a productive hobby and actually his hobby is quite productive, produces hundreds of plant starts or even thousands of plant starts for his garden and also you guys in the local area. So, another thing I wanna talk to you guys about, Tino, is that something I didn't get to mention in the video, that was important to me, that I didn't get to talk about is you know, another aspect of your gardening on the free or cheap, beside bringing not many inputs in is how you communicate with the plants. This is something I do myself and I know, you also do. So, you wanna talk little bit about talking and more importantly listening to your plants, and how important it is for your gardening style? Tino - The, the plants they, you can, you can watch them and they tell you story like they tell you, like , like if you play on cassette, they tell you like a, how can I explain that, that's I'm hard to explain that, you have to explain that. John - Can you explain it in Greek? Your language, your native language. Tino - No no no, I cannot, no no no. They tell you what they need, what they, just look at them, you see , how they are growing, you see how they, it's it's very, they tell you a story, the whole story, how they growing, like how, what they need, how they can be better, how they can, it's very, it's very simple but it's very complicated, you know, it could be very complicated for some, lot of people, then simple for some others, and I don't know how to explain that. John - Yeah, so I stumped him, he's having a hard time explaining, but I'll try to give you my best, so, basically he's saying, every plant will tell a story and you need to listen to the plant and I know, you know, I would call Tino here a plant whisperer like they have dog whisperers and all these things. He knows plants and you could listen to the plants and hear, maybe not hear what they are saying, but you could kind of feel their vibe, I mean, we are all interconnected on this planet, and we sometimes forget that, and you need to open up, to be able to listen more, you know. I mean that's one of the things that I learned is to become a better speaker, you need to become a better listener. So I encourage all you guys to listen to your garden, you know, he'll sit out on his chair just looking over his garden and listening to his plants and seeing them and feeling what they need and then he'll take appropriate action to do that, and I know a lot of you guys are new, you guys may think I'm crazy and Tino's crazy for talking to the plants and not talking to the plants and listening to the plants and all this stuff. But, you know what, one day its gonna click, you're gonna be in your garden and you're plants are gonna tell you, "John I need water", "John, hey put some of this on me" or "put some of that on me" or "hey, I need more sun, I need less sun", and whatever, they're gonna tell you some stuff, and then all you need, all your job is to do as a gardener is to react and give them what they really need, not what you think they need, and I think this causes a lot of challenges in gardening, "Oh, I, my plants need water", you flood the heck out of them man, they lose their life coz, you're flooding them out, right? I mean let's talk about that Tino, you, you water very minimally here, right?, you only water, when necessary, you let the plants fend for themselves, and why, why do you do this? Tino - Because, I have to water the plants when I start them, when I start I have to water the plants because, I can't, like some to start, something, then after, after they're watered, when they grow out, start growing, I let them go to find their own moisture, I try to harder the soil the most I can. So, keep the moisture on the soil and they're good to go, that's all you need, you don't need nothing else, that's all you need. By hardening the soil, with a plants, with a , then you've got everything. That's all you need. That's all. John - Yeah, so he has no irrigation system here and nothing like that, and I mean this time here in December, everything looks amazing. Tino - Just giving them basics, you know what I mean, give them the basics. It's like a raise a plants like raise a kid. That's the way I see it. You see, if you wanted the plants to succeed, just let them go the hard way , you know what I mean, they're gonna find their own way, they're gonna go deeper, they're gonna find moisture, they'll find what they need. So by giving the plants anything they need , so , they become lazy, so they depend on you, for work, for food, for disease, for everything. You have to fight all this, so let the plants to find what they need, by themselves. Don't give them what they need. They're gonna find it, give them the basics, that's the basic thing, moisture, that's all you need, and the rest is, they can do, they can do better by their own. John - Yeah,, I mean I , definitely agree like, right? My parents they didn't give me allowance I was the like kid that got all his money, I had to like go out and find a job and make money and I think that's why I turned out pretty good, you know. We all know them spoiled kids right?, they're just messed up in their lives, coz they've just been given everything, and likewise your plants are similar right? So, cut that water off your plants sometimes, you know, don't over water them, you know. I encourage you guys to check your soil moisture levels, make sure they have the proper amount of water, but don't give them too much. Make them fend for themselves and find their own water. Of course this also depends on your particular environment you live in and also your soil, so I wouldn't wanna say that anybody in Las Vegas should in the middle of a summer, let your plants fend for summer, coz that's gonna be a bit more challenging than it is here in Houston. So, the other thing, you know, that actually we maybe don't see eye to eye on, coz we have maybe different goals and values, which is alright, is, adding fertilizers, nutrition and worm castings, and even compost, like you add very little with any compost. I think you added some to this, but all your bed pretty much you don't add any compost. So, you wanna speak to all these things that people put in their gardens and why you feel, is not needed. Tino - You don't need it because you, you, need the worms, where they belong, in the ground. Their compost, their composting the ground, they make castings in the ground , they harden the soil, they have the things, they do more, you see, by buying the chemical product, that. By keeping the germs in the ground, and take them out of the bins, take it from the bins, they do much better. That's the way it's supposed to be. John - I would agree with that, he says, take your worms out of your bins and put them in the ground, provided you have, you know, the right temperatures year round, where they could actually live in the ground, like here there's no problem, other places may be more challenging. Put them in the ground so that worms can eat and digest and poop where you need them and they can irrigate the soil instead of having them, locked up in a bin. I mean. I'm definitely for that now, actually in my, I don't have a worm bin, all my worms are in the bin. I like to add some supplementary worm castings for my beds for additional fertility but I would agree the best is actually having the worms in the bin. Tino - The another thing is, you got the castings, you see the, the plants, every plant, the worms they make a tunnel under the soil. John - Worms make tunnels. Tino - All the tunnels they find castings, the plants will find the whole plants, the plans that hold the follow the tunnel, so the they'll now have to penetrate the hard soil. So they build it very strong root system, by building very strong root system, you're building a beautiful plant. Sheltered beautiful plant. That holds. You have to have a feet, strong feet to run a marathon, you know, you can't do it without strong feet. You can't have a healthy plant without healthy roots. The worms they play very, they do very, that's very important for the worms to be on the ground where your plants are and live, always live like a some kind, like leaves, you know that leaves that you, when you cut your plants, just cut them don't pull them out leave the rest of the roots to die so, you feed the worms, they can't. Sometimes that's this ground right here, sometimes I got, if I have a worm like this big, Lyme worms, I'm talking about Lyme worms, they by not tilling the soil, they, you see they building like, like a tunnel system, and by tilling the soil you can never till. John - Because the worms yeah, that'll destroy the soils, yeah. Irrigate the nutrients. Tino - That's very important for the plants, for the plants, to have a open tunnel underneath John - Yeah, it also causes irrigations too. Tino - They find food in the tunnel, they find oxygen, they find, they can built a very strong wall system. That's what you need, that's the basic, that's the most important thing for any plant. John - I mean I totally agree with Tino on this fact, the worms belong best in your beds. That's the best place for them and they do a lot of things in the beds as nature would want them to, so your plants could thrive. Tino - By Buying like a bag worm compost, and throw them on your plants, throw them on your beds is not gonna do nothing. It's do something, but it's missing the whole point, the whole point is missing. John - I agree with the worm castings on the top of the beds, mixed in , it's gonna help. Now some worm castings are better than others, coz some worm castings may have worm casting eggs, so now you're actually putting the eggs and the worm castings in the beds, so now the worms could hatch at the same time. Anyways let's we pretty much agree on the whole worm situation. Let's talk about something maybe that we don't maybe see eye to eye on, the rock dust. So, what do you think about the rock dust, Tino. Tino - What's rock dust? John - Rock dust, the ground up rocks. Tino - You, we're made of rocks, this planet itself is made by that, by big rocks. So, you don't have to pay from , you don't have to go to the, for sand and big rocks, you know. You got that underneath in your soil, you got everything you need. It's all accessible to your plants because the way you, the way you garden, the way you, you, cultivate your plants, that's not accessible, and then you have to bring all this stuff, plus it's money, the business a lot of things is involved, so you just put all this on the side and the sow seeds on the ground, and see what happens, and then you'll learn from there. Your next, next thing's gonna be, you're gonna move up better and better all the times, and then you're gonna end up, with something like a, you don't have to do nothing, you don't have to bring nothing from the outside, all that you have is something, plants and best of any kinds of vegetables, I think you have pretty much everything. I have no problem because I have everything, without bringing, without bringing nothing. So, it's good for, I mean, it's good for nature, it's good for the everybody. It's good for your health, its good for you, it's good for your money, it's good for your pocket, its good for everything. Plus you got the top quality vegetables, by doing this, you got much more, that's the point, that was the mission. By doing more you got less, that's the way it works for the vegetables. It doesn't work, maybe that doesn't work in other things, but the garden, that's the way it works. By doing less you got more. John - So yeah I mean, definitely this is Tino's opinion about this topic and maybe many of you guys too. I get a lot of flag by all the stuff I buy to put in my garden, right? But once again, just like Tino, this is his hobby, he, he puts a lot of time and love into his garden. I put you know some time and you know, some money and products into my garden which I believe are gonna help me, even if its psychological that my food is healthier, that I'm eating it, I'm eating healthier food in my mind, it's still helping me, right?, if I'm wasting money unnecessasarily, you know, based on the research I've done, in my trials and experiments I've done I believe, some of the things I add actually are helpful to my garden to create higher quality food and not to say that he's not growing amazing food here, because he has absolutely is, the thing to remember that there's many ways to garden, some soils are more nutritious]us than others and you can't just say, "Oh the guy Tino, I just grow with anything if you guys could live next door to Tino, then grow just like he does, guess what, you're gonna have the same remarkable success that he does coz you're gonna be in the same soil, the same climate, the same environment, right? But unfortunately, I know a lot of you guys live in Australia, the UK, maybe you live in Georgia, maybe you live in Maine, you know, things vary a lot. Then you have to like, maybe kind of learn how to do things little bit differently, and that's alright you know. I'm here to just share with you guys, what different people are doing. So, Tino, let's talk about something's that would probably both agree with, chemical fertilizers. What do you think about, chemical fertilizers. Tino - It's the, you had to see that, you had to see that, you see young kids with lot of problems, health problems you see, you see lot of, you never see, it's going, it's going like ,something like a disease. You got disease , you got problems everywhere, so we have to go back, I think you know better than nobody else, you know about this better. But top quality healthy food, consuming top quality healthy food, you got, normally you got your and I think, you know better than anybody else about this and it's, you contaminated your life, you contaminated your food, yourself. It's you have to live the plant, the plant is smart enough, the seed, the single seed is smart enough if it falls to the ground, and there are amount of moistures, he knows exactly what to do, and right temperature and moisture, he knows exactly what to do, he doesn't need nobody to tell. You don't need to go all this classes and all this crap and then you listen all this crap, and I mean, start by yourself, if you have a soil and you , luckily a piece of soil and little piece of space in your house, in your farm, if you have a soil, you need to measure things, you need to measure things, make sure you have the sunlight and drainage. It doesn't matter what kind of soil you have, of course it doesn't have to be contaminated, it doesn't matter m=what kind of soil you have, you can grow pretty much everything. You need a drainage, two important things, a drainage and sun light. John - And the right moisture Tino - The moisture's gonna, you're gonna have to, you have to do that. The plants have to do that. So, you can grow anything, it's nothing. It's unlimited, you can grow anywhere you could do anything. John - Yeah, I mean gardening really is that simple, I don't know maybe hasn't started yet, maybe Tino, in view all
 


 

 

