264
Views

How Cows IMPROVE the land - ONE Simple Trick

Justin Rhodes posted the article • 0 comments • 264 views • 2017-09-21 06:09 • came from similar tags

 

 
 

we move the cattle every single day for a few reasons one in hi guys Tim South well here with ABC acres really appreciate you taking part in a livestock feeding today so we're going to go around the farm we're going to move the cattle we're going to feed the chicken Pig the goats the turkeys and a little bit of everything else we have going on so we're going to be moving the cattle this morning we usually move our cattle every single day but we're moving them into a small paddock today so we're actually moving them this morning at 8:00 but we're also going to be moving them about 11:30 today so I'm going to jump in and do that really quick we think about the scared calves huh what's your first thought when you see that hand calf okay okay pull okay detracted um what is mineral flood single day for a few reasons one in an open stock grazing system where you might see cattle parked out on a large tract of land the cattle are always eating the most delectable tasty nuggets if you will and so what that happens is the unsavory stuff has a chance to really grow up germinate so imagine in five years three five seven ten years the pasture maybe has more undesirable plants and and edibles in it as opposed to the delectable ones so by putting them close together in a small compact pen they're actually competing against each other to mow down the lawn in a uniformity at the same time based on them being in close proximity they're trampling down the grass and so that put some biomass organic matter on the soil and by doing that it acts as a living mulch which holds more moisture in the ground thereby developing and building the microbiology below the soil surface which is what we're trying to do more so we're getting heavy manure heavy urination in this location so that is building our fertilization base we don't use pesticides herbicides fertilizers a the fertilizers there are machines to do that so we're into building healthy grass oh and this is just one tool what does y'all's name and where are you from I'm Holly burns and we're from Marshfield Massachusetts just south of Boston yes have you been around farms before I have she's kind of that kind a 100 hundred you know everything about farming and one you know absolutely nothing where are you two okay this is the beginning of the sewer when I see how that changes by the end okay guys we're going to open up chicken coop one so I'm going to ask you children to come forward with your cups we're going to give them a little extra feed this more if you want to do it around so many helping okay come on your Jernigan miscast you got buddy you're going to feed the diners you're going to feed those down before no yeah one for you we turned off the hot wire so it's not hot I'm going to ask you guys when chickens come out they're going to seek you out we're going to head over see those white steaks right there I just want you to find some cow pies and just sprinkle them on all the cowhides okay y'all know what a cow pies yeah good morning girls good morning girls come out and play oh my goodness just to pick up 250 power behind you cow pies put them down you're doing a great job yeah if you have the proper floor I like to actually step the terrain in little bit make a work board okay certainly don't need to do that let's see it buddy okay let's put it on that one give me a little bit more there we go I'd like to do that and I just like to push it down a little bit I really have to kind of work to get it and so you'll notice as we walk back from coop one along the past year that they grazed last week you're going to notice that there aren't any cow pies you're not going to be able to see them because they obliterate them so and distribute them over about a nine square foot area if not more you may pet the chickens if you would like absolutely are you guys hookah Moran's and boardwalk Hey buff Orpingtons Americana's a little bit of this in that there you go honey good job hey Lily is it strange to you that you're putting a feet on manure what general what do you think about cutting speed on manure why is he doing that and so the chickens spread off some manures hey kids how would you guys like to eat your food off of another species manure 9 no these are chickens right they love it they love it you guys don't believe they love it look at this you are putting down mr. Brown can you put some down he's on that's good boy good boy they've done so much on the pie come over here buddy Oh Oh ones vomit are you put it all on one let's ask them you like eating off the manure yeah you love that why own all the maggots you IG maggots you love that okay well you're in the right place mr. John mark goes Pig panic system we're actually going to put our goats await for just a minute while we utilize the alley between the static system alfalfa and so we're going to use the alfalfa to get the goats into this pin over here so you guys can just walk in come on through come on keep on off you don't turn your back they're very safe and then just walk into that yes they're very happy and so this allows us now to do the work for the logs and the chickens in the alley without having these guys do we come out you will come on yes there you go so this is our paddock this on that Padawan here's paddock so you can already see it starting to rebound it's starting to grow it's been rested now for only four days here in this paddock we have we have Kevin Bacon so come on in I'll just ask you not to let anybody else okay how you doing Kevin anybody want a pet pig we can get up there we can test Kevin lunch so I didn't ever hang those taxes you can just put on your own board ma'am on who I can scratch the tank we go sympathy which he's got plenty of grain right now he's not going to eat you oh wow he let you go right up to him we're going to dump that and I'm going to get one of you guys on filling that up okay and so Sammy what I'm going to do is I'm going to start the water up I'm going to ask you to go down there with the hose fill up the water saw and then I'll probably just have you dump a little just keep it flowing in there to create a little poop on and then we'll law we'll be done with that now you guys are you guys good coming here I will tell you they're big they can push you around once the grains on the ground they're very fun way to beer you see how yeah see how they've got this the remnants of the mud on it are talking about that wallow right so we come out here one o'clock in the afternoon they'll be pasted in in a month and matter of fact I'll get someone to fill that little wallow up here shortly so they're all company and we're going to see temperatures of mid 90s today tomorrow Wednesday so they're going to need every bit of it we do come out here during lunch time and still it makes you know water is good well Rewald them will spread they love it when they get sprayed down they'll dance in it and so it I'm sure it feels good I yeah exactly right all right one of the things on that thing you didn't try to bite you so why do you make the chickens beat their food off the couch a great question you know I'm sorry but in the loo to that earlier so we found out that when the cow pies on the ground the Flies like to come in and they lay their eggs in it and then days three or four there's more maggots crawling around oh and then they hatch out and fly off and they go land on a cow again and the process repeats itself so if we put the grain on the cow patty when those little maggots are crawling around the chickens go in ate the grain and if they open up the patty they see the dung beetles and they see the maggots and they see all sorts of creepy crawlies and they Peck them out and it puts their belly full it makes them healthy and strong but now there's no flies coming out to go to the cows so they break the pet psychic that's a great question other than that I wouldn't want it I like I wouldn't want even could offer Calvin hi girls ok I need to get you guys in the rain don't I speed so we don't usually give them this much grain but I like the fact that you guys are so interested in the poultry and you want to feed them they're going to be a little fatter today and that's ok have you had their eggs yet we have dozen so on a scale of 1 to 10 10 being like I've died and gone to heaven 10 that's next best sex you've ever had you can tell the difference delicious delicious how do they compare to store-bought eggs sooner there's so much doubt they're so yellow I mean that was the cool thing even remember like your pancake I made pancakes with them and even the pancake batter was a golden color versus you know store-bought eggs that one blue egg yeah well no the insides when you cook them and everything they're just so yellow it's rich tasting [Music] Oh welcome that at 10 that is it Justin I think everybody's done a fantastic job thank you so folks watching want more of you where do they do well you know we're we're at ABC acres calm we're on Facebook and ABC acres where YouTube at ABC acres and so I would encourage people to go out there and check us out reach out to us on the contact page and you know we're really trying to showcase a destination experience here at the farm trying to showcase regenerative agriculture based operations for both livestock and edibles and make it a full experience from livestock meetings to work along farm tours to self-guided this and that and we'll even get you on a horse and ATV and fly fishing if you want so the full package how much you know about farms now go one to 105 okay we doubled we've doubled our knowledge good pop quiz why does we have the cows every day just them okay that's one reason absolutely why does he throw the feed for the chickens on the manure oh I'm getting rid of the past yes to get rid of the time why does he like the Cooney Cooney Pig versus other pigs because they're very smaller okay nice job Daniel the smaller they're great grazers broad donate as much great I don't know as much overhead yep they don't need as much grain okay I would say I would say so you more than doubled your farm knowledge here today yes job thanks for your help morning and enjoy the Eclipse right yeah yeah last Eclipse and how many hours not start now I thought two hours two hours did you check what happening y'all don't burn your retinas this is what it's all about right here eggs just from their farms eggs from their farm pork from their farm and waffles made from a waffle maker on their bar I was pretty excited to see them awesome yeah so a blend we've got the farm fresh stuff and a little bit of comfort food with the waffle maker that we can't really be on the road right Andy yeah and look at that guys if you ever want a vacation on a farm come tour this place stay in a really nice Erin B this is it when you say not refreshing it's very nice let's do some abuse at this place holy moly that's your view are you kidding me you're going to love doing dishes in here look at that view out the window walking down the hall you got a view even out the hallway look at this permaculture yard this beautiful yard there's even a view in the bedroom down to the bottom so nice oh look the bathroom isn't without its view either the Eclipse is starting okay everybody gets to see it with a special glasses look at the Sun only with the glasses on he's closing his eyes okay my first kiss oh wow that's crazy how are the cows reacting to this super strange like they'll be really stoned and all of a sudden they start like running around like wait a minute wasn't it just dark I have to say it is like really cool like the temperature has dropped and it's like oh it's like us getting picky they're all it is so funny could some of the other ones are like looking at them like why are you like this sniffing good they feel good oh you probably won't be able to be out here with shorts please on I know it's really chilly look at how it's like so it's like start it's like I'm so extreme I guess except it's wanting him up to now total dark everywhere no 95 percent here you have slept yeah can't look like a moon it's so weird I got the camera on you can see the Eclipse up above the bright light oh no I lining up in real life all my wife want lining up on the camera all right it's it's we're on the other side of the eclipse it's still I could think it is but how to calm down what just happened yeah class that mean that means the moon right in front of the Sun what did you guys think about it clear cool we get exciting a boring did you guys actually see it you guys yeah cleany good Sabrina was that the craziest thing you've ever seen Wow so tomorrow more of ABC acres here's they got some crazy permaculture stuff going on like fish what the sage we're going to find out tomorrow but if you want more of them now make sure you check out yesterday's video there it is and down in the description


