pesticide

pesticide

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How to spray pesticide by using drones?

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Questionschris richards posted a question • 1 users followed • 0 replies • 276 views • 2019-02-20 19:11 • came from similar tags

455
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In Africa,how can farmers fix their crop diseases ,do you use pesticide?

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Questionsjackdeen posted a question • 1 users followed • 0 replies • 455 views • 2018-06-20 16:44 • came from similar tags

276
Views

How to spray pesticide by using drones?

Reply

Questionschris richards posted a question • 1 users followed • 0 replies • 276 views • 2019-02-20 19:11 • came from similar tags

455
Views

In Africa,how can farmers fix their crop diseases ,do you use pesticide?

Reply

Questionsjackdeen posted a question • 1 users followed • 0 replies • 455 views • 2018-06-20 16:44 • came from similar tags

         ​Introduction:
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
    A pesticide is any substance used to kill, repel, or control certain forms of plant or animal life that are considered to be pests. Pesticides include herbicides for destroying weeds and other unwanted vegetation, insecticides for controlling a wide variety of insects, fungicides used to prevent the growth of molds and mildew, disinfectants for preventing the spread of bacteria, and compounds used to control mice and rats. Because of the widespread use of agricultural chemicals in food production, people are exposed to low levels of pesticide residues through their diets. Scientists do not yet have a clear understanding of the health effects of these pesticide residues. The Agricultural Health Study, an ongoing study of pesticide exposures in farm families, also posts results online. Other evidence suggests that children are particularly susceptible to adverse effects from exposure to pesticides, including neurodevelopmental effects. People may also be exposed to pesticides used in a variety of settings including homes, schools, hospitals, and workplaces.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
 
 
                                                                                                                   Types of Pesticides:                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Herbicides kill weeds
  • Insecticides kill insects that eat plants and crops
  • Fungicides kill any bad fungi  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  Pesticide toxicity to bees:     
                                                                                                                                            Pesticides vary in their effects on bees. Contact pesticides are usually sprayed on plants and can kill bees when they crawl over sprayed surfaces of plants or other areas around it. Systemic pesticides, on the other hand, are usually incorporated into the soil or onto seeds and move up into the stem, leaves, nectar, and pollen of plants.

Of contact pesticides, dust and wettable powder pesticides tend to be more hazardous to bees than solutions or emulsifiable concentrates. When a bee comes in contact with pesticides while foraging, the bee may die immediately without returning to the hive. In this case, the queen bee, brood, and nurse bees are not contaminated and the colony survives. Alternatively, the bee may come into contact with an insecticide and transport it back to the colony in contaminated pollen or nectar or on its body, potentially causing widespread colony death.

Actual damage to bee populations is a function of toxicity and exposure of the compound, in combination with the mode of application. A systemic pesticide, which is incorporated into the soil or coated on seeds, may kill soil-dwelling insects, such as grubs or mole crickets as well as other insects, including bees, that are exposed to the leaves, fruits, pollen, and nectar of the treated plants.

Pesticides are linked to Colony Collapse Disorder and are now considered a main cause, and the toxic effects of Neonicotinoids on bees are confirmed.Currently, many studies are being conducted to further understand the toxic effects of pesticides on bees. Agencies such as the EPA and EFSA are making action plans to protect bee health in response to calls from scientists and the public to ban or limit the use of the pesticides with confirmed toxicity.