Alright this is John Kohler from growingyourgreens.com to bring you another exciting episode for you. I'm still here in Houston and I don't know what area in Houston it is, but doesn't looks like, you know, the best of neighbourhoods. But anyways, what I'm going to do today is actually visit the house right behind me, not the one over there with the bananas in the front, but this one behind the white fence there, the doors open, that has a red truck. This is going to be a interesting episode actually, this episode may challenge the beliefs you guys have about gardening. It's challenging some of the beliefs I have about gardening as well. So, the guy here, Tino, is actually from Greece and he's been growing, he's using little kid, he's been actually on this property about for last 4 to 5 years, when he's been actually growing food here. He does thing little bit differently, let me tell you this story actually. I first met Tino when I was actually at the Farm Dirt Compost, the place, and the guy their introduced me to him and he was like " You gotta meet this guy " and I was like driving off and I was kind of in a rush, because I had to like, you know get back to what I was doing, and he was like trying to tell me all this stuff and he was like, "You're gardening wrong! You don't need to add all the minerals, you don't need to add all the fertilizers, you don't need to draw and raise bed, It's all Wrong!" and I'm like, "Whoa, this guy is pretty interesting". But you know I'm always open like, even if somebody doesn't agree with me, that's fine. I know a lot of you guys may watch my videos and may not agree with everything I believe in, and that's fine. I'm just sharing my beliefs whether you want to believe what I believe, that's up to you guys right, totally up to you guys. But what I really like to do is I like to show many different styles of gardening, so that you guys could do whatever you want to do, right?, there's many kinds of gardener, I'm never going to say "Ooh this kind of gardening is the right way, this is the wrong way", depending on your particular situation, there are definitely better or worse ways to do it. So, actually in this situation, where we are here in Houston, with the given soil here, with the given climate, Tino's definitely figured out a way, you know, to garden and grow some food, actually with minimal inputs. Ok, so that was the first time I saw Tino and then I drove off. He didn't give me his contact and in front I'm like, maybe I'll run into that guy later. As luck turns out today, I was actually at the farmers market and he had a stand there, he was selling all kinds of plant starts, and actually he had the cheapest price for lettuce and other leafy greens at the market. It was like $5 for a nice size, flat of lettuce and other mixed greens that he was offering. So, we got to talking again and I'm like "Hey, what are you doing this afternoon?", he was like "Nothing", and I'm like "good can I come over and I want to see what you're doing and make a video". So, that's why I'm making a video for you guys to show you guy actually what he's doing, because he believes in, you know, gardening on the free and cheap, and I know that this is an episode a lot of you guys have been wanting for a long time, gardening on the free and cheap like, "John, you don't gotta waste money on that rock dust, you don't gotta bottle these worm castings, you don't gotta bottle these things that you garden", you could garden the free and cheap and it's not that hard. So, I don't wanna say that Tino is doing entirely free, there's a few things he brings in, but he actually brings in very few inputs for the impressive growth that he has and he does a lot of things himself, and builds things and he does a lot of techniques that I'm only gotta show you guys, maybe a few of them today, that actually in practices that he's done and learned overtime, by actually making mistakes, and that's why making mistakes is really good, because when you make a mistake, you learn how successfully not to do something. So, hopefully next time you'll do a bit better and he's actually even invented his little tools to do some of the things, you know , that he does, that I'll get to show you guys, that actually is quite impressive, actually that helped me out, it's something I'll be able to use now and save immense amounts of time. But yeah, he's definitely an interesting guy and he's from Greece and so I'm gonna call this episode, 'The Big Fat Greek Vegetable Garden Episode'. So let's go right behind the doors and show you guys what's growing on over here. So now we're at the gate for Tino's place here, and as you guys can see, he's got a nice white painted fence all the way around his property. This is not, maybe the nicest of areas so actually building a fence around your property, if you're able to do that, because I know that in some places you are not able to do that. Probably a good idea, right?, it keeps like stray animals and peoples from picking your stuff, but more importantly, also offers you guys some protection, form some of the elements, from some of the strong winds, he's blocking the wind with having a solid fence. Of course you could grow your own fence too, with many different plants and have trees and different things growing so tightly close together, which will be my first choice, rather than having a fence, just sitting here. Grow a living fence, it's actually gonna dig their roots in the soil and create further soil fertility. In any case, let's go beyond this fence and actually see what he's got growing on. Alright so now let's do a walk in to the yard here and as you guys could see, there is stuff growing everywhere, basically some are really long raise beds, he has lots of foods growing in all these raise beds and each bed is just a little bit different. But he does have some things that he does, you know, in all of them for sure, and as you guys could see , he also has a lot of plants starts. This is the back of his truck, he just got back from the farmers market. These are all the vegetables starts, he sells at the farmers market and this cooler right here, he basically just to harvest, just a part of his bed and it was like just full last night and he sold most of it at the farmers market, now he has this, some left over to eat for a salad for himself. But, you know, all that actually came from this bed over here, that he just clipped out and I'm looking at it and you could tell the clip from stuff out, but there's still so much more food in this bed. So, he says here this bed is about 45 Feet long and 4 Feet wide, it could feed about 5 people. So a family of 5, all the salad greens and greens they would want. So, I know a lot of you guys may have the space to do this. Let's see the other beds over here, this time of year, you know in December, he's growing lettuce primarily and some other leafy greens, dandelion, onions, some braska family plants and over on this side, he has all his nursery, starts that he's offering to people, and if he doesn't sell them, then he ends up planting them in his garden. So every gardener that I meet, there's things that we as gardeners can agree on and of course there's things that we may not agree on, where we have differences of opinion on, and that's alright, we're not gonna start World War III because we think that we should garden differently, that's alright. We can learn from each other, and I wanna encourage you guys in this episode to like, pick out the bits of things in this episode, that's gonna enhance your garden, and maybe even challenge your gardening style and to even adjust it, and make changes to improve what you're doing, and you know, maybe you believe in, what I'm gonna share with you guys today, maybe you don't. That's alright, I don't really care, but I want you guys to experiment, right, try some of the beds, how he's grown it. See if in your exact environment it actually grows better or maybe it's gonna grow worse, you know, than you're currently existing raise beds with sides. Anyways, one of the things that we both agree on here, Tino and me, is this guy, this roader tool, alright, he bought this, he used it a long time ago, but he no longer uses it to tiller, unless it's just maybe to clean up some of the in between the raised beds, but he does not till the soil. He believes in a no till method, this is very critical to both my style of gardening and Tino's style of gardening, you know. When you start disturbing the soil you lose fertility, you lose microbial life in there and these are the two things that we're trying to enhance with our gardening styles. Next I wanna show you guys, something else actually, that he used to do and that he actually gave up. That's maybe not exactly in agreeing to me, but that's alright because everybody has their own way of gardening. So one thing Tino doesn't do, is he doesn't create Compost Tea, he just simply doesn't believe in it. He tried it, he has a barrel here and what not, all the hoses and he used to create a Compost Tea but he didn't really see a difference, you know, with it. So he just basically discontinued the practise and you know I would say that maybe under ideal situation, when you got actually enough soil microbes in your garden, you might not need to use the Compost Tea, you know, I believe personally in diversity of microbes that, you know, can only be more beneficial, than not having them. But of course things are gonna grow with or without Compost Tea, things are gonna grow with or without, things like the rock dust. That I like to add, he doesn't even add the rock dust, doesn't believe in it and believe that you guys are wasting your money on rock dust, and that's cool, you know, we're gonna have a confrontation about that at the end of this, you know, he believes that all the nutrients are in the soil, and I agree, there's definitely nutrients in the soil, you know, and from what it looks like, things are growing really good. But I kind of wonder on like the, nutritional quality of the produce that is being grown, aside from just looking good, you know, if we did a breakdown of the nutrients in there, what would that look like. So that's what I think would be quite interesting to compare, lettuce at my garden, for example, compared to the lettuce at his garden, and kind of see where nutrition falls, and if the nutrition falls better in his favour maybe I'll abandon what I'm doing. But I don't know coz , you know, the thing for me is, like one of my main values with gardening is like, I almost lost my life, right, I've had major health condition and I'm totally, one of the main reasons why I'm gardening is to grow the highest quality food, or what I believe to be a highest quality food, and that's what I've have gone out and learned how to do, and that's what I share with you guys, and when I'm at my garden, but when I come to somebody else's garden, they might not have the same ideals as me. They might not have almost lost their life from a health condition, you know, they might not value their health as much as I do, so, they just wanna grow food on the free or cheap, but that's more important to them, and that's cool, you know, like, I'm not gonna tell you guys your values, I'm gonna tell you that, you know, in my opinion your life is the most valuable thing you guys own in the world, free and clear, and , you know, if you do things like smoking and maybe like, eat too many processed foods and junk foods, you know, that's gonna put your health in the toilet, and I don't choose to do that, but if you guys wanna do that, that's up to you, I don't really care. Anyways, let's show another thing, that actually both Tino and I both agree on. So now I'm inside Tino's house, and it's really just, you know, small house actually he said he converted his garage, that was his garage, into his living space and actually, the garden area that you guys just saw, he actually tore down a duplex that was outside. It was here like a 100 years, it was probably about time to either refurb it or tear it down, and he tore it down because he wanted to use the space instead of living for gardening and then just grow in a much and then actually live in a much smaller space, so his garden is actually about 5000 sq ft and his living space, I don't know, probably takes up the rest of the plot, maybe, I don't know, 3000 sq ft less, you know, just the walk ways is around the house or what not. So , you know, I wanna encourage you guys to , you know, he lives a minimalist lifestyle, he doesn't have much, he has a little bathroom, a little living area with a kitchen and a bedroom and stuff, and I think, you know, we've gotten too opulent in America and all these super huge houses, 2000, 4000 sq ft, and how much do you really use, how much you really need, it's just more space to fill up with junk you don't need. Anyways, one of the things he does in his kitchen is actually, he stores all his seeds on the top shelf there. You guys can see all the containers of seeds that he saves every year. So actually, the most of the things that he grows is actually from seeds that he saves. Of course, yes, he buys some seeds to get him started, but once he buys the seeds once, he grows that plant out too flourish him, saves the seeds and then he stores them up there and then he grows them out the following year. One of the things that actually he grows , actually that's quite good , is actually he'll go and buy produce from store and then he'll plant it. So, he's done this with green onions and he found that, green onions planted from the store didn't work so well. Instead what he found, were these guys, and these are like the little baby onions. They're called the pearl onions, and he likes these little pearl onions coz he'll just take these little pearl onions, that are like a couple bucks per bag, and there's a lots of these little onions here that most people might boil and eat or however they eat them. But he just takes these guys and he grows them out. So, now you just got, you know, I don't know, at least, like, several dozen plants for 2.50, and he says, these guys actually grow better than the green onions with the roots on them. So, yeah he definitely cuts a lot of cost, he's not growing on the total free but he's really doing it on a cheap. So, there's two main ways that Tino starts his seeds from, and these are the two ways that I use as well and would encourage you guys to use, right? Number one, he does direct seeding. Depending on what plant it is, he may direct seed them into his raised bed, I mean that's what I'm gonna show you guys now. So, he has a special technique for doing that, to, you know, preserve more soil moisture and to conserve water, you know, he uses sitting water here, I think, you should probably, maybe, catch some water off this roof, and what not to use that when he is able, but he uses sitting water and he only uses as much water as he needs, he doesn't like to use any excess water, and one of his beliefs is that, you gotta let fend for themselves. If you water your plants too much, their gonna be weak, their gonna be lazy, their roots are not gonna grow deep and seek out the water they need, as well as other nutrients in the soil, they need to fully thrive, and you know, overall actually, I do agree with that, you know, I think that's a good idea not to over-water plants, and many people, tend to over-water their plants which is definitely not a good thing in my opinion, and of course, it's not good to under-water your plants either. Anyways, as you guys could see, he's got one of his raised beds here, now, here's the thing, his raised beds, he does not have any sides on them, he does not believe in putting sides on your raised beds, because when you put a side on the raised beds, it may, you know, increase temperature a little bit, which is a pro, but he says the major con is, once it starts getting hot, you know, the sun will hit the sides of your raised beds, it'll heat up the soil, it'll cause more moisture loss inside the raised bed, which means you're gonna have to water more which means when you're watering more, you're gonna be leeching more nutrients out of your soil, and then its just a, you know, cycle. So, instead of a having sides on his beds, he just basically has a slope to raise bed, that actually he fills up with plants, so that the plants could cover the soil and he could actually grow more food in less space than having the sides. Another thing about Tino that he has learned very specific techniques that he does to, you know, start things from seed, to start things from tram plants to transplant things and I'm probably not going to be able to share with you guys all his techniques in this episode, but I'm gonna share a few of them, as much as I am able to retain and remember which hopefully is in line with what he shared with me. So, the start is seeds, basically he waters the soil or the ground where he's going to be planting. He then sprinkles the seed down all over and then I think he maybe waters a little bit more and then he puts the plastic over at the top, this clear, kind of plastic, and if we pull this up a little bit, you guys probably can't see underneath there too much, but some of the seeds underneath here are actually starting to germinate out, you know, when he puts the clear plastic over at the soil, it holds the moisture in, so it provides a nice place for the seeds to germinate, number one. Number two, it keeps the pests, like birds that might come down and eat your seeds away. Number three, it also keeps the ants and what not away, coz he does have a ant problems here, with the seeds and the ants and all this kind of stuff. So, it's basically covering the soil and protecting the soil. Now, here's the thing, he only will do this technique if it's under 80 Degrees in a day time, if it's over 80, he's not gonna use this. coz then you're gonna end up burning the soil. This also keeps, you know, the soil a bit warmer, so the seeds will have a nicer time to germinate, coz some seeds don't like to germinate when it's too cold, probably challenge that a lot of you guys are having right now, coz it's probably still winter time. But yeah, here in Houston, really nice day to day, we're in the 70's, and we're here in December. So, yeah, that's how he gets all this started, and this is just one of the ways, he does it. Let me go ahead and show you guys, after he does this, how the, all the seedlings look, in their raised bed. So, as you guys could see here's the bed, behind me here and this is one that he actually use the same technique that I should you, I don't know, maybe a month or two so ago and it looks like he's got some amazing growth, and he just literally threw out all the seeds. Here we have some spinach and, you know, it's growing really tightly and next to each other, as you guys could see also the lettuce behind me, it's also growing really tight and all next to each other, right? To him, there's no such thing as planting things too closely, but there is a problem with planting things too far apart. So I do encourage you guys, its in my opinion, its in probably Tino's as well, it's better to plant things too closely than too far apart, so that you're curving the soil. Plus, you know, the things that is actually planted too closely, to him, that's a good thing coz guess what, he'll come over and he'll pluck the things that are too close out of the bed, and then he'll transplant those into the six packs, which then is an income or revenue stream for him to make. He could also pull those up and just clip them, cut them back and eat them and let the other ones around them, grow. So, basically he's just growing more food in less space, this is actually quite intelligent. The other thing about this is that, you know, he doesn't add on any large amounts, any kind of compost or worm castings or rock dust or even any fertilizers, right, he just growing in the dirt that's sitting here, right, and in my opinion that's good and it's bad, I mean, we need to remember that, you know, depending on where you live, your soil could vary widely. You could actually be lucky and live in a place where that has fertile soil, you could also be unlucky, in maybe live in a place that maybe doesn't have the best of soil. Where I'm sitting right now is actually underneath, where his house used to sit. There was a house here, he tore it out, you know, the house was here for a hundred years, so the soil underneath the house has been basically covered for a hundred years and then he uncovered it, it probably hasn't been, you know, contaminated too much with all kinds of stuff, and so it's actually a fairly fertile and he's, you know, built it up over time. Because there is, the fact of the matter is, there is organic matter in most soils and here he has a clay soil, so, you know, it actually does and is actually quite nutritious, if it, you know, doesn't get water logged, and actually that's why we're sitting right now on these, 4 by 4's that actually is his walk ways, cause when it rains here, you get caked on the mud. But yeah, so yeah, it looks like, things are growing really good in here and next I wanna show you guys another technique he uses in his raised beds to grow, more food in less space. So, another technique he uses, besides planting things super close and super densely, is he actually does companion style planting, and he plants more than just one thing is a bed sometimes, you know, you guys saw where he had just mostly lettuce and spinach, but even in that bed, you know, every, so many feet he actually had an eggplant, little baby, that's gonna be growing up for the next season, after his lettuce or spinach is done, and in this bed, this is more of a cut and come again bed. He has things like the beets, he has a fennel, he has a cilantro, he has some parsley, he has a lettuce, all different kinds of stuff, and as you guys could see in the video there, this is really filled in, really nicely, it's like totally packed with plants, and he's proud of this fact, and actually I'm like yeah this is quite impressive, I like how, he's really densely seeded things, and they basically have to out compete themselves, and they just basically grow and, you know, what he's gonna do, he's gonna come in here and some of the bigger plants, he might actually just cut out and then those are the ones that he's gonna take to market, those are the ones that he's gonna eat, and then all the other ones, are basically just gonna fill in the space that was now created, when he did cut one out. In addition, , you know, he has planted things so closely and just basically three seeds down, that some of the seeds are coming up, so now there's new seedlings, that are this small, coming up in between the lettuces, so when he cuts down some of them, the new ones that are just emerging are now gonna get larger. So I mean, I think this is a technique that we can all learn and benefit from, you know, specially if you're trying to grow on the free and cheap, you could maximize your space, maximize the diversity for the most amount of yield. Up until now, you guys saw how basically he seeds his beds out and grows from seeds in place, I now wanna share with you guys, another way to do it, and you know, direct seed or planting from transplants, they both have their pros and cons, I like to personally do a little bit of each, and as it looks like here, so does Tino. So, now I wanted to share with you guys, just a, maybe a few more techniques he does, actually on my way to showing you guys the other way he starts his seeds out. These are his raised beds here, and as you guys could see, the soil is just mounted up to the sides and he's got things growing up the sides so that it just doesn't come to a edge, where he's not planting, it kind of slopes down mildly and he's been planting onions and different lettuces, right down the sides, so that, they'll actually fill it in, so it'll have a nice little narrow pathway in the middle, now it probably be a good idea to maybe do something like wood chips in between, so that you don't get all muddy, also the which was gonna break down over time, create more fertility. But anyways, he has all this stuff, here's the eggplant like I talked about planted within the lettuce, and also there's those little onion sets that I showed you guys earlier, little balls in between here. Over on this side, he has lots of different varieties of lettuces, including some of my favourite lettuces, those really dark rich lettuces that are at deeply pigmented, right. I wanna encourage you guys to eat deeply pigmented lettuce and other foods, coz they are higher in anti-oxidants. So yeah, and this is like, some of them really, this bed just really looks nice. He has, like so much food here, and I'm glad that he's probably one of the lowest priced sellers at the farmers market for your greens and by the looks of his greens, they're all quite healthy, and probably ones that you'd want to buy yourself, if you're not growing them yourself, here in Houston. he uses all organic methods. He doesn't sprays any kind of chemicals and all this kind of stuff, and actually he's getting some really superb results. So, another way besides direct seeding his plants, sometimes he'll actually start them in these little flats, you know, these are not plastic nursery flats, these are wooden flats that is he actually he made himself out of some 2 by 4 , and actually some, looks like, 1 by 6, fence post, like cedar fence post potentially, and that some good wood to use, coz it's gonna last a bit longer than just a pine or something. But these are nice, durable and stout. So, basically he fills this little container with a specific soil blend, that I'll share with you guys next, and then he basically grows his transplants. But to do that he does it in a few special ways to ensure he gets higher germination, because, once again, he doesn't want the water to dry out, he wants the proper moisture level. This is very important to him, to have a proper moisture level and also more importantly properly washed soil. So, the way that Tino starts his plants from the seed in the little containers are, he basically makes a little mini green house for them, and it's really simple, it's just this once again, the clear plastic that he likes so much and you guys could see, we'll go ahead and remove the plastic over here and underneath here , you guys could see, all these little baby starts, that are growing, that he says, that took like 4 days. These guys, are ready to have the plastic taken off, coz they are getting so tall, and that's another thing I wanna point out right, Tino does certain things for certain reason. If you guys looked, when I showed you guys these bins, side of the bins are made out of 2 by 4's, but the ends, but then the sides right, are actually made out of 2 by 6's and they're taller. This gives them about that much space, so that when he lays the plastic on top, it's not dragging on the top of the soil, so that gives the plants just a little bit amount of space to grow up. Once the plants almost touch the plastic, then that's time for the plastic to come off, coz otherwise the plants will start to bend and he doesn't want that at all, and yeah, he keeps nice little humid area for the plants to germinate, so this saves water, also creates a nice environment, you know, he's also right now seeding out some tomatoes, which generally like to germinate when it's warmer out, and by using this technique, he gets to warm up the soil, so that his tomato seeds could germinate here in Houston, even in December. So, now I wanna share with you guys, a special soil blend that Tino uses to start his transplants in, that I didn't get to show you guys yet. Now, this is the only time that actually he brings in some soil, but he also creates some, that I'll show you guys in a minute, to start his transplants, and he puts no coconut core, no peep moss and none of this stuff, right, he doesn't believe in it, right, and he's got a pretty good system down, I mean what he's doing, for the transplants is amazing, he's got some of the healthiest transplants that I've actually seen. One of the things I learned is to cover your wheel barrel, right, to cover the soil in the wheel barrel from the sun, the rain, all this kind of stuff. That's something I need to do, and this actually makes a nice little work table or work surface for you all too. So anyways let's go ahead and move this off, and as you guys could see here, he's got some really nice rich black soil, and one of his secrets is, he sips this down to quarter inch, so he gets comply by some compost from a certain place or maybe he gets a farm dirt compost sometimes. He sips it down, and then he adds some of his super potent compost that he's making right behind in a way that I've actually never seen before, which is gonna be good for you guys to see. But yeah, the soil is nice and filtered down, nice screened out, he has no big large chunks of stuff, that's very important and when I smell it, it actually has a nice mild neutral smell, looks like some really good stuff and this is where he starts all hi transplants in. Now, I know some of you guys might be thinking, "John, that's a really rich mixture of he's growing in all compost ", because they say don't grow in compost, you know , they say use a sterile soil medium. But, you know, one of the things that he does actually, once he puts this in a little six pack or tray, he'll actually wash, take the hose and he'll actually wash out, like, if you put coffee in a coffee maker, the water goes through and it leeches all the nutrients out of the coffee to put in your glass and you drink, right? He actually waters this compost down and there's like basically it's really brown and dark coming off and he does this for quite a while, depending on that the plants more mature or less mature, the plants more mature, they can handle a little bit stronger mix, but the plants that are baby, then he wants to kind of water a lot of the nutrients out of the plants, coz he says that might shock the plant. So yeah, so anyways, this mixture is mostly the stuff that he bought and brought in and the other stuff is what I'm going to show you guys next. Now, the reason why he does this is, this is the principal that I actually also agree with and why he treats his baby plants and his baby vegetables so well is because this, right? The most important time to determine the health of a plant over its life span is when it's a baby. If it had a rough time when it was a baby, if you're buying it from transplants from a nursery, that the roots are wrapping around the base and the basically the plant is root bound or if you are buying plants that aren't so healthy right? Those plants will not really ever turn out to their full genetic potential, they won't ever produce a lot of food, right?, coz they've already had hard times, they've already been stressed out, if like, you know I have friends and have been yelled at as a kid or maybe, you know, god forbid, beating as children and sometimes like you know, they have some issues when they grow older, now hopefully people can get counselling and stuff like that, but plants can't get counselling. So, you wanna start them off and give them the best environment, the best upbringing possible, whether you direct seed them or whether you start up from transplants, and that's actually one of the things he's doing here, you know, he strives to have the highest quality baby plants because in the end, that's gonna mean, he's gonna have higher quality, better tastier, larger large plants, and that's actually something that's not actually often talked about unfortunately in gardening. Anyways, let's go ahead and take a look at this unique way he's making compost, that I have never even seen before or even could've imagine. So, I know what you guys might be thinking, "John, what is that guy Tino have these big ass things in his yard, alright, is he a junk collector, well actually he has a few things kind of laying around like I do, but actually its pretty neat and tidy around here. These guys may seem a little bit out of place and look off, but actually they serve a very important purpose because instead of having a tumbling composter like I did, right?, he's repurposing something he got for free or cheap that I think is