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we move the cattle every single day for a few reasons one in hi guys Tim South well here with ABC acres really appreciate you taking part in a livestock feeding today so we're going to go around the farm we're going to move the cattle we're going to feed the chicken Pig the goats the turkeys and a little bit of everything else we have going on so we're going to be moving the cattle this morning we usually move our cattle every single day but we're moving them into a small paddock today so we're actually moving them this morning at 8:00 but we're also going to be moving them about 11:30 today so I'm going to jump in and do that really quick we think about the scared calves huh what's your first thought when you see that hand calf okay okay pull okay detracted um what is mineral flood single day for a few reasons one in an open stock grazing system where you might see cattle parked out on a large tract of land the cattle are always eating the most delectable tasty nuggets if you will and so what that happens is the unsavory stuff has a chance to really grow up germinate so imagine in five years three five seven ten years the pasture maybe has more undesirable plants and and edibles in it as opposed to the delectable ones so by putting them close together in a small compact pen they're actually competing against each other to mow down the lawn in a uniformity at the same time based on them being in close proximity they're trampling down the grass and so that put some biomass organic matter on the soil and by doing that it acts as a living mulch which holds more moisture in the ground thereby developing and building the microbiology below the soil surface which is what we're trying to do more so we're getting heavy manure heavy urination in this location so that is building our fertilization base we don't use pesticides herbicides fertilizers a the fertilizers there are machines to do that so we're into building healthy grass oh and this is just one tool what does y'all's name and where are you from I'm Holly burns and we're from Marshfield Massachusetts just south of Boston yes have you been around farms before I have she's kind of that kind a 100 hundred you know everything about farming and one you know absolutely nothing where are you two okay this is the beginning of the sewer when I see how that changes by the end okay guys we're going to open up chicken coop one so I'm going to ask you children to come forward with your cups we're going to give them a little extra feed this more if you want to do it around so many helping okay come on your Jernigan miscast you got buddy you're going to feed the diners you're going to feed those down before no yeah one for you we turned off the hot wire so it's not hot I'm going to ask you guys when chickens come out they're going to seek you out we're going to head over see those white steaks right there I just want you to find some cow pies and just sprinkle them on all the cowhides okay y'all know what a cow pies yeah good morning girls good morning girls come out and play oh my goodness just to pick up 250 power behind you cow pies put them down you're doing a great job yeah if you have the proper floor I like to actually step the terrain in little bit make a work board okay certainly don't need to do that let's see it buddy okay let's put it on that one give me a little bit more there we go I'd like to do that and I just like to push it down a little bit I really have to kind of work to get it and so you'll notice as we walk back from coop one along the past year that they grazed last week you're going to notice that there aren't any cow pies you're not going to be able to see them because they obliterate them so and distribute them over about a nine square foot area if not more you may pet the chickens if you would like absolutely are you guys hookah Moran's and boardwalk Hey buff Orpingtons Americana's a little bit of this in that there you go honey good job hey Lily is it strange to you that you're putting a feet on manure what general what do you think about cutting speed on manure why is he doing that and so the chickens spread off some manures hey kids how would you guys like to eat your food off of another species manure 9 no these are chickens right they love it they love it you guys don't believe they love it look at this you are putting down mr. Brown can you put some down he's on that's good boy good boy they've done so much on the pie come over here buddy Oh Oh ones vomit are you put it all on one let's ask them you like eating off the manure yeah you love that why own all the maggots you IG maggots you love that okay well you're in the right place mr. John mark goes Pig panic system we're actually going to put our goats await for just a minute while we utilize the alley between the static system alfalfa and so we're going to use the alfalfa to get the goats into this pin over here so you guys can just walk in come on through come on keep on off you don't turn your back they're very safe and then just walk into that yes they're very happy and so this allows us now to do the work for the logs and the chickens in the alley without having these guys do we come out you will come on yes there you go so this is our paddock this on that Padawan here's paddock so you can already see it starting to rebound it's starting to grow it's been rested now for only four days here in this paddock we have we have Kevin Bacon so come on in I'll just ask you not to let anybody else okay how you doing Kevin anybody want a pet pig we can get up there we can test Kevin lunch so I didn't ever hang those taxes you can just put on your own board ma'am on who I can scratch the tank we go sympathy which he's got plenty of grain right now he's not going to eat you oh wow he let you go right up to him we're going to dump that and I'm going to get one of you guys on filling that up okay and so Sammy what I'm going to do is I'm going to start the water up I'm going to ask you to go down there with the hose fill up the water saw and then I'll probably just have you dump a little just keep it flowing in there to create a little poop on and then we'll law we'll be done with that now you guys are you guys good coming here I will tell you they're big they can push you around once the grains on the ground they're very fun way to beer you see how yeah see how they've got this the remnants of the mud on it are talking about that wallow right so we come out here one o'clock in the afternoon they'll be pasted in in a month and matter of fact I'll get someone to fill that little wallow up here shortly so they're all company and we're going to see temperatures of mid 90s today tomorrow Wednesday so they're going to need every bit of it we do come out here during lunch time and still it makes you know water is good well Rewald them will spread they love it when they get sprayed down they'll dance in it and so it I'm sure it feels good I yeah exactly right all right one of the things on that thing you didn't try to bite you so why do you make the chickens beat their food off the couch a great question you know I'm sorry but in the loo to that earlier so we found out that when the cow pies on the ground the Flies like to come in and they lay their eggs in it and then days three or four there's more maggots crawling around oh and then they hatch out and fly off and they go land on a cow again and the process repeats itself so if we put the grain on the cow patty when those little maggots are crawling around the chickens go in ate the grain and if they open up the patty they see the dung beetles and they see the maggots and they see all sorts of creepy crawlies and they Peck them out and it puts their belly full it makes them healthy and strong but now there's no flies coming out to go to the cows so they break the pet psychic that's a great question other than that I wouldn't want it I like I wouldn't want even could offer Calvin hi girls ok I need to get you guys in the rain don't I speed so we don't usually give them this much grain but I like the fact that you guys are so interested in the poultry and you want to feed them they're going to be a little fatter today and that's ok have you had their eggs yet we have dozen so on a scale of 1 to 10 10 being like I've died and gone to heaven 10 that's next best sex you've ever had you can tell the difference delicious delicious how do they compare to store-bought eggs sooner there's so much doubt they're so yellow I mean that was the cool thing even remember like your pancake I made pancakes with them and even the pancake batter was a golden color versus you know store-bought eggs that one blue egg yeah well no the insides when you cook them and everything they're just so yellow it's rich tasting [Music] Oh welcome that at 10 that is it Justin I think everybody's done a fantastic job thank you so folks watching want more of you where do they do well you know we're we're at ABC acres calm we're on Facebook and ABC acres where YouTube at ABC acres and so I would encourage people to go out there and check us out reach out to us on the contact page and you know we're really trying to showcase a destination experience here at the farm trying to showcase regenerative agriculture based operations for both livestock and edibles and make it a full experience from livestock meetings to work along farm tours to self-guided this and that and we'll even get you on a horse and ATV and fly fishing if you want so the full package how much you know about farms now go one to 105 okay we doubled we've doubled our knowledge good pop quiz why does we have the cows every day just them okay that's one reason absolutely why does he throw the feed for the chickens on the manure oh I'm getting rid of the past yes to get rid of the time why does he like the Cooney Cooney Pig versus other pigs because they're very smaller okay nice job Daniel the smaller they're great grazers broad donate as much great I don't know as much overhead yep they don't need as much grain okay I would say I would say so you more than doubled your farm knowledge here today yes job thanks for your help morning and enjoy the Eclipse right yeah yeah last Eclipse and how many hours not start now I thought two hours two hours did you check what happening y'all don't burn your retinas this is what it's all about right here eggs just from their farms eggs from their farm pork from their farm and waffles made from a waffle maker on their bar I was pretty excited to see them awesome yeah so a blend we've got the farm fresh stuff and a little bit of comfort food with the waffle maker that we can't really be on the road right Andy yeah and look at that guys if you ever want a vacation on a farm come tour this place stay in a really nice Erin B this is it when you say not refreshing it's very nice let's do some abuse at this place holy moly that's your view are you kidding me you're going to love doing dishes in here look at that view out the window walking down the hall you got a view even out the hallway look at this permaculture yard this beautiful yard there's even a view in the bedroom down to the bottom so nice oh look the bathroom isn't without its view either the Eclipse is starting okay everybody gets to see it with a special glasses look at the Sun only with the glasses on he's closing his eyes okay my first kiss oh wow that's crazy how are the cows reacting to this super strange like they'll be really stoned and all of a sudden they start like running around like wait a minute wasn't it just dark I have to say it is like really cool like the temperature has dropped and it's like oh it's like us getting picky they're all it is so funny could some of the other ones are like looking at them like why are you like this sniffing good they feel good oh you probably won't be able to be out here with shorts please on I know it's really chilly look at how it's like so it's like start it's like I'm so extreme I guess except it's wanting him up to now total dark everywhere no 95 percent here you have slept yeah can't look like a moon it's so weird I got the camera on you can see the Eclipse up above the bright light oh no I lining up in real life all my wife want lining up on the camera all right it's it's we're on the other side of the eclipse it's still I could think it is but how to calm down what just happened yeah class that mean that means the moon right in front of the Sun what did you guys think about it clear cool we get exciting a boring did you guys actually see it you guys yeah cleany good Sabrina was that the craziest thing you've ever seen Wow so tomorrow more of ABC acres here's they got some crazy permaculture stuff going on like fish what the sage we're going to find out tomorrow but if you want more of them now make sure you check out yesterday's video there it is and down in the description


 
274
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The Permaculture Shepherd explains what you need to have for raising sheep, how to rotationally graze your sheep to maximize health and efficiency.

Justin Rhodes posted the article • 0 comments • 274 views • 2017-09-21 06:09 • came from similar tags

 

 
Words:

okay Dan Oh helps out somebody wants to do this they need to move their sheep everyday number one how are they gonna know how much to give them this is what it's all about folks breakfast from the line and little buddy dance son what are you eating Donna have some chickens dick from your chickens yes whoo hey where two eggs come from chickens oh where did chickens come from that's true we can keep going in a certain look everybody chickens are from the farm but you are okay it's final funny how the young circle of chickens goes in a circle yeah chickens come from the egg and the egg come from the chicken yeah let's see what the MasterChef is doing delicious smell there you have a frittata every morning Dan no just for a special occasion you treating us well it mean good morning Ashley where do you get this recipe from Dan well same place I get a lot of my recipes which is I just make it up really based based on the ingredients I have on hand so it's just as the simple concept is a frittata so you're just basically beating eggs together putting them in some kind of skillet and throw it in the oven right so then it's just what do you want to throw in there mushrooms you want you want cheese you want whatever you want in there yeah outside now we're about to move the sheep with the permaculture Shepherd the little buddy you want to tell the jugglers which sheep is that that's Maggie and who's behind you what do you think of the seat mr. Brown good hey mr. Brown this is sage sage what's the plan here Dan what's supposed to happen good morning what's supposed to happen this is this is a daily routine so got it down pretty good so you're pretty confident it's gonna happen I'm pretty confident because we've done it every day since they've been here little buddy about what little buddy what he's gonna say is it gonna happen yeah okay what's gonna happen Dan what's gonna happen is I'm gonna call the sheep I just let out a little whistle and all my girls they are trained my Rams are separate for obvious reasons we don't want to have out of season breeding so this is for my my use I will whistle my girls they will come running to me come on girls a little slow this that's slow normally that's that's excellent like what there you go girls good girl come on blue you ready how have you trained them to go to a whistle it was really early spring you're having a heavy winter still it was really wet and snowy so we had them in our Corral for a while every day I when I'd come out to feed them multiple times a day I would just whistle so they associated food with whistle I couldn't have lost dog right so they will come flock to me and I'm gonna open the fencing and I usually can I get one two three three here we go we take off and they follow me I lead them into the next paddock I lead my sheep I want them to follow me I don't want to be driving when you drive them you're putting pressure on them they're less comfortable they're more likely to veer off and that's when you get people on big acreage they have to bring in dogs which is awesome I'd love to be able to get working dogs we're just not there scale wise they're going to follow me into the next paddock and then immediately when they get over there they're gonna say whoa there's rat grass over here and that's where they're gonna focus on one side I have more rye grass the other side is a noxious weed tanzy which my sheep will eat I'm using them as part of our weed management program it's it's a real benefit having the Sheep because nobody else is eating that if we had cattle they're not eating it the chickens aren't touching it or sheep eat it so they will get to that but they're gonna eat that grass first okay good let's see this weed you're talking about come show me this weed okay so this is what they're gonna eat tomorrow they're eating all this what's this right this is right okay you planted that yes so after they leave here will you throw down more rye so originally I was at you know I've read all of Joel Salatin's books and you know he he's he makes it very clear that they've never imported a seed on their property and I was gonna do the exact same thing I was like I am not bringing in seeds we're gonna do it naturally the permaculture white bring this pasture back over time what I've realized is it takes too long Joel Salatin has been on his farm for over 50 years I don't have 50 years I got it I gotta get this thing going so where my goats are Shepherds in a rush that's right we gotta get this thing moving here so so what I have just done is I just got a shipment of seeds from my mowing seeds which is certified organic seeds it's it's a it's a veg winter rye combination so and this is how I'm gonna be actually working in the my pigs as well so my my ruminants are grazing the main forage down and then my pigs I'm hoping to accomplish with them is to create a disturbance with the soil with the pigs and create an environment where I'm gonna get good seed germination so I'm gonna move my pigs out after the Sheep and then throw down scatter my seed and know I'm not gonna be able to say in 50 years that we never brought in a seed but we're gonna have a much better pasture okay regeneration for that I didn't know sheep would eat a weed did you tell me they like goats sheep are similar to goats in some ways in that they do like some brows okay not nearly to the extent of a goat but in the sheep are also easier in a pasture they're more respectful with fences from an overall management perspective way easier what I just did with the Sheep moving them from the to the next paddock I would not have been able to accomplish with goats but in my observations they don't flock okay so they do have some similarities this is tansy this is considered by all the land grant universities and noxious weed the local governments spend a lot of money spraying this stuff to get rid of it it spreads by rhizomes so it is very aggressive and it is actually toxic to some animals there is a study do that was done in South Idaho as well as western Montana grazing sheep in particular the breed of sheep that I predominantly have which is Katahdin on tansy and they found over years they've been able to graze it out my sheep will eat this now at this point it's very STEMI so they will actually be leaving the stem but they will strip the green leaves off of it which will retard its growth earlier in the season when they came through when it's still green and not lignified they actually take it all the way to the ground and over time that weakens the plant it's not able to photosynthesize it's not able to regenerate itself and here's the deal with the sheep regarding the the eating of the tansy it's it's been believed by many that this is a toxic plant and it does have some toxic properties if I were to feed my sheep test 6 weeks prior to breeding it could lead to an abortion in their pregnancy which is obviously not good but scientists have studied our cotton and sheep in dead blood samples an hour before eating 10 minutes after eating an hour after eating and I did this study for three years doing blood samples of all the sheep and there was no signs of any toxic kick in their blood streams after eating the tansy so I so again the sheep are part of the regeneration process here where nobody else is going to eat this stuff but I can get my sheep to eat it it's gonna retard the growth here eventually they're gonna graze this out and I not applying any kind of chemicals that are harmful to the environment and in the end we get food for our table I'm putting a high quality nutrient-dense on the percent grass-fed and parsley tansy fish lamb on my table to feed my family as well as sharing some with neighbors so then you're telling me you're an Eastern Shepherd where you lead the Sheep you're not a Western Shepherd where you drive the Sheep you borrow ideas from all the different concepts absolutely Oh golly I take what works and leave behind what doesn't so what's a Western concept you've adapted I got your Western idea like trick net yes you don't have your son out there herding his sheep all day do you buddy I don't this is capital e homestead scale American Americanized permaculture adopted from the apron we're in permaculture taking it yeah absolutely he's got the he's got the the Western hat too so pretty good on me all right that's it good you represent permaculture well it takes all these different ideas and connects them that's right and it everybody's context is different I can't stress this enough what because our scale is so small here we are not on a thousand acre ranch you stay there and watching them Dan you stay there watching them [Music] that is my favorite part when the sheep go from their old paddock to the new paddock on fresh grass there's something so peaceful and relaxing about seeing the sheep on grass it's the best part of husbandry come take a look at this when you see these sheep just going to town on these the fresh vegetation they hear it hearing them chew and rip the the vegetation from its stem there's just nothing like it [Laughter] hey it's not every day I get to film a fellow youtuber and he can totally take over the channel and bring this whole nother dynamic right you got to check out his channel grass-fed homestead I'll leave the link down in the description and right there okay man Oh help us out somebody wants to do this they need to move their sheep every day number one how are they gonna know how much to give them that is it's a really complicated answer because it really it really changes on your context and the season what kind of forage you have in your pastures so I'll answer that question for our context and hope that helps somebody right we moved here just 13 months ago and when we were looking for property I had no idea what I was looking at when I was looking at pastures I just saw some green stuff and I thought yeah that looks all right I what I didn't know at the time is our forage quality was extremely poor it was overwritten with noxious weeds that most animals wouldn't really touch anyway so it's part of our regeneration process here we're grazing the Sheep we're pulsing them through every day but in most cases I could give them an enormous paddock and it's not going to give them the they need because of the low quality Ford sit there so I'm doing something this is something I got from Greg Judy myself hearing a talk years ago was bringing your first couple years you're probably going to be intensive bringing in hey you're probably gonna have to bring in a lot of that if you're establishing a pasture so so for me I'm giving them enough area I'm kind of looking at it it's based on history right so how quickly did they eat the last paddock if it were you know 2 4 hours and it's stripped down to nothing then you need to give them a bigger space you so you keep playing with that until you get it to where it takes about a day in in my case I'm giving them a look like this area here they will have all this grass stripped out by this evening and then the tansy will be left because and they'll say they'll eat that tomorrow morning ok so this is about the size for this many sheep if I had really good quality pasture so to answer your question I'm I'm bringing in the hay and I'm supplement feeding them with hay okay and what that is doing is I'm bringing in nutrition from elsewhere processing it through the Sheep making sure they get enough nutrition that they wouldn't otherwise get from my question and they're depositing it back on the land and that's free choice they can eat that if they want to or not correct now to move their basic needs looks like we got the hay feeder the water and the shed let's do it man so this I designed to be super light it's something I can move by myself oh my but it's also going to provide one of the sheeps basically one of the sheets one of the sheep basic needs which is some shelter from come on in the in the summer okay well then you're making it too easy on yourself this isn't much of a workout buddy this is no earth gym when it's this easy come on bulk up man oh come you got my feet there you go make it hard on yourself there you go get some curls I've designed everything on our homestead to be completely mobile portable because like I said earlier we've only been here a year and though I'm very committed to this lifestyle not committed to any one design at this point I don't know where I want stuff exactly things are always changing the seasons are changing how I manage is involving daily so I don't want to just have a static shelter somewhere because I want to move it maybe someday yeah no this is my everything's mobile modular and forgot the other end Joel Salatin Tasha but yeah it's a magnificent magnificent originally I was hauling out five-gallon buckets to the sheep's paddock each day which is not fun especially when they're you know 300 yards that way so I went ahead and finally got some extra hoses and I'm dragging hoses now which is a lot lighter big expense yeah I imagine that little shelter you built there cost $55 well I used cedar as on the base may have ended a hundred and five dollars I don't even think was that much I can't remember how much that was but that was not expensive you're the EMT conduit it's $2 a piece there's four of those on there a couple two by twos and some two by fours yeah it's pretty simple it's that much more than $50 here okay that's it I gotta do is close it up and you're done well I feel the water but yeah okay chores are done let's see what everybody else's do let's get hot okay man it is much cooler in here you guys got the idea yeah keeping it cool didn't comfortable what y'all been talking about like I suspect there's been some Girl Talk going on in here yes Girl Talk you've been talking about how handsome Dan and I are suggestin yeah we gave you a little introduction to sheep okay and is our hope here that we have somehow planted some kind of seed in you too that will blossom into you guys getting your own chief when you get back home okay so you know you don't have to commit to that at this point but we got you a little something as a piece of encouragement for you okay I think that whistling was encouraging enough he whistles and the Sheep come really that way so Anna give me a stand this is this is called a shepherd's crook and this was handmade in Germany what and these are sold by premier one it's a little Fleck for those guys see there's no hit stuff but this was handmade hand-carved in Germany and these are these are very instrumental in times when things go wrong and that does happen from time to time where you have a a lamb or sheep that goes wayward when during a moves and this is a really good way to help bring them back and you can steer with it like if there's an animal on this even go left if you just put that up it just puts a little pressure on their flight zone and they'll be R to the left you can steer them to the right or if you need to catch for medical treatment and they're a little flighty especially little lambs I don't know yet you can grab on and I treat them so this is our gift to you here at the grasp at home so okay thank you very much appreciate it and until I get sheep I can use it on much other snow that go right that's a wrap dan is a wealth of information about sheep I sat down with him to also create a more instructional video on how to raise sheep from the springtime to a processing a harvesting to putting them on your plate we filmed that today and actually what we thought would be one but actually turned into three so we're working through some things stay tuned on how we might make that available to you guys until then do check out Dan's channel I'll leave a link to it again right there it's good he's a wealth of information I think it's like over three hundred videos she pigs chickens they're one year homestead journey I'll leave the link but you


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okay Dan Oh helps out somebody wants to do this they need to move their sheep everyday number one how are they gonna know how much to give them this is what it's all about folks breakfast from the line and little buddy dance son what are you eating Donna have some chickens dick from your chickens yes whoo hey where two eggs come from chickens oh where did chickens come from that's true we can keep going in a certain look everybody chickens are from the farm but you are okay it's final funny how the young circle of chickens goes in a circle yeah chickens come from the egg and the egg come from the chicken yeah let's see what the MasterChef is doing delicious smell there you have a frittata every morning Dan no just for a special occasion you treating us well it mean good morning Ashley where do you get this recipe from Dan well same place I get a lot of my recipes which is I just make it up really based based on the ingredients I have on hand so it's just as the simple concept is a frittata so you're just basically beating eggs together putting them in some kind of skillet and throw it in the oven right so then it's just what do you want to throw in there mushrooms you want you want cheese you want whatever you want in there yeah outside now we're about to move the sheep with the permaculture Shepherd the little buddy you want to tell the jugglers which sheep is that that's Maggie and who's behind you what do you think of the seat mr. Brown good hey mr. Brown this is sage sage what's the plan here Dan what's supposed to happen good morning what's supposed to happen this is this is a daily routine so got it down pretty good so you're pretty confident it's gonna happen I'm pretty confident because we've done it every day since they've been here little buddy about what little buddy what he's gonna say is it gonna happen yeah okay what's gonna happen Dan what's gonna happen is I'm gonna call the sheep I just let out a little whistle and all my girls they are trained my Rams are separate for obvious reasons we don't want to have out of season breeding so this is for my my use I will whistle my girls they will come running to me come on girls a little slow this that's slow normally that's that's excellent like what there you go girls good girl come on blue you ready how have you trained them to go to a whistle it was really early spring you're having a heavy winter still it was really wet and snowy so we had them in our Corral for a while every day I when I'd come out to feed them multiple times a day I would just whistle so they associated food with whistle I couldn't have lost dog right so they will come flock to me and I'm gonna open the fencing and I usually can I get one two three three here we go we take off and they follow me I lead them into the next paddock I lead my sheep I want them to follow me I don't want to be driving when you drive them you're putting pressure on them they're less comfortable they're more likely to veer off and that's when you get people on big acreage they have to bring in dogs which is awesome I'd love to be able to get working dogs we're just not there scale wise they're going to follow me into the next paddock and then immediately when they get over there they're gonna say whoa there's rat grass over here and that's where they're gonna focus on one side I have more rye grass the other side is a noxious weed tanzy which my sheep will eat I'm using them as part of our weed management program it's it's a real benefit having the Sheep because nobody else is eating that if we had cattle they're not eating it the chickens aren't touching it or sheep eat it so they will get to that but they're gonna eat that grass first okay good let's see this weed you're talking about come show me this weed okay so this is what they're gonna eat tomorrow they're eating all this what's this right this is right okay you planted that yes so after they leave here will you throw down more rye so originally I was at you know I've read all of Joel Salatin's books and you know he he's he makes it very clear that they've never imported a seed on their property and I was gonna do the exact same thing I was like I am not bringing in seeds we're gonna do it naturally the permaculture white bring this pasture back over time what I've realized is it takes too long Joel Salatin has been on his farm for over 50 years I don't have 50 years I got it I gotta get this thing going so where my goats are Shepherds in a rush that's right we gotta get this thing moving here so so what I have just done is I just got a shipment of seeds from my mowing seeds which is certified organic seeds it's it's a it's a veg winter rye combination so and this is how I'm gonna be actually working in the my pigs as well so my my ruminants are grazing the main forage down and then my pigs I'm hoping to accomplish with them is to create a disturbance with the soil with the pigs and create an environment where I'm gonna get good seed germination so I'm gonna move my pigs out after the Sheep and then throw down scatter my seed and know I'm not gonna be able to say in 50 years that we never brought in a seed but we're gonna have a much better pasture okay regeneration for that I didn't know sheep would eat a weed did you tell me they like goats sheep are similar to goats in some ways in that they do like some brows okay not nearly to the extent of a goat but in the sheep are also easier in a pasture they're more respectful with fences from an overall management perspective way easier what I just did with the Sheep moving them from the to the next paddock I would not have been able to accomplish with goats but in my observations they don't flock okay so they do have some similarities this is tansy this is considered by all the land grant universities and noxious weed the local governments spend a lot of money spraying this stuff to get rid of it it spreads by rhizomes so it is very aggressive and it is actually toxic to some animals there is a study do that was done in South Idaho as well as western Montana grazing sheep in particular the breed of sheep that I predominantly have which is Katahdin on tansy and they found over years they've been able to graze it out my sheep will eat this now at this point it's very STEMI so they will actually be leaving the stem but they will strip the green leaves off of it which will retard its growth earlier in the season when they came through when it's still green and not lignified they actually take it all the way to the ground and over time that weakens the plant it's not able to photosynthesize it's not able to regenerate itself and here's the deal with the sheep regarding the the eating of the tansy it's it's been believed by many that this is a toxic plant and it does have some toxic properties if I were to feed my sheep test 6 weeks prior to breeding it could lead to an abortion in their pregnancy which is obviously not good but scientists have studied our cotton and sheep in dead blood samples an hour before eating 10 minutes after eating an hour after eating and I did this study for three years doing blood samples of all the sheep and there was no signs of any toxic kick in their blood streams after eating the tansy so I so again the sheep are part of the regeneration process here where nobody else is going to eat this stuff but I can get my sheep to eat it it's gonna retard the growth here eventually they're gonna graze this out and I not applying any kind of chemicals that are harmful to the environment and in the end we get food for our table I'm putting a high quality nutrient-dense on the percent grass-fed and parsley tansy fish lamb on my table to feed my family as well as sharing some with neighbors so then you're telling me you're an Eastern Shepherd where you lead the Sheep you're not a Western Shepherd where you drive the Sheep you borrow ideas from all the different concepts absolutely Oh golly I take what works and leave behind what doesn't so what's a Western concept you've adapted I got your Western idea like trick net yes you don't have your son out there herding his sheep all day do you buddy I don't this is capital e homestead scale American Americanized permaculture adopted from the apron we're in permaculture taking it yeah absolutely he's got the he's got the the Western hat too so pretty good on me all right that's it good you represent permaculture well it takes all these different ideas and connects them that's right and it everybody's context is different I can't stress this enough what because our scale is so small here we are not on a thousand acre ranch you stay there and watching them Dan you stay there watching them [Music] that is my favorite part when the sheep go from their old paddock to the new paddock on fresh grass there's something so peaceful and relaxing about seeing the sheep on grass it's the best part of husbandry come take a look at this when you see these sheep just going to town on these the fresh vegetation they hear it hearing them chew and rip the the vegetation from its stem there's just nothing like it [Laughter] hey it's not every day I get to film a fellow youtuber and he can totally take over the channel and bring this whole nother dynamic right you got to check out his channel grass-fed homestead I'll leave the link down in the description and right there okay man Oh help us out somebody wants to do this they need to move their sheep every day number one how are they gonna know how much to give them that is it's a really complicated answer because it really it really changes on your context and the season what kind of forage you have in your pastures so I'll answer that question for our context and hope that helps somebody right we moved here just 13 months ago and when we were looking for property I had no idea what I was looking at when I was looking at pastures I just saw some green stuff and I thought yeah that looks all right I what I didn't know at the time is our forage quality was extremely poor it was overwritten with noxious weeds that most animals wouldn't really touch anyway so it's part of our regeneration process here we're grazing the Sheep we're pulsing them through every day but in most cases I could give them an enormous paddock and it's not going to give them the they need because of the low quality Ford sit there so I'm doing something this is something I got from Greg Judy myself hearing a talk years ago was bringing your first couple years you're probably going to be intensive bringing in hey you're probably gonna have to bring in a lot of that if you're establishing a pasture so so for me I'm giving them enough area I'm kind of looking at it it's based on history right so how quickly did they eat the last paddock if it were you know 2 4 hours and it's stripped down to nothing then you need to give them a bigger space you so you keep playing with that until you get it to where it takes about a day in in my case I'm giving them a look like this area here they will have all this grass stripped out by this evening and then the tansy will be left because and they'll say they'll eat that tomorrow morning ok so this is about the size for this many sheep if I had really good quality pasture so to answer your question I'm I'm bringing in the hay and I'm supplement feeding them with hay okay and what that is doing is I'm bringing in nutrition from elsewhere processing it through the Sheep making sure they get enough nutrition that they wouldn't otherwise get from my question and they're depositing it back on the land and that's free choice they can eat that if they want to or not correct now to move their basic needs looks like we got the hay feeder the water and the shed let's do it man so this I designed to be super light it's something I can move by myself oh my but it's also going to provide one of the sheeps basically one of the sheets one of the sheep basic needs which is some shelter from come on in the in the summer okay well then you're making it too easy on yourself this isn't much of a workout buddy this is no earth gym when it's this easy come on bulk up man oh come you got my feet there you go make it hard on yourself there you go get some curls I've designed everything on our homestead to be completely mobile portable because like I said earlier we've only been here a year and though I'm very committed to this lifestyle not committed to any one design at this point I don't know where I want stuff exactly things are always changing the seasons are changing how I manage is involving daily so I don't want to just have a static shelter somewhere because I want to move it maybe someday yeah no this is my everything's mobile modular and forgot the other end Joel Salatin Tasha but yeah it's a magnificent magnificent originally I was hauling out five-gallon buckets to the sheep's paddock each day which is not fun especially when they're you know 300 yards that way so I went ahead and finally got some extra hoses and I'm dragging hoses now which is a lot lighter big expense yeah I imagine that little shelter you built there cost $55 well I used cedar as on the base may have ended a hundred and five dollars I don't even think was that much I can't remember how much that was but that was not expensive you're the EMT conduit it's $2 a piece there's four of those on there a couple two by twos and some two by fours yeah it's pretty simple it's that much more than $50 here okay that's it I gotta do is close it up and you're done well I feel the water but yeah okay chores are done let's see what everybody else's do let's get hot okay man it is much cooler in here you guys got the idea yeah keeping it cool didn't comfortable what y'all been talking about like I suspect there's been some Girl Talk going on in here yes Girl Talk you've been talking about how handsome Dan and I are suggestin yeah we gave you a little introduction to sheep okay and is our hope here that we have somehow planted some kind of seed in you too that will blossom into you guys getting your own chief when you get back home okay so you know you don't have to commit to that at this point but we got you a little something as a piece of encouragement for you okay I think that whistling was encouraging enough he whistles and the Sheep come really that way so Anna give me a stand this is this is called a shepherd's crook and this was handmade in Germany what and these are sold by premier one it's a little Fleck for those guys see there's no hit stuff but this was handmade hand-carved in Germany and these are these are very instrumental in times when things go wrong and that does happen from time to time where you have a a lamb or sheep that goes wayward when during a moves and this is a really good way to help bring them back and you can steer with it like if there's an animal on this even go left if you just put that up it just puts a little pressure on their flight zone and they'll be R to the left you can steer them to the right or if you need to catch for medical treatment and they're a little flighty especially little lambs I don't know yet you can grab on and I treat them so this is our gift to you here at the grasp at home so okay thank you very much appreciate it and until I get sheep I can use it on much other snow that go right that's a wrap dan is a wealth of information about sheep I sat down with him to also create a more instructional video on how to raise sheep from the springtime to a processing a harvesting to putting them on your plate we filmed that today and actually what we thought would be one but actually turned into three so we're working through some things stay tuned on how we might make that available to you guys until then do check out Dan's channel I'll leave a link to it again right there it's good he's a wealth of information I think it's like over three hundred videos she pigs chickens they're one year homestead journey I'll leave the link but you


 
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How to Set up a Profitable (backyard) Farm wherever you are

Justin Rhodes posted the article • 0 comments • 282 views • 2017-09-21 06:09 • came from similar tags