thrown out and I believe is a waste to throw these guys out because he's found an excellent use of them. He used to work in, you know, refrigeration and all this kinds of stuff. What these two things are, these are the ice makers, these are those big industrial ice makers that you might see in on the top there, that have all that, you know, machinery and equipment but the bottom is basically just an insulated, you know, brain that actually keeps the temperature regulated, so it keeps it cold inside there. Also has a nice little lid here that can be open closed. So when he's ready to harvest his compost, he just opens up this lid right?, and all his compost by gravity just drops to the bottom in here. So he has a really nice rich stuff. Now he's not using traditional composting like with worms, no no no, he's not using traditionally composting, that composts with heat actually. What he's doing is something unique and different and basically what he's doing is he's just modelling nature. He's speeding up the process and he's providing a home or a habitat for the creatures that live inside his ice box compost bins, right? and let me go ahead and show you guys, what some of them looks like, alright. So , each of these ice makers bottoms anyways, are at different stages, you know, the one on the other side is the stuff he's harvesting from, this is the stuff, it's kind of like letting digest and compost or more prominently break down over time. Like this one, coz it still has a little window here, that you could actually just, go in and you could actually see all the materials that he's been stacking up. So, basically it's open at the top, he basically puts in, you know, old okra twigs you know, food scraps, you know, yard wastes and things and basically just funnels down and you know, on the top there's not a lot of living material. It's kind of like a lot of dry, but this is the insulation level and as he packs more stuff on the top, all the stuff kind of works down at its own pace and breaks down, you know, here you could see some of the stuffs that's not really broken down, but in here, there's like a little area, that we could actually just dig into, and you could see this stuff, it's getting broken down and let me go ahead and open the door to show you guys what's breaking this organic material down. Alright, so this is the ice maker that still in process, not yet ready to be harvested, we'll open this guy up for you guys and look at that, I don't know if you guys could see that on a HD camera, but just in this ice bin thing here, I see all these little creatures and actually when I opened the door, they all like went into little like caves inside all this compost, you know, what these little creatures are, I see like rollie pollies, I see cockroaches and who knows what other kind of bugs are living in here. He didn't add these bugs I here, they just showed up, right? You provide food for the bugs, they're gonna show up and they're gonna chow it down, right?, you have a big table of tropical fruit, I'm gonna show up and I'm gonna eat it all, and that's what the bugs are doing. He's providing a nice home for them, they show up and they basically eat all the organic material and then they poop it out, which is creating a really rich, nutrition for his plants, you know, the bugs and things will basically breakdown the organic batter and when they poop out, they poop it out actually some of the richest biology, you know. So, they can be pooping out fungus or fungi, bacteria, fungi and different chitinease degraders, cellulose degraders and all these things. Its kind of like, you know, they have worm castings, which we know is so good, they also have meal worm castings, which is so good, and they also have other excrements from bugs, that, you know, in the forest, on the forest floor you just see all these bugs scurrying around and eating all the different organic matter, well hey he's just doing that in a more contained space so this is actually, instead of a worm bin, it's actually just a bug bin, using just the local bugs to breakdown his nutrients. This is something that's not really even talked about right?, and I think this is a really good way to do it. I mean there are black soldier flies all these different bugs, but you know, in my garden I have a lot of the little pill bugs or whatever and there just breaking down the leaf material and organic matter actually in my beds, so actually I don't even have to have a bin, and you know some of those bugs also if they're in your garden, maybe not be a good thing, they also chomp on your young plants. If you don't have a lot of organic matter, so this maybe a better option. So, you know, I like that he's doing this to create a really rich mix, so he uses some of this stuff with some of the box stuff to start off his transplant. So, I'm really glad I came to visit Tino today, coz one of the areas that actually I haven't been maybe the most successful as a gardener is starting transplants. So he has a system down, totally to get really good transplants. These are some of the healthiest transplants I've seen of all the places I've visited, like, he plants them really dense and then actually he plucks them out as he needs them. So, right here we have basically the, some celery that he planted, and as you guys could see in this half right here it's pretty thinned out, coz he's plucking all the large ones, and its the large ones that actually, he takes out of here. He could either, A, you know, put them into little six packs, like he's just done with these guys, and then sell them and then if he don't sell them, he can plant it in his garden, and other, or, he could actually just take these out and just pop them in his garden. So, he's gonna be actually starting, he's doing some beets right now, he's gonna pop out the beets and then put them in his garden to grow the beets, because he found that you know, if he just direct seed the beets, they don't come up so well. But if you put them in here first, then they work a lot better. SO, you know, you're only gonna learn this by maybe reading things online, or trying yourself, and see what works or not right? I always encourage you guys to try to, like, make your gardening life, like, easier and work less, right? So, if you direct seed things, hey, that's always the best, coz that's gonna be the least amount of effort, if you gotta transplant and do all these kinds of stuffs, its little bit more effort, but if it allows you to grow more food, it's definitely worth it. So, yeah, so what he did here was, he was just coming over and he was just popping out some of these guys and he waters these guys, and he just will pop out the little roots there, like that and take this little transplant and then he'll actually put it into a six pack or maybe even a 72 pack and make those available to people. Now the next thing I wanna share is actually, once he pops these guys out, I wanna show you guys his technique, that he uses, where he can actually transplant up to 2 thousand plants in one day just by himself, which to me is amazing coz like I transplant stuff all the time, and I'm really slow, you know, coz I don't have his technique down, so I'm gonna basically take his technique that he uses for transplants and run with it, coz it's actually quite intelligent and actually quite smart and he's actually even invented his own tool to do it. So, let's take a look at that next. So, now I'm gonna show you guys the first step to transplanting. Basically what he did was he took a, his a 6 pack here, he's actually using nice size six packs, you know. I encourage you guys always, when you're purchasing 6 packs, if you're gonna be using them, is to try to buy the ones that actually have, that hold the most soil. Some of them are like long and skinny, and in my opinion, those aren't that good, we wanna have lots of soil in there. So, as he filled up this with the soil mixture from the wheel barrel that I showed you guys earlier, and then he washes it down, it's very important step right? You could do it with like little hose, he just does it with a hose just like spray this down gently and basically he lets the water soak all the way through. So, now number 1, you're gonna have really nice rich soil, that's fully watered, but you're not just gonna, like, plant in it, where there's still water on top. You're gonna wanna give it some time to let the water drain out, and if you guys look at the coming out, I could see the water, even though the ground's like dirt. I could see the water that's coming out that looks like that coffee. We're leeching some of the nutrients out, or the tea out of the compost on to the ground, and he'll do this several times to bring it down to the level where he feels comfortable, and then plant his plants in that, right?, and as I said, you know, if the plants are younger, then he's gonna rinse it more, and if the plants are a bit bigger, then he doesn't rinse it as much. But this is a critical step to plant in a 100 percent straight, you know screen compost, which is you know, goes against the many gardeners style, which they ,"Oh you gotta use a sterile medium, coz if you use compost it could cause problems", but all his stuff's looking great. So, he's doing a lot of things that maybe go against convention gardening wisdom, and I would encourage you guys to try it, see what happens. So, now I'm gonna share with you guys Tino's revolutionary planting technique that even enlightened me actually. As you guys could see, we've actually already rinsed the soil out and it's a drained fairly well. Most of it has drained pretty well, except of these two cells, and so, that's very important, right? One of the most important thing he stresses is you wanna have well draining soil. If the soil is not draining and it stays wet, right?, you're gonna rot out your plant's roots, you know, and he has a high probability to success, not to say he doesn't lose a couple plants sometimes, coz you know whatever happens. But he does things to ensure his success of his baby plants. So, the first step is, once you have rinsed it all out, you're gonna have these little transplants here that you basically just pluck up. So the first step is to just put them in a wash, right?, you're gonna dunk them in the water, we dunk them in some water, and we bring them out, check it out, the roots are now all together, where as before, you know, the roots were kind of like, really bushy. So that's very important, number 1. Number 2, he has a special screwdriver, so this is not just any screwdriver, he took a standard screw driver here and took a special file, I think he used maybe a chainsaw file and he basically just put a notch in the tip of the screwdriver, and this is very important not to put a point in, but it's a kind of rounded notch, so you know, there's no sharp edges on the screw driver, that is gonna cut the roots of the plants you're transplanting, then all he does is, he takes a little plant here and he goes down, maybe a little bit above half way right?, coz basically, his whole goal is to get this roots, in the little cell as quickly and efficiently as possible, and so he basically, he'll put this down, sometimes he'll like formulate a figure 8, you know, to get it, if the roots really long, then he'll take the little screw driver, and the little tip there and then he'll put them in the roots so all kind of like line it up like this, kind of like right about maybe there, and then basically he pushes down in one fall swoop and then basically, he's now planted the plant. The other thing at the same time that, he's going down, he'll kind of like leave a little bit of hole, you know, as he comes down. What that Little hole's gonna do, that's gonna ensure the water directs down and also it's gonna funnel the water down so that it drains faster. This is another critical component, if you're growing in straight compost, coz I've seen sometimes the compost will not drain, and then you're gonna get water logged, and that's why many people use or grow, peat moss because it basically, give a larger method of air, larger , you know, probability of air or like a cushion basically. Where's in this case you gotta be more precise, and so you know, with this, like literally hundreds of plants starts over there it looks like he's pretty much precise every time. So yeah, this is something, that's gonna save me a lot of time, coz normally I would've just took these guys and try to plant these with all the roots hanging out, but just by simply dunking them into water, and having a little screwdriver thing, then you're gonna go ahead and go down, let me go ahead and give you guys a close up on this, its kind of cool. We're gonna go ahead and put this down, and he basically sometimes like, loops this around a little bit, and see if we could, sometimes he just loops this around a little bit, makes a little 'u' out of it or a circle, then he just shoves this all down just like that and this took me a couple times to figure out how to do it, but now, you know, I think he'd probably approve of my technique. But yeah, he just does whole little six packs like this and actually here's one that he did, so you guys could see, what it looks like. So next what I wanna show you guys is actually after he pots those up, kind of like this, he's potted them all up. These are kind of sitting out and depending on how large they are, he'll either put them in a shade, like if they're just transplanted out or sometimes he'll put them in area with the sun and he'll rotate this depending on his specific desires for the plant. If the plants getting too big, he wants the growth to slow down. he'll put it in shade, if he wants them to grow faster and get topped off, looking nice for market, he may put them in the sun. That's very important. The other things is sometimes, instead of doing the six packs, he'll also do, you know, large flats of 72. So look at this, this is like a really nice flat of lettuce here, and he'll even take sometimes the ones maybe not performing, underperforming, it's too small, he'll put it in a longer one so that, you know, there all consistent size. So you're gonna get some of the best plant starts. You know I popped up some of these roots and some of these guys, maybe like, we'll do it on these guys here, see, look at this, this is one of the starts he did and look at that, if you guys notice, there's no roots up near the top because he sucked this down in the ground, you know when he's transplanting, all the roots are at the bottom and these roots are not wrapping around each other yet. He'll also even come in and root prune in these guys sometimes, if the roots are getting too much, so that they actually don't get roop bound so that when you guys take his plant starts home, you're gonna get some amazing results, like he's getting in his garden here, and , you know, his price is actually quite affordable, some of the best prices I've seen in Houston, like if you're getting like just a standard 6 pack, it's like 2.50 for a healthy 6 pack, that's very important. If you guys, wanna buy, you know, whole flat, basically he'll give you a whole flat of 6 packs for, I think around, 12 bucks and if you're buying a 72, you got the hook-up deal, 20 bucks, right, and if you buy , like 5 flats of 72 plants like this, he'll even go down further, so I encourage you guys, if you guys are not starting you plant starts yourself, you live here in Houston area, definitely call him up, and he'll hook you up with some of the healthiest plant starts in the lowest prices that I've seen. I mean if I lived here, I'd definitely be getting some of the 72 packs you know, it's definitely easy way to go, because you're gonna have a higher level of success when you guys start out with healthy plants, like he's making here. I think the last part of this episode, I'd like to actually sit down with Tino, he is from Greece, originally, so he has a thick accent, so maybe hard for you guys to listen to him, so I'll try to do the best I can, to maybe, help him explain what he's trying to say and I hope as soon as I'm able to also getting subtitles on this for you guys. John - So, now I'm here with Tino, the gardener extraordinaire that has created this paradise here in Houston with all his amazing plants, that actually he doesn't add any fertilizers to, and all his amazing transplants, that you guys saw just a few of them, I mean it's just impressive the amount of healthy transplants he has going. I only have a limited amount of time left here today, before I actually have to take off, but I want to ask him a few questions about his garden and why he chooses to grow all this food here, for him and his family. So a teen of the first question is, Why are you growing all this food here, especially where your duplex used to be on your property. Tino - Because I like to, I like to grow and I can't eat all these, just some of myself, some I'll give it away to someone and I like to grow, I like garden, that's all I do. There's not a man, there's no you know, I like to do, I like what I'm doing. John - Yeah, so I mean he just basically loves gardening and I mean I love gardening, I mean it's good to get out in nature and have a hobby, that's a productive hobby and actually his hobby is quite productive, produces hundreds of plant starts or even thousands of plant starts for his garden and also you guys in the local area. So, another thing I wanna talk to you guys about, Tino, is that something I didn't get to mention in the video, that was important to me, that I didn't get to talk about is you know, another aspect of your gardening on the free or cheap, beside bringing not many inputs in is how you communicate with the plants. This is something I do myself and I know, you also do. So, you wanna talk little bit about talking and more importantly listening to your plants, and how important it is for your gardening style? Tino - The, the plants they, you can, you can watch them and they tell you story like they tell you, like , like if you play on cassette, they tell you like a, how can I explain that, that's I'm hard to explain that, you have to explain that. John - Can you explain it in Greek? Your language, your native language. Tino - No no no, I cannot, no no no. They tell you what they need, what they, just look at them, you see , how they are growing, you see how they, it's it's very, they tell you a story, the whole story, how they growing, like how, what they need, how they can be better, how they can, it's very, it's very simple but it's very complicated, you know, it could be very complicated for some, lot of people, then simple for some others, and I don't know how to explain that. John - Yeah, so I stumped him, he's having a hard time explaining, but I'll try to give you my best, so, basically he's saying, every plant will tell a story and you need to listen to the plant and I know, you know, I would call Tino here a plant whisperer like they have dog whisperers and all these things. He knows plants and you could listen to the plants and hear, maybe not hear what they are saying, but you could kind of feel their vibe, I mean, we are all interconnected on this planet, and we sometimes forget that, and you need to open up, to be able to listen more, you know. I mean that's one of the things that I learned is to become a better speaker, you need to become a better listener. So I encourage all you guys to listen to your garden, you know, he'll sit out on his chair just looking over his garden and listening to his plants and seeing them and feeling what they need and then he'll take appropriate action to do that, and I know a lot of you guys are new, you guys may think I'm crazy and Tino's crazy for talking to the plants and not talking to the plants and listening to the plants and all this stuff. But, you know what, one day its gonna click, you're gonna be in your garden and you're plants are gonna tell you, "John I need water", "John, hey put some of this on me" or "put some of that on me" or "hey, I need more sun, I need less sun", and whatever, they're gonna tell you some stuff, and then all you need, all your job is to do as a gardener is to react and give them what they really need, not what you think they need, and I think this causes a lot of challenges in gardening, "Oh, I, my plants need water", you flood the heck out of them man, they lose their life coz, you're flooding them out, right? I mean let's talk about that Tino, you, you water very minimally here, right?, you only water, when necessary, you let the plants fend for themselves, and why, why do you do this? Tino - Because, I have to water the plants when I start them, when I start I have to water the plants because, I can't, like some to start, something, then after, after they're watered, when they grow out, start growing, I let them go to find their own moisture, I try to harder the soil the most I can. So, keep the moisture on the soil and they're good to go, that's all you need, you don't need nothing else, that's all you need. By hardening the soil, with a plants, with a , then you've got everything. That's all you need. That's all. John - Yeah, so he has no irrigation system here and nothing like that, and I mean this time here in December, everything looks amazing. Tino - Just giving them basics, you know what I mean, give them the basics. It's like a raise a plants like raise a kid. That's the way I see it. You see, if you wanted the plants to succeed, just let them go the hard way , you know what I mean, they're gonna find their own way, they're gonna go deeper, they're gonna find moisture, they'll find what they need. So by giving the plants anything they need , so , they become lazy, so they depend on you, for work, for food, for disease, for everything. You have to fight all this, so let the plants to find what they need, by themselves. Don't give them what they need. They're gonna find it, give them the basics, that's the basic thing, moisture, that's all you need, and the rest is, they can do, they can do better by their own. John - Yeah,, I mean I , definitely agree like, right? My parents they didn't give me allowance I was the like kid that got all his money, I had to like go out and find a job and make money and I think that's why I turned out pretty good, you know. We all know them spoiled kids right?, they're just messed up in their lives, coz they've just been given everything, and likewise your plants are similar right? So, cut that water off your plants sometimes, you know, don't over water them, you know. I encourage you guys to check your soil moisture levels, make sure they have the proper amount of water, but don't give them too much. Make them fend for themselves and find their own water. Of course this also depends on your particular environment you live in and also your soil, so I wouldn't wanna say that anybody in Las Vegas should in the middle of a summer, let your plants fend for summer, coz that's gonna be a bit more challenging than it is here in Houston. So, the other thing, you know, that actually we maybe don't see eye to eye on, coz we have maybe different goals and values, which is alright, is, adding fertilizers, nutrition and worm castings, and even compost, like you add very little with any compost. I think you added some to this, but all your bed pretty much you don't add any compost. So, you wanna speak to all these things that people put in their gardens and why you feel, is not needed. Tino - You don't need it because you, you, need the worms, where they belong, in the ground. Their compost, their composting the ground, they make castings in the ground , they harden the soil, they have the things, they do more, you see, by buying the chemical product, that. By keeping the germs in the ground, and take them out of the bins, take it from the bins, they do much better. That's the way it's supposed to be. John - I would agree with that, he says, take your worms out of your bins and put them in the ground, provided you have, you know, the right temperatures year round, where they could actually live in the ground, like here there's no problem, other places may be more challenging. Put them in the ground so that worms can eat and digest and poop where you need them and they can irrigate the soil instead of having them, locked up in a bin. I mean. I'm definitely for that now, actually in my, I don't have a worm bin, all my worms are in the bin. I like to add some supplementary worm castings for my beds for additional fertility but I would agree the best is actually having the worms in the bin. Tino - The another thing is, you got the castings, you see the, the plants, every plant, the worms they make a tunnel under the soil. John - Worms make tunnels. Tino - All the tunnels they find castings, the plants will find the whole plants, the plans that hold the follow the tunnel, so the they'll now have to penetrate the hard soil. So they build it very strong root system, by building very strong root system, you're building a beautiful plant. Sheltered beautiful plant. That holds. You have to have a feet, strong feet to run a marathon, you know, you can't do it without strong feet. You can't have a healthy plant without healthy roots. The worms they play very, they do very, that's very important for the worms to be on the ground where your plants are and live, always live like a some kind, like leaves, you know that leaves that you, when you cut your plants, just cut them don't pull them out leave the rest of the roots to die so, you feed the worms, they can't. Sometimes that's this ground right here, sometimes I got, if I have a worm like this big, Lyme worms, I'm talking about Lyme worms, they by not tilling the soil, they, you see they building like, like a tunnel system, and by tilling the soil you can never till. John - Because the worms yeah, that'll destroy the soils, yeah. Irrigate the nutrients. Tino - That's very important for the plants, for the plants, to have a open tunnel underneath John - Yeah, it also causes irrigations too. Tino - They find food in the tunnel, they find oxygen, they find, they can built a very strong wall system. That's what you need, that's the basic, that's the most important thing for any plant. John - I mean I totally agree with Tino on this fact, the worms belong best in your beds. That's the best place for them and they do a lot of things in the beds as nature would want them to, so your plants could thrive. Tino - By Buying like a bag worm compost, and throw them on your plants, throw them on your beds is not gonna do nothing. It's do something, but it's missing the whole point, the whole point is missing. John - I agree with the worm castings on the top of the beds, mixed in , it's gonna help. Now some worm castings are better than others, coz some worm castings may have worm casting eggs, so now you're actually putting the eggs and the worm castings in the beds, so now the worms could hatch at the same time. Anyways let's we pretty much agree on the whole worm situation. Let's talk about something maybe that we don't maybe see eye to eye on, the rock dust. So, what do you think about the rock dust, Tino. Tino - What's rock dust? John - Rock dust, the ground up rocks. Tino - You, we're made of rocks, this planet itself is made by that, by big rocks. So, you don't have to pay from , you don't have to go to the, for sand and big rocks, you know. You got that underneath in your soil, you got everything you need. It's all accessible to your plants because the way you, the way you garden, the way you, you, cultivate your plants, that's not accessible, and then you have to bring all this stuff, plus it's money, the business a lot of things is involved, so you just put all this on the side and the sow seeds on the ground, and see what happens, and then you'll learn from there. Your next, next thing's gonna be, you're gonna move up better and better all the times, and then you're gonna end up, with something like a, you don't have to do nothing, you don't have to bring nothing from the outside, all that you have is something, plants and best of any kinds of vegetables, I think you have pretty much everything. I have no problem because I have everything, without bringing, without bringing nothing. So, it's good for, I mean, it's good for nature, it's good for the everybody. It's good for your health, its good for you, it's good for your money, it's good for your pocket, its good for everything. Plus you got the top quality vegetables, by doing this, you got much more, that's the point, that was the mission. By doing more you got less, that's the way it works for the vegetables. It doesn't work, maybe that doesn't work in other things, but the garden, that's the way it works. By doing less you got more. John - So yeah I mean, definitely this is Tino's opinion about this topic and maybe many of you guys too. I get a lot of flag by all the stuff I buy to put in my garden, right? But once again, just like Tino, this is his hobby, he, he puts a lot of time and love into his garden. I put you know some time and you know, some money and products into my garden which I believe are gonna help me, even if its psychological that my food is healthier, that I'm eating it, I'm eating healthier food in my mind, it's still helping me, right?, if I'm wasting money unnecessasarily, you know, based on the research I've done, in my trials and experiments I've done I believe, some of the things I add actually are helpful to my garden to create higher quality food and not to say that he's not growing amazing food here, because he has absolutely is, the thing to remember that there's many ways to garden, some soils are more nutritious]us than others and you can't just say, "Oh the guy Tino, I just grow with anything if you guys could live next door to Tino, then grow just like he does, guess what, you're gonna have the same remarkable success that he does coz you're gonna be in the same soil, the same climate, the same environment, right? But unfortunately, I know a lot of you guys live in Australia, the UK, maybe you live in Georgia, maybe you live in Maine, you know, things vary a lot. Then you have to like, maybe kind of learn how to do things little bit differently, and that's alright you know. I'm here to just share with you guys, what different people are doing. So, Tino, let's talk about something's that would probably both agree with, chemical fertilizers. What do you think about, chemical fertilizers. Tino - It's the, you had to see that, you had to see that, you see young kids with lot of problems, health problems you see, you see lot of, you never see, it's going, it's going like ,something like a disease. You got disease , you got problems everywhere, so we have to go back, I think you know better than nobody else, you know about this better. But top quality healthy food, consuming top quality healthy food, you got, normally you got your and I think, you know better than anybody else about this and it's, you contaminated your life, you contaminated your food, yourself. It's you have to live the plant, the plant is smart enough, the seed, the single seed is smart enough if it falls to the ground, and there are amount of moistures, he knows exactly what to do, and right temperature and moisture, he knows exactly what to do, he doesn't need nobody to tell. You don't need to go all this classes and all this crap and then you listen all this crap, and I mean, start by yourself, if you have a soil and you , luckily a piece of soil and little piece of space in your house, in your farm, if you have a soil, you need to measure things, you need to measure things, make sure you have the sunlight and drainage. It doesn't matter what kind of soil you have, of course it doesn't have to be contaminated, it doesn't matter m=what kind of soil you have, you can grow pretty much everything. You need a drainage, two important things, a drainage and sun light. John - And the right moisture Tino - The moisture's gonna, you're gonna have to, you have to do that. The plants have to do that. So, you can grow anything, it's nothing. It's unlimited, you can grow anywhere you could do anything. John - Yeah, I mean gardening really is that simple, I don't know maybe hasn't started yet, maybe Tino, in
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How to make a simple Langstroth beehive below $6

Joe Eli posted the article • 0 comments • 137 views • 2017-09-18 03:00 • came from similar tags

 
 
 

 
 
 

This is my body costing $23 the side body cost me stacked and it's made with plywood but joints and everything else everybody on the internet loves but again six dollars now the difference between the two is this one's made out of pine this one's out of plywood again it is a better deal on this because this will last anywhere between 15 and 20 years but if you don't have the money or you don't have the ability to get your own pie and saw your own mulberry dovetails and different things like that where you prove everything and handles then this might be the option where we deal with Queens plywood as a cheap alternative exterior plumbing but make sure you got exterior plywood and simple buck joints on the ends for people who kind of look at me doesn't really have a setup or the time or some other reason that you might not be able to do budgets you might have to earth feels like this so I'll show you a few little tricks to make these work and how you can build them with just a salt built little beehive isn't actually as hard as you may think it is I used to think it was crazy wild and there's numbers flying over at you you don't know what you're doing you don't know the inside the outside with length how many this tell me that so I'm going to actually kind of simplify this for you make it so that this height doesn't require all the dovetails and the cuts and the fancy pieces it's made out of cheap plywood but joints like I said and you can actually build looks old now throats at the end I've got some of these and you can find those in the description below and you can even find them on the website where I have a small blog I can keep everything that you guys can print these off later revert to the sizes on there because from time to time I call 5/8 7/8 and it's better if you just go off as planned so take a look at those and we're going to get started you're going to how easy it is actually going to be high so of course if you don't have a table saw to rip down to pieces you can always use these types of jigs and this is what I use for an adequate table saw and really this would be feet long specifically designed with that and what it is is that you take your circular saw and it's just a track you clamp it down onto your piece of work take your circular saw run a domed length of that and this is your RIP fence and this is your length that you're going to be kind of where your saw blade behind you you line that up at ninety five eighths so we're going to get to sawing the longer or plywood so that's going to be three of these cut down into 19 and 78 and the other one is going to give you seven and the pieces at twelve and a half so we're going to work over on the miter saw and show you what to do now of course if you don't have a miter saw it takes this you can either deal with a handsaw or you can take one of these jigs set them up on the link that you need run your circular saw and just keep working down the road takes a little more time if using plywood hides you've probably helped rotate about too many being produced you might be making for the most four aisles and by the way one plywood will make one high because you're going to get five root over this five beeps and one in video [Applause] [Music] and on to the next cup so I'm going to cut these down to 12 and a half and 19 and 7/8 and then we're going to move on I'm going to show you how to nail them together or not nail them together I guess I got to cut strips person makes it easier working in smaller pieces like this instead of an entire length even though you're getting all the ends off of the one piece so we're going to cut this all down seven times save your scraps at the end of those 19 and 7/8 cups because the ends the waste will be used for these guys now that we've got all the pieces cut out and we've got the 12 half by nine and five bags we now need to cut that little groove in there like a mess and if you can see that that's going to be 5/8 high and 3/8 and a little trick with plywood is each one of these layers is 1/8 so you just count them out and kind of set your table salt or your saw to that now there is a way that you can cut these out without a table saw or a circular saw you can use either a dado g8 with a circular saw or just a little bit of time and effort with a ansel here's what you're going to need if you're going to use just a saw and cut your groove in for your frames the culmination blade is already set to 5 8 v which one mark this off where we want to make the cut and I always try and knock out in like this where you've got an imperfection I use that of course this isn't a very good one to begin with but go ahead and bark off your 5/8 set up your line or your square edge just take a piece of 3/4 inch plywood and that will be able to sit there you'll also be able to use it as kind of a guide to keep your sausage and where we go basically the only thing you gotta really worry about is keeping that one and put all the way down to 3/8 once you get down to 3/8 switch out to the chisel and just peel that edge off so if you've been using a circular saw to this point you're going to have and you don't have a table saw you're going to have to use one of these to cut the edge at some point in time I got rid of mine or destroyed it for the actual side that was supposed to be cutting this is actually to ride along the left or it was made for a different table or a circular saw and what this is is you take 3/4 of an inch the depth of your piece that you want a dado you make it a 90 tack it all together glue it and how it works is you set it up like that now if this was the correct one this line right here would rough or sit right where you go to cut it now of course you're going to clamp it you're going to make sure that you go to secure work area I'm not actually going to make the circular saw go but you just set it and you write it right along there of course off with your fingers it's going to be clamped and it'll prove it right there of course you got upset that for yourself or for five-eighths once you've done that you're going to have a group cut into this and again take a chisel and just trim that off or you can just keep moving the jig over and you just keep slicing it until you knock everything off there and clean it up with a chisel so we're going to move on to the table saw and do the miter work with up and that's how you work with the circular saw and of course make sure you saw is turned off or unplugged even better you can't see this but just to the point to where it touches and I can feel it just nicking so that's good now that we have our pieces cut into twelve and a half and 1978 with same height now of course give you a medium to do it's a five eighths and basically what I've done is I've set up a corner here because I don't have any fancy jigs or anything for keeping a big square I've just taken two pieces of straight plywood from scraps mounted them on my table and made sure that it's square over here what I do take my own pieces for solid walls take my ends and frame rest move it nail it staple it Brad nail and whatever basically are going to be working with you can use screws but I recommend pre drilling screws if you got using two and a half inch screws Brad nails up used and they've held up but I loaded them full basically Brad nails the other option is the our dog's nail or spiral nail just a two and a half inch nail now onto the side as per normal but I'm going to use staples my gun takes inch and a half so that's when I run I recommend two inch if you can use two inch staples mine is just a narrow crown the process of it is take your glue get the best quality glue you can get for outdoor use [Music] so helps to open it try and get a little bit on the top not too much or a down upside no need to be really exact with it just as long as enough grouping all over your workplace together square it up and as its held together so I'm going to finish this off and I'm going to show you guys a trick up close about nailing right here and at the bottom so that when you use your piyo tool and get in there you start prying or having to pull frames apart you don't just separate this so I'm going to show you a little trick using screws or nails or anything else like that as I was building this I was doing this pattern while I was going but I left the last one for you guys to see and what I do is I take the staple and I crisscross it at the top and at the bottom that way it resists a little better on when you pull any pressure against it like this like this and these corner is done like that you can actually go all the way up and down each side angling it in there because right now we've got good chiseled strength but it's not really needed with a high except for on the sides or on the anvil area so what happens is these tend to pull apart when their butt joint that's the disc or the disadvantage to buckling so this just sort of helps out a little bit more guys hold that together I'm going to do that for your right now showing you what I mean so for the tops and bottom angle it in light and then up like that now you always know ol length lightness and will help resist the entire [Music] reset the miter saw to 14 inches and the reason why I'm making 14 inches so that the ends of being the hive lined up they're nailed through this point and then you've got these sides a little extra holding onto it that saves you the trouble antique wheat saves you the trouble of having to cut out rooms in that plywood to make handles these are going to be like AK weekend so basically sections when it's all up you can do this with handsaw or circular saw a game simply you're just tuning the Automator now it's time to do the handles and take care of then what we did is we cut these down to inch and a half and if you use the one by six unlike what I used I use the one by four you can use the remaining amount left over to start using as a three quarter by three quarter base or your bottoms but in this case we've got two handles anyway at 14 inches and that's what the distance is from here to here and what I did is I started using two inch lids anyway so I sent mine to two inch on the combination square I mark it down here like that you need to draw it across there but that's simply not needed I put the sharp side up just so it's easier on my hands glute and staple it together so I'll take care of that right now and I'm going to show you the end product of this when it's done so go ahead and take a care of the gluing on this and as you can see the cleats are set out to the very edges at 14 inches again we're dealing with a buck joint and everybody loves those so I'm going to defend it now what I do is I take and because it's a simple build we're really just aiming for the ones who don't have major woodworking skills doesn't have a lot of tools everything right now I've tried to show you can do with a handsaw and a screw at least a drill or a hammer and nail so what I do is first I start like this I ain't the staple up towards the top on the edges the reason for that is because when you hold of the handle the weight doesn't just pull out if you angle it down towards the bottom technically the staples can actually pull out when you're hauling 100-pound box so right now all the staples are angled up so that it resists it digs it further into the cleat and it has nothing to do with the length of the staples I use it's really just for added shape so I'll go ahead and continue nailing this together and that's how I build my hives I've tried to make it as simple as I could with a little woodworking skill as needed just simply to make them as fast as I can I think anyway I said I mean I'm planning on going down to the pine and that is the ultimate box basically this is the safest this of the pests but for some of us out there will have to do and I mean honestly if you only got four hives and you've got minimal money but you really want to get into beekeeping tools of your best bet now what this game was onboard a deep hive body or medium material that level and migratory talk are revered up and it makes it really simple for people to get into legs drops now down the road I'm going to be making and covering a little bit of both top fire pipes because I've run those as well and kind of give you a little bit more of an idea which way you might want to go and see the differences and that gave that just simple build on planning and working out as for everything else so see you next time and if you like this video give me a thumbs up drop content in the comments below and subscribe I don't see you next time


 
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This is my body costing $23 the side body cost me stacked and it's made with plywood but joints and everything else everybody on the internet loves but again six dollars now the difference between the two is this one's made out of pine this one's out of plywood again it is a better deal on this because this will last anywhere between 15 and 20 years but if you don't have the money or you don't have the ability to get your own pie and saw your own mulberry dovetails and different things like that where you prove everything and handles then this might be the option where we deal with Queens plywood as a cheap alternative exterior plumbing but make sure you got exterior plywood and simple buck joints on the ends for people who kind of look at me doesn't really have a setup or the time or some other reason that you might not be able to do budgets you might have to earth feels like this so I'll show you a few little tricks to make these work and how you can build them with just a salt built little beehive isn't actually as hard as you may think it is I used to think it was crazy wild and there's numbers flying over at you you don't know what you're doing you don't know the inside the outside with length how many this tell me that so I'm going to actually kind of simplify this for you make it so that this height doesn't require all the dovetails and the cuts and the fancy pieces it's made out of cheap plywood but joints like I said and you can actually build looks old now throats at the end I've got some of these and you can find those in the description below and you can even find them on the website where I have a small blog I can keep everything that you guys can print these off later revert to the sizes on there because from time to time I call 5/8 7/8 and it's better if you just go off as planned so take a look at those and we're going to get started you're going to how easy it is actually going to be high so of course if you don't have a table saw to rip down to pieces you can always use these types of jigs and this is what I use for an adequate table saw and really this would be feet long specifically designed with that and what it is is that you take your circular saw and it's just a track you clamp it down onto your piece of work take your circular saw run a domed length of that and this is your RIP fence and this is your length that you're going to be kind of where your saw blade behind you you line that up at ninety five eighths so we're going to get to sawing the longer or plywood so that's going to be three of these cut down into 19 and 78 and the other one is going to give you seven and the pieces at twelve and a half so we're going to work over on the miter saw and show you what to do now of course if you don't have a miter saw it takes this you can either deal with a handsaw or you can take one of these jigs set them up on the link that you need run your circular saw and just keep working down the road takes a little more time if using plywood hides you've probably helped rotate about too many being produced you might be making for the most four aisles and by the way one plywood will make one high because you're going to get five root over this five beeps and one in video [Applause] [Music] and on to the next cup so I'm going to cut these down to 12 and a half and 19 and 7/8 and then we're going to move on I'm going to show you how to nail them together or not nail them together I guess I got to cut strips person makes it easier working in smaller pieces like this instead of an entire length even though you're getting all the ends off of the one piece so we're going to cut this all down seven times save your scraps at the end of those 19 and 7/8 cups because the ends the waste will be used for these guys now that we've got all the pieces cut out and we've got the 12 half by nine and five bags we now need to cut that little groove in there like a mess and if you can see that that's going to be 5/8 high and 3/8 and a little trick with plywood is each one of these layers is 1/8 so you just count them out and kind of set your table salt or your saw to that now there is a way that you can cut these out without a table saw or a circular saw you can use either a dado g8 with a circular saw or just a little bit of time and effort with a ansel here's what you're going to need if you're going to use just a saw and cut your groove in for your frames the culmination blade is already set to 5 8 v which one mark this off where we want to make the cut and I always try and knock out in like this where you've got an imperfection I use that of course this isn't a very good one to begin with but go ahead and bark off your 5/8 set up your line or your square edge just take a piece of 3/4 inch plywood and that will be able to sit there you'll also be able to use it as kind of a guide to keep your sausage and where we go basically the only thing you gotta really worry about is keeping that one and put all the way down to 3/8 once you get down to 3/8 switch out to the chisel and just peel that edge off so if you've been using a circular saw to this point you're going to have and you don't have a table saw you're going to have to use one of these to cut the edge at some point in time I got rid of mine or destroyed it for the actual side that was supposed to be cutting this is actually to ride along the left or it was made for a different table or a circular saw and what this is is you take 3/4 of an inch the depth of your piece that you want a dado you make it a 90 tack it all together glue it and how it works is you set it up like that now if this was the correct one this line right here would rough or sit right where you go to cut it now of course you're going to clamp it you're going to make sure that you go to secure work area I'm not actually going to make the circular saw go but you just set it and you write it right along there of course off with your fingers it's going to be clamped and it'll prove it right there of course you got upset that for yourself or for five-eighths once you've done that you're going to have a group cut into this and again take a chisel and just trim that off or you can just keep moving the jig over and you just keep slicing it until you knock everything off there and clean it up with a chisel so we're going to move on to the table saw and do the miter work with up and that's how you work with the circular saw and of course make sure you saw is turned off or unplugged even better you can't see this but just to the point to where it touches and I can feel it just nicking so that's good now that we have our pieces cut into twelve and a half and 1978 with same height now of course give you a medium to do it's a five eighths and basically what I've done is I've set up a corner here because I don't have any fancy jigs or anything for keeping a big square I've just taken two pieces of straight plywood from scraps mounted them on my table and made sure that it's square over here what I do take my own pieces for solid walls take my ends and frame rest move it nail it staple it Brad nail and whatever basically are going to be working with you can use screws but I recommend pre drilling screws if you got using two and a half inch screws Brad nails up used and they've held up but I loaded them full basically Brad nails the other option is the our dog's nail or spiral nail just a two and a half inch nail now onto the side as per normal but I'm going to use staples my gun takes inch and a half so that's when I run I recommend two inch if you can use two inch staples mine is just a narrow crown the process of it is take your glue get the best quality glue you can get for outdoor use [Music] so helps to open it try and get a little bit on the top not too much or a down upside no need to be really exact with it just as long as enough grouping all over your workplace together square it up and as its held together so I'm going to finish this off and I'm going to show you guys a trick up close about nailing right here and at the bottom so that when you use your piyo tool and get in there you start prying or having to pull frames apart you don't just separate this so I'm going to show you a little trick using screws or nails or anything else like that as I was building this I was doing this pattern while I was going but I left the last one for you guys to see and what I do is I take the staple and I crisscross it at the top and at the bottom that way it resists a little better on when you pull any pressure against it like this like this and these corner is done like that you can actually go all the way up and down each side angling it in there because right now we've got good chiseled strength but it's not really needed with a high except for on the sides or on the anvil area so what happens is these tend to pull apart when their butt joint that's the disc or the disadvantage to buckling so this just sort of helps out a little bit more guys hold that together I'm going to do that for your right now showing you what I mean so for the tops and bottom angle it in light and then up like that now you always know ol length lightness and will help resist the entire [Music] reset the miter saw to 14 inches and the reason why I'm making 14 inches so that the ends of being the hive lined up they're nailed through this point and then you've got these sides a little extra holding onto it that saves you the trouble antique wheat saves you the trouble of having to cut out rooms in that plywood to make handles these are going to be like AK weekend so basically sections when it's all up you can do this with handsaw or circular saw a game simply you're just tuning the Automator now it's time to do the handles and take care of then what we did is we cut these down to inch and a half and if you use the one by six unlike what I used I use the one by four you can use the remaining amount left over to start using as a three quarter by three quarter base or your bottoms but in this case we've got two handles anyway at 14 inches and that's what the distance is from here to here and what I did is I started using two inch lids anyway so I sent mine to two inch on the combination square I mark it down here like that you need to draw it across there but that's simply not needed I put the sharp side up just so it's easier on my hands glute and staple it together so I'll take care of that right now and I'm going to show you the end product of this when it's done so go ahead and take a care of the gluing on this and as you can see the cleats are set out to the very edges at 14 inches again we're dealing with a buck joint and everybody loves those so I'm going to defend it now what I do is I take and because it's a simple build we're really just aiming for the ones who don't have major woodworking skills doesn't have a lot of tools everything right now I've tried to show you can do with a handsaw and a screw at least a drill or a hammer and nail so what I do is first I start like this I ain't the staple up towards the top on the edges the reason for that is because when you hold of the handle the weight doesn't just pull out if you angle it down towards the bottom technically the staples can actually pull out when you're hauling 100-pound box so right now all the staples are angled up so that it resists it digs it further into the cleat and it has nothing to do with the length of the staples I use it's really just for added shape so I'll go ahead and continue nailing this together and that's how I build my hives I've tried to make it as simple as I could with a little woodworking skill as needed just simply to make them as fast as I can I think anyway I said I mean I'm planning on going down to the pine and that is the ultimate box basically this is the safest this of the pests but for some of us out there will have to do and I mean honestly if you only got four hives and you've got minimal money but you really want to get into beekeeping tools of your best bet now what this game was onboard a deep hive body or medium material that level and migratory talk are revered up and it makes it really simple for people to get into legs drops now down the road I'm going to be making and covering a little bit of both top fire pipes because I've run those as well and kind of give you a little bit more of an idea which way you might want to go and see the differences and that gave that just simple build on planning and working out as for everything else so see you next time and if you like this video give me a thumbs up drop content in the comments below and subscribe I don't see you next time


 
 
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How I build honey bee brood boxes.