 
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my name is Chris stone I'm an urban farmer I run an operation called green city acres in Kelowna BC Canada [Music] saw thousands of people all around the world how to grow food in their backyards and make a living at doing it [Music] my primary audience or people that I teach are people who are kind of sick of their jobs to go what they're doing and they want to do something that aligns with their values you know that those values usually growing food and living off the land in some way [Applause] [Music] [Applause] though a lot of people that I've taught have been even people like lawyers and professionals working professionals who are kind of just tired of the grind and want to do something a bit more holistic so the first thing that's really important if you want to start making the living with a small farm is first identify your market place figure out if there's actually people in your area that want to buy this kind of stuff and you know we're talking about specific crops that's really important we're generally growing high-value fast-growing high yield per square foot crops and if there isn't a market for those crops if nobody in your area knows about salad mixes or microgreens or baby root vegetables then it might not work in area but that's number one you can go and build a farm and plant crops till you're blue in the face but if nobody's gonna buy it then it's all for nothing so these were all planted on Wednesday and today is Sunday so I'm uncovering them now I put the weights on there to create a bit of resistance and that just gives makes them Germany more consistently right to the edge kind of mimics nature in a way if you think about it because you know seeds will often have not ideal conditions to germinate in and that makes a nice nice even germinated crop and then we'll harvest these by Thursday so it's an 8 day cycle from seed to harvest that crop is sunflower and that's one of our main microgreens we knew sunflower pea and radish are most common ones but then I have these other odds and ends ones here but this is an important part of how our farms profitable is we're focusing on high-value crops these are certainly the highest valued crop they're the shortest date to maturity high yield per square foot highest price per pound and I can grow them year-round so those are those are characteristics that make a profitable crop and I outline not in my book but you know our farm isn't growing pumpkins and potatoes and melons we're growing salad greens microgreens cherry tomatoes but it's mostly about the crops that we can grow year round that really bring in the revenue of our farm number one mistake is that well it's not just urban it's a farmer makes the number one mistake as they take on too much they try to do too many things they come in that they watched channels like yours and mine and they get all these ideas all I want to do this I want to do rainwater catchment I want to live off the grid I want to do it all and then they don't get anything done because they have too many goals and it's really best to just get one thing done dial it in make it good go to the next thing and so that goes for crops to farmers often grow too many crops and the problem with that is that if you grow too many crops you don't learn all the nuances of the crops because you're not paying close enough attention you got too much going on so you're running around putting out fires when you grow less you can learn more about what you're growing look at this I got some slugs growing in my with my son shoots so that's pea shoots same thing eight days to harvest and this is gonna be harvested tomorrow so when the guys come in tomorrow morning that'll be one of the first things they do and so we're harvesting the whole flat we get a little over a pound per flat and that sells for about $15 per pound so on each flat we're making at least 20 bucks so that's an eight-day crop $20 great thing about these two is that I can vertical eyes the space so as the Sun Goes Down lower in the sky close to the winter this greenhouse actually captures more light and I can grow more stuff with less energy because I don't need I don't need I don't use artificial light I do the odd time here and there but for the most part it's all just natural light so the second thing is finding out where you want to farm finding some land now you don't have to own land to farm most people think you do that's what I thought until I found that I could farm people's backyards that's exactly why I do what I do is sort of out of default it wasn't because I wanted to be an urban farmer I just didn't have any other alternatives so there's many different ways you can find land you can lease land you can rent land you can buy land if it's cheap you can buy land if you want to pay for it it's up to you but one thing that's really important to know is there's nothing wrong with leasing or renting land for a period of time because if you buy a land and then realize after a year you don't like farming it's not for you well now you're stuck with this land and now it's a liability to you a number of people that I've consulted for have bought land bought all the gear put up fifty thousand dollars of capital and then realized after two years that just wasn't for them or there was flaws in their marketplace that they should have identified earlier they didn't like the lifestyle there's a variety of different reasons but I've seen it happen time and time again that's why there's an advantage to actually not buying the land when you start because you can just get in grease the wheels if you like it build a farm somewhere else I've turned over twenty different plots of land and I set up multiple farms it's not that big of a deal to have to do it a couple times in fact it just makes you better because then the next time around you're gonna do it a lot better than you did the first time so there's actually an advantage to leasing and renting land the other part of that too is that sometimes the land to buy isn't in an ideal location and this is why I ended up in Kelowna is because cologne is a really good marketplace and so just like from step number one was identify a market place I wanted to be in that market place but as no way I could have afforded to buy land here so I just leased land to start was giving people vegetables in exchange for the use of their land so that's how I got into it sometimes the marketplace itself is more important than the land because you can change your land around later on but it's first establishing that market place so keep in mind you don't have to own land to start farming everything in my greenhouse is I used quick couplers because sometimes I want to use this really soft spray to water these crops so that it doesn't knock them over and then sometimes I want a heavier spray from some of my other microgreens and I'll show you both but I can switch these up really quickly and I love that because then then I don't have to sit there and unscrew it so for these ones I like to use this off spray salad over lettuce this is our probably our most valuable this is certainly our most valuable field crop we it's the base of our salad mix and we grow it around ten months of the year it's very valuable crop these are some more of the dainty type microgreens that we grow that's read and ran this is radish here this is cabbage that I'm watering right here all these go in a mix that we grow called the rainbow mix it's a micro green salad mix and then for these crops I switch my water nozzle and then these ones like the bit these ones take more water so I must have something that's not a good flow I'm just gonna turn something off for a second there's probably a stunning irrigation running yeah there you go nice big flow this dumps down a lot more water it's still a soft spray but it just dumps down a lot of water so it's faster to water and these crops are more robust so they can handle it you shouldn't market farm if you don't like getting dirty and working hard and if you don't like being in a community and you don't like talking to people you shouldn't be a market gardener one thing about being a market gardener or farmer is that you really have to fill a lot of different roles you've got to you got to be a people person and if you're not you can hire somebody to do that but you've got to be out there talking to people getting to know people in the community and and you also got to be a business manager you got to be out pulling weeds planting stuff then taking it to market delivering it to restaurants making customers doing the books I wear many different hats in this business I've learned and it's great because it really gives you experience doing all kinds of things if we're looking at five stages here is to set up your post harvest area so this is the area where you wash and dry things and you pack things you store things in walk-in coolers this is one of the things that is most overlooked so many farmers think just go Terra plant start planting crops and it'll sell itself that's far from the truth because what happens is if you don't have this post harvest stuff set up you're gonna bottleneck and you're gonna have so much stuff coming off the field and you don't have a place to wash it and pack it and store it that you're gonna let stuffs gonna spoil and if you've gone out and planted crops without having this in mind then all that's for nothing and you're losing because now you've done that work and then you're not selling that crop so the post harvest is very important walk-in coolers in particular are probably one of the most critical pieces of infrastructure on any commercial farm so the walk-in cooler allows you to store the product for longer which allows you to market for a multiple day as opposed to just packing everything for a farmers market and then hoping to sell it the next day but most importantly it allows you to get the field heat off so after you harvest vegetables out of the ground they're warm and if you don't cool them right away to slow down that process of decomposition they're gonna keep breaking down and you're gonna spoil this is our washing table so this is where we got a sprayer here so this is where I wash things all the water gets diverted into a pump and I pump it on my trees but so this these carrots were just harvested the other day actually the last time you were here and they were soaking in water and so this is how I wash carrots I put them in a tote like this watch out a little bit shake them around spray some water on here and this essentially gets the dirt off so there's this is you know DIY and we don't do that many carrots so this works for our context if I was doing hundreds of pounds of carrots a week I would have a proper carrot washer but for us this washing table works great for for this I do radish is the same way beets turnips I'll do it the same way and so it's shaking this around and spraying some water on here step number four and getting this all going is start preparing your land and I put that after the post harvest intentionally so that the post harvest is prepared first so that when you start doing this stuff you can you can kind of chip away at that stuff too but starting to prepare your land so there's many different contexts here you could be really rural and have a slope with lots of rocks or you could be in a prairie with tons of quack grass or you could be in a backyard grinding up yard like lawns so there's many different approach it basically what is involved usually is going in and go grinding up the raw land so going into the cultivator or a roto tiller to bring up the soil and start working it from there with lawns my favorite thing to do is tarp it for six months if I if I know that I'm looking at a new site and I'm on prepare it for next season that's the most ideal if you can have at least six months to prepare it you can let time do the work and you can lay down silage tarps on that lawn let it kill off the grass and all the weeds so once you pull the tarp off then you can start cultivating but ideally letting that tarp sit there for six months even a year if you've got the time it's gonna make it so much easier to go in and do the prep work afterwards once you pull the tarp off and do that initial cultivation then you're gonna start forming out your beds so everything we do in our Market Garden is a 30 inch bed this is very standard for market gardens myself Sean Maher 1040a Ben Hartman we all do the 30 inch bed that's become a standard and small farming so now you can start forming out your beds and there's I could keep going on but I think that's that you basically get the gist of how you get started there this is called the tiller and it's essentially a roto tiller but it only it's only telling the top inch of soil this is the Jiang cedar this is my number one seating tool it has different densities you can plant at it's very accurate all of this like this was planted with the Jiang cedar that's arugula crops meaning that I'm just planting right in the soil and they're growing from there opposed to being transplants so the last thing that's gonna happen on your farm is gonna start planting you got all your beds prepped you got your structure in place now you're gonna start planting you're gonna be planting stuff in the nursery at the beginning of the season getting things ready to go for transplants to go in the field and then once the spring comes along you start direct seeding in the field and there's a lot of nuances to planting there's a lot of different ways to do it but what's really important about planting is understanding succession is that on a farm in order to have production consistently throughout the season you have to keep planting you can't just plant a bunch of stuff in May and then be harvesting all summer it doesn't work that way you got to continuously plant so there's a lot of nuances to how far to spread your plantings apart and at what times of the year the biggest challenge for us in North America and this is the same for people in the southern hemisphere is that our day lengths change radically from the winter solstice to the spring equinox to the summer solstice the days are getting exponentially longer and that they get exponentially longer quicker after we pass this the spring equinox from the spring equinox to the summer solstice the day's get radically long we're in the summer here we're at 18 and a half hours of daylight at the summer solstice but at the winter solstice we're at eight hours of daylight or seven and a half so it's radically different and so the challenge for for a market grower is to learn the nuances of their bioregion so I can't teach you this exactly I can teach you what it is in Kelowna but you're gonna have to apply that information to yourself and one quick tip I have to do that is record everything you do in your first year of spreadsheets record when a crop goes in the ground and when you harvested it because you can plant spinach at the first week of March and it might take 65 days to harvest but if you plant it in June it might be ready in 30 days so it's different and it's constantly changing and these are the nuances that we have to learn as farmers and we can really only learn them from just doing it ourselves so this whole greenhouse is actually or most of it is one succession this is all planted at once to beds of radishes planted at once to beds of arugula planted at once to beds of spinach planted at once so that's a that was like a weekly block of planting so on another plot I've got the exact same thing that's a week prior and a week after so the thing that's really neat about the seasons changing is that at the beginning of the season in the springtime I'm actually doing wider successions on planting things in wider intervals like two or three week intervals but then as I get into the summer I need to start planting things in weekly intervals and here's the root the thing that's kind of weird is that is you go into the fall you actually start to tighten it up even more you might actually start planting every four days the reason for that is that in the fall the days are now getting exponentially longer so if I plant a crop on Monday and then I plant a crop on Thursday say this is in the last week of September they actually might end up being two weeks apart because that crop that was planted four days after is at starting at a different point where it's gonna have a lot long shorter days and cooler nights whereas in the springtime you things are gonna grow slower but they're gonna catch up to one another so in the springtime if you say it's the first week of April if I plant a crop of radishes one week and then a crop radishes the next week same Monday and Monday they both end up being ready at the same time that's where it gets kind of nuanced but you learn all these things just through experience the thing I love about doing this is that each day I go to bed feeling like I feel connected I feel connected the land I feel connected to my community one of the greatest things about being an urban farmer in particular is that I'll be at my front yard doing stuff and people walk by and they go this is a great idea I love what you're doing why are we growing lawns it makes people think about stuff and I don't even have to engage them or evangelize them in any ways this is why you should eat organic food this is why you should grow your own food or any of that people walk by and they see the production and it makes sense them and I love at the end of the day knowing that I'm working in the soil growing food good healthy food that people are eating and it really gives me an amazing life purpose sure I could do other things sure I could have gone to university and been a doctor or a lawyer or whatever but this kind of thing it really comes back to community connection and having an intrinsic value in a new community knowing that I'm needed as a food producer people need me people rely on me [Music] [Applause] Curtis is just important to some files he shot some videos of this today isn't that cool like he has the Steadicam gimbal you know the walk along smooth shots he did the drone footage he's a fellow youtuber it is so fun filming fellow youtubers especially when they contribute two of the three cameras so if you enjoyed that do please check out Curtis at his YouTube channel I'll leave the link for that there and down in the description also you gotta want to check out his website where you can get cool resources like the urban farmer the book and the course and stuff like that on his website I'll leave the link down below