Hunter posted the article • 0 comments • 107 views • 2017-09-18 02:24 • came from similar tags

  

hello Scottie here Wenlock myself another load of pine to build some brood boxes for these colonies I'm working on I'm not sure how much of this pile I'm gonna eat up but I decide to show you what I'm starting with I'm not sure how many to make I might shoot for a hundred so we'll see how far I get so let's go make some sawdust to make some noise all right so I'm topping the boards to length first and then I'm going to rip them the way I chop into lengths I've got blocks set up here against the stopper the 19 and 1/8 and currently I'm using 16 5/8 I like to cut them to length first and then rip them to width a piece that comes off when you rip them is about an inch and a half I could have run the boards through the table saw and ripped off the inch and a half off of one side and then cut them to length I've worked just fine except when you've got knots like this on the edge now this board was actually pretty good it only has the one knot that was bad but of course when I rip the inch and a half off I have a perfect board a problem comes in if you rip the inch and a half off and you've got a knot on this side and maybe further down the board you've got a knot on the opposite side and if you've already taken the inch and a half off well now you've got a problem with that knot down there by cutting it to length first you have the option of ripping a chunk off this side or off this side so you just end up with a lot more usable material so not a lot to this you put your blocks and make sure there's no sawdust in the way of course dust collector Beyond and have my headphones on normally but once it's fight against there and tight against the fence and a little pieces are left over then that goes into my wife's birdhouse collection so that's all there's that I got a couple more boards the caisson see I have most of it cut but a couple more to do and then we'll get on to ripping them to width so stick around okay so the ripping them twist not a lot to show you the table saw is set up to 9 and 5/8 and then you just pick the worst side just had a little wee bit of a burr there and you just cut that off and you're good the pieces that come off I might not use that one because I've got lots to choose from but the better pieces will get attached there to be my handle and then the sixteen and five-eighths and of course there's the other ones are 19 and 1/8 I'll save this better stuff and I could also use that to make inner covers so all I do is I just take my board to have a look at it you can see this one's got a bad spot there so that's the side I cut off if if the board looks good on both sides well you just cut one off and Kerry are not much to that I got a probably another hour or so here I got some more piled up around the back over there so I am making a hundred like I said so there's a lot of pieces to cut but that's still a miserable day outside so nothing better to do so I'll get that done we'll get onto some row to work and we'll make some more sawdust and some more noise so stick around well I wasn't bad it took me about an hour and a half I have all the pieces now ripped to their proper width I've got more than enough material for handles and many inner covers I'll sort through it you know some of these pieces aren't going to be any good firewood but a lot of this stuff is excellent material yet so we'll go get the water table set up now and we'll start making our end joints and the frame rest so stick around oK we've got all our pieces ripped to wist now and it's time to do the road work to create the corner joints probably seen me do this before I got a couple of shims that are 3/8 take the guard off and I would put put my straightedge on top of the blade with the two pieces of 3/8 under each end and then adjust the height of the blade to three okay then I simply take a couple of scraps of 3/4 put up against the tent put the straightedge up against there same thing move the fence back and forth until I've got the the depths or the yeah I guess that's the depth of my cuts going to be 3/4 of an inch so I'm going to make a data joint down the side of the N bars that's 3/8 by 3/4 and that'll make my my corner joints so all I need to do at this point is grab my earphone start machine turn the desk electron [Music] [Applause] [Music] then I would grab one of my 3/8 pieces and put on here and I just feel that to make sure that that cut is 3hd and the other way is 3/4 I do the same thing I put a straight edge on there and that's going to make our props gonna make a quarter joint of our our brood box so that's all there is to that oh very quickly do one [Music] and then I usually I usually like just to recheck the first one just to make sure that's good the other end feels good I have a 3/4 inch strap here then just put it in there check that yeah I'm pretty happy with that so I only got a couple hundred pieces to do so give me a few minutes I'll get size done and then we'll come and do the frame rest so stick around [Music] alright so there's the last of the corner joints done and that took me just over an hour 60 63 minutes so now we need two loops we need to unplug the machine and we're just going to make the adjustment so that we can now make the frame rest all I need to do there is loosen this off I use a bullet for people refer to the way I need my two five eight blocks five eighths so the height the height of the bit doesn't change at all but the depth of the fence is going to change to 5/8 so we rotate that blade around so it's stick it out we bring the whole unit forward and then we push it back slowly with a straight edge on there and then we try now I got a still shot of this as well get that spare set those out of the way we're going to put the guard back on and plug this back in Oh [Music] then all we need to do is check it this way to make sure that the cut is 5/8 down and like I say the 3/8 doesn't change look pretty good there something else I do in obviously I'm doing quite a number I keep this handy and maybe every 15 or 20 or so I do check just to make sure that that bit hasn't moved that looks good and there's our 5/8 so that's like say that's going to be our frame rest now I will get these all done and then we'll get on to assembling so we could do a couple and then we'll shut the camera off save some battery [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] my father-in-law always says when you're doing a big job and you get to the last one there's the one we were looking for last one done that took me about 40 minutes so the easy stuff is done now now time to assemble not tonight see you next time all right so it's time to assemble these brood boxes we're working on if you've watched some of my other videos you've probably seen me use this jig but if not I'll explain it just to check the steel plate and I got two pieces of steel plate welded they're 90 degrees to the plate and they're 90 degrees to each other with a couple braces down on the other two sides I've got two six-inch C clamps that I cut in half and welded them down and then I weld a little piece of plate to the foot and everything is square with each other and it's made to fit a standard Lance trough box I use it for my honey supers my ventilation boxes and of course what I originally built it for was putting brood boxes together so all I do is I grab a couple of my ends and I very quickly you know just have a look at them check the milling work make sure that there's no big burrs grab my trusty Titebond three lay a bead down the the two ends of each board so the four ends then I just stand the first one in there just temporary and I grab my sides and I always look at the sides and they almost always have a little wee bit of a cup to them put the cup out because you can pull it in with a clamp so I just stand that in there now I'm just putting nut a corner together let's put that in there that's up against the two pieces of plate then I grab the next one same things check the cup I'll put that up against the clamp on this side and I put it into this corner and I leave that end out a little wee bit just make it easier to put this the other end in just slide that down between the clamp in the end then I pull these two in a little bit and look at it then I just snug up the clamps I don't actually get try and go too tight because this plate wasn't heavy enough I'm gonna and have to build a new one please and at the same time maybe I'll get around to putting the legs on it but I just snug them up just to hold them and that gets everything square and just holds everything in place then I just check all these stalks and these two here a little bit just top side down a little bit that's good that's pretty good now you can't see it from the camera angle but because these two side boards are bowed out a little bit on the inside right in this area both ends there's just a little bit of a gap so I just grabbed my background and I'm going to put four screws in the end so I put the clamp right in the center and just give that a squeeze and I see a little bit of glue come out of there I just recheck these let's get to my microphone then a few pilot holes just to prevent the screws from splitting the wood and I start them down maybe or maybe three-quarters of an inch and I'm trying to get in the middle of this boards what I'm trying to do so I just drill for the holes here bottom one about an inch or so or 3/4 an inch from the bottom same at the top then grab four screws these are number eight by inch and a half wood screws they're Robinson's so it's the number two or the red Robinson I have one in a driver you do have to careful with these drivers you if you overdo it you'll sink the screw rate out of sight kind of defeats the purpose but a little bit of practice grab a few more screws [Music] then is that other side is also out I just bring my bar clamp around do the same thing here read about the center and then just it takes so little to pull that in then again like I'd like to set the drill on my hand and then you know you can hang on to the box and it just makes it so much faster cut this half a little little low on this side but doesn't really match the positioning is [Music] that clamp was a little bit going after you do a hundred of them you get it back all there is so that loosen off the clamp there's one gun only 99 to go so let's have some fun [Music] [Music] [Music] and there we are with a magic of video editing the one we've been looking for number 100 I was keeping track of my time with my little kitchen clock and I've been obviously I didn't do it all at once I stopped a couple of times had a couple of the chores I had to do but I was writing it all down about five and a half hours but it took couple changes I made trying to find faster ways to do it I stopped drilling the pilot holes for the two Center ones because it's really the top and the bottom ones but the other thing I've been doing is I just grabbed a frame just to drop in I had some problems with some boxes I made a year or so ago that they were a little tight so this time I was thinking ahead I've checked them I think I got four that I'm going to have to make a couple of adjustments on but anyway that's that for assembling boxes I'll get some handles on these next but not today so see you next time all right so today I'm going to try and get the handles put onto my brood boxes to do that I have a little stand sitting here that gets the height work up to a bit more comfortable height then I have a little oh and I always grab the box I always feel for the frame rest so I know I've got the boxes all the same just something to do like a little jig made up says brood box handles little stopper on the back and all I do is I just sit it on there bring that block over then I put my thumb's on it to hold it and then like my four fingers I just checked to make sure that's straight all that's doing is getting the handles also the same height and to get them straight not that's all then I just take a bead of glue and I just laid in behind this just a long an inch or so down my handles are about an inch and a half and these are all the scraps that I cut off so I just grab them look at it and I just carefully lay it on top of that glue and then what I do is I I use my four fingers to check that and my thumb to kind of hold that in place then I grab my air nailer and I you I just I just put two two air nails in the ends just to hold it because it wants to move around on that glue then I take a couple screws I did get some shorter screws for this job these are number eight by inch and a quarter and I just come back a few inches that way I don't have to worry about its splitting this if you put it out near the end of course it wants to split and I went with the shorter ones I was using H and a half before but two pieces of three-quarter-inch pine an inch and a half one if it sticks through it's really hard to scrape and clean up the box so the inch and a quarter ones these drivers if it puts it down a little bit too deep it doesn't matter now one other feature my little stand here and has groove in the center that's perfect because now when I flip it over that handle goes down in there and at 8'o the boss wants to sit level so again I just grab my glue I grab my jig I put the jig on I square it top I lay a bead of glue I grab a handles have a quick look at it I position it on there I feel a seal this top edge and with my thumb I'm holding it tight I have my nailer pop a couple nails in temporary then I grab a couple screws and that is all there is putting handles on spots $1.99 to go so let's have some fun with trying to be done today there we have it once again with the magic of video editing there's the last one a little over two hours two hours ten minutes I guess a few interruptions this afternoon but they're all done so now we'll just wait for a nice sunny day and we'll get them outside get them painted so see you next time all right so today is finally painting day I have all hundred boxes out here these metal racks for something that my wife and I used to use to grow plants on the cue plants up off the ground but we don't use this greenhouse anymore obviously but it makes a great painting location so I just spread the boxes out and I put the boxes kind of corner to corner I don't know if the camera will see that or not when you're painting you want to try and keep your gun at 90 degrees and I have the Box this way I got to try and turn and it's just awkward to do plus by putting them corner to corner I can put more boxes closer together so all I do is I try and paint this top edge and the face and I'll do you know this side I'll go round round round then this afternoon I'm going to flip them over and I'll do it again so I end up with one coat of paint on the top one coat of paint on the bottom and usually two coats on the side I've got one these Waggoner electric sprayers I'll put the model number and the thing so all I do is just and I'll just work my way down the line we'll keep track of my time see how long it takes so let's just have a little bit of fun [Music] [Laughter] [Music] I [Music] [Music] there we are done so I'll let this dry now for about ho three hours four hours to see what the weather is like after lunch I'll flip them all over and I'll paint second coat but I'm not going to waste my time filming that I love this gun I will tell you after how long was it almost an hour after now we're like gun gets heavy yeah looks like I've used about half that pale but that should work out just about fine so yeah how good I flipped over I'll paint the other side and then we'll get back in the shop and I'll have some final thoughts on this little project so see you in a bit all right so we've got all our boxes painted back inside the shop I thought I would just share a little bit of the numbers of what it actually took the build these I don't actually think there's any point getting into the cost because wherever you live I mean your your cost of wood and screws and glue whatnot paint I'm sure it's going to be different I'll share with you the amount of material I use and then you can just you know substitute your prices and you can decide whether or not you want to do the work of making your own and it is good fun I I prefer to build my own the wood that I get I think I mentioned before it's second so there is a fair bit of waste involved there were various lengths here there were 16 footers twelve footers 14 footers but doesn't matter I kept track of them all and I added it all up I had 776 linear feet and these are 11 and a quarter so I did have to rip them down so there's some waste there and then where the large knots whatnot where there was waste so you know if you're buying grade-a material then it's easy you just figure out you know 2 times 16 and 5 8 2 times was at 19 and 1/8 buy as many boxes as you want to build and if you're buying grade-a material you just buy that amount I'll be a little extra if it is seconds well you know it may have more or less waste than with my hat so the mind worked out 700 seventy-six linear feet of this material indicate his seconds for me it's pretty pretty cheap screws I used actually 2,000 screws to do this I buy them in a box of 6500 those are for here where I am the ninety three bucks so penny but one and a half cents is what that works out to but again wherever you are buy them in the biggest box you can get them they don't go bad and it's way better price the glue I buy in a gallon jug and then I just keep refilling that little squeeze bottle and I'm going to probably book to squeeze bottles the paint again five gallon pails are a lot less expensive I did have a need is a little extra I end up going through about six gallons and something I do you probably notice the yellow dots and I put a yellow dot on there this is the same paint I used to paint my honey supers last year so that's why they're both yellow if you watch that other video I just do that for record-keeping I'll take a still photograph of this and I print it and put it in one of my records books I also keep that on the computer I'm right on here where I bought it what I paid for it and then you know I can keep an eye on them in the bee yard to see how they stand up and I'm actually fine and believe it or not some of the parts the primer paint does pretty well now the labor you know I kept track of everything cutting to lengths ripping the rotor work cleaning up the shop assembling them putting the handles on moving the both side painting them I actually came up with about thirteen and a half hours and I I I think I kept pretty close on that so it is a bit of work but this one hundred boxes here so you divide that out by hundred I mean then you have to pay yourself whatever you want to pay yourself but for me for me to buy on a sample box in South in Ontario and then get them shipped up here and then I still have to put them together and glue and screw them together and then paint them this is a fraction of the cost and it's fun so you'll have to decide I mean if you only need a few well probably want to buy them but if you need more than a few it's good fun anyway um I guess we'll leave it at that so thanks for watching and as always you be good to your bees and I'm sure they'll be good you see you next time you
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hello Scottie here Wenlock myself another load of pine to build some brood boxes for these colonies I'm working on I'm not sure how much of this pile I'm gonna eat up but I decide to show you what I'm starting with I'm not sure how many to make I might shoot for a hundred so we'll see how far I get so let's go make some sawdust to make some noise all right so I'm topping the boards to length first and then I'm going to rip them the way I chop into lengths I've got blocks set up here against the stopper the 19 and 1/8 and currently I'm using 16 5/8 I like to cut them to length first and then rip them to width a piece that comes off when you rip them is about an inch and a half I could have run the boards through the table saw and ripped off the inch and a half off of one side and then cut them to length I've worked just fine except when you've got knots like this on the edge now this board was actually pretty good it only has the one knot that was bad but of course when I rip the inch and a half off I have a perfect board a problem comes in if you rip the inch and a half off and you've got a knot on this side and maybe further down the board you've got a knot on the opposite side and if you've already taken the inch and a half off well now you've got a problem with that knot down there by cutting it to length first you have the option of ripping a chunk off this side or off this side so you just end up with a lot more usable material so not a lot to this you put your blocks and make sure there's no sawdust in the way of course dust collector Beyond and have my headphones on normally but once it's fight against there and tight against the fence and a little pieces are left over then that goes into my wife's birdhouse collection so that's all there's that I got a couple more boards the caisson see I have most of it cut but a couple more to do and then we'll get on to ripping them to width so stick around okay so the ripping them twist not a lot to show you the table saw is set up to 9 and 5/8 and then you just pick the worst side just had a little wee bit of a burr there and you just cut that off and you're good the pieces that come off I might not use that one because I've got lots to choose from but the better pieces will get attached there to be my handle and then the sixteen and five-eighths and of course there's the other ones are 19 and 1/8 I'll save this better stuff and I could also use that to make inner covers so all I do is I just take my board to have a look at it you can see this one's got a bad spot there so that's the side I cut off if if the board looks good on both sides well you just cut one off and Kerry are not much to that I got a probably another hour or so here I got some more piled up around the back over there so I am making a hundred like I said so there's a lot of pieces to cut but that's still a miserable day outside so nothing better to do so I'll get that done we'll get onto some row to work and we'll make some more sawdust and some more noise so stick around well I wasn't bad it took me about an hour and a half I have all the pieces now ripped to their proper width I've got more than enough material for handles and many inner covers I'll sort through it you know some of these pieces aren't going to be any good firewood but a lot of this stuff is excellent material yet so we'll go get the water table set up now and we'll start making our end joints and the frame rest so stick around oK we've got all our pieces ripped to wist now and it's time to do the road work to create the corner joints probably seen me do this before I got a couple of shims that are 3/8 take the guard off and I would put put my straightedge on top of the blade with the two pieces of 3/8 under each end and then adjust the height of the blade to three okay then I simply take a couple of scraps of 3/4 put up against the tent put the straightedge up against there same thing move the fence back and forth until I've got the the depths or the yeah I guess that's the depth of my cuts going to be 3/4 of an inch so I'm going to make a data joint down the side of the N bars that's 3/8 by 3/4 and that'll make my my corner joints so all I need to do at this point is grab my earphone start machine turn the desk electron [Music] [Applause] [Music] then I would grab one of my 3/8 pieces and put on here and I just feel that to make sure that that cut is 3hd and the other way is 3/4 I do the same thing I put a straight edge on there and that's going to make our props gonna make a quarter joint of our our brood box so that's all there is to that oh very quickly do one [Music] and then I usually I usually like just to recheck the first one just to make sure that's good the other end feels good I have a 3/4 inch strap here then just put it in there check that yeah I'm pretty happy with that so I only got a couple hundred pieces to do so give me a few minutes I'll get size done and then we'll come and do the frame rest so stick around [Music] alright so there's the last of the corner joints done and that took me just over an hour 60 63 minutes so now we need two loops we need to unplug the machine and we're just going to make the adjustment so that we can now make the frame rest all I need to do there is loosen this off I use a bullet for people refer to the way I need my two five eight blocks five eighths so the height the height of the bit doesn't change at all but the depth of the fence is going to change to 5/8 so we rotate that blade around so it's stick it out we bring the whole unit forward and then we push it back slowly with a straight edge on there and then we try now I got a still shot of this as well get that spare set those out of the way we're going to put the guard back on and plug this back in Oh [Music] then all we need to do is check it this way to make sure that the cut is 5/8 down and like I say the 3/8 doesn't change look pretty good there something else I do in obviously I'm doing quite a number I keep this handy and maybe every 15 or 20 or so I do check just to make sure that that bit hasn't moved that looks good and there's our 5/8 so that's like say that's going to be our frame rest now I will get these all done and then we'll get on to assembling so we could do a couple and then we'll shut the camera off save some battery [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] my father-in-law always says when you're doing a big job and you get to the last one there's the one we were looking for last one done that took me about 40 minutes so the easy stuff is done now now time to assemble not tonight see you next time all right so it's time to assemble these brood boxes we're working on if you've watched some of my other videos you've probably seen me use this jig but if not I'll explain it just to check the steel plate and I got two pieces of steel plate welded they're 90 degrees to the plate and they're 90 degrees to each other with a couple braces down on the other two sides I've got two six-inch C clamps that I cut in half and welded them down and then I weld a little piece of plate to the foot and everything is square with each other and it's made to fit a standard Lance trough box I use it for my honey supers my ventilation boxes and of course what I originally built it for was putting brood boxes together so all I do is I grab a couple of my ends and I very quickly you know just have a look at them check the milling work make sure that there's no big burrs grab my trusty Titebond three lay a bead down the the two ends of each board so the four ends then I just stand the first one in there just temporary and I grab my sides and I always look at the sides and they almost always have a little wee bit of a cup to them put the cup out because you can pull it in with a clamp so I just stand that in there now I'm just putting nut a corner together let's put that in there that's up against the two pieces of plate then I grab the next one same things check the cup I'll put that up against the clamp on this side and I put it into this corner and I leave that end out a little wee bit just make it easier to put this the other end in just slide that down between the clamp in the end then I pull these two in a little bit and look at it then I just snug up the clamps I don't actually get try and go too tight because this plate wasn't heavy enough I'm gonna and have to build a new one please and at the same time maybe I'll get around to putting the legs on it but I just snug them up just to hold them and that gets everything square and just holds everything in place then I just check all these stalks and these two here a little bit just top side down a little bit that's good that's pretty good now you can't see it from the camera angle but because these two side boards are bowed out a little bit on the inside right in this area both ends there's just a little bit of a gap so I just grabbed my background and I'm going to put four screws in the end so I put the clamp right in the center and just give that a squeeze and I see a little bit of glue come out of there I just recheck these let's get to my microphone then a few pilot holes just to prevent the screws from splitting the wood and I start them down maybe or maybe three-quarters of an inch and I'm trying to get in the middle of this boards what I'm trying to do so I just drill for the holes here bottom one about an inch or so or 3/4 an inch from the bottom same at the top then grab four screws these are number eight by inch and a half wood screws they're Robinson's so it's the number two or the red Robinson I have one in a driver you do have to careful with these drivers you if you overdo it you'll sink the screw rate out of sight kind of defeats the purpose but a little bit of practice grab a few more screws [Music] then is that other side is also out I just bring my bar clamp around do the same thing here read about the center and then just it takes so little to pull that in then again like I'd like to set the drill on my hand and then you know you can hang on to the box and it just makes it so much faster cut this half a little little low on this side but doesn't really match the positioning is [Music] that clamp was a little bit going after you do a hundred of them you get it back all there is so that loosen off the clamp there's one gun only 99 to go so let's have some fun [Music] [Music] [Music] and there we are with a magic of video editing the one we've been looking for number 100 I was keeping track of my time with my little kitchen clock and I've been obviously I didn't do it all at once I stopped a couple of times had a couple of the chores I had to do but I was writing it all down about five and a half hours but it took couple changes I made trying to find faster ways to do it I stopped drilling the pilot holes for the two Center ones because it's really the top and the bottom ones but the other thing I've been doing is I just grabbed a frame just to drop in I had some problems with some boxes I made a year or so ago that they were a little tight so this time I was thinking ahead I've checked them I think I got four that I'm going to have to make a couple of adjustments on but anyway that's that for assembling boxes I'll get some handles on these next but not today so see you next time all right so today I'm going to try and get the handles put onto my brood boxes to do that I have a little stand sitting here that gets the height work up to a bit more comfortable height then I have a little oh and I always grab the box I always feel for the frame rest so I know I've got the boxes all the same just something to do like a little jig made up says brood box handles little stopper on the back and all I do is I just sit it on there bring that block over then I put my thumb's on it to hold it and then like my four fingers I just checked to make sure that's straight all that's doing is getting the handles also the same height and to get them straight not that's all then I just take a bead of glue and I just laid in behind this just a long an inch or so down my handles are about an inch and a half and these are all the scraps that I cut off so I just grab them look at it and I just carefully lay it on top of that glue and then what I do is I I use my four fingers to check that and my thumb to kind of hold that in place then I grab my air nailer and I you I just I just put two two air nails in the ends just to hold it because it wants to move around on that glue then I take a couple screws I did get some shorter screws for this job these are number eight by inch and a quarter and I just come back a few inches that way I don't have to worry about its splitting this if you put it out near the end of course it wants to split and I went with the shorter ones I was using H and a half before but two pieces of three-quarter-inch pine an inch and a half one if it sticks through it's really hard to scrape and clean up the box so the inch and a quarter ones these drivers if it puts it down a little bit too deep it doesn't matter now one other feature my little stand here and has groove in the center that's perfect because now when I flip it over that handle goes down in there and at 8'o the boss wants to sit level so again I just grab my glue I grab my jig I put the jig on I square it top I lay a bead of glue I grab a handles have a quick look at it I position it on there I feel a seal this top edge and with my thumb I'm holding it tight I have my nailer pop a couple nails in temporary then I grab a couple screws and that is all there is putting handles on spots $1.99 to go so let's have some fun with trying to be done today there we have it once again with the magic of video editing there's the last one a little over two hours two hours ten minutes I guess a few interruptions this afternoon but they're all done so now we'll just wait for a nice sunny day and we'll get them outside get them painted so see you next time all right so today is finally painting day I have all hundred boxes out here these metal racks for something that my wife and I used to use to grow plants on the cue plants up off the ground but we don't use this greenhouse anymore obviously but it makes a great painting location so I just spread the boxes out and I put the boxes kind of corner to corner I don't know if the camera will see that or not when you're painting you want to try and keep your gun at 90 degrees and I have the Box this way I got to try and turn and it's just awkward to do plus by putting them corner to corner I can put more boxes closer together so all I do is I try and paint this top edge and the face and I'll do you know this side I'll go round round round then this afternoon I'm going to flip them over and I'll do it again so I end up with one coat of paint on the top one coat of paint on the bottom and usually two coats on the side I've got one these Waggoner electric sprayers I'll put the model number and the thing so all I do is just and I'll just work my way down the line we'll keep track of my time see how long it takes so let's just have a little bit of fun [Music] [Laughter] [Music] I [Music] [Music] there we are done so I'll let this dry now for about ho three hours four hours to see what the weather is like after lunch I'll flip them all over and I'll paint second coat but I'm not going to waste my time filming that I love this gun I will tell you after how long was it almost an hour after now we're like gun gets heavy yeah looks like I've used about half that pale but that should work out just about fine so yeah how good I flipped over I'll paint the other side and then we'll get back in the shop and I'll have some final thoughts on this little project so see you in a bit all right so we've got all our boxes painted back inside the shop I thought I would just share a little bit of the numbers of what it actually took the build these I don't actually think there's any point getting into the cost because wherever you live I mean your your cost of wood and screws and glue whatnot paint I'm sure it's going to be different I'll share with you the amount of material I use and then you can just you know substitute your prices and you can decide whether or not you want to do the work of making your own and it is good fun I I prefer to build my own the wood that I get I think I mentioned before it's second so there is a fair bit of waste involved there were various lengths here there were 16 footers twelve footers 14 footers but doesn't matter I kept track of them all and I added it all up I had 776 linear feet and these are 11 and a quarter so I did have to rip them down so there's some waste there and then where the large knots whatnot where there was waste so you know if you're buying grade-a material then it's easy you just figure out you know 2 times 16 and 5 8 2 times was at 19 and 1/8 buy as many boxes as you want to build and if you're buying grade-a material you just buy that amount I'll be a little extra if it is seconds well you know it may have more or less waste than with my hat so the mind worked out 700 seventy-six linear feet of this material indicate his seconds for me it's pretty pretty cheap screws I used actually 2,000 screws to do this I buy them in a box of 6500 those are for here where I am the ninety three bucks so penny but one and a half cents is what that works out to but again wherever you are buy them in the biggest box you can get them they don't go bad and it's way better price the glue I buy in a gallon jug and then I just keep refilling that little squeeze bottle and I'm going to probably book to squeeze bottles the paint again five gallon pails are a lot less expensive I did have a need is a little extra I end up going through about six gallons and something I do you probably notice the yellow dots and I put a yellow dot on there this is the same paint I used to paint my honey supers last year so that's why they're both yellow if you watch that other video I just do that for record-keeping I'll take a still photograph of this and I print it and put it in one of my records books I also keep that on the computer I'm right on here where I bought it what I paid for it and then you know I can keep an eye on them in the bee yard to see how they stand up and I'm actually fine and believe it or not some of the parts the primer paint does pretty well now the labor you know I kept track of everything cutting to lengths ripping the rotor work cleaning up the shop assembling them putting the handles on moving the both side painting them I actually came up with about thirteen and a half hours and I I I think I kept pretty close on that so it is a bit of work but this one hundred boxes here so you divide that out by hundred I mean then you have to pay yourself whatever you want to pay yourself but for me for me to buy on a sample box in South in Ontario and then get them shipped up here and then I still have to put them together and glue and screw them together and then paint them this is a fraction of the cost and it's fun so you'll have to decide I mean if you only need a few well probably want to buy them but if you need more than a few it's good fun anyway um I guess we'll leave it at that so thanks for watching and as always you be good to your bees and I'm sure they'll be good you see you next time you
 
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How to Make a Honey Bee Box (with videos)

Hunter posted the article • 0 comments • 113 views • 2017-09-18 02:24 • came from similar tags

How to Make a Honey Bee Box (with videos) part 1
 
 

part 2
 

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Good morning guys is Cindy and as promised yesterday we're going to be Stan to put together this national behave now it's a flat pack you love to see Wayne and Caitlyn in the background yeah it's a great little project you can do the kids like sit down a minute then okay right so it's a flat pack and we're just gonna have a quick look what we've got in there and and then Wheeler will go and Starkel this with the process of building it now these year okay are the frames okay and it's three packs of 30 frames there's one for the super sorry one for the blue box and two for the supers okay and so I'm going to stick them over here a moment okay the next thing we have in you guys this two packs there of foundation for the supers and one pack for the blue box okay now this did come in two boxes but I've just stuck it all on one box of spring down now we have a queen excluder now you may note this with this one it's a timber-framed queen excluder and it's got a rolled bar mesh in here which will stop the queen from getting up into the supers and stop it from laying brood and things up there now and there are lots of different types available and it is like a slotted cut mesh steel mesh one and and I have here that they've got the habit of taking the wings off the bees and things like that so um so we won't be using one of those okay right now in the box this is a gabled is a gable roof hi okay guys so when we're going to be building it from that and as you can see in the box there's the two Gabe ends for the roof we got various components here and they're all numbered as you can see here that is a number 14 and that will correspond with the set of instructions that I've got now this hive came from Cadden hives okay and it's quite a good little detailed instructions of how to set it up so what I'm going to do I'm going to pull out these pieces stick them up the weight right next now we've got all the pins and screws and things that we require and a couple of little sort of vent right this is your top board okay and they've got some poor to be escapes in them and what-have-you the next bit we have this is the mesh floor of a row a mesh floor which will which will allow the verall mates to fall through but not come back up okay now we have some bigger parts now and this is from the blue box okay and this is what we'll be using sorry this one is the super and we'll be using these to put this is a cedar hive and everything is all made of cedar so we'll put these together as and when and each one is numbered as you can see on that one that is number 16 okay some metal runners here okay and a lot more pieces which will require this is the floor I gain more pieces so as you can see guys there is loads and loads and loads of pieces and this one is the and the body for the brood and as you can see it's much deeper than the than the supers it's a bit overcast today so I'm not sure if I'm going to get to do all of this today because it depends on the rain the next thing in here that's the top crown board and and a couple of other bits which I'll find out what they are for later on and we also have excuse me wing watch your fingers two roofs see that again a lot of hives have a play roof but these are made out of C decks it's a good quality high and they've already got a galvanized sort of tin roof which will keep the rain out so we're and that's how they're going to go together on top of the hive so that's all the components and what we're going to do we may do this in a couple of videos and I'm not sure yet but we may do this in a couple of videos and I'm going to break it down so we're going to do a section on the brood box a section putting together a super and they're going to be pretty much the same and and then we'll do a frame section and the roof and everything else um we'll see what it goes so I don't know how many parts this videos going to be it may be too party maybe three maybe four I'm not sure yet okay and from looking at the instructions it says that it's going to take few hours to build so and again it depends on whether the rain holds out so it'll depend on many parts we make it up of anyway let's get on with it okay guys so a great pass here we've got a two front and back the two sides and the rails for the for the brood box okay so what it says on here it just says that 14 is across the bottom 13 is across the top okay so the numbered obviously we need to ensure that they can go in I've put some glue on the insides of these using gorilla glue okay it's a PVA glue and all I'm going to do now is just put some on the on the legs as well just to make sure we've got a really good really good bond and it's just a case of just fitting these together it's a nice tight joint there we go anything that squeezes out we will rub over with some with some a damp cloth and and then we can wipe off any excess glue so that was number 13 number 14 it's got a sham fur on it you'll see here is slight chamfer and that's designed to shed the water away from the side of the from the side of the thing so I'm just going to put some glue on this one and then this one will get put in as well the same as the other I'm just using an old pink brush to - to do this because I haven't got a glue brush the joints are very tight and maybe worth giving a little tap and then they are very tight joint scale what keepin ya know right just damp cloth just wipe off any excess glue I'll just save on the cleanup later on just give a little more tap okay so we got the same thing now on this side so I'll just move these up to the weight so the number fourteen if anything I will say about the about these joints they have made them really really tight so you've got a you're going to have to tap them in but like I said you know you you do what you can so now we just want to get this one in started maybe a good idea just to have something to protect this would but I am bothered just wipe off any excess glue okay so you're number 13 year now and that's all it is guys it's like a big jigsaw puzzle and it takes a bit of time to to get it to work but so just spread that glue across there and all we need to do now is get this one in oh baby yeah I understand that laughs no problem right go to the blue a minimun okay so we've just given it a bit of a cleanup now and before we put the others in now we need to sit in both of these sides just make sure it's well seated a fact that one is for that side because I want the numbers facing inwards because we don't want to see them okay think I simp and the same thing with this one they lit up the way the camera babe if you have to just give a little tap just to make sure they fully seated and now we need to get some glue on these ones and this is where it's going to be a bit of a handful is getting all four these in on the next one provoke little cross these which I should have done on outside in fact I think I will go take it out just gonna put a bit of glue in there I know you shouldn't really glue across the grain but the movement on this is going to be nothing so that one's in right tight so I going to leave him okay so now we want to put the top on I'm sorry if you can't see through the cameras I don't help but Caitlin running around yeah okay so we just need to clean that up all right so there we have it at the moment though it's not looking too square we have to unlock what's going on it or at least bang on screen oh just 25 and a half okay so once we've done that track a square position the rails and skew will blacken pins so we need two rails thanks babe go another flower off click net okay so which way they go I'm assuming like that is it yeah that's how they go wait so I'm going to secure these now with GIMP pens black and pins and we're away so we go for them thanks babe right give me a sign right let me get on with this I mean I won all right thanks love love you love you bye so there's one rail then one more this side and we are good to go on this blue box thanks babe top right click on play for $5.00 let me just get on with the sorrows for everybody so two more nails I win this guy's and we should have ourselves a nice strong brood box ready for our frames there you go nice strong blue box chamfered sides as you can see so I'll shred the ring I'm not sure whether we're going to paint them or what and I don't know yet but but that's the first one done guys the I don't know if you can see here the reason this is lifted up like that is when you sit your frame there and leave a little space underneath so when you put your frames back in you're not actually squashing Beezer today okay so you can put it back in and I'll keep a little B space underneath there alright so that's the first that's the first blue box then now the the supers are exactly the same to build so I'm not going to bother filling them it's just a repeat of these but just slightly smaller shallower box so I'm going to get them built and I'll come back to bye okay guys so as you can see the the three boxes no we're done we got the brood at the bottom and then we got to UM supers here so they've got the metal runners on them and everything and the next and square so so that's all good and what we need to do now we need to get on to building the floor and the roof and then once we've done that all we've got to do anyth build 30 frames up I haven't seen no difficult they are yet but but we'll get on them but the next step there will be the gabled roof okay so all I've done here now have collected some of the parts and what we need to do this is our gabled end here for a gable roof um got some flat out pieces here we just need to UM tack in some long nails into them I'm not sure if I'm going to get these in the right places all so bill misse-x that's not quite right more like they donate them maybe half so we need to put one down the bottom now as well there we go so we're nice and tight there but a glue now on the next one and go from there no the ones then we can turn it upside down will be easier to nail these things are quite will be winner when they get going okay so bit more glue and this is just part for the gabled roof and it's just building me up the frame the moments try not to bend the nails up like I just did babe don't stand in front of the cameras alright yeah again you just stand by there be quiet for me while I do this all right and then one more there we are so that's a nice strong frame okay so we know where we've got it to this sort of stage now the next thing afterwards now we've got to put these little things around now we're saying 25 mil up so I go to mark 25 mil on I'm assuming they're on about 25 mil from the bottom so I'm going to get a tape measure I'm going to mark a couple of so 25 mil is there it's about one inch okay I've got many long ones I'm going to have to use these ones and just two in each of these whoops no one saw that okay so give you four of them anyway all right and they go right around so we need to do another 25 mil up guys you're learning up to do this the same as I am because there'll be beekeepers out there probably laughing at me the way I'm doing this because they can probably make these with their eyes shut but it's all it new to me and I'm just doing what I can and the good thing is um we don't market ouble the good thing is like I said I haven't paid someone else to make it you know the the ex wolf it'll come as a flat-pack but you know I've played together myself when I could have paid someone into doing it this cedar by the way is quite hard using nails and sometimes I hitting a knot or something the loop it's wanting to bend so you go be quite careful with it is that okay now because of the slant on you it's going to be a bit harder I think what I'm going to do I'm going to use the laser clamp guys just to hold it there for me if I put a couple of clamps on the end just all lit up just to make life a bit easier because it's because these are on a sham fo here so one it's a bit hard to to nail on that because it wants to make it loose but what we're going to do we're going to just clamp it in to that so that makes it nice and tight which what should we've trimmed them down slightly and I can just place them there and get some nails and hopefully this won't move now when I'm putting these nails in excellent the same on this side so this table saw sleds come in quite handy today and like I said this is just a framework for this together it does say that this should take an hour to make but I can't understand why you would take someone so long if it's only this put a bit of sheeting on it and every now and then a it or not I'm not pulling a load I'm just trying to straighten it up okay just have a check of that that way excellent you can have that sitting either way guys I'd be a venire sitting this way but I'm happy with that okay so next thing is this let's see if we can get this right this time ask better what I'm going to do I'm assuming that slides right up there I may be wrong in this but we'll soon find out looks I'll get the other one is well in check right so that's more or less 50/50 on it we'll have a look at what we're going to do do you know what this can be a pain sometimes guys right I'm happy with that okay so now what does the instructions say instructions say to nail right through the roof and one two three four says two with these I think these are not very confident on where these are going to go power locks odds lon blow me up in and we've missed that okay oh right el faro we know it let's get okay and to write a bit okay look I don't know babe I don't know long I'm going to be okay so now we just got this two effects okay ladies don't get up today babe they're not supposed to yeah right with all we've got left now guys it's just the wasp traps front I'm going to do that that one is yeah this one's still on me so let Dad finish your circ hmm we're going to use these little gold pins for it okay okay so that's the first wasp trap put on and we just need to do the other side now kaylynn can you stop making noises love and trying to film no I'm trying to film stop reggae so that's um that's it on the roof I'm not going to bother pls plastic coating off it because um I think it'll just help with with shading and there we are and quite happy with that right gay so we've got the brood the two supers and the roof dint we just got a floor left but that's going to be in the next episode along with the frames and everything else thanks for watching and I'll see you in the next episode bye you
 