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my name is Chris stone I'm an urban farmer I run an operation called green city acres in Kelowna BC Canada [Music] saw thousands of people all around the world how to grow food in their backyards and make a living at doing it [Music] my primary audience or people that I teach are people who are kind of sick of their jobs to go what they're doing and they want to do something that aligns with their values you know that those values usually growing food and living off the land in some way [Applause] [Music] [Applause] though a lot of people that I've taught have been even people like lawyers and professionals working professionals who are kind of just tired of the grind and want to do something a bit more holistic so the first thing that's really important if you want to start making the living with a small farm is first identify your market place figure out if there's actually people in your area that want to buy this kind of stuff and you know we're talking about specific crops that's really important we're generally growing high-value fast-growing high yield per square foot crops and if there isn't a market for those crops if nobody in your area knows about salad mixes or microgreens or baby root vegetables then it might not work in area but that's number one you can go and build a farm and plant crops till you're blue in the face but if nobody's gonna buy it then it's all for nothing so these were all planted on Wednesday and today is Sunday so I'm uncovering them now I put the weights on there to create a bit of resistance and that just gives makes them Germany more consistently right to the edge kind of mimics nature in a way if you think about it because you know seeds will often have not ideal conditions to germinate in and that makes a nice nice even germinated crop and then we'll harvest these by Thursday so it's an 8 day cycle from seed to harvest that crop is sunflower and that's one of our main microgreens we knew sunflower pea and radish are most common ones but then I have these other odds and ends ones here but this is an important part of how our farms profitable is we're focusing on high-value crops these are certainly the highest valued crop they're the shortest date to maturity high yield per square foot highest price per pound and I can grow them year-round so those are those are characteristics that make a profitable crop and I outline not in my book but you know our farm isn't growing pumpkins and potatoes and melons we're growing salad greens microgreens cherry tomatoes but it's mostly about the crops that we can grow year round that really bring in the revenue of our farm number one mistake is that well it's not just urban it's a farmer makes the number one mistake as they take on too much they try to do too many things they come in that they watched channels like yours and mine and they get all these ideas all I want to do this I want to do rainwater catchment I want to live off the grid I want to do it all and then they don't get anything done because they have too many goals and it's really best to just get one thing done dial it in make it good go to the next thing and so that goes for crops to farmers often grow too many crops and the problem with that is that if you grow too many crops you don't learn all the nuances of the crops because you're not paying close enough attention you got too much going on so you're running around putting out fires when you grow less you can learn more about what you're growing look at this I got some slugs growing in my with my son shoots so that's pea shoots same thing eight days to harvest and this is gonna be harvested tomorrow so when the guys come in tomorrow morning that'll be one of the first things they do and so we're harvesting the whole flat we get a little over a pound per flat and that sells for about $15 per pound so on each flat we're making at least 20 bucks so that's an eight-day crop $20 great thing about these two is that I can vertical eyes the space so as the Sun Goes Down lower in the sky close to the winter this greenhouse actually captures more light and I can grow more stuff with less energy because I don't need I don't need I don't use artificial light I do the odd time here and there but for the most part it's all just natural light so the second thing is finding out where you want to farm finding some land now you don't have to own land to farm most people think you do that's what I thought until I found that I could farm people's backyards that's exactly why I do what I do is sort of out of default it wasn't because I wanted to be an urban farmer I just didn't have any other alternatives so there's many different ways you can find land you can lease land you can rent land you can buy land if it's cheap you can buy land if you want to pay for it it's up to you but one thing that's really important to know is there's nothing wrong with leasing or renting land for a period of time because if you buy a land and then realize after a year you don't like farming it's not for you well now you're stuck with this land and now it's a liability to you a number of people that I've consulted for have bought land bought all the gear put up fifty thousand dollars of capital and then realized after two years that just wasn't for them or there was flaws in their marketplace that they should have identified earlier they didn't like the lifestyle there's a variety of different reasons but I've seen it happen time and time again that's why there's an advantage to actually not buying the land when you start because you can just get in grease the wheels if you like it build a farm somewhere else I've turned over twenty different plots of land and I set up multiple farms it's not that big of a deal to have to do it a couple times in fact it just makes you better because then the next time around you're gonna do it a lot better than you did the first time so there's actually an advantage to leasing and renting land the other part of that too is that sometimes the land to buy isn't in an ideal location and this is why I ended up in Kelowna is because cologne is a really good marketplace and so just like from step number one was identify a market place I wanted to be in that market place but as no way I could have afforded to buy land here so I just leased land to start was giving people vegetables in exchange for the use of their land so that's how I got into it sometimes the marketplace itself is more important than the land because you can change your land around later on but it's first establishing that market place so keep in mind you don't have to own land to start farming everything in my greenhouse is I used quick couplers because sometimes I want to use this really soft spray to water these crops so that it doesn't knock them over and then sometimes I want a heavier spray from some of my other microgreens and I'll show you both but I can switch these up really quickly and I love that because then then I don't have to sit there and unscrew it so for these ones I like to use this off spray salad over lettuce this is our probably our most valuable this is certainly our most valuable field crop we it's the base of our salad mix and we grow it around ten months of the year it's very valuable crop these are some more of the dainty type microgreens that we grow that's read and ran this is radish here this is cabbage that I'm watering right here all these go in a mix that we grow called the rainbow mix it's a micro green salad mix and then for these crops I switch my water nozzle and then these ones like the bit these ones take more water so I must have something that's not a good flow I'm just gonna turn something off for a second there's probably a stunning irrigation running yeah there you go nice big flow this dumps down a lot more water it's still a soft spray but it just dumps down a lot of water so it's faster to water and these crops are more robust so they can handle it you shouldn't market farm if you don't like getting dirty and working hard and if you don't like being in a community and you don't like talking to people you shouldn't be a market gardener one thing about being a market gardener or farmer is that you really have to fill a lot of different roles you've got to you got to be a people person and if you're not you can hire somebody to do that but you've got to be out there talking to people getting to know people in the community and and you also got to be a business manager you got to be out pulling weeds planting stuff then taking it to market delivering it to restaurants making customers doing the books I wear many different hats in this business I've learned and it's great because it really gives you experience doing all kinds of things if we're looking at five stages here is to set up your post harvest area so this is the area where you wash and dry things and you pack things you store things in walk-in coolers this is one of the things that is most overlooked so many farmers think just go Terra plant start planting crops and it'll sell itself that's far from the truth because what happens is if you don't have this post harvest stuff set up you're gonna bottleneck and you're gonna have so much stuff coming off the field and you don't have a place to wash it and pack it and store it that you're gonna let stuffs gonna spoil and if you've gone out and planted crops without having this in mind then all that's for nothing and you're losing because now you've done that work and then you're not selling that crop so the post harvest is very important walk-in coolers in particular are probably one of the most critical pieces of infrastructure on any commercial farm so the walk-in cooler allows you to store the product for longer which allows you to market for a multiple day as opposed to just packing everything for a farmers market and then hoping to sell it the next day but most importantly it allows you to get the field heat off so after you harvest vegetables out of the ground they're warm and if you don't cool them right away to slow down that process of decomposition they're gonna keep breaking down and you're gonna spoil this is our washing table so this is where we got a sprayer here so this is where I wash things all the water gets diverted into a pump and I pump it on my trees but so this these carrots were just harvested the other day actually the last time you were here and they were soaking in water and so this is how I wash carrots I put them in a tote like this watch out a little bit shake them around spray some water on here and this essentially gets the dirt off so there's this is you know DIY and we don't do that many carrots so this works for our context if I was doing hundreds of pounds of carrots a week I would have a proper carrot washer but for us this washing table works great for for this I do radish is the same way beets turnips I'll do it the same way and so it's shaking this around and spraying some water on here step number four and getting this all going is start preparing your land and I put that after the post harvest intentionally so that the post harvest is prepared first so that when you start doing this stuff you can you can kind of chip away at that stuff too but starting to prepare your land so there's many different contexts here you could be really rural and have a slope with lots of rocks or you could be in a prairie with tons of quack grass or you could be in a backyard grinding up yard like lawns so there's many different approach it basically what is involved usually is going in and go grinding up the raw land so going into the cultivator or a roto tiller to bring up the soil and start working it from there with lawns my favorite thing to do is tarp it for six months if I if I know that I'm looking at a new site and I'm on prepare it for next season that's the most ideal if you can have at least six months to prepare it you can let time do the work and you can lay down silage tarps on that lawn let it kill off the grass and all the weeds so once you pull the tarp off then you can start cultivating but ideally letting that tarp sit there for six months even a year if you've got the time it's gonna make it so much easier to go in and do the prep work afterwards once you pull the tarp off and do that initial cultivation then you're gonna start forming out your beds so everything we do in our Market Garden is a 30 inch bed this is very standard for market gardens myself Sean Maher 1040a Ben Hartman we all do the 30 inch bed that's become a standard and small farming so now you can start forming out your beds and there's I could keep going on but I think that's that you basically get the gist of how you get started there this is called the tiller and it's essentially a roto tiller but it only it's only telling the top inch of soil this is the Jiang cedar this is my number one seating tool it has different densities you can plant at it's very accurate all of this like this was planted with the Jiang cedar that's arugula crops meaning that I'm just planting right in the soil and they're growing from there opposed to being transplants so the last thing that's gonna happen on your farm is gonna start planting you got all your beds prepped you got your structure in place now you're gonna start planting you're gonna be planting stuff in the nursery at the beginning of the season getting things ready to go for transplants to go in the field and then once the spring comes along you start direct seeding in the field and there's a lot of nuances to planting there's a lot of different ways to do it but what's really important about planting is understanding succession is that on a farm in order to have production consistently throughout the season you have to keep planting you can't just plant a bunch of stuff in May and then be harvesting all summer it doesn't work that way you got to continuously plant so there's a lot of nuances to how far to spread your plantings apart and at what times of the year the biggest challenge for us in North America and this is the same for people in the southern hemisphere is that our day lengths change radically from the winter solstice to the spring equinox to the summer solstice the days are getting exponentially longer and that they get exponentially longer quicker after we pass this the spring equinox from the spring equinox to the summer solstice the day's get radically long we're in the summer here we're at 18 and a half hours of daylight at the summer solstice but at the winter solstice we're at eight hours of daylight or seven and a half so it's radically different and so the challenge for for a market grower is to learn the nuances of their bioregion so I can't teach you this exactly I can teach you what it is in Kelowna but you're gonna have to apply that information to yourself and one quick tip I have to do that is record everything you do in your first year of spreadsheets record when a crop goes in the ground and when you harvested it because you can plant spinach at the first week of March and it might take 65 days to harvest but if you plant it in June it might be ready in 30 days so it's different and it's constantly changing and these are the nuances that we have to learn as farmers and we can really only learn them from just doing it ourselves so this whole greenhouse is actually or most of it is one succession this is all planted at once to beds of radishes planted at once to beds of arugula planted at once to beds of spinach planted at once so that's a that was like a weekly block of planting so on another plot I've got the exact same thing that's a week prior and a week after so the thing that's really neat about the seasons changing is that at the beginning of the season in the springtime I'm actually doing wider successions on planting things in wider intervals like two or three week intervals but then as I get into the summer I need to start planting things in weekly intervals and here's the root the thing that's kind of weird is that is you go into the fall you actually start to tighten it up even more you might actually start planting every four days the reason for that is that in the fall the days are now getting exponentially longer so if I plant a crop on Monday and then I plant a crop on Thursday say this is in the last week of September they actually might end up being two weeks apart because that crop that was planted four days after is at starting at a different point where it's gonna have a lot long shorter days and cooler nights whereas in the springtime you things are gonna grow slower but they're gonna catch up to one another so in the springtime if you say it's the first week of April if I plant a crop of radishes one week and then a crop radishes the next week same Monday and Monday they both end up being ready at the same time that's where it gets kind of nuanced but you learn all these things just through experience the thing I love about doing this is that each day I go to bed feeling like I feel connected I feel connected the land I feel connected to my community one of the greatest things about being an urban farmer in particular is that I'll be at my front yard doing stuff and people walk by and they go this is a great idea I love what you're doing why are we growing lawns it makes people think about stuff and I don't even have to engage them or evangelize them in any ways this is why you should eat organic food this is why you should grow your own food or any of that people walk by and they see the production and it makes sense them and I love at the end of the day knowing that I'm working in the soil growing food good healthy food that people are eating and it really gives me an amazing life purpose sure I could do other things sure I could have gone to university and been a doctor or a lawyer or whatever but this kind of thing it really comes back to community connection and having an intrinsic value in a new community knowing that I'm needed as a food producer people need me people rely on me [Music] [Applause] Curtis is just important to some files he shot some videos of this today isn't that cool like he has the Steadicam gimbal you know the walk along smooth shots he did the drone footage he's a fellow youtuber it is so fun filming fellow youtubers especially when they contribute two of the three cameras so if you enjoyed that do please check out Curtis at his YouTube channel I'll leave the link for that there and down in the description also you gotta want to check out his website where you can get cool resources like the urban farmer the book and the course and stuff like that on his website I'll leave the link down below