okay so in part one you saw us make all the bodies of the brood box and of the supers and within the roof today we're going to be doing the the base for this and we're going to make some frames as well which will go in and put a foundation in that frame you you you okay so we've got the parts your four and up here for the for the base okay and this is where the entrance for the bees are going to be and the varroa mesh and things like that okay there's a solid flaw in this but we can remove it if we want to select a polyp tree like an inspection tree for the varroa mites and things ok so when what we're going to do we're going to wear get some of these together and and then once we know what's what will await so first thing I need to do is get some glue but yeah and I need to get a brush bring me one second guys so what we want to do now is get some glue over this and we just need to slot these pieces together nice and tight leave me huh nice fix it these pieces actually fit a little better than the last lot so we will give a clean out in a moment go a bit of okay have it mmm I'm just filming the base okay do da booty I'm just going to put a nail down in each of these love you see you later all right all right thanks but ok so let's just give that a little wipe off clean up any overrun let the blue it's always easier to do it now then later on guys now last Monday I went to my b course and my instructor give me a shout he said come on let's go we're going to get lost warm today and as i can imagine i thought wow you know I'm you know I'm happy to do that unfortunately the swarm was in was in a chimney of a house and it was just no way we were going to get up there you get it and everything else without causing any sort of damage so um so obviously I didn't have that but like I said you know it's still early days we will get it eventually and there's no rush like I said this will be finished know today and and then once this is finished we are ready to take these now I have another lesson tonight at six o clock so we will see what happens then I'm not I'm not rushing to try and get it you know get it sorted but we'll see what happens right what I'm going to do now I'm just going to put a nail down through here just all these pins these wings together nice and tight there we go it's nice and square okay so next things next we now we need to slide in our mesh and I believe that goes in like this maybe huh consequently i'm not going to I am NOT gonna nail that guy's I'm just gonna leave us set i think but i'll probably have people tell me I should have nailed it so it doesn't say to win the instructions but I think it's a good idea not to let nail it so that you're able to so you're able to remove it if you need to I think if I nail apt it's going to be a problem removing it and then the last thing we need is this and this is our board which will it's like our inspection tray now here we are and I saw a tray put together guys we now have our entrance and as you can see here there's a big slot cut out you and a very small one here and this is like your summer entrance okay and this is your winter one obviously helps or keeping down um you know the amount of coal gaming and rain and things like that getting into the hive but also and it makes it easier when the when the swarm isn't so beigel when the hive isn't so big and doesn't have so many members it makes it easier for them to defend as well against mobbing bees and things like that so when that just sits there so that's the base tree put together guys didn't take long so all nice and done so the square and so all we have to do now like i said is put that they're not only we're gonna get the rest of hive together so we just got a few frames no to build I'm just going to do a quick video one of them so when yes it's been a bit of an interesting couple of weeks now I've got a couple of frames here and I have made some up already but what I found was that this hive I had ten frames and these are the Hoffman frames and I had 10 for the super isn't for the for the brood and unfortunately this one takes 12 well time for jaundice it's not an issue and we'll just get a couple more but I have ordered a feeding tray so Tina's put these in a bag and bent them up a little bit soon after and it's got warm so okay that's fine so I've got two left here that I gotta make up and then so what all we've got on here guys is I don't know if you're making this out but this is the one of the sort of top rails and and there's a piece here we have to break off but before I do that I just need one gaming knife build me one second ginger and all we have to do is push down on it like this spend it back and it will snap out and what it does it gives you this little section it clears that middle out there okay and there is a little cleaner than it needs is needed and these looked quite daunting when they came and then show you the bag actually and you open it and it's just tons and tons of pieces in it I don't know if you can see this guy's but they are just loads and loads of pieces and when you first get them the real it's quite daunting when you open all these pieces fall out but I've been surprised they're very easy to put together but it's quite monotonous so again now we just need to file down this little lip that's left from where it's been snapped out to the other piece because it's not required and I gotta say guys I have really enjoyed building this and thank you for all of us commented on the first part because there's been a few people saying or maybe I shouldn't have nailed through the metal and Suffolk up but it was all in the instructions so I'm following them verbatim because I've never built one of these before and it may turn out to be wrong and you know but then that's what we have now these hoffman's and they self spacing because they've got the this cut out so we don't need like a slated separators and things like that in there so the first thing we're going to it's just push them together like that okay and I'm not going to glue these guys traditional something probably would glue them but I don't see a major issue in it ok the next thing we need is some wax like I said this one has been bent a little now on the bottom of the wax I don't know if you can make it out there's some wires sticking out this a wide wide foundation okay and that just needs to bend so what I'm going to do I'm going to turn this around and I'm actually gonna clamp it down just to make life easy for myself excuse me angel now i'm not sure what sort of view you're going to gather this with a camera so if you're not going a great shot I do apologize I will double check it now in a moment so not ideal having these sticking up but just be mindful that they're there ok so we're what we do we'll slide we can put one in actually in the top make life easier you get these little thin sticks and they just literally slide in the top and you just nail it into place let's give it a tap if it needs it get me up there we go right now we've got some thinner tax yer for those one thing i will say guys I'm a bit that was a bit disappointed in getting these frames that you know I had a good price for them but they never came with any tax you had to go out and buy them separately and I thought it was a bit a bit naughty like you know cuz you expect to put these things together and all of a sudden you can't so it's just one in each there we go and I know we can slide our foundation down yeah Tina unfortunately put these into the bag in the shed it got a bit hot in it so they've they've studied to not melt but take shape of whatever they were sat on but it's not a problem with me when we get these in now so we'll take the one now okay the one piece of timber know that week at out and that what we've done here we've bent over the tabs so that we can nail them down okay and we literally just put that in it trapping the the wax and we're getting some tax I tend to put three in send another warm day today now and I've been having a bit of an eight-minute the plot in fact I've been having a lot of a nightmare to plot and there'll be more about that in the next episode unfortunately it's caused me a few issues and I have lost some produce because of it but steps are being taken so that it never happens to me again because I was not happy person when it happened okay just get this within maybe up couple more taxing in out and there's another frame gun so they don't take longer just a bit monotonous these 30 is easy to do don't know why that doesn't want to stay on it today and I won't speak right the rabbit gate is a frame with your wax so now we're going to have a look so now we're going to have a look at how it all goes together this guy's is our frame now this is a too high frame okay it's what we're going to be using it's got folding legs so if we want to ever put it back and it's got a landing boards here okay so this is the frame we're actually using a little both of our hives all right now the next thing that we need is the basic we've just made and that it's just going to sit there with our without entrance then we have behave itself this is the blue box like I said we've only got 10 in it at the moment and we will sort out the rest again maybe now after that and we can just put the lid on to start with but as things get going as we already explained about this before this is a queen excluder and this is got roll bars so it doesn't actually hurt the bees okay so that's the next thing which would go on and then after that then we have our soup as their empty simplest at the moment guys okay but um I just gotta build the just gotta build the frames to go win Emperor just showing you for the just for the sake array so it's to supers and then we have this is the crown board and it's got too poor to be escapes in it okay so that's on the top and then we have our lid or roof for whatever you want to call it so there it is guys I'm just going to scroll you down so you can see better and and that's basically I was going to work we're going to build another one of these days which will sit on the other side and hopefully the good thing about this is we're able to put a strap up over the top to stop it from being blown over and knocked over by somebody so hopefully you guys have enjoyed this two parties hey Liv and you guys have enjoyed this two-part series and of how we made these and took long enough okay um but yeah it's a you know it's a good little build it it was some it was easy enough to build bit time consuming but like anything else you know us that's what you have to do and so hopefully now we can get a swarm pretty quick and get him in there and start producing some honey this year anyway guys that's it for this episode I will see you in the next one hope you have a great day for me I'm from angel bye you view all
How to Make a Honey Bee Box (with videos) part 1
 
 


part 2
 


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Good morning guys is Cindy and as promised yesterday we're going to be Stan to put together this national behave now it's a flat pack you love to see Wayne and Caitlyn in the background yeah it's a great little project you can do the kids like sit down a minute then okay right so it's a flat pack and we're just gonna have a quick look what we've got in there and and then Wheeler will go and Starkel this with the process of building it now these year okay are the frames okay and it's three packs of 30 frames there's one for the super sorry one for the blue box and two for the supers okay and so I'm going to stick them over here a moment okay the next thing we have in you guys this two packs there of foundation for the supers and one pack for the blue box okay now this did come in two boxes but I've just stuck it all on one box of spring down now we have a queen excluder now you may note this with this one it's a timber-framed queen excluder and it's got a rolled bar mesh in here which will stop the queen from getting up into the supers and stop it from laying brood and things up there now and there are lots of different types available and it is like a slotted cut mesh steel mesh one and and I have here that they've got the habit of taking the wings off the bees and things like that so um so we won't be using one of those okay right now in the box this is a gabled is a gable roof hi okay guys so when we're going to be building it from that and as you can see in the box there's the two Gabe ends for the roof we got various components here and they're all numbered as you can see here that is a number 14 and that will correspond with the set of instructions that I've got now this hive came from Cadden hives okay and it's quite a good little detailed instructions of how to set it up so what I'm going to do I'm going to pull out these pieces stick them up the weight right next now we've got all the pins and screws and things that we require and a couple of little sort of vent right this is your top board okay and they've got some poor to be escapes in them and what-have-you the next bit we have this is the mesh floor of a row a mesh floor which will which will allow the verall mates to fall through but not come back up okay now we have some bigger parts now and this is from the blue box okay and this is what we'll be using sorry this one is the super and we'll be using these to put this is a cedar hive and everything is all made of cedar so we'll put these together as and when and each one is numbered as you can see on that one that is number 16 okay some metal runners here okay and a lot more pieces which will require this is the floor I gain more pieces so as you can see guys there is loads and loads and loads of pieces and this one is the and the body for the brood and as you can see it's much deeper than the than the supers it's a bit overcast today so I'm not sure if I'm going to get to do all of this today because it depends on the rain the next thing in here that's the top crown board and and a couple of other bits which I'll find out what they are for later on and we also have excuse me wing watch your fingers two roofs see that again a lot of hives have a play roof but these are made out of C decks it's a good quality high and they've already got a galvanized sort of tin roof which will keep the rain out so we're and that's how they're going to go together on top of the hive so that's all the components and what we're going to do we may do this in a couple of videos and I'm not sure yet but we may do this in a couple of videos and I'm going to break it down so we're going to do a section on the brood box a section putting together a super and they're going to be pretty much the same and and then we'll do a frame section and the roof and everything else um we'll see what it goes so I don't know how many parts this videos going to be it may be too party maybe three maybe four I'm not sure yet okay and from looking at the instructions it says that it's going to take few hours to build so and again it depends on whether the rain holds out so it'll depend on many parts we make it up of anyway let's get on with it okay guys so a great pass here we've got a two front and back the two sides and the rails for the for the brood box okay so what it says on here it just says that 14 is across the bottom 13 is across the top okay so the numbered obviously we need to ensure that they can go in I've put some glue on the insides of these using gorilla glue okay it's a PVA glue and all I'm going to do now is just put some on the on the legs as well just to make sure we've got a really good really good bond and it's just a case of just fitting these together it's a nice tight joint there we go anything that squeezes out we will rub over with some with some a damp cloth and and then we can wipe off any excess glue so that was number 13 number 14 it's got a sham fur on it you'll see here is slight chamfer and that's designed to shed the water away from the side of the from the side of the thing so I'm just going to put some glue on this one and then this one will get put in as well the same as the other I'm just using an old pink brush to - to do this because I haven't got a glue brush the joints are very tight and maybe worth giving a little tap and then they are very tight joint scale what keepin ya know right just damp cloth just wipe off any excess glue I'll just save on the cleanup later on just give a little more tap okay so we got the same thing now on this side so I'll just move these up to the weight so the number fourteen if anything I will say about the about these joints they have made them really really tight so you've got a you're going to have to tap them in but like I said you know you you do what you can so now we just want to get this one in started maybe a good idea just to have something to protect this would but I am bothered just wipe off any excess glue okay so you're number 13 year now and that's all it is guys it's like a big jigsaw puzzle and it takes a bit of time to to get it to work but so just spread that glue across there and all we need to do now is get this one in oh baby yeah I understand that laughs no problem right go to the blue a minimun okay so we've just given it a bit of a cleanup now and before we put the others in now we need to sit in both of these sides just make sure it's well seated a fact that one is for that side because I want the numbers facing inwards because we don't want to see them okay think I simp and the same thing with this one they lit up the way the camera babe if you have to just give a little tap just to make sure they fully seated and now we need to get some glue on these ones and this is where it's going to be a bit of a handful is getting all four these in on the next one provoke little cross these which I should have done on outside in fact I think I will go take it out just gonna put a bit of glue in there I know you shouldn't really glue across the grain but the movement on this is going to be nothing so that one's in right tight so I going to leave him okay so now we want to put the top on I'm sorry if you can't see through the cameras I don't help but Caitlin running around yeah okay so we just need to clean that up all right so there we have it at the moment though it's not looking too square we have to unlock what's going on it or at least bang on screen oh just 25 and a half okay so once we've done that track a square position the rails and skew will blacken pins so we need two rails thanks babe go another flower off click net okay so which way they go I'm assuming like that is it yeah that's how they go wait so I'm going to secure these now with GIMP pens black and pins and we're away so we go for them thanks babe right give me a sign right let me get on with this I mean I won all right thanks love love you love you bye so there's one rail then one more this side and we are good to go on this blue box thanks babe top right click on play for $5.00 let me just get on with the sorrows for everybody so two more nails I win this guy's and we should have ourselves a nice strong brood box ready for our frames there you go nice strong blue box chamfered sides as you can see so I'll shred the ring I'm not sure whether we're going to paint them or what and I don't know yet but but that's the first one done guys the I don't know if you can see here the reason this is lifted up like that is when you sit your frame there and leave a little space underneath so when you put your frames back in you're not actually squashing Beezer today okay so you can put it back in and I'll keep a little B space underneath there alright so that's the first that's the first blue box then now the the supers are exactly the same to build so I'm not going to bother filling them it's just a repeat of these but just slightly smaller shallower box so I'm going to get them built and I'll come back to bye okay guys so as you can see the the three boxes no we're done we got the brood at the bottom and then we got to UM supers here so they've got the metal runners on them and everything and the next and square so so that's all good and what we need to do now we need to get on to building the floor and the roof and then once we've done that all we've got to do anyth build 30 frames up I haven't seen no difficult they are yet but but we'll get on them but the next step there will be the gabled roof okay so all I've done here now have collected some of the parts and what we need to do this is our gabled end here for a gable roof um got some flat out pieces here we just need to UM tack in some long nails into them I'm not sure if I'm going to get these in the right places all so bill misse-x that's not quite right more like they donate them maybe half so we need to put one down the bottom now as well there we go so we're nice and tight there but a glue now on the next one and go from there no the ones then we can turn it upside down will be easier to nail these things are quite will be winner when they get going okay so bit more glue and this is just part for the gabled roof and it's just building me up the frame the moments try not to bend the nails up like I just did babe don't stand in front of the cameras alright yeah again you just stand by there be quiet for me while I do this all right and then one more there we are so that's a nice strong frame okay so we know where we've got it to this sort of stage now the next thing afterwards now we've got to put these little things around now we're saying 25 mil up so I go to mark 25 mil on I'm assuming they're on about 25 mil from the bottom so I'm going to get a tape measure I'm going to mark a couple of so 25 mil is there it's about one inch okay I've got many long ones I'm going to have to use these ones and just two in each of these whoops no one saw that okay so give you four of them anyway all right and they go right around so we need to do another 25 mil up guys you're learning up to do this the same as I am because there'll be beekeepers out there probably laughing at me the way I'm doing this because they can probably make these with their eyes shut but it's all it new to me and I'm just doing what I can and the good thing is um we don't market ouble the good thing is like I said I haven't paid someone else to make it you know the the ex wolf it'll come as a flat-pack but you know I've played together myself when I could have paid someone into doing it this cedar by the way is quite hard using nails and sometimes I hitting a knot or something the loop it's wanting to bend so you go be quite careful with it is that okay now because of the slant on you it's going to be a bit harder I think what I'm going to do I'm going to use the laser clamp guys just to hold it there for me if I put a couple of clamps on the end just all lit up just to make life a bit easier because it's because these are on a sham fo here so one it's a bit hard to to nail on that because it wants to make it loose but what we're going to do we're going to just clamp it in to that so that makes it nice and tight which what should we've trimmed them down slightly and I can just place them there and get some nails and hopefully this won't move now when I'm putting these nails in excellent the same on this side so this table saw sleds come in quite handy today and like I said this is just a framework for this together it does say that this should take an hour to make but I can't understand why you would take someone so long if it's only this put a bit of sheeting on it and every now and then a it or not I'm not pulling a load I'm just trying to straighten it up okay just have a check of that that way excellent you can have that sitting either way guys I'd be a venire sitting this way but I'm happy with that okay so next thing is this let's see if we can get this right this time ask better what I'm going to do I'm assuming that slides right up there I may be wrong in this but we'll soon find out looks I'll get the other one is well in check right so that's more or less 50/50 on it we'll have a look at what we're going to do do you know what this can be a pain sometimes guys right I'm happy with that okay so now what does the instructions say instructions say to nail right through the roof and one two three four says two with these I think these are not very confident on where these are going to go power locks odds lon blow me up in and we've missed that okay oh right el faro we know it let's get okay and to write a bit okay look I don't know babe I don't know long I'm going to be okay so now we just got this two effects okay ladies don't get up today babe they're not supposed to yeah right with all we've got left now guys it's just the wasp traps front I'm going to do that that one is yeah this one's still on me so let Dad finish your circ hmm we're going to use these little gold pins for it okay okay so that's the first wasp trap put on and we just need to do the other side now kaylynn can you stop making noises love and trying to film no I'm trying to film stop reggae so that's um that's it on the roof I'm not going to bother pls plastic coating off it because um I think it'll just help with with shading and there we are and quite happy with that right gay so we've got the brood the two supers and the roof dint we just got a floor left but that's going to be in the next episode along with the frames and everything else thanks for watching and I'll see you in the next episode bye you
 