 
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Rookie (Alaskan) Farmers: FAILS | WINS

Justin Rhodes posted the article • 0 comments • 354 views • 2017-09-21 06:09 • came from similar tags

 

 
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it's your first year on the farm now your first time first year on the farm your rookie yes yeah you feel like a ready a total rookie I've made too many mistakes today's feature what sila Alaska where life went north a couple of folks moved up here from Oregon fellow youtubers let's see what's going on you're the first stop with your own landing strip congratulations yeah where's your plane I don't have a plane wait a minute I thought I realize I'm supposed to have a plane yes there you go okay you're new Alaska do have a snow you do have a snow plow we do have a snow plow okay check it off the last we don't have a snow machine yet because we got chastised for things you don't say yeah yeah they have a truck so they're just chicken journalist yeah there's a lot of that gear required my name is Mindy and we are in Wasilla Alaska we are from a small town in Oregon where we did urban homesteading and we just decided we wanted some more land to kind of set up a more serious homestead and we thought Alaska sounded like a pretty cool place but we just felt drawn to come to Alaska I don't know it's kind of inexplicable that we both had that that feeling of that pull to come here and our kids are still pretty young so we decided if we were ever going to have an adventure move now would be the time to do it so we failed pretty epically at cucumbers this year epic fail epic fail on that we need to start way earlier next year turning our seeds zucchinis are doing okay but probably could have started those earlier too we don't have any giant produce to show you unfortunately no no any one pound cabbage it has been a very weird summer here this year it's been really rainy and and not a lot of sunshine so I think so you need that wasn't it more fun they say this is a beautiful day rare day in Alaska look at this day and look at that view [Music] what are you gonna do next year I think next year we're gonna focus on root crops do more carrots because they're super sweet hair there's something about the soil here that makes for a really awesome carrot so I think we'll do way more of those more beets and the previous owner said potatoes do really well here so all right Charles show us your plane right yeah we have it drove it you've turned this hanger into a barn Lavar good job eventually we're thinking goats will live in here okay but for this winter we're gonna overwinter the chickens and the ducks keep them out of the elements the Ducks are pretty cold hardy but the chickens especially with their combs okay some issues hey did your parents thank you or nuts oh they're mostly mad because we left them that's hard this everybody fancy doc here we need an upgrade soon those are the sandhill cranes over there hmm and they're huge when they light on the landing strip they're pretty big you can get out on the dog Vinci go ahead Big Daddy right out to the end I heard it I got the camera going more sandhill cranes up there guys the Ducks have made it back we have four Campbell khakis for Swedish blues three buck Cayuga and for chocolate runner they legs they're still pretty young they're just gonna be there a few months old we got on this spring so they haven't laid off and yaks know where our plan is to use them for a if we can ever find the eggs along the shoreline or something they get to come down to the lake all day and come on to plant and then come up to the house and have their duck food yeah they're up at the door at like 7:00 a.m. every single day quacking for breakfast yeah I can hear em quacking from bed you open the door and they all run up and have their breakfast and then they all head down to the lake bon voyage [Music] [Music] we are bowed [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] one more thing before we go you got to see this you got to see this greenhouse attached to this house this is really nice I dream of doing this yeah it's really nice it gets pretty hot in here actually it gets like 90 degrees yeah oh so much warmer there there's like a vent you know when he or 99y comes on and helps and you're able to grow tomatoes well we are trying we need to start earlier next year but we just got one red tomato just yesterday are you still in a hurry been planting schedule is that what's going on here so I'll just start a little bit earlier next year so okay good thanks for be sure to check these guys out life goes north YouTube channel I'll leave the link in the description onward to the next place a rookie market farmer in Alaska actually before we go to the farm how to change plans it's such a clear and beautiful Bay and the locals say that's pretty rare we're gonna go see if we can't see then off the Denali mountain yeah Denali so we're gonna go to the town called will oh well oh well then we'll go to talk to you which is 53 miles away Talkeetna so we're hoping we see it at willow but we're only here once and that is the tallest mountain in North America let's do it hey guys remember the journey is the destination [Music] we came over the hill and there was a range of mountains that were just incredible and beautiful and I kind of had to take a moment and be like is this is it this is it like this is what we came to see Denali so it was it was incredible it it's like inspiring [Applause] [Applause] [Music] what planes in Alaska there there they got everything here we're at our farm check it out Matt one of the viewers met him at the Meetup we've got greenhouses has a house built at all kids what are you guys gonna come on the tour I heard he's got strawberries as big as an apple oh that got him up that got him up yeah we're gonna go on a strawberry hunt here guys the strawberry season is over but he said he still has some fruits but first what's what are you doing with these Tomatoes Matt well we're at killing them actually murdering them you two made a murderer yeah so time to get these out until we get too cold and put in something else are you serious if she harvesting the green tomatoes yes are you gonna make fried green tomatoes no time you're just dreaming okay no do you know about fried green tomatoes oh yeah actually I'm video on okay good and so we're gonna try that here it'll be my first time okay so can you use panko breadcrumbs instead of cornmeal or is it just right I just use cornmeal cause I'm gluten free comes the rest of the period don't you need a properly energized everybody everybody all right there's my wife Jenny hello hey Jimmy is McKenna okay come on jumping jacks just no dance let's see this place yeah come on in now where are you from so originally I'm from Arizona okay so why in the world Alaska oh man I don't know I just wanted to change you know what about it yeah how many years you've been here 15 years yeah yeah yeah they say half the people leave after two yeah that is true what you're committed you don't miss Arizona no I see pictures of back home and it's like I am no thanks okay alright I don't mind the heat but I could I could never live without all the green you know again yeah okay so anyway this is our green house I just like I said we're ripped out a bunch of tomatoes had 300 tomato plants in here this year and we had just a crummy wet season we're cloudy all summer long and so the tomatoes just struggled all summer so yeah just time to rip them out put in something that's going to take the cold a little bit better okay so we got a little few peppers over here we just drill for ourselves and some celery mostly all we do in here is greens spew cucumbers back there these are my raised beds that are heated for the winter time hmm so hot water feel that I turn the hot water side oh wow so these pipes it's just like in floor key too but you'd have in your house yep and they just circulate through there and warm the soil and when it's really cold I'll cover this with another low tunnel another layer of poly mm-hmm and it'll be you know zero degrees outside or ten below and underneath that plastic will be 65 70 degrees so you're this this will survive the winter yes absolutely even without the daylight well I have these and which we're getting ready to start doing that prep work here pretty quick okay who's we my wife and I so Jenni and I we run pretty much this whole farm okay we are you doing full-time yep it's your first year on the farm knowing your first time first year on the farm your rookie yes yeah feel like a ready a total rookie I've made so many mistakes so many mistakes oh you know what I've learned a lot and I know what I'm gonna do next year they're gonna be better than this year and we have it and if we just loved making this transition from a regular construction - now this what do you what was your biggest mistake man probably trying to do too much too quick I think you know we'll see when we go out to the strawberry patch that it is inundated with weeds and which didn't really hurt the production too much but and really what is a weed but but I think just trying to do too much and and too many variety of things you know we tried growing about 40 50 different types of vegetables and next year that's going to shrink down by probably half maybe even more hey you guys ready to go do the strawberries okay I wonder who can find the biggest strawberry out there an Alaskan sized strawberry let's go let's see the strawberry the biggest strawberry you win buddy I think you got the biggest one the reason I planted so many strawberries and I liked I grow strawberries is because I like them I started growing things that I liked because I wanted to not get burned out I wanted to have passion for what I was doing and if I can walk into the greenhouse and pick a bell pepper and eat it while I'm working that's a reward for me yes and same thing with the strawberries and peas and whatever else growing it makes me wonder where's the bacon Yeah right some pigs run it in there right I will someday you will but you got to take one thing at a time yeah look at that perfect look at that look at that one and they taste so good I can't believe how sweetie have you tasted it yeah you got come eat the strawberries Lillie i'ma get something good the best strawberry you've ever had drank your shine yep really you gotta taste these strawberries the best you have ever had the biggest you've ever had - okay let's see you eat what can you get it to market for thee okay eat that mr. Brown is that good I'm good in it and they taste really good okay strawberry Queen oh they're so good Matt what's your favorite part about having this farm I would have to say that my favorite part is having families come out and you know you're talking to the little kids and they got strawberry juice just Ramanujan you know and they just love it [Music] [Music] see is it a big one yeah okay you want to pick it all right all right take a bite on that side [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Applause] [Music] okay what do you say guys very nice we're gonna be your new best friend we're back at our Airbnb who's good day don't forget tomorrow we're putting up that special movie on the off-grid homestead in Alaska absolutely beautiful story retired couple why did they come how did they do it where are they in the process why you gonna live off-grid would you do anything different what are the struggles we go into all of that stuff it's really good almost got it done yesterday so I'm gonna finish it out tonight it'll go up next