okay so in part one you saw us make all the bodies of the brood box and of the supers and within the roof today we're going to be doing the the base for this and we're going to make some frames as well which will go in and put a foundation in that frame you you you okay so we've got the parts your four and up here for the for the base okay and this is where the entrance for the bees are going to be and the varroa mesh and things like that okay there's a solid flaw in this but we can remove it if we want to select a polyp tree like an inspection tree for the varroa mites and things ok so when what we're going to do we're going to wear get some of these together and and then once we know what's what will await so first thing I need to do is get some glue but yeah and I need to get a brush bring me one second guys so what we want to do now is get some glue over this and we just need to slot these pieces together nice and tight leave me huh nice fix it these pieces actually fit a little better than the last lot so we will give a clean out in a moment go a bit of okay have it mmm I'm just filming the base okay do da booty I'm just going to put a nail down in each of these love you see you later all right all right thanks but ok so let's just give that a little wipe off clean up any overrun let the blue it's always easier to do it now then later on guys now last Monday I went to my b course and my instructor give me a shout he said come on let's go we're going to get lost warm today and as i can imagine i thought wow you know I'm you know I'm happy to do that unfortunately the swarm was in was in a chimney of a house and it was just no way we were going to get up there you get it and everything else without causing any sort of damage so um so obviously I didn't have that but like I said you know it's still early days we will get it eventually and there's no rush like I said this will be finished know today and and then once this is finished we are ready to take these now I have another lesson tonight at six o clock so we will see what happens then I'm not I'm not rushing to try and get it you know get it sorted but we'll see what happens right what I'm going to do now I'm just going to put a nail down through here just all these pins these wings together nice and tight there we go it's nice and square okay so next things next we now we need to slide in our mesh and I believe that goes in like this maybe huh consequently i'm not going to I am NOT gonna nail that guy's I'm just gonna leave us set i think but i'll probably have people tell me I should have nailed it so it doesn't say to win the instructions but I think it's a good idea not to let nail it so that you're able to so you're able to remove it if you need to I think if I nail apt it's going to be a problem removing it and then the last thing we need is this and this is our board which will it's like our inspection tray now here we are and I saw a tray put together guys we now have our entrance and as you can see here there's a big slot cut out you and a very small one here and this is like your summer entrance okay and this is your winter one obviously helps or keeping down um you know the amount of coal gaming and rain and things like that getting into the hive but also and it makes it easier when the when the swarm isn't so beigel when the hive isn't so big and doesn't have so many members it makes it easier for them to defend as well against mobbing bees and things like that so when that just sits there so that's the base tree put together guys didn't take long so all nice and done so the square and so all we have to do now like i said is put that they're not only we're gonna get the rest of hive together so we just got a few frames no to build I'm just going to do a quick video one of them so when yes it's been a bit of an interesting couple of weeks now I've got a couple of frames here and I have made some up already but what I found was that this hive I had ten frames and these are the Hoffman frames and I had 10 for the super isn't for the for the brood and unfortunately this one takes 12 well time for jaundice it's not an issue and we'll just get a couple more but I have ordered a feeding tray so Tina's put these in a bag and bent them up a little bit soon after and it's got warm so okay that's fine so I've got two left here that I gotta make up and then so what all we've got on here guys is I don't know if you're making this out but this is the one of the sort of top rails and and there's a piece here we have to break off but before I do that I just need one gaming knife build me one second ginger and all we have to do is push down on it like this spend it back and it will snap out and what it does it gives you this little section it clears that middle out there okay and there is a little cleaner than it needs is needed and these looked quite daunting when they came and then show you the bag actually and you open it and it's just tons and tons of pieces in it I don't know if you can see this guy's but they are just loads and loads of pieces and when you first get them the real it's quite daunting when you open all these pieces fall out but I've been surprised they're very easy to put together but it's quite monotonous so again now we just need to file down this little lip that's left from where it's been snapped out to the other piece because it's not required and I gotta say guys I have really enjoyed building this and thank you for all of us commented on the first part because there's been a few people saying or maybe I shouldn't have nailed through the metal and Suffolk up but it was all in the instructions so I'm following them verbatim because I've never built one of these before and it may turn out to be wrong and you know but then that's what we have now these hoffman's and they self spacing because they've got the this cut out so we don't need like a slated separators and things like that in there so the first thing we're going to it's just push them together like that okay and I'm not going to glue these guys traditional something probably would glue them but I don't see a major issue in it ok the next thing we need is some wax like I said this one has been bent a little now on the bottom of the wax I don't know if you can make it out there's some wires sticking out this a wide wide foundation okay and that just needs to bend so what I'm going to do I'm going to turn this around and I'm actually gonna clamp it down just to make life easy for myself excuse me angel now i'm not sure what sort of view you're going to gather this with a camera so if you're not going a great shot I do apologize I will double check it now in a moment so not ideal having these sticking up but just be mindful that they're there ok so we're what we do we'll slide we can put one in actually in the top make life easier you get these little thin sticks and they just literally slide in the top and you just nail it into place let's give it a tap if it needs it get me up there we go right now we've got some thinner tax yer for those one thing i will say guys I'm a bit that was a bit disappointed in getting these frames that you know I had a good price for them but they never came with any tax you had to go out and buy them separately and I thought it was a bit a bit naughty like you know cuz you expect to put these things together and all of a sudden you can't so it's just one in each there we go and I know we can slide our foundation down yeah Tina unfortunately put these into the bag in the shed it got a bit hot in it so they've they've studied to not melt but take shape of whatever they were sat on but it's not a problem with me when we get these in now so we'll take the one now okay the one piece of timber know that week at out and that what we've done here we've bent over the tabs so that we can nail them down okay and we literally just put that in it trapping the the wax and we're getting some tax I tend to put three in send another warm day today now and I've been having a bit of an eight-minute the plot in fact I've been having a lot of a nightmare to plot and there'll be more about that in the next episode unfortunately it's caused me a few issues and I have lost some produce because of it but steps are being taken so that it never happens to me again because I was not happy person when it happened okay just get this within maybe up couple more taxing in out and there's another frame gun so they don't take longer just a bit monotonous these 30 is easy to do don't know why that doesn't want to stay on it today and I won't speak right the rabbit gate is a frame with your wax so now we're going to have a look so now we're going to have a look at how it all goes together this guy's is our frame now this is a too high frame okay it's what we're going to be using it's got folding legs so if we want to ever put it back and it's got a landing boards here okay so this is the frame we're actually using a little both of our hives all right now the next thing that we need is the basic we've just made and that it's just going to sit there with our without entrance then we have behave itself this is the blue box like I said we've only got 10 in it at the moment and we will sort out the rest again maybe now after that and we can just put the lid on to start with but as things get going as we already explained about this before this is a queen excluder and this is got roll bars so it doesn't actually hurt the bees okay so that's the next thing which would go on and then after that then we have our soup as their empty simplest at the moment guys okay but um I just gotta build the just gotta build the frames to go win Emperor just showing you for the just for the sake array so it's to supers and then we have this is the crown board and it's got too poor to be escapes in it okay so that's on the top and then we have our lid or roof for whatever you want to call it so there it is guys I'm just going to scroll you down so you can see better and and that's basically I was going to work we're going to build another one of these days which will sit on the other side and hopefully the good thing about this is we're able to put a strap up over the top to stop it from being blown over and knocked over by somebody so hopefully you guys have enjoyed this two parties hey Liv and you guys have enjoyed this two-part series and of how we made these and took long enough okay um but yeah it's a you know it's a good little build it it was some it was easy enough to build bit time consuming but like anything else you know us that's what you have to do and so hopefully now we can get a swarm pretty quick and get him in there and start producing some honey this year anyway guys that's it for this episode I will see you in the next one hope you have a great day for me I'm from angel bye you



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How to build a top bar bee hive which is a simple DIY project almost anyone can do for under $50.

Isaac posted the article • 0 comments • 109 views • 2017-09-18 02:02 • came from similar tags

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part 2
 
 



I've got a recent desire to get into beekeeping so the first thing we need to do to become a beekeeper is to have a place for our bees to live and what I've decided on is to build a top bar hive and let me show you a picture that would represent not what I built but just the typical design so this is something that can be built by most guys with just basic tools and I'm going to give a quick material list this will be a multi-part video and I'll make sure that I've detailed enough so you can follow along and build it yourself it's very simple so what we're going to start with is the set is the box and then in part two we'll do the frames and the legs so what you're going to need to start off with is you're going to need a 1 by 12 you can get this from Home Depot and I've just got this piece here which is made out of pine ponderosa pine pine is good hemlock western red cedar whatever you can find it's not going to be exactly 1 by 12 it's going to be got your loves in 1/4 that's fine enough that's fine that's what we're working with we're going to need a piece of 1 by 6 at least 36 inches long also in pine is fine and then we're going to need for our dividers we're going to need a sheet of plywood or something equivalent that's about let's see 16 32 inches long by 11 inches deep so I've got this scrap of AC plywood you can laminate some smaller pieces together whatever you want but these are the three things that is all we really need to get started so let's get into it so we're going to start is with our two dividers what the what that's going to do is it's going to give us the basic angle and framework for the frame and also give us some flexibility with the high up so if we start with a couple frames and the bees continue to grow we can move these out and add additional frames so the shape of this is essentially the trapezoid is going to be like this the minute the size of wood that you need to start with either needs to be about 1/2 inch or 3/4 I'm just using a piece of AC plywood and it needs to be 11 inches exactly and no less than let's say 30 and a half so what we're going to start is off of this corner we're going to measure 15 inches then we're going to measure the middle at seven and a half take your framing square and put a line at the seven and a half mark right down the middle from this line we're going to come two and a half each side now take your straight edge and connect the outside corner with a two and a half mark on the bottom we're going to connect these with a line this is going to determine the angle of our hive do it on both sides and we'll come out here and connect to our 15 inch mark repeat this process because we're going to need two of these so with our layout complete we'll take our skill saw cut out our two pieces so now with our two ends cut just check them there should be a mirror image of each other we can we're going to put our first top bar or top piece on here now this what's one critical dimension on this whole thing is the width of these top bars this has just cut out a regular just one by pine so that would be 3/4 inches thick so we don't have to fool with that however the width of these as they stack together are critical and people that have been raising bees and no bees a lot better than I do have determined that this is about the ideal width which is somewhere between inch and a quarter and inch and three-eighths I wasn't sure which way to go so I split the difference in with inch and a fifth each inch and fifteen sixteenths width apparently that's very very important so make sure that you adhere to that so 3/4 inch thick by inch and 5/16 so I went with and then overall length is 17 inches so what that gives us is an overhang of one inch on each side so what we want to do is we want to Center this on here we should have one inch overhang on each side equal reveal on both on the opposite sides and then we'll go ahead and glue this clamp it put a couple screws in it and then continue on so I'm going to be using these inch and a quarter deck screws these are made for outdoors exterior so they'll work fine in here I'll pre-drill this and countersink it you're going to be looking at it the rest of your life and showing your wife you don't want her to see shoddy workmanship it's a way it ought to be bruised secure it you can go ahead and remove this and most work web work woodworkers are going to tell you to leave it overnight and come back tomorrow and finish it up let the glue set but I just don't have time for that when I start something I want to get it done so that's why I put the screws in the glue will set up on its own we'll just be careful with it so we'll got one complete now we'll just do the second one exactly like I showed you and then we'll cut the stock sides and start putting it together so now we're ready to cut our side so we're going to take our 1 by 12 and cut 2 36 inch pieces out of it you all right so after a 36 inch or sizer cut then with the remaining two bite would we have a bit 2 by 12 or 1 by 12 pine we're going to cut out to 18 inches for the end caps well take our 2 spacer bars in here space them out about 24 inches apart you're using your square and then we'll start laying the sides in this is where your math is going to come over the rooster the quality of your cuts and then we'll place our sides here so what you're shooting for is when everything is assembled and pressed together at the bottom of your you're inside the end panel should be flush with the inside bevel there of the side and of course the sides here all matching up a reason being is we're going to be putting a very tight screen over here of Somesh and then we'll have a cap here to put over for cold climates or for wintertime so that needs to work out like that so if you find that these are a little bit too long I'll go ahead and trim them down but they need to seal tight against that bottom mesh we don't want the bees coming out getting out we want them coming in and out of their hole so now we want to fit all this together really tight make sure that all of our corners are all pulled in tight if you have a strap clamp it works good for that if you don't just simply drive a small nail and right here in the corner of the top bar and that will hold that keep that from spreading and slipping out on you so I've got this pulled tight here to show you all the joints make sure that there's no gaps or spacing anything that's too big or anything big enough for Abby to come out of it will fit and measure and lay out our end clamp all right with our end cap centered with it should be showing 3/4 inch overhang on each side from the top going to very carefully draw lines on the outside and the inside both of them here both sides now we can remove it so now we got our lines here and we've got both ends I've got one stacked on the other so I don't have to do layout twice so what I've done here is marked here measured from here from the bottom at - what was it - yeah - six and ten keeping far enough away from the edges not to crack it and these will pre-drill these all the way through both ends in our layout would be perfect and these will be our screws that will hold the box and into the sides if you want to know the measure measure across here make sure you're in the center this is 3/4 wide so we're at 3/8 to the center we'll finish up by countersinking what a countersink is as you can see the small bit that basically just makes a little bit of a groove or a little hole in there don't fit the risa that will fit the the white part of the screw so as you run the screw in flush it doesn't smash and distort the wood it's just a it just looks nicer so by putting those two together you know just seems time and we get a better more precise match you know we've drilled all the way through so our layout holes already here so we can simply flip this over and then do our countersinks where our screw heads on the other side also so now with our end plate with the marks on it we want to put that around here just line up our marks and this is we're going into at the end of a only 3/4 inch so it's really critical that we don't split that out so make sure you get a drill bit just a little bit smaller than your screw you're going to want about a two and a half inch screw for this to pre-drill these holes and make sure you drill them in straight or poke out the side all right with our holes pre-drilled let's go ahead and put some glue on here don't worry if you get a little too much on there we can wipe that off so now we'll put our screw in on this delicate would it just take a minute I don't run my screws all the way in with the cordless set all these by hand I'm just below the surface so when we sand it we don't sand off the the coating it makes it weather resistant all right so we're ready to fix our other side and just again make sure that you have tight fits all the way around here and now is the time to sand these insights just a little bit just not get burrs off because you won't build it to get too low after this is glued on so check it out pretty cool our own very own the top or hive what do we have into this so far 20 bucks if that one 10 foot 1 by 12 pine Home Depot a couple of scraps of plywood there's just this is not that much to it there's no excuse not to have these especially when you take a little initiative and even collect your own swarm so you don't even have to buy those which I'm going to attempt to do I don't know how much success I'll have I've got feelers out to people that are going to call me in the orchards if when the bee starts forming and I'm hoping to go out there and get me some so here's the box as you can see these the dividers so there's a couple more things left to do in this video I'm not we're not going to do the legs or the rest of the frames today we'll do that in part two or the top bars but what we will do is put the holes in and then finish at the bottom we're going to use a little bit of screen and we'll make a little bottom board for everything to collect I guess for everything that the bees drop the Mike's different things can collect fall at the bottom and that board could be removed to clean it out so what I don't know about bees is a lot I'm just going off of what I read and sometimes you just got to jump in and do it so let's go see if we scrounge around some screen and finish this up so the previous owners were kind enough to leave their steady satellite dish here for me and I almost throw it away I took it to the scrap and I thought hmmm that might come in useful someday and sure enough who would have thought so here's a perfect screen right here for our B project so see if we can't strip some of this off here so if you're not fortunate enough to have a 40 year old satellite dish in your yard any type screen at a hardware store will suffice I I'm sure they have it at most lumber yards or Home Depot's and I don't know the exact size I read it online I don't remember but I don't think it matters just something that won't corrode Lumino stainless galvanized so I'm going to use a chalk line here what seems to be about right the right width is about 7 inches so I'm going to snap a line here at 7 maybe so the screen is going to just be work ideal and what