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it's your first year on the farm now your first time first year on the farm your rookie yes yeah you feel like a ready a total rookie I've made too many mistakes today's feature what sila Alaska where life went north a couple of folks moved up here from Oregon fellow youtubers let's see what's going on you're the first stop with your own landing strip congratulations yeah where's your plane I don't have a plane wait a minute I thought I realize I'm supposed to have a plane yes there you go okay you're new Alaska do have a snow you do have a snow plow we do have a snow plow okay check it off the last we don't have a snow machine yet because we got chastised for things you don't say yeah yeah they have a truck so they're just chicken journalist yeah there's a lot of that gear required my name is Mindy and we are in Wasilla Alaska we are from a small town in Oregon where we did urban homesteading and we just decided we wanted some more land to kind of set up a more serious homestead and we thought Alaska sounded like a pretty cool place but we just felt drawn to come to Alaska I don't know it's kind of inexplicable that we both had that that feeling of that pull to come here and our kids are still pretty young so we decided if we were ever going to have an adventure move now would be the time to do it so we failed pretty epically at cucumbers this year epic fail epic fail on that we need to start way earlier next year turning our seeds zucchinis are doing okay but probably could have started those earlier too we don't have any giant produce to show you unfortunately no no any one pound cabbage it has been a very weird summer here this year it's been really rainy and and not a lot of sunshine so I think so you need that wasn't it more fun they say this is a beautiful day rare day in Alaska look at this day and look at that view [Music] what are you gonna do next year I think next year we're gonna focus on root crops do more carrots because they're super sweet hair there's something about the soil here that makes for a really awesome carrot so I think we'll do way more of those more beets and the previous owner said potatoes do really well here so all right Charles show us your plane right yeah we have it drove it you've turned this hanger into a barn Lavar good job eventually we're thinking goats will live in here okay but for this winter we're gonna overwinter the chickens and the ducks keep them out of the elements the Ducks are pretty cold hardy but the chickens especially with their combs okay some issues hey did your parents thank you or nuts oh they're mostly mad because we left them that's hard this everybody fancy doc here we need an upgrade soon those are the sandhill cranes over there hmm and they're huge when they light on the landing strip they're pretty big you can get out on the dog Vinci go ahead Big Daddy right out to the end I heard it I got the camera going more sandhill cranes up there guys the Ducks have made it back we have four Campbell khakis for Swedish blues three buck Cayuga and for chocolate runner they legs they're still pretty young they're just gonna be there a few months old we got on this spring so they haven't laid off and yaks know where our plan is to use them for a if we can ever find the eggs along the shoreline or something they get to come down to the lake all day and come on to plant and then come up to the house and have their duck food yeah they're up at the door at like 7:00 a.m. every single day quacking for breakfast yeah I can hear em quacking from bed you open the door and they all run up and have their breakfast and then they all head down to the lake bon voyage [Music] [Music] we are bowed [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] one more thing before we go you got to see this you got to see this greenhouse attached to this house this is really nice I dream of doing this yeah it's really nice it gets pretty hot in here actually it gets like 90 degrees yeah oh so much warmer there there's like a vent you know when he or 99y comes on and helps and you're able to grow tomatoes well we are trying we need to start earlier next year but we just got one red tomato just yesterday are you still in a hurry been planting schedule is that what's going on here so I'll just start a little bit earlier next year so okay good thanks for be sure to check these guys out life goes north YouTube channel I'll leave the link in the description onward to the next place a rookie market farmer in Alaska actually before we go to the farm how to change plans it's such a clear and beautiful Bay and the locals say that's pretty rare we're gonna go see if we can't see then off the Denali mountain yeah Denali so we're gonna go to the town called will oh well oh well then we'll go to talk to you which is 53 miles away Talkeetna so we're hoping we see it at willow but we're only here once and that is the tallest mountain in North America let's do it hey guys remember the journey is the destination [Music] we came over the hill and there was a range of mountains that were just incredible and beautiful and I kind of had to take a moment and be like is this is it this is it like this is what we came to see Denali so it was it was incredible it it's like inspiring [Applause] [Applause] [Music] what planes in Alaska there there they got everything here we're at our farm check it out Matt one of the viewers met him at the Meetup we've got greenhouses has a house built at all kids what are you guys gonna come on the tour I heard he's got strawberries as big as an apple oh that got him up that got him up yeah we're gonna go on a strawberry hunt here guys the strawberry season is over but he said he still has some fruits but first what's what are you doing with these Tomatoes Matt well we're at killing them actually murdering them you two made a murderer yeah so time to get these out until we get too cold and put in something else are you serious if she harvesting the green tomatoes yes are you gonna make fried green tomatoes no time you're just dreaming okay no do you know about fried green tomatoes oh yeah actually I'm video on okay good and so we're gonna try that here it'll be my first time okay so can you use panko breadcrumbs instead of cornmeal or is it just right I just use cornmeal cause I'm gluten free comes the rest of the period don't you need a properly energized everybody everybody all right there's my wife Jenny hello hey Jimmy is McKenna okay come on jumping jacks just no dance let's see this place yeah come on in now where are you from so originally I'm from Arizona okay so why in the world Alaska oh man I don't know I just wanted to change you know what about it yeah how many years you've been here 15 years yeah yeah yeah they say half the people leave after two yeah that is true what you're committed you don't miss Arizona no I see pictures of back home and it's like I am no thanks okay alright I don't mind the heat but I could I could never live without all the green you know again yeah okay so anyway this is our green house I just like I said we're ripped out a bunch of tomatoes had 300 tomato plants in here this year and we had just a crummy wet season we're cloudy all summer long and so the tomatoes just struggled all summer so yeah just time to rip them out put in something that's going to take the cold a little bit better okay so we got a little few peppers over here we just drill for ourselves and some celery mostly all we do in here is greens spew cucumbers back there these are my raised beds that are heated for the winter time hmm so hot water feel that I turn the hot water side oh wow so these pipes it's just like in floor key too but you'd have in your house yep and they just circulate through there and warm the soil and when it's really cold I'll cover this with another low tunnel another layer of poly mm-hmm and it'll be you know zero degrees outside or ten below and underneath that plastic will be 65 70 degrees so you're this this will survive the winter yes absolutely even without the daylight well I have these and which we're getting ready to start doing that prep work here pretty quick okay who's we my wife and I so Jenni and I we run pretty much this whole farm okay we are you doing full-time yep it's your first year on the farm knowing your first time first year on the farm your rookie yes yeah feel like a ready a total rookie I've made so many mistakes so many mistakes oh you know what I've learned a lot and I know what I'm gonna do next year they're gonna be better than this year and we have it and if we just loved making this transition from a regular construction - now this what do you what was your biggest mistake man probably trying to do too much too quick I think you know we'll see when we go out to the strawberry patch that it is inundated with weeds and which didn't really hurt the production too much but and really what is a weed but but I think just trying to do too much and and too many variety of things you know we tried growing about 40 50 different types of vegetables and next year that's going to shrink down by probably half maybe even more hey you guys ready to go do the strawberries okay I wonder who can find the biggest strawberry out there an Alaskan sized strawberry let's go let's see the strawberry the biggest strawberry you win buddy I think you got the biggest one the reason I planted so many strawberries and I liked I grow strawberries is because I like them I started growing things that I liked because I wanted to not get burned out I wanted to have passion for what I was doing and if I can walk into the greenhouse and pick a bell pepper and eat it while I'm working that's a reward for me yes and same thing with the strawberries and peas and whatever else growing it makes me wonder where's the bacon Yeah right some pigs run it in there right I will someday you will but you got to take one thing at a time yeah look at that perfect look at that look at that one and they taste so good I can't believe how sweetie have you tasted it yeah you got come eat the strawberries Lillie i'ma get something good the best strawberry you've ever had drank your shine yep really you gotta taste these strawberries the best you have ever had the biggest you've ever had - okay let's see you eat what can you get it to market for thee okay eat that mr. Brown is that good I'm good in it and they taste really good okay strawberry Queen oh they're so good Matt what's your favorite part about having this farm I would have to say that my favorite part is having families come out and you know you're talking to the little kids and they got strawberry juice just Ramanujan you know and they just love it [Music] [Music] see is it a big one yeah okay you want to pick it all right all right take a bite on that side [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Applause] [Music] okay what do you say guys very nice we're gonna be your new best friend we're back at our Airbnb who's good day don't forget tomorrow we're putting up that special movie on the off-grid homestead in Alaska absolutely beautiful story retired couple why did they come how did they do it where are they in the process why you gonna live off-grid would you do anything different what are the struggles we go into all of that stuff it's really good almost got it done yesterday so I'm gonna finish it out tonight it'll go up next